1 = 0. What do we mean

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6. L’Hˆ opital’s Rule Everyone knows that 0/1 = 0. What do we mean when we say that 1/0 = ∞ or x is infinite or does not exist. We can’t actually −∞ , or “does not exist”? e.g., lim x→1 x − 1 divide by zero; we mean something like the example above, that is, if lim f (x) = 1 and x→a

f (x) lim g(x) = 0 then lim is infinite or “does not exist”. x→a x→a g(x) This much you more or less knew already, but what is lim f (x)/g(x) if lim f (x) = 0 x→a

x→a

and lim g(x) = 0? We call this a 0/0 form. x→a

e.g. ex − 1 =1 x→0 x lim

or 1

lim

(x + 2) 2 − 2

x→2

1

(x + 6) 3 − 2

=3

How do we find these limits? There is a useful procedure known as L’Hˆopital’s Rule. L’Hˆ opital’s Rule If limx→a f (x) = 0 and limx→a g(x) = 0 and f 0 (x) =L lim x→a g 0 (x) then f (x) =L x→a g(x) lim

as well. (There are additional assumptions on f and g, but these are commonly satisfied by the functions we deal with in this course, so we shall skip the details.) In other words, if you are trying to evaluate limx→a f (x)/g(x) and it is of the form 0/0, then try limx→a f 0 (x)/g 0 (x). If you get an answer, the same answer will work for limx→a f (x)/g(x). 1

ex − 1 (ex − 1)0 ex ex is in 0/0 form at x = 0. Also = and lim = x→0 1 x (x)0 1 ex − 1 e0 = 1 Therefore lim = 1. x→0 x In our examples,

1

(x + 2) 2 − 2 1

(x + 6) 3 − 2

is in 0/0 form at x = 2. Also 1

((x + 2) 2 − 2)0 1

((x + 6) 3 − 2)0

=

1 2 (x 1 3 (x

1

+ 2)− 2 2

+ 6)− 3

and 1 (x lim 21 x→2 (x 3

1

+ 2)− 2 2

+ 6)− 3

=

1 2 1 3

1 2 1 4

=3

Therefore 1

lim

x→2

(x + 2) 2 − 2 1

(x + 6) 3 − 2

=3

Why does this rule work? Notice that if f (a) = 0 and g(a) = 0 then f (x) − f (a) f (x) f (x) − f (a) x−a = = g(x) − g(a) g(x) g(x) − g(a) x−a So

f (x) − f (a) f (x) f (x) − f (a) f 0 (a) x−a lim = lim = lim = 0 x→a g(x) x→a g(x) − g(a) x→a g(x) − g(a) g (a) x−a f 0 (a) f (a) If 0 makes sense, and is in 0/0 form, then g (a) g(a) f 0 (a) f (x) = 0 lim x→a g(x) g (a)

This is called L’Hˆ opital’s Rule. (The foregoing calculation has a number of technical shortcomings. Nevertheless, it does embody the central idea of a rigorous proof.) Notice that L’Hˆ opital’s rule doesn’t work if limx→a f (x) 6= 0 or limx→a g(x) 6= 0. e.g. x2 (x2 )0 2x = 1 6= lim = lim =2 0 x→1 x x→1 x x→1 1 lim

2

Sometimes, L’Hˆ opital’s Rule needs to be applied more than once; e.g., checking that we still have a 0/0 form each time before we apply the derivative to both numerator and denominator, ex − 1 ex 1 ex − 1 − x = lim = lim = x→0 x→0 2 x→0 x2 2x 2 lim

L’Hˆ opital’s Rule works in another case besides 0/0 forms. It works on expressions of the form ±∞/ ± ∞; e.g., (ex )0 ex ex ex is of the form ∞/∞ and = . Since lim = ∞, it follows that lim x→∞ 1 x→∞ x (x)0 1 ex = ∞. lim x→∞ x Another example: find limx→0+ x ln x. (This is of the form 0 · (−∞). In case you think that 0 · ∞ is always zero or maybe infinity, notice that limx→0 x ·

1 x

= 1.)

First, turn the expression into a ±∞/ ± ∞ form.

lim x ln x = lim

x→0+

x→0+

ln x 1 x

(this is of the form −∞/∞) = lim+ x→0

1/x = lim (−x) = 0 −1/x2 x→0+

It would have been more correct to omit the last = sign and to say instead: therefore limx→0+ x ln x = 0 ; but the circumlocution gets tiresome after a while. Why does L’Hˆ opital’s Rule work in these “infinite” cases? The argument is a little involved, and not so transparent, hence we won’t present it here; but see Problem 11 below. e.g. x2 2x 2 = lim x = lim x = 0 x x→∞ e x→∞ e x→∞ e lim

3

In fact, any power of x over eax will go to zero as x goes to +∞ as long as a > 0. e.g. lim

x→∞

x100

(∞/∞)

e.00001x

100x99 x→∞ .00001e.00001x

= lim

still (∞/∞)

= . . . 100 applications of L’Hˆopital’s Rule later 100! =0 x→∞ (.00001)100 e.00001x

= lim

since the numerator, though enormous, does not change, while the denominator, though it looks small for all reasonable values of x, still goes to ∞ as x goes to ∞. To appreciate how powerful this method is, notice that if you try substituting some numbers to guess the limit: x = 2 gives approximately 1.27 · 1030 , while x = 10 gives approximately 10100 . x100 /e.0001x hardly seems to be approaching 0 as x gets large; but it does! L’Hˆ opital’s rule can be used on other kinds of limits if they can be manipulated so as to require the evaluation of a 0/0 or ∞/∞ limit. e.g., find lim

x→∞



1+

a x x

(1∞ )

 a x . Then Let y = 1 + x a  ln 1 + ln y = x ln 1 + = 1 x x 

a x



which is in 0/0 form as x → ∞. Hence, 1 1+ lim ln y = lim

x→∞

x→∞

4

 a x −



1 x2

a x2

simplifying algebraically a

= lim

x→∞

1+

a = a x

So ln y → a as x → ∞. y = eln y → ea as x → ∞; that is, lim

x→∞



1+

a x = ea x

(Remember continuous compounding? 1 +

 r nt n

→ ert

as n → ∞.)

Exercises ax − 1 a>0 x→0 x x 1−e 2. lim √ + x x→0 3. What’s wrong with the following calculation? 1. lim

3x2 + 1 6x x3 + x − 2 = lim = lim =3 2 x→1 2x − 3 x→1 2 x→1 x − 3x + 2 lim

(The answer is really −4.) (ln x)2 4. lim x→1+ (x − 1)2 2 ex − 1 − x − x2 5. lim x→0 x3 1 6. lim (1 + 3x) 2x x→0

2

7. lim x x−1 x→1

lim+ (x − 1)ln x x→1 2x+1  2x − 3 9. lim x→∞ 2x + 5   1 1 10. lim − x→0 ex − 1 x 11. If the limits of f (x) and g(x) are both infinite as x → a, then the limits of 1/f (x) and 8.

1/g(x) are both 0 as x → a. 5

1 f (x) g(x) = which is in 0/0 form. Apply L’Hˆopital’s rule to this second expression 1 g(x) f (x) f (x) to get an idea of why the rule works for ±∞/ ± ∞. and “solve” for limx→a g(x)

6

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1 = 0. What do we mean

6. L’Hˆ opital’s Rule Everyone knows that 0/1 = 0. What do we mean when we say that 1/0 = ∞ or x is infinite or does not exist. We can’t actually −∞ ,...

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