1 - There are a few of

Loading...
Pick Ocean Grove Site for Nixon Sjieech FINAL THEBMLY EDITION

SEE STORY BEIXW

Occasional Rain

Occasional rain and cooler today and tonight. Clear and cooler tomorrow. «to» Betalli,

7

7

Red Bank, Freehold Long Branch

Monmouth County's Home Newspaper for 92 Years VOL. 93, NO. 78

RED BANK, N. J., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1970 iiBiiiiBiiiigiiiiiiiiiiiiB

36 PAGES

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiBiiii i din u i i i u II IIIIWII iiii i II i iii i IIIII iii II ii II i IIIIIII »i iii iii i iii i iin in II 11 MII niiii mum i mi i IIIIIP IIIIHIHI ii!iii«HMinHtiMS>ittiiriiHiHimJiii«[inii!iitiiiiBimiriJifiintiiuiittwti)iHiHuitiMnBBiiHniiraminnni

TEN CENTS mmmmmmmmum

U. S. Is Hopeful Despite Hanoi

PARIS (AP) - U.S. offl. calling it "a deceptive maneucials still had hopes today ver" and a "fraud." that President Nixon's Viet- , Xuan Thuy, Hanoi's chief nam peace proposal would delegate to the Paris peace provide the basis for secret talks, was expected to repeat negotiations with the Niorth the-statement at the weekly Vietnamese despite Hanoi's session of the talks today. Despite the uncompromisrejection of the U.S. plan. T h e North Vietnamese ing tone of Hanoi's statement, Foreign Ministry, in a state- State Department officials in ment broadcast early to'day, Washington said it appeared rejected Nixon's five-point to be a typical • Communist p r o p o s a l "categorically," bargaining device, and Wash-

It said the American plan ington does not regard it as North Vietnam's last word on does not "contribute at all to the peaceful settlement of the •Nixon's plan. T h e North Vietnamese Indochinese problem but only serves the scheme to prolong statement declared: "The Vietnamese people and expand its aggressive and the government of the war in Indochina." The statement repeated the Democratic Republic of Vietnam sternly condemn and Communist demands for uncategorically reject the de- conditional withdrawal of all ceptive 'peace' proposal American troops and U.S. made by the Nixon adminis- ' abandonment of President Nguyen Van Thieu, Vice tration."

Kenn

Inflation FOR VICTORY — Secretary of the Treasury David M. Kennedy, center, raises hands with William F. Dowd, Republican candidate for Congress in a victory salute just before Mr. Kennedy left Monmouth County Airport yesterday for Newark and a meeting with U.S. Senate hopeful Nelson S . Gross. Admiring the pose is state Assemblyman Joseph E. Robertson, R-Monmouth.

Nixon Speech Set For Ocean Grove President Nixon is coming to Monmouth County Saturday and he'll speak at the 5,OOO-seat Ocean Grove Auditorium. That was decided yesterday after the Garden State Arts Center was eliminated by the chairman of the New Jersey Highway Authority'. The chairman, John P. Gallagher, refused to allow the President to use the arts cen. ter because it would violate a long-standing authority policy not to allow the center to be used for political purposes. M r . Gallagher admitted that he had come under pressure, especially because he happens, also to be the Midd l e s e x County Republican leader.

S o m e Monmouth County Republicans think Mr. Gal. lagher refused to compromise on the issue because he was miffed that the President chose Monmouth County rather than Middlesex County for his stop. Cites Policy Mr. Gallagher said only that the authority's policy is not to allow the center to be used for political purposes, and the President's visit is political in nature. Mr. Nixon is coming to New Jersey as part of the four-state campaign swing which will also take him to Vermont, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. His purpose in New Jersey, according to state GOP leaders, is to lend support for U.S.

GOP Senate candidate Nelson G. Gross, and Third District congressional candidate William F. Dowd. Needless to say, Monmouth County Republicans are delighted. County Democrats are fearful of what the visit may mean in terms of vote swaying. Mr. Nixon is expected to ar. rive aboard Air Force One at Newark Airport around noon. A news conference has been scheduled at the airport. ' To Teterboro He then will take a helicopter to Teterboro Airport for a rally with Mr. Gross. After that 1 p.m. rally, the President is scheduled to fly to Monmouth County for his (See Nixon, Page 2)

County Police Discuss

By BEN VAN VLIET WALL TOWNSHIP - Secretary of the Treasury David M. Kennedy said bere yester. day that inflation has been checked and the nation's economy is headed for better times. However, he said, this has been accomplished at the cost of increased unemployment. Mr. Kennedy made his remarks yesterday during brief press conferences here at the Monmouth County Air. port and at Newark, where the secretary met with GOP

Senate candidate Nelson G. Gross. The secretary said the Nixon administration had sought to persist in "orthodox economic policies" which have resulted in increased buying and price stability. Mr. Kennedy said that he felt the unemployment rate, which went over 5 per cent last month, was a "bad figure over a long period of time but it's the price we've had {o pay." Serious Problem Mr..Kennedy said that since the Nixon administration had

President Nguyen Cao Ky and their associates. Hanoi said Nixon's proposal for a large-scale International conference, on the order of the previous Geneva conferences, was "nothing but a cunning trick aimed at fooling public opinion and hiding the fact that the United States must change its policy and end its aggression against the three Indochinese countries."

taken office "we've had a very serious problem created during the past four years of meeting inflationary pressur. es largely caused by war expenditures imposed upon a peacetime economy." Mr. Kennedy said he believed that the Republican ad. ministration had "taken the wind out of their sails," in a r e f e r e n c e to Democratic charges that the Republicans hadn't dealt effectively with economic problems. "I suppose you could call it political," Mr. Kennedy said, "but I've been going around

the country speaking. Actually, I've been doing this long before the political season, and my purpose is to bring the President's message to the people." Mr. Kennedy predicted that the prime Interest rate would not be reduced further soon. The prime interest rate Is that rate which is fixed by banks on loans to their best customers. Noting that reductions in the past few months have low. ered the prime rate from 8 $ to 714 per cent, Mr. Kennedy said, "we've just had a reduc-

tion and it should take some time before another." Mr. Kennedy said he believed that gross national product figures would show a slight increase for the third quarter in spite of a strike by the • General Motors auto workers union. Mortgage rates, Mr. Kennedy predicted would be Blow, in being reduced, while other interest rates would come down more rapidly. Mortgage rates, he said, are more or less "inflexible." Mr. Kennedy arrived In (See Kennedy, Page 2)

Middletown Aide Called in Probe By BOB BRAMLEY MIDDLETOWN — Richard W. Seuffert, township business administrator, was in Newark yesterday in response to a subpoena to appear before a Federal Grand Jury investigating the failure this summer of the Eatontown National Bank. Robert Goldstein, assistant to the U.S. attorney in New Jersey, said this morning Mr. Seuffert's appearance was adjourned yesterday and he was instructed to return next week. Mayor Harold H. Foulks said last night he was told of the subpoena by clerks in Mr. Seuffert's office when he asked where the administrator was about 5 p.m. yesterday in Township Hall.

"They told me he'd been gone all day, and that he'd been subpoenaed to appear before the Grand Jury. They said he'd been called to appear the day before, but the appearance was postponed until yesterday", the mayor explained. Reason Unknown He added that he doesn't know what Mr. Seuffert may have been questioned about, or why he was ordered to appear. Mr. Seuffert could not be reached for comment last night. Mayor Foulks made it plain that he has no notice from the Grand Jury or from investigating officials that the business administrator would be called to testify, and he added that he has no knowl-

edge of any charges or accusations against Mr. Seuffert. Referring to a current special audit of township finances by the township auditor, Joseph X.' Seaman, and an investigation of rumors that $55,000 in township money was in the Eatontown National Bank at the time it failed, Mayor Foulks said the business administrator's office, as well as the township treasurer's office, would naturally be involved. Search for Truth The investigation of the reportedly missing funds has been taken over by the county prosecutor's office. But the Township Committee, wishing to get at the truth by any possible means, also notified the FBI as well, since federal as well as state funds granted

the township may have been involved. The rumor about the $55,000 apparently stems from a slip of paper allegedly found in t h e desk of Douglas J. S c h o 11 e , president of the defunct bank, who has been accused of misapplication of about $5 million in bank funds. The slip reportedly bore only the cryptic words, "$55,000 -Middletown." "I hope there's nothing wrong, but if there is something, we want to know about it," the mayor declared. "And if there's anything coming to the township, we want it," he added. Commltteeman Robert P. McCutcbeon, chairman of the finance committee of the governing body, said he could not (See Jury Calls, Page 2)

Richard W. Seuffert

Radicals, News, Drugs School to Rim on Potato Field By NANCY KUBINSKI ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS A sampling of Monmouth County policemen shows that law enforcement officers have little sympathy for radical groups, believe the news media has been unfair in its coverage of police activities, and support stronger narcotics laws. The views were among several results of a survey

conducted by two local patrolmen, Kenneth Graver and Frederick W. Hogan, as part of an assignment for a Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice class at Ocean County College. Both officers are Gophomores in the police administration course at the college. Patrolman Grover has been with the force 4% years, Patrolman Hogan, two.

The Inside Story Bachelor sorts whiie sance simmers Page 2« Pantsuits inarch Into Ft. Monmouth Page 27 Women's News -', .....Page 26, 27 Reds stay alive in World Scries Page 28 Howell soccermen rated 4th In state Page 28 Knlcks and Rangers victorious Page 29 Freehold Today .....-• ?*& f Monmouth County bowling roundup Page 30 14 Amusements 24 Synagogue Page 24 Astraldata 35 Television .26, 27 Bridge/ 35 Women's News The Chuck Wagon 29 DAILY REGISTER Classified Ads -, 31-34 Comics 356 PHONE NUMBERS Editorials 741-001* Financial • 23 Main Office .741-6900 Here's to Health 9 Classified Ads Looking 'em Over 28 Home Delivery 741-0010 Obituaries *6 Middletown Bureau ...671-2250 Opinion Page ' Freehold Bureau 462-2121 Outdoor World 12 Long Branch Bureau 222-0010 Palette Talk 21 Sports 28-30 Sports Department 741-0017 "All the books you can carry" Sickle's Farm Tomatoes, apples, w i n t e r $1. Fri. and Sat., AAUW Used squash and pumpkins. Little Book Sale, 18 W. Front St. (Adv.) Silver. (Adv.)

Patrolman Hogan leaves this week to assume duties as After two years In New York, house, the dining area and the now lives In Holmdel Village By LINDA ELLIS an investigator with the state H O L M D E L - Matilda the couple came back to stay. room above, are 270 years on W. Main St., has lived In Public Defender's office, as. Longstreet Holmes' grandthe township all her life. She "The living room used to be old. signed to Monmouth County. Oak, maple and a stately sold the 60-acre farm to the son is going to high school on divided into the parlor and 66 Out of 100 the land where his grand, my play room, they were two holly tree shade the house, a Board of Education for school The survey was conducted father once planted potatoes. separate rooms," Addie Lub. barn and two smaller out- sites in January, 1967. The 2.8 early this year and was an- Kenneth Lubkert is the 14. kert recalled. Harry Lubkert buildings. acres where the Lubkcrts live swered by 66 of the 100 men year-old son of Harry and pointed out that parts of the Grandmother Holmes, who Is still family property and sent the questionnaires. Of Adeline Lubkert (she nee those returning the forms, 63 Holmes) of Crawfords Corner policemen were from this Road. Ken's a ninth grader at county, two from New York the Intermediate School and and one from a North Jersey in 1973 will be among the first city. batch of students to enter the Questions ranged from In- halls of Holmdel High, the quiries on personal back- construction of which was apground and community in- proved by township voters volvement to civil rights, Tuesday. youth, narcotics, news media, He doesn't have far to go to prostitution, gambling, Mafia, school. Lubkert property decentralization of police a b u t s The t h e Intermediate forces .and police review School's line and the high boards. school will have a property The survey revealed that a back yard of the former large percentage of policemen line 100 feet away from the attend college and 56 hold Crawford farm. memberships in veterans, reHarry and Adeline ligious, fraternal and service L When u b k e r t moved into the organizations. white frame house As regards civil rights and graceful Crawfords Corner In 1947, demonstrations, 63 respond- on years after their marents claimed no sympathy two it was a homecoming "with the Yippies, Abbie riage, for her. Mrs. Lubkert was (Sec Police, Page 2) born in the house, which at Just received quality Lee's that time was surrounded by remnants: Fabulous savings. 60 acres of potatoes and corn. Shehadi Rugs, Rt. 35, Shrews- She grew up there and, after bury, next to Post Office. 741- college, she and her husband 6272. (Adv.) were married in the beauThe Water Department of the tifully appointed living room. Borough of Atlantic Highlands TeachersT^You are invited to GETTING THERE it half the fun for Ken Lubkert, a nintfi grader at Holmdel Interwill be flushing hydrants from a free cocktail party in honor mediate School. The Lubkerts live only a short distance from the present school Oct. 19 through Oct. 30 during of Congressman James Hovythe hours of ID p.m. to 2 a.m. ard, Friday, October 16, 4:3D and are even closer to the high school site — 100 feel. Seeing. Kent and his p.m. Civic Auditorium, MonJ. Leonard Clark •classmate David Treger, right, off to classes is Mrs. Harry Lubkert. , Borough Clerk Administrator mouth Shopping Center. I Register Staff Photo) (Adv.) (Adv.)

will, Mrs. Holmes said, remain so. She was widowed in 1956. Matilda Longstreet Holmes (There is a Longstreet Road n e a r the Lubkert home; Holmes Court is also nearby) recalls her own education In Holmdel. "We were In what Is now Township Hall on Crawfords Corner Road," the matriarch reminisced." It was just one room. "I'll be happy to have the brand new high school there," she continued. "The Inter, mediate School Is a lovely place. Of course, I've always been in favor of a high school for Holmdel," she said with spirit. "My grandson will have a wonderful place to go to school. Holmdcl," she con. eluded comfortably, "Is doing very well." Harry Lubkert Is a 16-year member of the Board of Education and Is its liaison member to the Planning Board. He knows a high school in the back yard will mean a big change of scenery for the family but he's philosophical about it. "We like kids," he grinned. "Harry Lubkert always puts what's good for the (own. ship way high up on his list," Planning Board Chairman Lnrrabee M. Smith 3aid. Young Ken is happy at the thought of being surrounded bv schools. "No long bus rides," he noted, "and some, times I get to use the gym equipment after hours."

THURSDAY, OCTOBER IS, 1970 THE DAfLY REGISTER, RED BANK-MIDDLETOWN, N. J.l»-

mmmmmmmmmmmm - m y

e

"¥"W

4

"I

1

Births Nursing Home Ambulances

"ART FOR DEMOCRACY" is title of wan Township Democratic Municipal Oct. 24 and 25 in Victor Olup's Art books are co-chairman, left to right, and Mrs. Ruth Justice Ne'bus.

series of art fairs to be sponsored by MataCoinmWei on Saturday and Sunday and Fair Galleries, Holmdel. Looking over art Mrs. Bert* Collins, Mrt. Lauretta Chunks

Chamber Also Wants To Save Signal School By FLORENCE S. BRUDER RED BANK — The Community Chamber of Commerce ig supporting the Board of KreeTiolders' effort to keep the Signal School at Ft. Monmouth. At a meeting in Molly Pitcher Motor Inn yesterday of its board of directors, the chamber president, Robert D. Hope, received unanimous consent to instruct Jack T. Phinney, executive vice president, to wrfte a letter to that effect to the board to U.S. legislators and the news media. Members said the letter should include the fact that personnel at the fort created certain needs, which the community met by instituting shopping centers and restaurants, and asking the pertinent question as to whether some other military facility would take the place of the Signal School, if it is moved. In other business, Joseph Farrell, head of the Distributive Education department of Bed Bank Regional High School, made a presentation about his program and asked local merchants to continue to support i t

The program is designed chairman of the parking and for students not planning to traffic committee, said meter enter college, and is an in- receipts are up 20 per cent school training agent. over this time last year, and It instructs in merchandis- the Mayor's Committee to ing, marketing and manage- study the feasibility of a ment under the supervision o[ Parking Authority is still the school board and adminis- working on the project. The tration with the cooperation chamber is on record as in faof the business community. vor of such an authority. Youngsters are hired by To Continue Dinners businessmen and work during W. Alex McClendon, chairschool hours for school credit. man of the chamber's first They are rated by their em- annual dinner, reported by ployers on a' number of letter that prestige and statpoints, and receive vocational ure was gained by the event, (Continued) training in marketing and which look place Sept. 24 in Hoffman or other groups of merchandising goods and ser- Gibbs Wall, Ft. Monmouth! this type." Two expressed vices leading to permanent Mr. Hope said the dinner sympathy. occupations In such fields as will be an annual event, and No other question provoked retailing, advertising, finan- it was suggested local ressuch a negative response. cial, transportation and secre- taurants be patronized, as A majority of the answering tarial. well as utilizing nationally- policemen expressed no con18-Year Effort known economic specialists cern for the possibility of Mr. Farrell asked members as speakers. large scale demonstrations in of the chamber to continue Jim Bishop, syndicated col- their communities and S3 offitheir association with this ef- umnist and former resident of cers answered yes to the fort of 18 years, and said it is Sea Bright, was the main question "Do you feel large a terminal program that speaker Sept, 24. He was scale civil demonstrations are opens up careers for young- praised for his presentation in bound to involve broken laws sters. a letter from the chamber's and disorders?" The Sport Spot, B«"°ad St., retail Board of Trade. Irwin Radical Groups Shrewsbury, . was unani- Vogel, president of the board, Forty-six of 64 respondents mously voted in as a member also complimented the food claimed stronger laws are the of the chamber. and service at the dinner. answer to the problems posed Bernard "Bud" Nalelson, by radical groups and 43 offi. cers claimed Civil Rights is a false issue covering a more disruptive aim. The answers were split, 29 yes and 31 no, to the question Consideration was given, a "Do you believe the federal Republican leader said, in usgovernment, not local govern, ing Monmouth Park, the race ment, must solve these probtrack. KEANSBURG - About 30 lems?" of civil rights and "But the problem with that men from both borough fire radical groups. place," he said, ts that no companies put out two fires The police were generally matter how many people you early this morning. critical of coverage by newsattract, it would look empty." The first was reported at papers, television and radio, "And that's no good for the 4:31 a.m. for a blaze of unde. with 49 answering no io fair President's image," said an. (ormined origin in two empty coverage and 12, yes. olher. stores at 19-21 Center Ave. Specifically, 60 of 66 reThe large, old, wooden auThe owner is Joseph Ma. spnndents believed the covditorium was finally chosen nawge, police said, and the late yesterday. It met recur, building sustained extensive erage was unfair to Chicago police in'the 1968 Democratic ity requirements and also had damage. Convention disturbances. the approval of GOP leaders. The second call was reAlthough a majority of poII may, however, lead to a ceived at 7:2B a.m. for a fire licemen said they are becomgiant traffic jam as Ocean in a trailer at a temporary ing more aware of the media Grove is not known either for construction office on Jlariltin its traffic flow on narrow, Ave. owned by the Ronafcde ;ind agreed that a wise inone-way .streets, or its park- Co., which is building an ur- vestment would be a public relations program within the ing facilities. ban renewal project. police department, most believed that the positive Bide of police work received too little publicity. With regard to narcotics, Mr. Pqwd, 2(1, had worked come into Monmouth County there was-overwhelmlng supfor Mr. Kennedy ;is a speech this week supporting their faport for more stringent laws writer before he took a job as vorite candidate. governing drugs and there a presidential stuff assistant. was agreement that lesser •Saturday, President Nixon "It's H particular pleasure himself is scheduled to arrive d r u g s , even marijuana, to be with you, Bill. At the for a major campaign' pilch should not be legalized. Treasury il was an honor In on Mr. Dnwd's behalf at a ralDrug Usage work with you on many projly in the Ocean Grove AuditoOf 63 respondents, 27 said ects," Mr, Kennedy said. rium. the present drug use among Mr. Dowd acknowledged young people is part of orgathe secretary's remarks. He Saturday night, the Demo, nized crime and not a youthsaid, "Although the secretary ciats strike buck with a ful movement with no crimispoke in muted terms, • the scheduled appearance of Sarnal base. message was clear that the gent Shriver, former Peace Also on organized crime, 57 President needs and wants Corps, director, and former officers agreed that the Mafia Republicans in Congress to ambassador to France. Mr. poses a real threat to law and carry out his economic reShriver is set to speak at a order, while nine did not. forms." Democratic fund raising dinTwenty-seven policemen bener at fionlah's Motor Inn, Mr. Kennedy was the first lieved that the Mafia cannot Spring Lake Heights. of three national figures to be touched by local agencies, but 311 said they could be. The 84 questions were composed by Patrolmen llogan and Grovcr, who said the specific questions were geared to today, the Northeast and .Southeast, touch on phases of today's sections nf the Ohio Valley The Weather Bureau issued most topical problems. freeze warnings for parts of and some areas of northern The general age bracket nf Arkansas and Kansas. Michigan, Wisconsin, Iowa, Hie respondents was between Missouri and Kansas. TIDES 23'and S3 years, with the maSandy Hook Moist cool air brought snow jority falling between 25 and to the eastern slope of the Today — High 9 p.m. and 35. Rockies in southern Colorado low 3:06 p.m. Of those answering, 50 were and northern New Mexico. Tomorrow — High (1:24 a.m. married, 15 were single and and 0:48 p.m. and low 3:12 one was divorced. By early morning, new

After jthe White House was denied use of the arts center, there appeared to be doubt that the President would even come into the county. "It was on again and nff a g a i n several times last night," Mr. Dowd said. One of the big problems re. portcdly was the, matter of finding a place the Secret Service regarded as meeting security requirements.

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiaiiiiia

Weather: Occasional Showers C l o u d y with occasional showers and isolated Ihundershowers today and tonight^ high today in low 70s. Turning cooler tonight, low in low 50s. Partly cloudy and cool Friday, high in low 60s. Outlook Saturday, fair and cool. In Long Branch, yesterday's high was 74 and the low was 63. It was 68 at 6 p.m. The overnight low was 06 and the temperature at 7 this morning was 67. An eastward flow of cold air brought crisp temperatures to the nation's midlands

EATONTOWN Nursing homes in this borough may soon be forced to supply their own ambulance service. Ordinances introduced last night would require the ambulances and would also require that the vehicles and their crews meet minimum standards. Councilman Vincent C, Festa", who moved the two ordinances, complained that the borough first aid squad is asked to transport nursing home patients back and forth to hospitals.

Noting that squad members are volunteers who also hold down jobs, Councilman Festa commented the emergency transportation for nursing homes, "is getting quite burdensome." I f t h e ordinances are adopted, private ambulances and their crews will have to meet the standards of the First Aid Society of New Jersey and will have to file reports of their activities with the police department.

Wall St. to the West Long Branch line. Council rejected a ?500 offer from Michael Carcciola for two borough owned lots in the Shark River Estates area. B o r o u g h administrator George A. Morgan explained that selling the borough land would result in two 'lots substandard for the zone. Mr. Morgan said that the borough had owned several lots in the area that were sold to returning World War II servicemen for a nominal sum in the late 1940s. Action Is Delayed Council delayed action on two recommendations from Harold Hardman, chairman of the Planning Board, to revise the sign ordinance and realign the Rt. 18 Freeway. According to the borough administrator, Mr. Hardman feels that the proposed route of the freeway will leave the borough with two too small lots in its research and development zone near the Garden State Parkway. The other recommendation is to tighten sign regulations to cut down on 'the bright neon signs on Broad St. B o t h recommendations were held over for discussion at an executive Eession. Council accepted the resig. nation of George Mott, municipal building custodian for the last four years. Mr. Mott is taking a position with private industry. Residents were reminded that they can still purchase a copy of the History of Eatontown at the special price of fZ between now and Nov. l.when the price will go up to $3.

The council also introduced an ordinance to provide access to the Ira. E. Wolcott Playground from High St. The ordinance appropriates $3,300 to purchase a lot owned by Milton Kramer. The 5,000 square foot lot will be developed for foot traffic only. Residents arriving by car will continue to use the WUIow St. entrance. An ordinance was adopted on final reading appropriating {300,000 for improvements on Parker Road. The borough plans to widen the street from

Jury Calls Middletown Aide in ENB Probe (Continued) ure, Mr, McCutcheon went comment on the report of Mr. on, there were no outstanding accounts in the Eatontown Seuffert's appearance before National Bank. The township the Federal Grand Jury. "As soon as we can legally had had certain certificates of do so, we will provide addi- deposit in that bank, but they tional information. We have had been withdrawn last involved the proper author- April, long before the bank i t i e s , " Mr. McCutcheon failed. stated. Any township funds, disDeposit Called For covered to have been in the He explained that any funds bank when it failed would received by the township .therefore liave to liave been, from federal or state sources deposited there without going would normally come through through the township treasurthe township treasurer's of- er's office, Mr. McCutcheon fi c e . By ordinance, they explained. would have to be! deposited in one of three township deposIt is such a possible diveritories within 48 hours. sion of funds that the townOn the treasurer's records ship auditor has been checkat the time of the bank fail- 1 ing since Aug. 26, the com-

mitteeman went on. So far, all funds have been accounted for, but the audit will continue until all grants made to the township by federal and state g o v e r n m e n t s have been checked out, he said. In passing, Mr. McCutcheon stressed that the resignation of former township treasurer Cal Ohlsen, who has been replaced by Mrs. Marie Moran, has nothing to do with the investigation. "It was purely an economy, move. He was getting $4,000, and we are paying Mrs. Moran only $1,000 — we're saving the township $3,000," Mr. McCutcheon said.

snow measured up to 8 inches in the mountains west of Denver and 1 In ,1 inches southward into northern New Mexico. Scattered showers or thunderstorms dampened parts of

from PROWN'S, of Course!

DON'T

SAMSON

a.m. and 3:54 p.m. For Red Bank and Rumson bridge, add two hours; Sea Bright, deduct 10 minutes; Long Branch, deduct 15 minutes; Highlands bridge, add 40 minutes.

Plastic Bugs Kill Cows DE AAR, South Africa (AP) — Dairy farmer Giel (hi Toll lost three ol his best cows when they died after eating plastic bags blown onto his farm by wind.

LOOK! YOU GET: lloblllier Bar • Sturdy Scram Framt Aladlied Aluminum Screen Wire is-yeer Point Ouorontn Fully Weomtritrlepel

FALL Clean-Up Specials

PAINT! CLIMB UDDERS! FREEZE!

Don't drag out the old wooden storm window* . . . wrap* and paint them. Give up that tedious work and have thes* fine HEAVY DUTY WHITE Aluminum Combination Storm and Screen Windows installed. No mow work!

Two Fires Put Out In Keansburg

Kennedy Sees Inflation Ended (Continued) Monmouth County around noontime aboard a Iwincngined Jet operated by the He. p u b l i c a n National Committee. He spent nearly two hours at a private luncheon lor arat bankers and stock brokers M the Spring Lake Golf and Country Club. Before he boarded the Muc and silver aircraft for Newark, Mr. Kennedy held a 35. minute press conference at which he prefaced and concluded his remarks with testimonials to William F. Dowd, the GOP congressional candi. date.

Seen Needed in Eatontown

Police

Nixon Visit Set (Continued) appearance at the Ocean Grove Auditorium. It is tentatively set for 2 p.m. Mr. Nixon will then fly by helicopter, directly from Ocean Grove to a campaign stop in Lancaster, Pa.

RIVERVIEW Red Bank Mr. and Mrs. David Hoys (nee Pamela Sherdel), 7 Her Drive, Middlelown, daughter, Tuesday. Mr. and Mrs. Ray Brady (nee Gloria Smith) 2098 Stoney Hill Road, Eatontown, daughter, Tuesday. Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Niven (nee Delores Goldie), 301 Nutswamp Road, Middletown, daughter, Tuesday. Mr.gand Mrs. Owen Sweeney (nee Eleanor Danielus), 130 Cedar Ave,, East Keansburg, daughter, Tuesday. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Micle (nee Joan Fink), 12 Holly Ave., West Keansburg, son, Tuesday. Mr. and Mrs. Peter Bogardus (nee Karen Lyness), 43 Crest Circle, Matawan, son, Tuesday, Mr. and Mrs, Wayne Giger (nee Linda Pelletier), 2 Crine Road, MorganviUe, daughter, Tuesday. M r , and Mrs. Rathael Hughes (nee Joan Bretun), 40 Virginia Ave., Hazlet, son, Tuesday. Mr. and Mrs. Jeral Diehl (nee Nancy McDonald), 520 East Road, Belford, daughter, Tuesday. Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Poulin (nee Julianne Horvath), 3 Johnson Ter., Middletown, son, Tuesday. Mr, and Mrs. Michael Fox (nee Mary Be|h Lorrenz), K-7 S u 11 o n Drive, Matawan, daughter, Tuesday. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Beldonza (nee LaNora Bigler), 28 Cross Ave., Matawan, son, Tuesday. Mr. and Mrs. Edward Dolan (nee Alvcrna Jacks), 26 Kleetwood Drive, Hazlet, daughter, Tuesday.

Rao. 1.98

GLORY RUG CLEANER Atrojol-CHms tin li

»'xi!'

SPRAY LYSOL

White Aluminum Combination Window

LIQUID WOOLITE

Triple TrecK • CleeM From Inildt

INSTALLED

99° 99°

Reg. 1.4?—14-Oi.

HEAVY DUTY

4 - «68

1.39

Reg. 2.H

5C0TCHGARD Reg. 1.4»—Aerosol

LEMON PLEDGE 14-OZ.

Reg. 7?c—Solid

AIR WICK

COMPARE! They Sell S3 to $4 more elsewhere!

99' 39*

WINDOW SHADES

SPOOK IT UP FOR

HALLOWEEN COSTUMES

*.m 1 *

SIZES: 4 t o o — 4 t o 8 — S t a l O — 12 to 14 Skeletons, Clowns. Fairies, Cinderella and many others

WIGS

AU

COLORS

CANDIES — 10 Bars

98* Bring your roller and get extra savings en in-stock shades up to 72" wide. A tremendous selection in a wide range of stylet anil including stripes, florals, whit* and colon. I f you need new rollers, please bring your measurements.

39c

Harshays, Mounds, Nestle* and Others

TRICK or TREAT BAGS

10c

ALL KINDS OF MASKS and MAKE-UP TAILS CLOTHS, NAPKINS, CUPS — PLATES

from

TRASH TOTER

1.49

REG. 5.95 CHURCH

LINEN CALENDARS for 1971

TOILET SEATS

30 Subjects to Choose from

WhlM only 998 Wood i

CHARGE ITI

32 BROAD ST. RED BANK

741-7500

roum's

Dally and Saturday 8-5:30 FrI. and Wad. 'Ml« p.m.

THE DAILY REGISTER, FED BANK • MIDDLE* OWN, N. J.: THURSDAY, OCTOBER IS, 1970

Tdp of the News Egypt Urges-U.N. Mideast Debate •*• ) SAIGON *- The U.S. Air Force is scaling down bombing raids across South Vietnam wMle maintaining pressure on North Vietnamese supply routes in Laos, informed sources reported today. American air attacks in Vietnam on suspected North •Vietnamese and Viet Cong positions and in support of allied ground troops in battle have dropped off by as much as 70 per cent since the big enemy offensives in 1968, the sources said. The main reason, the sources said, is that the war has de-escalated into small'clashes, with few large concentrations of enemy troops to be found. > Another factor is that American forces are disengaging from the war in line with President Nixon's Vietnamization policy, and the South Vietnamese, air force is flying more sorties. The U, S. 7th Air Force has been reduced by about 200 fighter-bombers since January, more than half the fleet it had in Vietnam, as part of Nixon's withdrawal program. It now has about 175 fighter-bombers at four bases in South Vietnam. The South Vietnamese air force has increased about 200 planes and helicopters since January and now totals about 600.

UNITED NATIONS, N. Y. (AP) - Egypt stole the spotlight from the silver anni. versary of the United Nations today with a request for an urgent debate on the Middle East as soon as the commemorative session is over. The question is already on t h e G e n e r a l Assembly's agenda, but diplomats had hoped to avoid a public airing of the dispute between Israel and her Arab neighbors.

The commemorative ses. sion, attended by chiefs of state and government from all over the world, began Wednesday and ends Oct. 24. Oct. 26 Sate Eyed The Middle East debate, requested yesterday by Egyptian Ambassador Mohammed H. El-Zayyat, is expected to get under way Oct. 26. A U.N. spokesman also an. nounced that the Big Four foreign ministers have ac-

cepted an invitation to dine w i t h Secretary-General U Thant on Oct. 22 or 23 in Thant's offices. The Americ a n , British, Soviet and French diplomats are expected to discuss the Middle East and other world prob. lems. U.S. Secretary of State William P. Rogers was arriving today for the commemorative session. He invited Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei A.

NEWARK — Mayor KentiBtfo A. Gibson planned to con-. fer in Washington today with Housing and Urban Development officials, amid reports that Newark has been selected as one of only six cities to benefit from an experimental Model Cities program. The program would give Gibson absolute power over federal Model Cities money used in Newark by relaxing stringent guidelines. The mayor said he would not comment on the plan until he received official confirmation that Newark had been selected. The selection of Newark would mean a substantial increase over the $5.6 million granted for its Model Cities program in 1970.

Unrest Sparks Tuition Refund NEW YORK - A judge has awarded the father of a New York University student a partial tuition refund of $277.40 because the school canceled classes for 19 days during campus unrest last May. Judge Patrick J. Picariello, making the award yesterday in Small Claims Court to Roger Paynter, a fireman from Queens declared: "College administrators have yielded too easily to the demands of campus dissidents and have thereby ushered in an era of physical and intellectual intimidation." The university, a private institution, said it would appeal the ruling.

WHITESBOG — Richard J. Sullivan, commissioner of (he state Department of Environmental' Protection, outlined yesterday a series of measures he said must be put into law to keep the environment from becoming "a total mess." He said new rules to control electric power production' and sewage treatment would be needed if "New Jersey's growth continues toward 20 million wall-to-wall people, with sewer pipes and chimneys making the environment a total mess."

Atomic Powers Blast Away WASHINGTON — The Big Three atomic powers have set off nuclear blasts on the same day, apparently for the first time, unleashing force equivalent to more than nine million .tons of TNT. The Atomic | Energy Commission announced Communist China had resumed nuclear testing with a 3-million-ton atmospheric blast. That followed by about an hour yesterday what apparently was the largest Soviet underground nuclear explosion in seven years and the most potent subterranean blast ever triggered by any nation. The ABM said the United States also set off an underground blast rated equivalent to 20,000 to 200,000 tons of TNT.

Seton Hall Gets 14th President SOUTH ORANGE - Seton Hall University inaugurated ' .Rev. Thomas G. Fairy as its 14th president yesterday and ttonferred an honorary doctor of laws degree on Newark Mayor Kenneth A. Gibson. Both Father Fahy and Mayor Gibson cited the many links between the university and the city in addresses at the ceremony. \ "We shall continue our attempts to aid our neighbor city whenever she needs and wants us," said Father Fahy, as he announced the establishment of. four full tuition scholarships at the university to be awarded annually to students in Newark schools.

CLOSE-OUT ON

CEDAR FENCING 6 Foot

CEDAR — VJ Round

STOCKADE

POST & RAIL

I ' panel complaM with on* post

10

1 poit—2 rail; 10- feet

:

2

149

95

CASH 'N f

CASH 'N' CARRY

CARLOAD SHIPMENT OF DuBOIS POST and RAIL NOW IN STOCK. U.S. STEEL VERTAGREEN

LAWN FERTILIZER

0 95

Formula 25-5-10

SPECIAL" ALL GRASS SEED Wild llw Exception of Scotli and Ptrinnlol Rye.

BROAD ST.

UNDER CONSTRUCTION — Top phofo shows artist's concept-ion of completed Bayshors Community Hospital. Tfia bottom photo jfiows the project under eonstructiofl. ,

Plan Tour of Bayshore Hospital Building Site HOLMDEL — An invitation was extended this week to all residents of the Bayshore Communities to attend a "look-see tour" of the new Bayshore Community Hospital now under construction on N. Beers St. in Holmdel. The tour will be conducted Sunday from 3 to 5 p.m. Members of the nine affiliated auxiliary chapters of the new •hospital will attend to answer questions and serve refreshments to all those attending. It was stressed by D. Louis ' Tonti, president of the board of trustees of Bayshore Community Hospital, that the tour will be an opportunity for all residents of the new hospital's service area to inspect the

747-5555

SHREWSBURY

progress of construction and learn about the hospital. There will be no solicitation nor collection during the tour. Bayshore Community Hospital, when completed in late 1971 or early 1972', will be a 154-bed acute, general hospital and will serve the area between Red Bank, Freehold and South Amboy, now.without hospital facilities. The total cost of the Bay. shore Community Hospital, including equipment and furnishings, is estimated by architects and consultants at $6.5 million. In addition to approximately a half-million dollars on hand from a 1964 campaign, the hospital has secured a $i million FHA guar-

anteed long-term mortgage and recently announced a public campaign to raise the ?2 million dollars in voluntary three to five-year pledges from the individual and corporate citizens of the hospital service area. Robert H. Wharton, chairman of the public relations committee for the hospital, said the story of Bayshore Community Hospital will be shown on film during the tour. The 15-minute, color sound film, "You Can Make It Hap-~ pen", will be shown every half hour during the two hour 'tour. Mr. Wharton also pointed out that the film is available to all clubs and organizations at no charge.

Red Bank Business District May Get Two Restaurants RED BANK - Two new restaurants may open in Red Bank. The owner of a ChineseAmerican restaurant in Eatontown hopes to open one in the former home of The Daily

Register at 40-42 Broad St. Tommy Tang, owner of Tang's Restaurant, Rt. 35, Eatontown, has purchased the three-story building near the White St. intersection from Dominic and Louis Vaiti, who

also own Sal's Tavern here. Mr. Tang said yesterday that he hopes to open for business in about three months. He has been in the restaurant business 17 years, he said, having owned the.Eatontown establishment 10 years. In the meantime, Messrs. Vaiti are negotiating with Robert Edwards for purchase of the historic Old Union House on Wharf Ave., a restaurant that has been closed for nearly a year.

Horsemen Want AC Races at Monmouth TRENTON (AP) - New Jersey's horse owners and trainers have launched a drive to shut down the Atlantic City race track next year and transfer its racing dates to Monmouth Park. In a letter to the state Racing Commission and Gov. William T. Cahill, the New Jersey Horsemen's Benevolent Association said yesterday O r t h o p e d i c Society

— Coupon

try to provide a brighter fifuture for the one billion people in countries that have gained independence in the past quarter century. "Squalid poverty lives side by side with overabundance on our earth," he said. "We have reached the moon but we have not reached each other." Thant called for a fresh start toward realizing the goals of the U.N. charter.

Anderson Bits Back At O'Hern's Charge

Newark Mayor Welcomes Aid

Environment Controls Planned

Gromyko to dinner on Friday, and Gromyko will entertain Rogers at the Soviet mission Monday night. Rogers was to see a number of other foreign ministers dur. ing his stay in New York, including Mahmoud Riad of Egypt. Thant set the theme of the commemorative session Wednesday with a message calling on member states to

T o Meet S a t u r d a y NEPTUNE - The 25th annual meeting of the New Jersey Orthopedic Society will be held for the first time at Jersey Shore Medical CenterFitkin Hospital, here Saturday. The program will be held in the Ford Auditorium of the Medical Center. Dr. William G. D'Elia,-director of the orthopedic department at the hospital, is president of the society. The all-day session will start at 9:30 a.m. and will include luncheon.

that Monmouth's larger handles would earn the state at least an additional $2.4 -million and their members another million. They said that continuing the meeting at Atlantic City would amount to a state subsidy of the resort industry. Their proposal calls for the owners of Atlantic City Race Course to operate the extended season at Monmouth. Racing at Atlantic City began Aug. 10 and ends Saturday. A spokesman tor the racing commission said the proposal would lie studied,

Louis Vaiti said the final sale hinges on results of a title search now being conducted. Titles on the property date to 1791. Mr. Vaiti said plans for the Red Bank landmark will be released when the deal is closed.

RED BANK - William S. our borough, so it isn't any Anderson, Republican candi- surprise that that is the way date for mayor, today called he is running his campaign." Mayor Daniel O'Hern's In reply to Mr. O'Hern's charge that the Republicans request that the Republicans are trying to buy back the issue a platform, Mr. Andercontrol of Red Bank by leas- son said, "I suggest that our ing all available stores for Mayor stop weeping and wail, c a m p a i g n headquarters ing about the way we are con"about the most pathetic ducting our campaign and statement I have ever heard start explaining to the public from a mayor." why he didn't fulfill his own "Let me inform our cry platform promise made two baby mayor, "loud and years ago to stop spiraling .clear," he said, "that the taxation of homeowners. Red Bank Republicans have "Now, after he has been In not signed one lease, rented office for the past two years one store, or paid one penny and our tax rate has risen to to anybody for the use of their the highest in the history of campaign headquarters or Red Bank, he actually has the store front' windows. They unmitigated gall to again were all donated, every single send out mailing pieces askone of them. ing the public to vote for him "There are still a number to stop high taxes. I must of vacant stores in choice lo. remind our free spending cations, and there are plenty mayor that it was the Reof stores on Shrewsbury Ave. publican council, who, over that haven't been occupied his objections, cut 5100,000 for months. I wonder If it ever from the school budget In an occured to O'Hern that per- effort to keep our taxes in haps the owners just don't line. want their premises used for "Two years ago Mr. O'Hern Democratic display purposes conducted one of the lowest, or as a Democratic headquar- most insidious campaigns I ters? have ever witnessed In an at. "Mr. O'Hern has certainly tempt to besmirch the charac. helped project the image he ter of a fine man who has has created, as being a mayor since been appointed a Judge. with hindsight rather than "This year I know what to foresight. For the past two expect and if Mr. O'Hern years he has always waited tries any more of his stock-inuntil something happened and trade innuendoes, let him be then cried about it, instead of forewarned that he will find taking the action necessary to me to be a tough two-fisted prevent such occurrences be- opponent who won't pull any fore they took place. That is punches to make him keep in the way he has been running line with the truth."

Freeholder Slate Issues Platform FREEHOLD — Democratic freeholder candidates Marvin Olinsky1 of Hazlet and C. B. Carglle of Neptune City yesterday issued their 10-point platform for Monmouth County. The candidates promised that when elected they would work strongly to Implement the program. Their platform is: —Creation of a citizen adv i s o r y committee to the Board of Freeholders to bring the voice of the people back , into county government. — Adoption of a strong executive manager form of county government. . — Establishment of night meetings by the Board of Freeholders. — Finding ways to eliminate areas of frustration which lead to the alienation of citizens and ultimately to serious disturbance. Tax Curb Eyed — Holding the line on county taxes'by reducing all nonessential spending. ° — Careful revaluation of priorities to decide if the spending of $10 million for a new county office complex or additional millions for a county golf course may be redirected at this time. — I m m e d i a t e establishment of a county police force to end duplication, save money and Increase efficiency. — Creation next year of a county health department to provide full health coverage

to the people of Monmouth County. — Efficient county administration to reduce the daggering cost of welfare. — Full cooperation with every federal and state law enforcement agency to end organized crime in Monmouth County.

Radio Mast Construction Brings Fine ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS Will WiBemse of Bay Ave., was fined $120 last night In Municipal Court for violating a borough ordinance regarding the construction of a radio tower. Judge Arthur P. Siegfried acted on a complaint by building inspector Leslie Carhart, who claimed Mr. Willemse did not properly apply for a building permit to construct a tower behind his home for his ham radio operation. Me also claimed that the tower did not comply with side lot restrictions. Other complaints regarding the tower erection, made by M r . Willemse's neighbors were dropped. The neighbors had claimed the tower was c a u s i n g interference with televisions and appliances. Last month however, Mr. Willcmse has intsalled filters to eliminate the problem.

II

Light Applejack On-TheRocks A real swinging way to start a : modern party. A light drink you can stay with.

light Applejack Highball .An exciting long, tall drink that's light and frisky,. Use your favorite mixers.

Jick Rote Cocktail • Here's the traditional Apple • Jack favorite. It's delicious and now, smoother than ever.

Light Apple Jack Sour The best of the Sours, Smooth and delicious too.

Dig they must... Pay wewill!

It was learned that Charles Truax, former manager of Old Orchard Country Club and Rod's Shadowbrook restaurants, will head the Union House operation if the sale is completed. Mr. Truax is a 35year veteran of the hotel and restaurant business in Florida, New York and New Jersey.

Main Office: 103 Cbeitnnt HI., Ifed Bank. H. J. 01701 Branch offlrfli: 81« IK 3.1, MMdll'Kwn, N. J. 30 X n l ilaln HI., rrMlioM. N. 3. 270 flronduar. ljong Branch. N. J. Established ID 1878 by John II. Cook and Hrnrj Cllr Published by The R*d Bnnk Rrnlnter incorporated Member of the Associated Trees — Tho Associated PrfM U entitled exclusively to the uss for republican™ or all th» local newi printed tn this newspaper aa well as all AP news dispatches. Second class postage paid at Red Bank, N. j . 07701 and at additions! malllrnt ofricej, publnned dally, Monday Uirough Friday. 1 month—12.75 0 montris—JI4.H0 3 montiis—J7.50 12 monlns—S27.C0 Subscription Prlcr* In Advance Home Delivery by Carrier — flnfli copy it counter, 10 centi; by Carrier 50 Centi Per Ween

PC Wl§6... Finarwa your sewer system hookup costs through us on our special low terms

can».MPyou?

^CENTR*UEBSEYBAIX SEYBA1.X /IMO

COMIVINY

80 PROOF, LAIRD S COMPANY, SCOBEYVILIE, N. J. 35% STRAIGHT APPLE JACK BRANDY, 65% GRAIN NEUTRAL SPIRITS.

-THE DAILY REGISTER, RED BANK-MIDDLETOWN, N. J.:

Obituaries Mrs. Albert York FORKED EIVER - Mrs. 'Myrtle E. York, G8, of 309 Pensacola Road died Wednes. day in the Toms River Con( valescent Center. Mrs. York was born in Port Monmouth and had lived in | Kearisburg 30 years before 3 moving here eight months ago. Surviving are her husband, Albert York Jr.; a daughter, Mrs. Lester E. Smith, here; a sister, Mrs. Catherine Meehan of East Keansburg; three grandchildren, and two great, grandchildren. Arrangements are under the direction of the Anderson and Campbell Funeral Home, Toms River. DEATH NOTICE SAMSON — Elizabeth McCall. ol l Rlvtre.liie Roatl. New flhrcwiibursr, oi •Tue«., Oct. 1». ltriO. Wile ot the late John. Devoted mother or Mra. Victor A. Bandberg, John, Alex, and WMI«m Bameon. AIBO survived by 18 grand, children and one great-granddaughter. Visitation at Mcayer and l/undquUt Fu. ncral Home. 100 Valley Road. Montclalr 2 lo 4 and 7 to 8 p.m. Memorial aervlce at Grace Prenbyterlan Church, drove St., Montclalr. Friday 1 p.m. Ir ttrmtnt Mt. Hrbrcin Cemetery In lie of flowers, contributions may be mad a t" 'he Hunger Memorial Fund, Oralrrcnbyterlan Church. Montclalr.

NURSING HOME • 24-Hour Cor* • RN on duty all flirt* • Mtdleart Appramd

NAVESINK HOUSE W RIVERSIDE AVE. M2-MM

RED BANK .

Greenwood,

50,

Is D r o w n i n g Victim BETHEL, Conn. — Joseph Greenwood, 50, of this place was found dead Saturday from an accidential drowning in Westfield, Mass: Surviving are two sons, Albert Greenwood of Port Monmouth, N.J., and Michael Greenwood of Wood Haven, N.Y. Arrangements were under the direction of Healy's Funeral Home, Westfield, Mass. Miss P a t r i c i a M o r r i s HAZLET - Miss Patricia Ann Morris, 15, of 51 Nevada Drive died Tuesday in Vineland. Born in Queens, she was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John J, Morris. A resident of the area most of her life, she was a member of Holy Family Catholic Church, Union Beach. Surviving, besides her parents, are two brothers, John J, and Edward T. Morris, both at home; a sister, Marianne Teresa Morris, also at h o m e , and her maternal grandmother, Mrs. Teresa A. King of Jersey City. Private arrangements are under direction of the Day Funeral Home, Keyport.

A TIMELESS TRIBUTE

A panonjlizid monumanr, carved'of stlact Barra Grartita, can »ay mor« than man/ words. Sat our diiplay of Barra Guild Monument!, backed by the induitry'i itrongeif monument guarantee.

BARRE GUILD Monuments

LONG BRANCH MONUMENT CO., Inc. Wall jr. and Locmr Ave>.

222-O300

Weir Long Branch. N. J.

Mrs., Samson

Harry Edwards

SHREWSBURY Mrs. Elizabeth McCall Sam. son, 83, of 172 Riveredge Road died Tuesday at home after a long illness. She was born in Colonsay, Scotland, and came to this country in 1922, first cettling in East Orange and then Montclair. She lived here 13 years. She was a member ol the Grace Presbyterian Church, Montclair, and was a Sunday School teacher there. She was an active member of the Women's Guild of the church. She was past chief daughter of t h e Lady Drummond Lodge, Daughters of Scotia. She was the widow of John Samson. Surviving are three cons, John Samson of Montclair, Alex Samson of West Caldwell and William Samson of Kennelon; a daughter, Mrs. Victor A. Sandberg, here; 18 grandchildren, and one greatgranddaughter.

MARLBORO - Harry Edwards, 83, of,Jit. 79, died Tuesday at Riverview Hrspital, Red Bank. He was born in North Staffordshire, England, and had lived here more than 30 years. He retired 19 years ago from his position as garage foreman at the New Jersey State Hospital. Mr. Edwards also operated a restaurant on Rt. 79 for many years. He was a member of Matawan Lodge, No. 192, F&AM. He is survived by a brother, William Edwards of North Staffordshire, England; four sisiers, Mrs. Doris Salt of freehold, Mrs. Mary Ellen 9proston, Mrs. Polly Roberts -and Mrs. Kathleen Earlam, all to North Staffordshire, England. Higgins Memorial Home, Freehold, is in charge of arrangements.

Arrangements are under the direction of the Neayer and Lundquist Funeral Home, Montclalr.

Miss Lillian Eifert MADISON TOWNSHIP Miss Lillian A. Eifert, 61, of Amboy Road died yesterday in Perth Amboy General Hospital. Born here, where she resided all her life, she was the daughter of the late William and Lena Ott Eifert. She retired three months ago from M&T Chemical Co., Matawan, where she had been employed 40 years. She attended Christ Episcopal Church, South Amboy. Surviving is a brother, George W. Eifert of Matawan. Arrangements are under direction of the Bedle Funeral Home, Matawan. DEATH NOTICE NBAIJ — Robert, ot ft Steven Ave., Npw flhrewibury. on, October 12. 1070. Ix>vtnK son or Mr. and' Mrs. Robert NCHI Sr. Father of Lanell: brother or Mark, Donald and Terry, Vanenia and Donna and Mra. fihlrley Hardy; grandion of Frank Jdhnaon Sr. Funeral service Saturday I p.m. at the Child* Funeral Home, 364 Shrewabury Ave.. Red Bank. Rev. Andrew Macltcy oFriclatlnfr. Interment White Ridge Cemetery, Eatontown. Friencta may call at the funeral home Friday evening Mt.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1970

Rumson Board Slates Action On Easing School Space Need

MONMOUTH BUILDING CENTER M

Q>

INTRODUCING

RED MADEIRA II HICKORY

V

4' x 8' PANEL

ACCENT

CINNAMON

43rd Anniversary Celebration fntnUIHc m MAN MAM

Star Sapphires and Cats Eyes

BY PLY-GEMS

US PLYWOOD

&%» NOW 4" WALNUT PECAN 4x8 ft. 99 HAZELWOOD Reg. 6.95 NOW 5 • • • •

WHITE

CROSS BUCK

• REPEAT OF A SELLOUT! SYCAMORE GREEN Mx8 Ft. Pan.i* LARKSPUR ASH V88 BUTTERNUT ^ Tl^ m TAWNY BROWN 9.95'

PRE-HUNG

RANCHERO

lff' : > '""""' ^•"':'1':';

m

your

choice

$

*99

One Full carat ypur choice

349l

Diamonds by thetotalcarat weight

• COMPLETELY FINISHED

• READY TO ASSEMILE

• LARGE ASSORTMENT DECORATIVE

IV. Inch

WINDOW BUNDS

PLASTIC PANELS Assorted Colors and Patterns 2x4 Ft. Panels

mm

680

269

your choice

choice

1*179

'5991 Council ol Antrlci

Monmouth Saturday 10-6

715 2.8x3.3 /

• 12 in. x 12 in. WHITE

FOLDING DOORS

CEILING TILES

(2x6 Ft. in Wainuttone 13.95)

including Formica top and 2 adjustable shelves 4 ft. wide. (Other Sixes Available)

44"

Moveable Flats 6x16 Inches Open Fabric Frames Available

CAFE DOORS AV. A V l.' 11" l

4 S

pr,

•%

Fibreglass

(

FURNACE FILTERS C Q up to 15x20 Inches

PINE SHUTTERETTES 7 9 '

BUILDING I CENTER I

pr.

2 Ft. 6 In. x 6 Ft. 8 In. 1 5

• Jencrafr Wooden

[MONMOUTH Shopping Ctntir Opon Monday Thru friday Till 9:30 p.m.

pr

• Leuvred DOOR

KNOTTY PINE BAR Two carats

DOOR

119°°

lOxlO-ft. STEEL SHED

m • ALL METAL

65 Bread St. fled Bank Open Wcdnasday and Friday . Till 9:00 p.m.

All 4x8 ft.

Aluminum

...at wary spMtalprioMl

OPEN A LITTMAN'S FLEXI-CHARGE ACCOUNT

Mrs. William J. Brothers, Rumson, and Felix Molzer, Little Silver, were appointed as part-time staffers; Mr. Molzer will direct the choir and Mrs. Brothers will teach one session of kindergarten.

Mrg. Lahsberry MANALAPAN ' Mrs. Doris E. Lansberry, 52, of 259A Lafayette Mills Road, died of asphyxia late yesterday afternoon, according to County Medical Examiner Dr. C. Malcolm B. Gilman. Mrs. Lansberry was found by her husband at about 5:30 p.m. in the front seat of her car, with doors and windows closed, in the family garage, State Police at Tennent said. She was pronounced dead on arrival at Jersey Shore Medical Center, Neptune. According to. Dr. Gilman, t h e death Is under investigation.

Special VEuues During Our

EJHIUIIH Minhr In New Je-riiy tjrWn&Qhmtrii

sibility for designating uses for $800 made available by the Parent-Teacher Association for in-service programs and seminars for teachers to supplement those provided by the board. Application for Title I funds, to finance a second summer p r o g r a m for brain-injured and neurologically impaired

possible for a recommendation to be made next month. Wiiliam Frank, board president, appointed Mr. Zydney to chair the committee, saying that Donald Howard, former chairman, was pressed with other board work. Mr. Howard and Mr. Frank remain on the committee. The board accepted respon-

ItUMSON - What direction the Board of Education will go toward resolving its space shortage may be indicated next month. Herbert Zydney, appointed last night to chairmanship of the Faculties Committee, said that Tuesday's referendum approving expansion at the high school should make it

Robert Neal Jr. NEW SHREWSBURY Robert Neal Jr., 19, of 5 Ste. ven Ave. died Monday in K i v e r v i e w Hospital, Bed Bank, after a short illness. He was born in Trenton and resided in the shore area most of his life. Surviving are his parents, Robert Neal of Princeton and Mrs. Frances Neal, here; a daughter, Lanell, at home; three brothers, Mark, Donald and Terry, all at home; three sisters, Vanessa and Donna, at home, and Mrs. Sheila Harding of Hildaberg, Germany and his maternal grandfather, Frank Johnson Sr. of Trenton. Arrangements are Under the direction of the Childs Funeral Home, Red Bank.

children was ^proved. The board aeoepted a 1MB10 audit which rtoance Committee chairman John Emery termed "very favorable, with only one minor recommendation." Herbert Fisher, lowest of three bidders, was awarded a contract to taxi two special students to special classes in Wall Twp. at $13.87 per day.

t0

^T

3-Track White Aluminum COMBINATION O5 WINDOWS ROCKWELL DRILLS 9 " ROCKWELL Circular SAW 3 9 "

II

777 Shrewsbury Ave., Shrewsbury Opposite Sycamore Lanes MON.. TUBS.. SAT. 7:30 A.M..* P . M . -

WID., THUR1. M l . 7:30 A.M.-t P.M.

fAm

e
747-5220

-THE DAILY REGISTER, RED J3ANK - MIDDLETOWN, N. J.s

Scout Camporee Begins Tomorrow OAKHURST - Paul Sommere of Oceanport, camping chairman of Central District, Monmouth Council of Boy Scouts, plans for the annual fall camporee of the district. The district, which includes Eatontown, Oceanport, Monmouth Beach, Sea Bright, Long Branch, West Long Branch and Ft. Monmouth, will have the event at Camp Smokey on Squankum Road Colts Neck. All scout troops ;Withln the geopranhic hni'Ms of the district have been invited to attend. A crowd of

Atlantic Highlands Orders Stricter Law Enforcement

about 200 boys is expected. The program begins tomor. row with a check-in. It continues Saturday with morning breakfast and flag-raising ceremony, troop campsite preparedness and troop gadg e t r y . The program will break at 11 a.m. for lunch and will begin again at 1 p.m. Sunday will begin with breakfast, morning worship services, an hour of scout in. struction and clean up tf camping area, lunch and closing at approximately noon with a final flag ceremony.

FURNITURE FOR CHILDREN—Members of the Helmdel Jaycess made 12 pieces of furniture designed for use by youngs-tars handicapped by cerebral palsy. Douglas Frank, left, Jaycee external vice president, presents one of the pieces to Robert Meyer, representing the board of directors of United Cerebral Palsy of Monmouth and Ocean Counties. (Register Staff Photo I

Christmas

i account.

Publisher Out to Buy FreeholdTranscript By HAIXIE SCHRAEGER FREEHOLD TOWNSHIP Arthur S. Schreiber, publisher of the Colonial News, confirmed last night that he is negotiating with the owners of the Freehold Transcript to buy that 82-year-old weekly newspaper.

Grained Bella calfskin boot, fully leather lined, with three-eyelet side buckle. Great with flares. Sizes 7 >A'to 12, C and D widths, New arid classic shoes side by side in the Nunn Bush Shop just off

ImiuMiiniitiiuumiiiuuituiiiuiiiiiw^

THURSDAY, OCTOBER ,15, 1970

the vast pocket park.

Broad and Front, Red Bank.

But Mr. Schreiber emphasized that "we are still just talking. "I've been talking to them for six months, but this is the .closest we've ever been (to an agreement). "Of course, at this point, anything could happen to stop it." Mr. Schreiber said if he does succeed in buying the Transcript, he will continue to publish it, but he declined to confirm a rumor that he plans to transform it into a daily. He also declined to talk about price. The Freehold Transcript, founded in 1888, is published at 27 South St., Freehold. It publishes news of the borough and nearby communities. Mr. Schreiber is the sole owner of the Schreiber Publishing Co., which publishes four weekly editions of the Colonial News, a shopper, at offices on Rt. 9 here. He lives at 5 Longview Ave. Mr. Schreiber said he at one time negotiated to buy the Howell Booster, a weekly newspaper in Howell Township, but the negotiations fell through.

ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS The mayor and Borough Council slapped the wrists of the police department by announcing that stringent enforcement of traffic laws and borough ordinance against loitering and littering will begin immediately. "The police chief (James J. Egidio) says he's undermanned and we say the ordinances must be enforced," Mayor James H. Snyder declared. Concern Told "We're very concerned with the matter of police enforcement now and plan to discuss further with the chief approp r i a t e enforcement," the mayor added. Specifically, the council wants First Ave. cleaned up .— of debris and teen loiterers alike. "We're down to a real drastic move, Mayor Snyder said, but refused to elaborate on the proposed action. "This isn't political — all of us on the council are for this," he said. "We don't want to give the kids tickets, but we seem to need a constant enforcement because it's either no action or spurts of summons issuing," the mayor said. After complaints from residents, council is also urging stepped up enforcement of curfews at the harbor recreation site and patrols on Ocean Blvd. | Borough Administrator J. Leonard Clark, in response to a complaint from Mr. and Mrs. Paul Joy, of 34 Ocean Blvd., said signs have been posted at the recreation site announcing closing of the facility at dusk. " W e ' v e also asked the police to step UD patrols of the area," he added. The Joys wrote council complaining of continual disturbances, well after midnight, at the park, including loitering, profanity, car horns and radios and nuisances. "The loitering on First Ave. is worsening too," Councilman Allen V. Tracy proclaimed. Mrs. Livio Poll, of Ocean Blvd., prompted council action with her complaints RALLY SUKDAY CLIFFWOOD - Sen. Harrison A. Williams Jr., Hep. James J. Howard and Democratic Freeholder candidates Marvin Olinsky and C. B. Cargile will be honored at an "old fashioned" rally Sunday from 2 to 5 p.m. in Burlew's CUffwood Inn, Rt. 35. Spon. soring the event are the Democratic Clubs of Matawan Township. Refreshments will be served.

SCOUT PROJECT HAZLET Boy Scout Troop 737 will conduct a house number painting project in Raritan Valley Saturday beginning at 10 a.m. Members will paint numbers on the curb in 'front of each residence and solicit dona, tions from the homeowners. | The unit is sponsored by the, Drug Addiction Problem? local Jewish War Veterans Call 988-8333 For Help Day or Post. • Night.

of constant speeders along the boulevard "at all hours of the night." She and the council expressed concern for the safety of children walking along the roadway, which has no sidewalks. The police department will beef up patrols and issue more summonses if necessary, Mr. Snyder said. Patrolman Resigns T h e police department's claim of too few officers was bolstered as council accepted the resignation of Patrolman Frederick W. Hogan. Patrolman Hogan, with the department two years, will become an investigator with the N.J. Public Defender's office effective Monday. The resignation leaves 11 men on the force. Mayor Snyder said a replacement will be found as soon as possible. The patrolman's initial request for a sixmonth leave of absence was denied because it would set a precedent the council said,

noting that similar requests from two other departing pa-

trolmen were also turned down.

Hillman/Kohan Eyeglasses in one hour (In Matt Caws)

coming soon to

Eatontown Route 35i
CALL S4S-MII

EAST ORANGE MILL END SHOPS CUSTOM MADE DRAPERY EVENT!

BROCADES in 50 dlHtr.nr 4MI«M

FIBER6LAS FABRICS HAND PRINTS CASEMENT FABRICS •»•'» lm»«lnrtl« WMVI, w«l«ht mi color

DACRONS & LINENS

In ihwr and Nirurt wilghri • and many others by the World's Flntst D n l g n t r s . . .

• IMPORTED CUT VELVETS

ORDER NOW FOR THE HOLIDAYS

Our Workroom Will Custom-Make Your A new generation of well-bred, pure Shetland wool sweaters -— from England, by Alan Paine, takes some liberties with

DRAPERIES LINED OR UNLINED

DRAW DRAPERIES INCLUDED

the establishment and adds to Natelsons Fall Harvest Festival. Good-fitting 4 x 6 rib comes in lively shades of Norse blond, plum and royal blue mist. U-neck sleeveless, long enough to wear with a belt. 16.00. Long sleeves, 20.00. Wide wale corduroy pants with deep belt loops, 15.00.

SOFA & CHAIR 4 CUSHIONS

• HEAVY DUTY ZIPPERS • OVERLOCKED SEAMS

1OO5 0 • Rig. W 159.50 W

• 200 Dlfftrt nr Matt rial* to Choose From

READY MADE DEPARTMENT! Come in and see our new fall collection of customized BEDSPREADS and READY MADE CURTAINS. Choose from the largest selection in New Jersey; EVERY SIZE and STYLE AVAILABLE!

Contemporary sportswear and a SHOP AT HOME SERVICE • Call 741-6080

glass of cider, Latest Style

on the main floor.

NakkonJ./CtiJel

MILL END SHOPS

3

137-B BROAD STREET, RED BANK OPEN FRIDAY EVENINGS 'TIL 9 P.M.

BROAD AND FRONT STREETS RED BANK, NEW JERSEY 07701 TEL 201-741-5300

Fur Pillows 98

DIAL 741-6080

Othtr itoroi: Eoit Orang*, Marrlitown, Fair Lawn, Meoreilswn Mall, Woodbrldgo. More: No affiliation with any othir sforn on .Jauty Shor» with limilir n«mi. B« iur» yoO ir« in thi EAST ORANfiE MILL IND SHOP.

''£?£

I

EFL

Established la 1878 - Published, by The Bed Bank Register, Incorporated M. HAROLplKELLY. Publishei •

.

Arthur Z. Kamin, Editor

Thomas J. Bly, Executive Editor —S

'

-

FROM OUR READERS "A Cap Of Black Powder And A Few Rounds Of Ammo? Certainly, Neighbor"

William F. Sandford, Associate Editor

Mr. Lacey's Successor

Interestingly, Sen. Clifford P. Case,. R-N.J., who proposed Mr. Lacey for his new assignment, said he had mixed feelings about it be- " cause of his "outstanding performance in the year" he has been U.S. attorney. This, of course, was not said in any way to take away from Mr. Lacey's selection. He is highly q u a l i fied for the judgeship and we can only commend Sen. Case for naming him. Mr. Lacey long will be remembered for his outstanding performance as the U.S. attorney. How soon Mr. Lacey takes over in his new post remains to be seen. Sen. Case indicated it was up to the Justice Department and the White

House to determine whether Mr. Lacey would take his position as a federal judge immediately or remain as U.S. attorney for an indefinite period before relinquishing the job for the judgeship. Under any circumstances, we want the battle against organized crime that Mr. Lacey started to continue. The task has just begun and it must continue. It is known that Mr. Lacey strongly favors Herbert J. Stern, the first assistant U.S. attorney, to succeed him. Mr. Stern has worked closely with Mr. Lacey and has been -es? tremely effective. It would be a shame to lose the coordination he helped establish in the assault against crime. We can only hope, at this point, that partisan politics will not enter the picture in choosing Mr. Lacey's successor. Mr. Stern appears to be the man for the job.

Preserving Resources Pleasant Valley Road Marlboro, N. J. To the Editor: The Register is to be commended for its continuing interest in preservation of the county's natural and historical land resources. Your editorial concerning the efforts of the Pleasant Val- ' ley Preservation Committee toward adequate historic land zoning in Marlboro will be applauded by those who would save one of the most beautiful remaining landscapes in Monmouth County. The committee has worked patiently many years toward the goal of protecting this area with its many established historic sites. It is to be hoped that ttie Marlboro Council will now act quickly to create by ordinance a historic preservation district before the valley is lost to the pressures' of mass development. Many thanks for your attention to this matter. Sincerely yours, Mrs. Andre M, Pontone Pleasant Valley Preservation Committee

Gross and Agnew Nelson G. Gross, the Republican candidate for the U.S. Senate, disappoints us when he says that Vice President Agnew is "not dividing at all, but bringing a certain sentiment together." It is a purely political comment from Mr. Gross, a candidate who at the start of the campaign maintained a great deal of independence and then dramatically started shifting his philosophy to the right. Mr. Agnew has brought the campaign to its lowest level — especially with his sharp attacks on Sen. Goodeli, the New York Republican. The vice president not only is dividing his party, but is also dividing the nation with his political rhetoric. Frankly, many Americans are getting fed up with that approach. And there is also the embarrassment that comes with having the vice president travel that road in a quest for votes/

We do not oppose a robust and vigorous campaign. This is in keeping with the American political' tradition. But a high degree of responsibility should be uppermost in any such thrusts. For Mr. Gross to tie the "radicliberal" label on his Democratic opponent, Sen. Harrison A. Williams Jr., is also disappointing. This also smacks of the Agnew style. Fortunately, New Jersey voters have a tradition of rejecting such tactics. And we are confident that they will again at the polls next month. Republicanism in New Jersey has, as an example, flourished with such moderate and clear thinking. officeholders as Sen. Case and Gov. Cahill. Mr. Gross, as the campaign comes to a close, might try crossing over the bridge again — back to, where he Started.

A Big Day at Brookdale Sunday will he an important time at Brookdale Community College in Lincroft. It will be Founders' Day and several public events have been scheduled, all designed to highlight the progress that is taking place at the college there. Those of us who have watched Brookdale reach its present state must: take pride in its accomplishments. In the short space of several years, it has become a truly outstanding community college, without question one of the finest of its kind in the slate. './','• That is why the Founders' Day program takes on even more meaning as, the events of the past and the course for the'future are before the public. Judge Lawrence A. Carton Jr. of

Locust will speak at the ceremonies. There will be an open house at the Lincroft campus and at the college's adjunct centers. The afternoon's events will mark both the organization of the college's first board of trustees three years ago and the construction of a foundation for the first complete new facilities at the Lincroft campus. Also taking part will be three men who have had a significant part In the college's growth: Freeholder Director Joseph C. Irwin, Maj. Gen. . W. Preston Corderman, chairman of the Board of Trustees, and Dr. Ervin L. Harlacher, the^college president. We recommend a visit to Brookdale College Sunday. It is a good opportunity to view MonmOuth County's successful entry in the field of higher education. ,

INSHlE WASHINGTON

Academic Views Neutral? By ROBEHT S. ALLEN ind JOHN A. GOLDSMITH Martha Mitchell, the waspish wife of the attorney general, tells us that "the academic society is responsible for all our troubles, in this country. " T h e y don't know what's going on," says Mrs, Mitchell, of the professors and administrators who arc working in the academic groves with the record-breaking ' number of young people who crowd the nation's col-" leges and universities. In its controversial report, the I'residcnl'u ComALLEN mission on Campus Unrest champions political freedom for members of the academic community. It cautions, however, that the universities themselves must be "politically neutral, except in those rare cases in which their own Integrity, educational purpose or preservation Is at stake." What, then, are the on-campus viewpoints which have provoked Mrs. Mitchell? What arerthe academic views which flourish in the classrooms while the universities I,.. _ themselves strive for a ( '^Hht' P ul)lic posture of bland * ^ ^ * ^ k and unprovoking neutrality? It can be slated, generally but rather nutnnritatively, that nearly half of the nation's university faculties consider themselves "middle of the road" or "moderately conservative"; half of thorn GOLDSMITH voted for Hubert Humph-

rey, and four out of five — whether they approve, on balance, or object — have some reservations about the recent wave of oncampus student activism. That is the faculty profile, which emerges from survey conducted for the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education. More than 60,000 faculty members were questioned. The sampling was dime last full. So the survey should be reasonably current and complete, Only 5.5 per cunt of the faculty respondents described themselves as politically "left." A tiny 2.2 per cent said they were "strongly conservative," More than 41 per cent characterized themselves as "liberal." However, nearly 25 per cent characterized their politics as "middle of the road" and another 22 per cent as "moderately conservative." . With respect to the war In Vietnam, 10 per cent of the faculty members surveyed ' favored withdrawal "immediately." About ' 12 per cent of tliem would encourage a coalition government in Vietnam, and some 20 per cent would reduce the U.S. commitment but prevent a Communist "takeover. The rest, 6 per cent of the total, would win the war at whatever cost. * * :|: IN 1969, JUST over liiilf of 'the more than 60,000 respondents voted for Ilumiihrey.. Nearly 30 per cent supported President Nixon, and not quite 1 per cent voted for Wallace. There was a 2.2 per cent sprinkling for other candidates, and a riiqnificant 10.5 per cent who did not vole at all in the presidential election., ,,

i

65 Queen Anne Drive Shrewsbury, N. J.

To the Editor: ':'Each election year, letters appear thanking Congressman Howard for previous favors. Mr. Howard and all die other congressmen certainly deserve commendation whenever they are able to help a citizen with a particular problem. Mr. Howard has a huge staff paid for by the taxpayers. He keeps it very busy with his publicity assignments, e.g. sending cookbooks to newlyweds and baby books to new parents. Have these rather insignificant practices any bearing on the efficiency of the congressman? These are the traditional methods of every politician and yet nhey Influence a tremendous amount of votes. Study Mr. Howard's legislative record. It is public knowledge that it is in a state of shambles. His absence has obstructed medical reforms critical to the welfare program, federal aid to our district and many other congressional issues. William Dowd is an energetic, intelligent and earnest young candidate. Compare his positive courses of action to Mr. Howard's inability to meet current issues head on. Mr. Dowd has won the admiration of the President and is highly regarded among all his associates in Washington. He .will • use this support to benefit the people of this neglected Third Congressional District. He certainly has my vote. Sincerely, Ann Tucker

•• .

Thursday, October 15, 1970

Now.that U.S. Attorney Frederick B. Lacey has been approved by the Senate for a federal judgeship, the question comes up as jto v/ho his successor will be in the critical post.

A Vote ior

POOR MAN'S PHILOSOPHER

Never Enough Leisure Time

Setting Record Straight Box 81 Fair Haven, N. J. To the-Editor: To borrow a cliche from the politicians, allow me to (hank you for "setting the record straight." I am referring to the explanation which you gave . . . to the unfortunate incident of the critical letter to the Board • of Freeholders, purportedly written by me. When this letter appeared in your paper, many of my friends called to criticize me. When the same friends saw yesterday's paper, they called to say how relieved tjiat they were to see the true story in print. By what we have learned, let us hope that such incidents may be avoided in the future. . . . Sincerely, Donald C. Stone

Raise penguins In his basement. By HAL BOYLE Curbstone comments of a Pavement Invent a telephone system that works. Plato: Sail on a raft to Tahiti. Some social scientists worry over Write more advisory letters to his conwhether man may destroy himself not by gressman. " •:• the hydrogen bomb but by Travel more widely and build the largtoo much leisure. est collection of stolen hotel soap in his They estimate that the neighborhood. productive needs of civilization may be met by Figure a faster route through his local the end of this century by supermarket. a work week of 20 hours or Sponsor a good cause of his own, such less. What will man then as the erection of a nationwide chain of 181 Swimming River Road do with more spare time homes for overaged retired dime-a-dance * New Shrewsbury, N. J. on his hands than he has girls. To the Editor: , had in any previous period * * * As a resident of New Shrewsbury, I am overwhelmed ofhiUnmory? FINISH THE CORRESPONDENCE that our town has been chosen as the site of the proposed F o r • some reason course in ventriloquism he started as a all-county garbage dump. In all fairness, however, we must marty intellectuals believe that they alone youth but quit because he could never keep reject the honor. know how to use leisure time wisely. They up the payments. Holmdel and Colts Neck have more open spaces than feel that the average man, if he is allowed we do. Also, their tax rates are so much lower than ours Develop a new form of modern art in to lift his nose from the grindstone ever so, that I'm sure they wouldn't feel the pinch of the loss of taxwhich the drawing is done with a Chinese slightly, will spend that extra time debauchable land. (Additionally, it would give me a good deal of back s?ratcher instead of a paint brush. ing in a saloon, fighting his neighbor, or reassurance if an all-white community were chosen over an beating his wife. Serve as a marriage counsellor for Holintegrated one.) This viewpoint, of course, reflects an ar- . lywood stars such. as Ava Gardner and Announce that you are going to build a plant in New rant class snobbery a democracy should out-. Frank Sinatra, Shrewsbury that will convert garbage into garden compost grow. Given more leisure, it is the InLaunch a series of social clubs for her. . . not only will I be proud, but also, I will buy it from you. tellectual, not the common man, who Is mits tired of being unsociable.. (Proceeds from sales shared by the township). In this more likely to use it to create chaos and stir Stagger Wall Street by becoming the crowded, polluted time, do we really have.to suffer another revolutionary violence. 1 first investor in modern times to corner the dump, anywhere? .. ' , Your ordinary fellow is more likely to market in sarsaparilla. Florence Hayes add to his education, moonlight on another Found an insurance company that will job in order to buy a better house or a place protect playboy husbands againsi exin the country where he can grow a bigger horbitant alimony awards. tomato or a finer rose. Patent a machine that will shoot arrows * * *' Village Garden Club , into the tires of any car parked in the wrong Middletown, N. J. , BUT THE BIG advantage of more leisparking place. To the Editor: ure for all of us is that it gives us the chance Come up with a beer can made of some The following letter was sent to Mayor Foulks of Midto make our daydreams come true, to kind of material which will evaporate When dletown. . achieve those ambitions, large or small, that thrown on a public highway. Sincerely, we haven't gotten around to achieving beThese are but a iew oi scores of ways in , Mrs. David S. Byrne fore. • President which a man might use more leisure profitFor example, now that financial credit ably. It is only by having extra time to for any purpose is so easily obtainable, if make a better world that mankind will ever "The Village Garden Club was most distressed to hear, work weeks'were made shorter or vacations about and observe the unnecessary destruction of trees and get the job done. longer, a man might decide to— embankment surrounding Twin Brooks Pond during the recent laying of the.sewer lines. "As We do support any lands that are set aside for park facilities within the township, we would like to prevail on YOUR MONEY'S WORTH your committee to personally see that the uprooted trees are removed and that die bank is restored as quickly as possible and that the hazardous conditions that exist be eliminated before the winter weather adds to them. We would also recommend that the Shade Tree Commission evaluate the damage and suggest the proper methods of restoration. ' By SYLVIA PORTER National Association of Real Estate Boards "We know that you share our'concernin this matter and The federal government Is now pouring in Washington, is an all-time record $23,725 funds into the home mortgage market to re- and still climbing. Today only about one In are looking" forward to your effective resolution of this proovive housing. The prime loan rate in our six houses can be bought for less than lem." land is down from a 1970 peak of 8& per $15,000, while houses selling for more than cent to V/2 per cent and $25,1100 account for a startling 25 per cent of h e a d i n g lower. Newsall transactions. papers across the land are headlining reports that It's * . * * much easier and much ITEM: COSTS of sites on which to build cheaper for you to finance a house are at unprecedented peaks too, a home purchase. and, while land prices have softened slightly But it is not much easin some areas, the retreat is only temporier or cheaper—not at all. ary and there's no doubt that Hie-long-term Item: Although morttrend of land suitable for homes is up. gage interest rates (ire In addition, home repair bills, utility sliding a liny bit, at latest bills, property taxes—all the costs that e» rep|)rt] the average with a home—are soaring. tional rate charged for conventional new One result of these facts and trends Is i home mortgages was an all-time peak S.dl strong move toward inexpensive moliilti per cent and the average for mortgages an homes. Nine out of every 10 houses beim; existing homes was also a pew peak 8.4 per bought in the fl5,000-and-undcr range aw cent. , mobile homes. * . * * Another result is a return to "doubliug up" in houses by moderate-income families WHAT'S MORE, these averages obscure — with parents and children sharing quarthe fact that in many cities and areas, home ters to save money, for the first time In this mortgage interest rates, Including points generation. and related costs, run to 9 ^ per cent and And still another result is a mass search more. for apartments by young adults convinced It Item- Price tags on houses and apartis much cheaper to rent than to buy. ments — new and old — are mounting to But is it cheaper? It may seem so over ever higher levels, and so serious is the the short-term. But It is not. Even against apartment squeeze that the once-familiar today's steep housing prices, mortgage In-' lures (a month's free rent, extra utilities) tcrest costs and house operation expenses, have completely disappeared. it's still more economical over the'long-run The median (half above, half below) to buy than to rent. price of a houso being sold today, says the

About That Dump

Twifi Brooks Pond

Rent or Buy?

„,,.

•THE DAILY REGISTER, RED BANK. MIDDLETCWN, N. J.s THURSDAY, OCTOBER IS, 1970.

MatawanRepublwansGive Homing Views MATAWAN-Gartfen M A T A W A N — Gaivfen apartments, no; a planned a d u l t community, maybe. This is the position taken by Republican Borough Council candidates Mrs. Lillian G. Burry and Salvatore Milazzo. The candidates stated their p o s i t i o n because multiple dwelling complexes "have become topical again . . . In light of the recent disclosure of a 'new plan1 for the Freneau tite."

Thora are ™ . about - u . . . ! 1,000 « . £ . apart, __•_..." There ment units in the borough, or one apartment unit to every two private homes — very

' much. a zoning imbalance/' ' , the candidates dclared. The only multiple dwelling project the candidates -might

'-' find desirable is a planned adult community with individ. u a l o w n e r s h i p of condominiums limited to persons

at least 52 years old. But even for such condominiums, the candidates feel, legal ramifications must be carefully researched. Advantages of the condominiums would be that senior citizens may require few-

er services and would t ute few children to the i al school system. Mrs! Burry and Mr. ML . warned that to many, the word "ratable" denotes a cure-all. However, it's not that simple, they said. Ques-

Uons which must be weighed . to. J ^ n o estabBsbed tto include cost of servicing the rean^ inl«8; wheiihe ran In ratable, the actual M o w of a write-hi campalgn-opposlHg tax from it, its long range ef* additional garden apartment feet on the borough and construction. Mrs. Burry says whether and at what rate its she has consistently supvalue will grow or diminish ported sound zoning and long range planning. over the years. •



%

*

Mrs. Burry and Mr. Milazzo referred to a garden apartment referendum last year in which voters endorsed, 2,142 to 567, a moratorium on constuction of garden apartments or other additional multiple dwellings in the borough. "The referendum was motivated by sound planning in. stincte that still hold true. The facts haven't changed.

School Study Plan Aired InRedBqnk BED BANK - The Board of Education has learned some of the aims of a proposed study of the local system to be conducted by a Columbia University team if the board gives final approval. Dr. Robert C. Hoops, superintendent, announced that Dr. Carroll Johnson, former suparintendent of schools, White Plains, N.Y. and Dr. Gordon McKenzie, who are affiliated with Columbia, have submitted preliminary plans for the evaluation. But the estimated cost of the project has not been revealed, he said. (Earlier, the board chose Columbia over a number of other universities that submitted proDosals for the project, he said.) Dr. Hoops said six areas ofstudy may be included in the overall analysis. They are community attitudes, motivation, and adjustment of students, teachers' attitudes and approaches, employment policies, administrative organization and the academic program. T h e superintendent said that, if the project is approved in the near future, initial findings will be made available by March 1st and final recommendations would be made public six months later. He said a cost estimate will be submitted to the board shortly. Dr. Hoops said the study team would expect maximum involvement of the staff and professional growth through self evaluation."

»••

MH

*?•;*** •

Drunk Driving Charges Filed HAZLET — Two men were charged with driving violations after a police rfiase which allegedly reached 100 m.p.h. Monday night along Rt. 36. Policy Chief William J. Smith said Gerard Fey, 21, of South Amboy was charged with drunken driving and drivine 100 m.p.h. in a 50-mile zone. Because lie was driving on a'learner's permit, his passenger, Edward J. Boyle, 28 of Laurence Harbor, was charged with allowing a perenn to t w ^ t e a car while under the influence of alcohol. 'fr. Fov w»s released in $200 bail and Mr. Boyle is out in $100 bail pending Oct. 21 kcourt hearings. ^ The arrests were made by Sgt. Carl Price and Patrolmen Rudolph Cherney and Francis Emery following a lfrmlle chase up Rt. 38.

-

I I

Ifk

»•-*.

>.-.*: , *«,¥

JS: :;>•:

in*

km

:•«•''.•

<• •?

:\v

D.

Credit Card Use Sparks Man's Arrest MIDDLETOWN - A West long Branch man was arrested Monday evening as he allegedly tried to purchase an airline ticket at aJocal travel agency with a stolen credit card. According to Defective Capt. Robert M. Letts Jr., the s u s p e c t , R u d o l p h R. D'Ambrist; 42, of 71 Golf St., was arrested at the Boddie Travel Agency, Rt. 35, by Detectives Joseph Shaffery and Allen Ford. Mr. D'Ambrisi was charged with possessing a credit card belonging to Trans World Airways that was allegedly stolen in New York City last m o n t h ; forgery and attempted fraud. He is being held in lieu of $10,009 bail pending arraignment before municipal Court Judge Jerry J. Massell this morning.

>

V

-'Jtt

'.••,

•••-•••••-.



M

* * w

' . '

wi'•

DONT M l « O U t . . . USI YOUR MV61V4HAR0EI

Lamps in the Stiffel tradition.., see the states greatest collectioh! A. Poliih«d inllquid bttu, 3 1 " n i l , •nd coordinated while shantung lhada

,,

.m

,'

JJIAA

D. Antlquid bright brass, 3 8 " (all, whh Ivory slub-textured fabric over vinyl tranilucent shade , „ ft.Sft

AT HUFFMAN-KOOS, New Jersey's most impressiva thowcose of Sliffel Iamp7..s jhe place you simply must come if you're looking for the ultimate in'lamps,*GAMMA all the classics... lamps with that special Stiffel esprit. Timeless in design, meticulously de-

i. Oittrnud bran candlestick limp, 43" tall, t " reflector bowl and champagne alllc-iexlured fabric over •vinyl tranilucent « h . d . .;.„. I07JO

E. Antiqued Ivor/ and gold Tradltionel limp, 39" tall, off-white shantung coordinated ihede .72.50

C Diitrened brau and black clastic lamp, 39'/," tall, chempagnt ilub•entured fabric over vinyl translucent shade _ _ _ . _ _ _ _ 100^)0

F. Antiqued'OU Bran and black t r i . ditional lamp, 37J4" fall, chempagne silk-textured fabric ever vinyl tremlucant ih»/t. ... mtui

tailed1, these are lanjps whose special perfection transcends fad or fashion A . they'ra as appropriately correct with Contemporary as they are with Colonial... as fluent with French as they are with Mediterranean or Italian Provincial. A Stiffel lamp' if-the, crowning jewel of your room's decor, a clever decorating investment that casts its own special glow of luxury on all its surroundings.

HUFFMAN- KOOS

# r™RLL?Uf^ RAHWAY.RT.27,388-3700 . EAST BRUfTSWICK, RT.IS.257-4S0O • FREEHOLD EATONTOWN, RT.35,542-1010 . LIVINGSTON, RT. 10.99M60O . PARSIPPANY, RT.46.334-4100 . -POMPTON PLAINS. RT. 23, 835-3400' . S O M f l B B E B T SPRtNGFIELD, RT.24.3Z8-430Q . TOTOWA.RT, 46,785-0600 . TRENTON, RT. 1,882-6880 . NANUET, N.Y. (914) 623-8041 SHOP 9 ^ 0 TO MOJ SAT. TIL 6

.

• •



-THE DAILY REGISTER,,, RED BAXK • MIDDLETOWN, N. J.: THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1970 ,

*?;>

Service Between Bayshore, City Eyed

By NANCY J.KUBINSKI HIGHLANDS Calling Monmouth County the "stepchild of the state" as regards transportation, Norman Slater, assistant commissioner of t h e state Department of Transportation,, has heartily endorsed a new commuter s e r v i c e between Atlantic Highlands and New York City. The resumption of the water route, which flourished until World War II, has been a dream for 10 years, but was deemed unfeasible for lack of a proper vehicle. At the invitation of Atlantic Highlands contractor DominIck Caruso, Mr. Slater and Assemblyman Joseph Azzolina, R-Monmouth, told 30 members of the local Lions Club that the proposal may won become a reality. The vehicle to end the debate may be the Hovercraft, Bow feed extensively and eco. nomlcally between England tnd France. The vehicle, which rides about four inches tbove the water on a cushion of air, replaces earlier hopes for a hydrofoil as the best transportation method to the city from Atlantic Highlands. According to Mr. Azzolina, the vehicle has to be "modern, fast and useful for purposes other than commuting to become a reality." He visualized the craft being used morning and night for commuters and in be-

tween for trips to Sandy Hook State Park to relieve the summer traffic congestion to the park. "We welcome anyone to come forward with plans and we will do all we can to support the proposal and help finance the setting up of docking facilities, ironing out political considerations between the two states and financially underwriting the concept," Mr. Slater explained. The problem apparently lies in the availability of hovercrafts, which Richard L. Going of Atlantic Highlands, a guest at the meeting, said are not produced in this country. He said plans for the vehicle were drawn up by Boeing and Lockheed Aircraft companies, but they did not progress further. "The hovercraft has no legal status in this country either," Mr. Going explained. It is recognized by the International Federation of Aeronautics in France as an aircraft, but the designation has never been made here. He said a drive Is afoot in this country to have it designated as a boat. Mr. Caruso, armed with material on vehicles built by tne British Hovercraft Corporation, said several private' individuals' from Atlantic Highlands are banding together to urge the Britishers to come to Trenton to discuss the project. He said friends have dis-

cussed the matter in England with the builders and the reception was very warm. "This could be the salvation of the Bayshore and the county," Mr. Caruso predicted. The hovercraft would probably carry about 700 persons on each run and would cover the 17 miles to Battery Park at the southern tip of Manhattan In IS minutes. In contrast to the English version, which carries cars and trucks, only passengers would be carried on the local craft.

be very interested in beginning it here. We're basically looking for reliability so we will wait and see how it works further north." The hydrofoil concept has long been considered here, At present Mr. Slater ex- but tests over the years have plained, the state is closely proved the boat too unstable watching the use of a hydro- for the harbor waters. foil from 90th St. in ManhatIn 1964, according to Mr. tan to Wall St. and the soonto-begin hydrofoil commuter Caruso, a hydrofoil making a run between Hobokcn and the test run between Atlantic Highlands and New York lost east end of Wall St. a foil after striking debris in "This is a privately fi- the water. nanced project," he said, Unlike the hydrofoil, the "but if it works out, we would hovercraft is immune to the But, stressed both Mr. Azzolina and Mr. Slater, the vehicle would be used for transportation of machinery or freight during off-commuter hours.

problems of polluted New York Harbor. It rides above the water and ice in winter, can ride in eight to ten-foot seas, can carry more people with more economy and uses radar in fog. Last March a firm called New Jersey Hydrolines Inc., announced it would test the hydrofoil in the water route this summer. According to its local attorney, Stanley Yacker of Matawan the tests never took place, but he said the boat is being successfully used in California and the Caribbean.

tives He said eight acres of land owned - by Charles , jj. Hesse of Belford at the foot of First Ave. in Atlantic flj#ilands have been offered for docks and parking spaces;' "All we want to do is make Although noting that the commuting a much happier boat could not be used in win- experience," Mr. Azzojina ter because of ice flows and , stated. "Here we have., the would be a problem in fog and shortest route to New York, if high seas, the study sup- we go by water." p o r t e d the concept and He called on any firms or claimed the boat would carry private individuals who may 46,000 persons a day. have ideas on the hovercraft Docking facilities would commuter line to call him or pose no problem, Mr. Caruso the Department of Trans* assured the state representa- portation for a discussion! •

Ten years ago Stanford University conducted a feasibility study on the establishment of a hydrofoil commuter run between Atlantic Highlands and New York.

SALE TODAY thru SAT.

DISCOUNT DKPARTMKNT STORKS

MEN'S & YOUNG MEN'S

ZIPPER JACKETS 100% COTTON CORDUROY

ZIPPER JACKETS BY MR. JAYSHIRE Sturdy quilt-lined jackets of cotton corduroy with rubberized water-repellent backing,'self • collar, slash pockets. Bronze, Olive. S, M , L,XL

Discover a World Value

mam

MEN'S PERM. PRESS

DRESS SHIRTS by JAYSHIRE Fine 65% polyester, 35% combed Pima cotton.; In white and colors. 1414-17/ 32-35.

RMdytocuddh

Englffh-ityto

lOUSMMim

DOUPBAM

2.99

10.99

Oolli with rooted h*ir. movtbta •yet snuuled on pretty pillow, draned to ilMpor, parly dnu.

Loolu like tha grown-up version J*b "WMko My. folding booASi»dforn>omi3 to 7.

•NYLON

SKI JACKETS OuPont 70 denier nylon jacket, quilted over 9-oz. acrylic fill, with self collar, roll-under hoodr knit cuffs. .Blue, black, green or gold. S, M , L arid XL.

DRESS SUCKS Ivy oK I and d Continental C l InK b f a b r i c * .

Anyont em do it

DESUHKlT

BOYS' DENIM

Flannel Lined JEANS Everything's included to create fascinating and limitless designs. 7'Showhow" book. Refills T7ft

Many styles in Orion®, acrylic piles, laminated all wool plaids, laminated cotton corduroys. Sizes 4-12.

Reinforced, double needle stitched preshrunk cotton denim with cotton flannel lining. Navy. 6 to 12.

Fun way to go

BIDE EM BUNE BU6GV t i i y l l i , ^ 'SIXM'4 ld;wtf. ^ i | / . j

, 1i Plenty of room for driver up front, passenger in back. Bright molded plastic. "Steering" wheel.

S

win this 2I.8B ROAD RUNNER Mini to buy. rm In Ihli blink m d dtpoH i i your n u r i i l Woolworlh. You •nllht Kin Ihli pidil dilvi Roid Runnir »llh 'Ida I I T I I , lull cockpit. 41" lon|.

. 1

Dipoill coupon n y l October M, 1170.. Drawing will ba I tiel* Oclobir I I . a m o . winner will | I t announud ant . notllled. Void I prohibit* Wtlir* Brahlhltari • • by law,

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED REPLACEMENT OR MONEY REfUNDED

BOYS'

V1NYI JACKETS

100% NYLON REVERSIBLE

SKI JACKETS

PANT COATS

LITTLE GIRLS'

CLIP C0UP0N...DEP08IT IN TOY DEPARTMENi

LAMINATED CORDUROY

BONDED SLACKS Solids, plaids or checks in acetate-backed r a y o n boxer slacks. Sizes 3-6X.

1

Instructor stripe box quilt with two zipper pockets &^ zip-in hood, reversing to plain with two pockets, in fall colors. Sizes 6-18. Double breasted, belfed coat styled with a loose yoke back, raglan sleeves, of thick-andthin wale cotton corduroy in camel, brown, loden. 8 to 18.

Shiny vinyl coat with acrylic pit* lining, qulh-liiwd tfotvtt, in a epic* cHoto, Sims 4 to 14.

MIDDLETOWN •ROUTE 35

OPEN DAILY 9:30 A.M. 'TIL 10 P.M. SUNDAY* 10 A.M. 'TIL 6 P.M •FOR SALES ALLOWED ti LAW

THE DAILY AEGISTER, RED BANK - MIDDLETOWJ, N. J.j THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1970

Can Suffer 'Tennis Elbow,' BylRWINi. POLK.M.D. Tennis elbow doesn't come only from playing tennis. It is a common condition, more painful than serious, which may develop in anyone who uses his lower arm in a twistIng motion often. Mechanics and carpenters That's where iho irouble who use the screwdriver are starts in "tennis elbow." especially, likely to develop when the tennis olayer "tennis elbow." But the con- grips his racquet, When the dition may also occur in mechanic twists his equip, housewives who twist bottle. ment or the housewife twists caps to open or close them her bottletop, the wrist extenfrequently. sor muscles become taut. As So, for the growing number they do, the muscle fibers of tennis players as well as passing over the elbow joint the many who. work or play irritate the bursa. After many years of gripwith their hands, "tennis-elping and twisting, there has bow1? is a constant threat. 1 ,, It I s much easier to de- been enough irritation to cause pain. The pain begins icribe this condition than to Ttihderstand it. "Tennis el- mildly, but gradually bebow" is known to doctors as comes worse as the irritating '^radio-humeral bursitis," an action is repeated over and Irritation of the bursa, the over again. Finally, there is a lingering covering of the elbow joint, i ;At theelbow, the bone of ache at the upper part of the : fhe upper arm, the humerus, forearm, on the outer Side, "meets the two long bones of , just below the elbow/ at the the lower arm, the radius and point where the muscle fibers irritate the joint. the ulna. The ache becomes per. Humerns, Radius sistent, but is always made ; When you look at your arm worse by the grasping or with the palm up, the radius twisting motion which caused • is the long bone on the outside it initially. Sometimes, the of the arm below the elbow. ache is so severe and so per: '^he humerus and radius meet sistent that it Interferes with aj the elbow where their joint sleep. ' is covered by a fluid-filled There can be marked ten8ac, the bursa. derness on the eutside of the j On the outer side of the arm arm, just below the elbow, '{pass strands of the muscles too. It is about this time that t which run all the way down to medical help is sought. •the wrist, muscles which pull Simple Test i the fist open and cock the The doctor has a simple test wrist up, the wrist extensors. for tennis elbow. He asks the For some reason, nature has patient to straighten his'arm, seen fit to have these muscles turn his palm down, then try . attach to the upper arm at the to bend the wrist downward. radius. This manuever should cause Actually, the extensor mus- the pain of tennis elbow. cles would work just as well if Sometimes, while the hand Is (hey were attached to the low- held, in this position, turning er arm, but there they are, the.wrist from side to side - running all the way from the brings out the pain still wrist to above the elbow. more.

Here's To Health

Ttteft ChargeSent To Grand Jurors .'LONG BRANCH - I n . M u , . nicipal Court, Judge • Jacob :s Band held Larry King of 148 :;'i|iftli Ave. ..for action of;, the grand jury after a preliminary V hearing on a stealing charge. , Mr. King, charged with ':• stealing $1,000 worth of tools from Corlis Fisher of 122 Liberty St. Sept. 27, was released in $500 bail. Also in the court session, Patricia Marszalek of Th» :• Fountains Motel had a ?25 'fine imposed on a charge of failing to send her child to -.school. -••;. Catherine McCullers of 168 [Laurel St. was given a $25 suspended fine on a charge of 'disobeying a city ordinance on a charge with failing to tend her child to school f Mr. and Mrs. Francis Gran' it of 128 Woodrow Wilson , Homes paid a $10 fine on a

charge of failing to send their child to school, as did Wilma Sims, 266 Central Ave. for the same charge. .In traffic cases, Judge Rand imposed a $30 fine on Angel Natal of 41 S. Broad, way on a charge of falling to have his auto registration in possession. Ostiao Diaz of 83 N. Broadway had $40 In fines imposed on him on a charge of falling to sign his driver's license and another charge of careless driving. Robert Sickler of 3!r Horicon Ave., Oceanport, paid a $25 fine on a careless driving charge. Patrick Marotta of 308 Yorke Ave. paid $5 court costs and was given a $10 sus. pended fine on a charge of failing to have his rear view lights working.

Despite the lack of swelling and normal elbow x-rays, the doctor needs little more than the story of pain which devel. ops in a much-used elbow on twisting and gripping, to make the diagnosis of tennis elbow.

Heat and aspirin, may help, too. But even after much rest, using the elbow again in the manner which caused the injury will bring back the pain. And what tennis player can be asked to give up tennis forever? Treatment is not quite as Cortisone U<-e simple. The first suggestion is rest. Because repeated use of M o r e importantly, what the arm brought on the condi- worker can afford to give up tion, rest may take it away. his livelihood because of el-

bow pain? So on to more adva-x-.U .raatment, the use of cortisone drugs. These medicines, taken by mouth or injected into the painful area, relieve the In. flammation and stop the pain, permitting use of the arm in the meantime. They are best used by injection into the sore spot and give good relief — at least the first time or two. After a few such treat-

lore •foryour.

ttau SW DISCOUNT DEPARTMENT STORKS SEASONAL DEPARTMENT

The base map and a land use survey were prepared by the professional planning firm of Alvin E. Gershen Associates of Newark, which is working with the board on a continuing basis in an effort to develop new proposals. announced The board last night acceptTMr. Motichka that he has presented the ed a rough draft of the land borough's new base map to use analysis completed by the manager while indicating that firm. Its potential value in presentBoard members accepted • ing information about the with regret the resignation of borough; Mrs. Helen Thomas, who served the municipality 10 years. Mrs. Thomas' vacancy will be filled by Mrs. Majorie Giacobe of 02 Ramsey Ave., an alternate. B o a r d member William C a r e y will represent the borough later this month in , . HAZLET - Police are re- Trenton when the formation v e s t i n g help from residents of a statewide recreation In finding a car wanted in commission will be consid; connection with a hit and run ered. •ccident early Tuesday mornIng. -Patrolman Rudolph Cherney said the car, a light colored 1970 Chrysler with a dark SHREWSBURY TOWNt o p , apparently struck a parked vehicle owned by An- SHIP — There will be a Halfoa P. Boehler of 111 Tenth loween Parade, sponsored by the Woman's Club of Vail 'St., WestKeansburg. The impact pushed the Homes and the township, for Boehler car into, another children ages one through 12, owned by Frank Panzero, Sat., Oct. 31 at 3 p.m. time address. Both cars The parade will step off were parked in front of the from the corner of Crawford 10th St. House. St. and Barker Ave. and at Its Mr. Boehler told police he conclusion there will be a cosheard the crash shortly after tume contest with prizes. i a.m. and looked outside, spotting the car as it iped . Mrs. A.J. Garafola Jr. Is chairman of the committee. tway.

JHelp Sought In Locating Hit-Run Car

Parade Slated On Halloween

(TOY DEPT. )

VOICE CONTROL

KENNEDY AIRPORT

397 !!

** < -

REMCO

PREVIOUSLY SOLD FOR 10.44

SAVE

listen to tht control tower & greet air traffic by eltctro-phone commudkatiom. Complete with four Jet Air lines, Copteri, Hangars, Control Tower, and Poistnger Terminal. . •

YOUR CHOICE

• * * *

WASH N' WEAR

MONSTER

TINY TOT PAJAMA COSTUMES

HALLOWEEN COSTUMES

REG. 1.95 S. 1.96

Not just for Trick or Treat but, for sleeping, foo! Fluffy cotton flannel, flame retarclant. Style 1609. SIZE 3, 5, 6x

&>*

^ ' ^ :

k*m.

*$*

BY COLLECEVRLE

JOHNNY LIGHTNING

Reflecta-s'rte mask. Flame retarclant, safety approved rayons. Sized for comfort and fit. Style 3200x. SIZES SMALL-MEDIUM-LARCE

PREVIOUSLY SOLD FOR 2.39 Race with the fattest;

BY COOPER

^***J

SINGLE DRAG

SPORTS DEPT. (AUTOMOTIVE DEPT.)

r,wm %<.* *,

(

*z.

^ i

.* •*»T <

PHYSICAL FITNESS" SAVINGS!

!>**«, v**3

6-AMP BATTERY CHARGER JCEAflSBURG - The Plan aing Board's chairman, Mic h a e l Motichka, its vice chairman, Walter Roseman; and its secretary, Eugene Maura were elected to retain tjwir positions for another year.

Dr. Polk will be happy to answer questions on medical subjects. Letters may be addressed to him In care of The Dally Register, 105 C'»stn"' St., Red Bank, N.J. 07701. ,

SMS WDM

HEAVY-DUTY

Retain Top Officers

is a cure for "tennis elbow," even if it develops in-grand, ma from twisting too many j a r t o p s when canning peaches.

attachments and allowed to float free. They soon attach themselves to the bone at a point below the elbow, permanently relieving the pain of tennis elbow. Exactly why tennis elbow develops remains a mystery. But doctors do know how and in whom. Treatment for the condition Is satisfactory, even' if the exact details of its cause are unknown. So there

ments, even wonder drugs may not be helpful. So it is on to the final stage of the treatment, surgery. The object of surgery is io disconnect the wrist extensors from their attachments above the elbow. Because this can be done without serious side, effects, it is the final treatment of choice. At surgery, the wrist extensors are severed from their

1195

REG. 1S.95

For all 6 and 12-volt batteries. Super-grip, copper-plated, 50-omp clips. Automatic re-set circuit breaker and tapering charge prevents overcharging.

ifc*

*V1 EXERCISE

70-LB. VINYL

EXERCISE

BENCH

BARBELL SET

BIKE

88

88

BY ROBERTS Sturdy tubular iteel construction.

11-

17:97

JBL JBL n.«7 BY BILLARD

Interlocking plates. 4-ft. steel bar.

KEEP TRIM & FIT Exercise with a tension control bike.

(CAMERA PEPT.

DELUXE GLASS BEADED or SILVER LENTICULAR*

GAF ANSCOMATIC COLOR SLIDE PROJECTOR BRILLIANT 500-WATT ILLUMINATION

MODEL # 6 6 0 • Color corrected f3.5 lens • Easy single strong action • Self-contained case

TRIPOD SCREENS 30 x 40 GLASS BEADED. . . . . . 0.99 40 x 40 CLASS BEADED 8.90 30 x SO GLASS BEADED 12.99 •LENTICULAR FOR BRIGHTER SHARPER PICTURES EVEN IN DAYLIGHT. 40 x 40 LENTICULAR . 12.99 SO x 50 LENTICULAR lfl.99

LQ DELUXE BAIA SUPER " 8 "

MOVIE EDITOR PREVIEW & EDIT YOUR HOME MOVIES Easy slip-in loading. 5 - P v * 7 Complete with splicer. ^Tm DUAL MODEL Will accept both Super 8 and Regular A Q A 8 movies lor 2 systems in one. <7*%Fv7

MIDDLETOWN ROUTE35

OPEN DAILY 9.30 A.M. 'TIL 10 P.M. SUNDAY* 10 A.M. 'TIL 6 P.M.

•FOR M i l l MUWIB I T UW

10

-THE DAILY REGISTER, RED BANK • MIDDLETODPN, N. J.: THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1970

ATLANTIC

COMPLETE STOCK OF

BROADWAY SHOWS

CODE

CODE

CODE

"MUUTIPLE SETS MULTIPLY OUT" • WOODSTOCK • OLIVER • HAIR • EASY RIDER • FUNNY GIRL • HELLO DOLLY PLUS MANY-MANY MOM .

••«••„ .'..•.*.

FABRIC?

ITS "GAME" TIME •BATMNG TOPS

CORDUROY NO-WALE-THE VELVET LOOK!

STANDING WINS THE BATTLE

yard

WOOLENS

c LOCK RADIO

j"SPACE SAVER"

YARD

EACH • HANG • BUCK-fl-ROO ON HARVEY! 10AD BUCK-MOO TILL HE KICKS OIF THE

DON'T LET HARVEY FALL TO THE BOTTOM •

3.98

SELECTION OF MANY PRETTY COLORS, THE I0EAL SPORTSWEAR FABRIC.

PICES

FUN FUR-WATER REPELLENT EXCELLENT FOR COATS.JACKETS AND ETC

TERRY VEIOUR

MANYPRETTYSOLIDCOIORS AND STRIPES IN THE GROUP. THE FABRIC WITH A LUXURIOUS LOOK AND FEEL

THIN-IINESTYUNG FITS IN ANYWHERE, SOLIO STATE DESIGN. 4 " FRONTFIRED DYNAMIC SPEAKER. WOOD GRAIN FINISH O N POLY. STYRENE CABINET

I YD.

ANIMAL FUR

VINYL Reptile & Solid Color

AM TABLE RADIO

THE MEN'S WEAR FLANNEL

Off

WMETO

DON'T LOSE YOUR MARBLES YOU'LL WIN THE GAME

LAST TOP

LUXURIOUS QUALITY PILE CONSTRUCTED FOR LONG WEAR. SEASON'S NEW COLORS SAMPLE FOLDED FABRIC LENGTHS 4 5 " WIDE

»FM/AM

•WRESTLE AROUND

Reg.37?,

$098

SUPERAMA SERVICE CENTER Jumbo Plastic

LOCATED NEXT DOOR TO THE LIQUOR STORE

KNIVES or SCISSORS SHARPENED

7

PINKING SHEARS SHARPENED

13th ANNIVERSARY SALE

TRASH CAN

SWEEPSTAKES DRAWING • No Obligation. Enter as

w i t h

LIMIT cover ONE

Often as You Wish! Additional Entry Blanks at the 'Store. SUPERAMA and FOOD CITY EMPLOYEES AND THEIR FAMILIES, AND AIL MINORS ARE NOT ELIGIBLE)

ALL ALUMINUM Folding Clothes

TO THE LUCKY WINNER CHOICE OF ONE of

KEYS MAPI

WE REPAIR • TOASTERS • LAMPS • IRONS and ETC.

4-RCA or ZENITH COLOR IMPORTABLE TV S

YOU DO NOT NAVE TO BE PRESENT TO WIN

The Work Skipper!

PLASTIC COATED DOWELS REG. 5.97 LIMIT ONE

• SAT. OCT. 10 • SAT. OCT. 17 • SAT. OCT. 24 • SAT.0CT.31 THE LUCKY WINNER WILL BE DRAWN EACH SATURDAY at 9 P.M.

LEAVE THEM WHEN YOU COME SHOPPING AND PICK THEM UP WHEN LEAVING

HARMl,tl
DRYER

ONE TV GIVEN AWAY FOR 4 SATURDAYS DURING OUR ANNIVERSARY SALE

"MISS CLAIROL' Creme Formula

DUPONTLUCITE

LVlT Wall Paint

HAIR DYE1

WALL PAINT FORMULA 6 0 1 REALLY COVERS, BRUSH AND HOLIER MARKS EVEN OUT. DRIPLESS DRIES IN •30 MINUTES FULL LINE OF DECORATOR COLORS WHILE THEY LAST, WE RESERVE THC RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES -

1

DROP CLOTHS Buy One at 29 C AND

GET 2 FREE for

A

20 Oz. Bottle

n

Lotion

WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES

ATLANTIC

SHREWSBURY AVE. at RT. 35 •

c

STORE HOURS MON. thru SAT. 9 A.M. to 10 P.M. SUNDAYS 9 A.M. to t P.M.

Tablets A 7 Bottle of 100

W

UST89'

"MENNEN" DRY

ANTI-PERSPIRANT Spray Deodorant

NEW SHREWSBURY

usTi.65

"ANACIN"

After Shave

APPROX.9'X12'

Plastic

MOUTH WASH

MENNEN"

SKIN BRACER n OUR REG. LOW DISCOUNT PRICE 6.77

LIST 1.49

"LAVORIS'

UST 1.49

"SCHICK" ' Plus Platinum SUPER STAINLESS

STEELBIADES

master charge] 1

IKE INUN01NK CARD {

UST 1.09

/

UST79«

r

11

-THE DAILY REGISTER, RED BANK - MTODLETOWN, N. J.i THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1970 •

LOVE COLLARS

SALE of EARRINGS PIERCED

« •rnimwiorvirADi WIMNECKCHOCKtEi WITH ORNAMENTS

1

MILLINERY DEPT.

|

I Women's & Teens

SHAG SLIPPERS $100 teg. 1.79

SMSCMIIY

PRICED AT

SOFT HUSH ANDCOZY.AN AMAZING ARMY OF O0U3M. MDOED SOU AND

LADIES'SWEATERS -vaoie Front Cardigans • Pull-overs

1

Comp. Met $5.99

PAIR YOU'LL FIND ALL THE NEWEST SWEATER LOOKS HERE AT THIS GROOVY COLLECTION. AUTUMN SHAMSOAlORE,AUWAtHAME.

PRE-WINTER

KNITWEAR PARADE! HEAD INTO W I K i n IN OUR FAIUIOUS KNITWEAR Or ACRYLICS AND ACRYLIC • U K D S . MATCH Y O U ! HATS WITH YOUR MOOD. HIIMETS, BIDETS, STOCK AND TOQUES IN NOVELTIES, DESIONS, SOMDS AND HEADLINE COLORS.

WOMEN'S & TEENS

MEN'S PERMA-PRE5S

Better Mode

comp. price 5.99

Penny

GIRDLES

LOAFERS

Long Sleeve

KNIT SHIRTS

l f l f . U I SAKE OVER SOX

1

CLASSIC STYLING, SOFT COMFORTABLE UPPER*; AND TRKOT UNID, LONG WfARM8SOIESANDHEELS.

Reg. 2.96 each

$

2I 5 _

SFtCIAl IOTI BONDED ACRYLICS WITH • E l l kOTTOMS A U O NOVEITY DENIM JEANS. ASSORTED F A H SHADES I N MAIDS AND SOLID COlORS.SlZES * 1 . 1 6

LADIES' Quilted

DUSTERS

ACMUM OR POLYESTER AND COTTON KMT FABRICS. CHOOSE STMKS.

MEN'S MOM BUGGED JO IIS YfT NEVHB NEEDS IS ON ING 1OUGH COTION AND NV1ON BUNC WITH 'D-VNEi lOOi'i BOSFACKH) ArJO »["IN(OBi.FO 0- POIN'S 01 S'Pf'.S COIOR"' Sl'»l!:.{ ( , " I E \

,UST ARRIVEDI CHOICI OF MANY STYUS. IN THE NEW SEASON'S COLORS, EMBOIDIRY TRIMMINO. FUll CUT FOR COMFORT AND OUARANTEED WASHABLE. SUES SM ALlMEDWMANDLAROE.

SUFfRAMAml FOOD CITY EMPLOYEES AND THE* FAMILIES, AND A l l MINORS ARE NOT ELIGIBLE.

TO THE UJCKY WINNER CHOICE OFONE o.

4-RCA or ZENITH COLOR 18" PORTABLE TV

BOYS'

PAJAMAS

GIRLS'HOODED

DRAWINGS

Reg. $1.99

i BOYS'Si. KNIT SHIRTS 3^5°° $163

YOU DO NOT HAVE TO BE PRESENT TO WIN

• SAT. OCT. 10 • SAT.0CT.17 • SAT.0CT.24 • SAT.0CT.31 THE LUCKr WINNER WILL BE DRAWN EACHSMUHDAY XT 9 PM

JACKETS

100% COTTON PRINT SHELL — QUILTED LINING — ORION TRIM HOOD — ZIPPER FRONT — 2 POCKETS, PRETTY NEW PRINTS IN A N ASSORTMENT OF COLORS. SIZES 4 lo 14.

GIRLS' KNIT TOPS

-,',:W NOW!

romp pnci' 1 39 l U U - i i OUONKNIIS STRIPES AND SOIKJ COIOR', I O N I . ".lEtVrS CHOICE 01 IURIIF S l Y I t i SI7f. t TO 14

Sizes 8 to 18 A WIDE AND COLORFUL SELECTION OF T H I U T E S T I N LONO SLEEVC KNITS FOR EpYS I N COnON OR ACROAN. CHOOSE FROM HIOH CREWS, NOVELTIIS. TURTLE NECKS AND COLLAR MODIIS, ASSORTEO SOUOS AND COLORFUL STRIPES.

nOFORTIONIS tntttTHt, FRONT PANEL FOR TUMM1 CONTROL — SIDE PANELS FOR HIP AND THIGH CONTROL CHOICE OF WHITE AND C O U 0RS.Sin(SS-M4-XL

Sate!

ONE TV GIVEN AWAY fOR 4 SATURDAYS DURING OURANNIVHSART SAU

FLANNEL & SKI

* REO.STYU • PANTYSTYIB

$3 00

13th ANNIVERSARY SALE SWEEPSTAKES DRAWING • No Obligation Enter as Often as You Wishl Additional Entry Blanks at the Store.

A HANDSOME ASSOUMINT OF 1OYS' PAJAMAS. CHOOSE FROM 100% COTTON PUllOVIR, KNIT SKI MODEL OR FLANNEL BUTTON FRONT COAT MODEL ASSORTED COLORS. SIZES 8 toll

LADIES'

MISSES'SLACKS

Girls'Western ATLANTIC

SMRAMA SHREWSBURY AVE. at RT. 35 •

NfW SHREWSBURY

STORE HOURS M O N thru 'iAT 9 A . M . Is 1C P M SUNDAYS 9 A M . to 6 P.M.

"W*R«Mrve THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES

master charge

PANTS $199

comp. price 2 . 9 9 100% COTTON CORDUROY FLARE LEGS. IN THE NEW FASHION SOLID COLORS. FULLY CUT, STRONG AND DURABLE IN SIZES 7 to 14.

COMP.: PRICE

-THE DAILY REGISTER, RED BANK• MIDDLETCWN. N. I: THURSDAY, OCTOBER IS, 1970 -

Hawk in Danger; Wetlands Act Opponents Busy By WILLIAM F. SANDFORD » 0 n dear day you can see for miles from the top of Sunrise Mountain. We remembered that fact from a number of years ago, before a clear day became such a rarity. Saturday wasn't a good day for a hawk watch, even by to- and swept away into the mist day's standards. A stagnant below us in a matter of secair mass hung over the region onds. We count it a rare day and New York's air pollution now when we sec a peregrine index ranged from "poor" to (duck hawk in your book if "unhealthy." It wasn't much it's an older one), even on the better 50 miles to the north- ridges the hawks favor as a west of the city oh the Kitta- migratory route. tinny ridge in Sussex County. Big Hawk Not only was visibility poor, A rough-legged hawk, a big but the winds that create cur- member of the buteo group, rents on which the hawks like was the next to show. It glidto soar was absent. ed overhead in wide, lazy cirWe stared into a gaseous cles, drifting slowly southsolution of oxides — of lead w a r d . A turkey vulture and carbon and sulfur and the passed, circling down the valrest — which obscured all but ley below so that we looked the nearest adjacent hills, down on it. Then another little expecting much action. went by, well overhead, glidWe were almost immediately ing in a bee-line parallel with surprised. A peregrine falcon the ridge. — fastest a-wing of all our That was it. We watched for birds, one of the most impres- a n o t h e r half-hour without sive and rapidly becoming seeing anotfier hawk. one of the rarest •*- dived out On a good day, almost any of the veil of gloom to the of the Appalachian ridges will north in a majestic swoop, produce more birds of prey banked gracefully overhead than we ordinarily would see

Outdoor World

at the Shore in a year. One of t h e better local vantage points is the Hawk Mountain Sanctuary at Kempton, Pa. Kempton isn't on most road maps, but is near Allenlown. The Monmouth Nature Club's next field trip will be to the sanctuary on Oct. 24. Next Wednesday night, the club will have an illustrated talk on "The Decline of the Peregrine Falcon," a subject of top current concern among ecologists, by a man who has done a lot of original research into the problem. Stanley A. Temple, of the Cornell University Laboratory of Ornithology, the speaker, studied the effect of pesticides on peregrines and gyrfalcons in Alaska in 1967-68, the ecology of t h e merlin in Newfoundland in 1969, and pesticide effects on the peregrine on the Yukon River, Alaska, this year. • «

Mr. Temple has written Protection power to regulate some interesting reports on development of lands below a his work. The decline of the level one foot above extreme peregrine population, world* high tide. It's a vital measure wide, has been alarmingly ra- aimed at protecting estuarine pid in recent years, and the and other shorefront lands so important to the marine and speaker's findings will be of upland ecologies. So much of major/interest to local birders this land already has been deand conservationists. stroyed that what remains is Wetlands BUI close to the critical minimum. As long as there's a buck to Basis of the opposition is be made in resource exploitation, the price of envi- the desire of developers to acronment protection is going to quire these lands, of the ownbe" eternal vigilance. ers (some with rather flimsy That Wetlands Act which land titles) to sell them, and cleared the state legislature of some municipalities to put Sept. 14 to the cheers of con- them on the tax rolls. It's a servationists isn't home free contest of private and municiyet. Gov. William T. Cahill, pal rights vs. the general welwho fortunately is very much fare of mankind, and a victoon our side, still has to sign it. ry for the former here could And the governor is under be calamitous. heavy pressure from special Sen. William T. Hiering, an interest groups to sidetrack Ocean County attorney who it. long has championed the deThe act would give the De- veloper's cause, and whose partment of Environmental effort to amend the con-

Steinbach Schedules UN Week Programs ASBURY PARK - The Steinbach Company, celebra. ting its centennial this year, will wish the United Nations a "happy 25th birthday" in a Salute to the UN in all five stores. Displays of arts and crafts from many countries, exhibitions or exotic dances and the art of Ikebana, cooking, dem. onstrations of foreign dishes, and distribution of information about the UN are a few of the events scheduled. A major goal will be the formation of chapters of the United Nations Association, the educational and public relations affiliate of the UN, in all areas where Steinbach has stores. To this end, a UNA booth will be set up in all

stitutional guaranty of state title to tidelands was termed by former Gov. Richard J. Hughes a "billion-dollar giveaway" effort, is again a prime mover against the Tidelands Act. Gov. Cahill said he will, in fairness, hear opponents' arguments. These include a charge the bill's wording is vague, although Massachusetts ' and Connecticut have found the same wording acceptable.

Gloucester — have not been spelled out. Our message to Gov. Cahill should be that we feel that any weakening of the act — any lowering of the

MARIMtVIIW SAVINGS

Aides to the governor say he will weigh the special int e r e s t g r o u p pressures against those of the public. Citizen response to the bill has been heavily in favor of it. We can't afford to let up now. At this writing, amendments to be offered by Sen. Hiering and his backers — Sen. Robert E. Kay, R-Cape May, and Assemblyman Kenneth A. Black Jr., R-Salem-

"Gives you more for your MONEY"

NOW

•Providing a $50 balance b malntatmd mtil quwttr

dnchor Your Savings to , . . aid LOAN ASSOCIATION MIDDLETOWN 671-2400

ATI. HIGHLANDS 291-0100

WHIRLPOOL WASHER

"The Steinbadi Company is taking this opportunity of recognizing the wonderful work that the United Nations does toward establishing international peace and cooperation," said Mr. Michael Slovak, president.

• 2 agitation, 2 spin ipood lelectfon • 3-cyclt Hlecrtoni

* .

• 24" wide • Parmaitont P r t u Cyelt

"We feel that it Is very important that every one of us support the work of the UN and the precepts it is emphasizing on its 25th anniversary, 'peace, justice, and progress.1 "

WHIRLPOOL DRYER . T. REFRIGERATOR

10 CU. FT. UPRIGHT

• 5 drying cyclec

3*i |BMl«ctioni •Sptdol cool down car* lor parmomnt pr.ti

FREEZER

tour money works harder foryou...everyday

Holds 352 lbs. • Many Conveniinn f loturn

Rtnlar

SSBOOK SAVINGS PASSl Interest paid from Day of Deposit to Diy of Withdrawal, compounded and paid quarterly.

.

On O n « Year, automatically

5 5

rtnwabl* CERTIFICATES Of DEPOSIT available In a $1,000 minimum amount and

PORTABLE

B&WTV

COLORTV

multiples of $100 thereafter. Pays a 5.55fy yield tor the year.

'269

On Two Y e a r , automatically rtniwablt CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT Interest compounded daily. Ceitilicates

5.9% for onn Year

PHILCO

FAMOUS NAME 18" PORTABLE

Interest compounded daily. Certificates

Yield

available in a $1,000 minimum amount and

CONSOLE

multiples of $100 thereafter. Pays a 5.9% yield for one year.

For Information ask any of the First Merchants people in our 15. convenient community offices.

COLOR TV

i ALL WOOD 2 3 " COLOR

ONE \STORt MCIAL

CONSOLE TV

Highest Interest allowed by law PHILCO 4-PIECE FM STEREO FM/AM RECEIVER, RECORD CHANGER & AIR-SUSPENSION SPEAKERS ^ • 20 WATTS • Wood Finith Cabinets ,

with Solid Start Signal

J ONLY

CONVENIENT MONTHLY PAYMENTS FINANCE WHERE YOU BUY

OMR Nn master charge. lec
ATLANTIC APPLIANCE SELLS ONLY NATIONALLY ADVERTISED BRANDS

*

SAVE WITH ATLANTIC'S CARRY OUT/DELIVERY OPTIONAL PLAN

?J ALL STORES OPEN DAILY 9:30 TO 9 : 3 0 * SAT. TILL 7 • SUNDAYS AS NOTED

IS CONVENIENT COMMUNITY OFFICES Head Offici: S01 Mattison Ave., Albury Park Asbury Park • North Asbury • West Asbury • Avon • •

. . . Earnings Poid From Day of Deposlr to Day of Withdrawal On All Rtgutar, Passbook Savings Accounts*

WASHER-DRYER

stores next week to recruit members. The UN Salute will culminate Oct. 31 in a Halloween party and costume parade for children in the Asbury Park store.

First Merchants Now Pays Higher Interest

Yield' 5.65% for tha Year

bars to wetlands development . before the ecological effect of such development has been expertly assessed - is Inimical to the public welfare.'

Brielle • Colts Neck • Eatontown • Fair Haven Holmdtl • Manalapan • Manasquan • Millstone • Neptune • Red Bank • Upper Freehold Member Federal Reserve System Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

ASBURYPARK

BRICK TOWN

EATONTOWN

715 Main St. 775-9516 1015 Main SI. 775-9750

In Brick Plaza Route 70 477-9707 Open Sun. 11-5

In Bradloes Route 35 & Ejtontown Circle 542-9597

HA2LET In B r a d U o s Route 36 itPooleAvt. 264-9721

FAIR LAWK

PATERSOK

35-02 Route 4

199 Market St. 274-6282

797-9882

HOWELL

MIDOLETOWH

NEW

NEPTUNE

TOMS RIVER

Route 9 ' AldrichRd. 363-9421

1833 Route 35 $71-9836

SHREWSBURY

716 Route 35 776-9733

Roiit(37iRouti$ 349-9I6S OpanSus. 11-5

|

In Sunemm J Shrewsbury Avt. 542-9132 • „

iomsihicis Mir OF

mmmc

LINCROFT (42-4409

mi.

THE MJJ.Y REGISTER; RED BANK • MiDDLETOWN, N. J,:

Long Branch Renewal Aired ByALHOftAY LONG BRANCH - A plan to upgrade two city areas as a kiekoK to a major city rede, velopment program was aired at a special City Council cession last night. Initiation of the program calls for a state graiit of from $75,000! to ?10O,O00, ft was said. The; start of-'the renewal plan would \ipgrade an area from McClellan St. to the Monmbuth Beach boundary line arid a smaller section of the city in the Willow Ave.Jeffrey St. portion of the community'. . , Aside from the application for state funds to finance the program, according to Samuel Penza, a representative of the sta,te Department of Com. mtmity Affairs, the city must hold a/i election'^ to najtne' a panel to administer the pr'ogram

'-Election Needed It was said .last night that members of a Community Development Board must be elected Within four .months pf

the date of a state grant being approved. Mayor Henry R. Cioffi and City Council members have approved a move to have the Wonmouth Community Action Program Inc. monitor the election. All community development proposals, according to the initial plan; must be sanctioned by the CDB and approved by the governing body. Should the city receive the requested grant of $75,000 to $1(10,000, it was said, the salaries and administrative costs w.oujd consume about 527,000. Staff Requirements A project description caUsr1 for a four-member staff/a survey to support subsequent planning, the formation of a citizens participation ctructiire, the initiation of a workable planning process, prepa. ration of high-priority action projects and the development of'a follow-up six-month community development proposal. Paul Turf, a representative of SYNETICS, Trenton, a

firm employed by the city to seek federal and state funds needed for local "programs, said last night the program calls for "city involvement."

He called on local residents to "give us your ideas." City Council President Wilbert C. Russell added: "This is a preliminary draft." He

13

THURSDAY, OCTOBER. 15, 1970

ALL ROADS LEAD T O . . .

said that appropriate changes could be made. "We are committed to upgrade the city,'1 he said. "Let's get togetJier and do the job."

Officials Would Query THE NEWEST Nixon About Fort's Fate OF THE GREAT LONG BRANCH - A plan by Councilman Samuel Teicher and Mayor Henry E. Cioffi to get an answer from President Richard Nixon on the fate of the U.S. Army Signal School, Ft, Monmouth, was unknowingly thwarted by John Gallagher, chairman of tiie N.J. Highway Authority. Mr. Teicher told City Council he favors asking county freeholders to set up a meeting with the President on his planned arrival at the Garden State Arts Center,

move. He said the President's Holmdel, Saturday. Mr. Gallagher ruled that the visit here could help resolve Arts Center may not be used "the question of Russian roufor political purposes. His lette the authorities seek to ruling apparently precludes play" with the lives of area the nation's President from residents. making an appearance in the City Council also introcounty's most modern facility. duced a code which But now that the President , would allow Hie mayor or city will be in Ocean Grove on administrator to impose a Saturday, the possibility has curfew when it is decided that an emergency condition could come up again. In sponsoring the move Mr. arise in the city. Teicher said it "would be a T h e move followed a good time to ask" about the request by Charles Hughes, fate of the Army's school. 268 Florence Ave., for cityMayor Cioffi supported the sponsored activities to create an outlet for local youths who would take part in acts of vandalism during the coining Holloween celebration. "Last year," Mr.. Hughes said, "the Halloween parade was cancelled' due to vandalism." He called for preventive measures to halt a repeat of last year's situation. Mr. Russell told the.gathering that Councilman George P. Hoffman has been working with the city Exchange Club and with high school students in an effort to schedule youth activities for the mischief season. Thus far, it was said, costume judging has been set for elementary school students and pre-game activities are being arranged for the high school stadium prior to the Long Branch High School football game with Ocean Township High School Council also received a garbage collection bid from M. and T. DeLisa, Inc., New Shrewsbury, for a year's contract at $298,000. The offer, which was held for study, would increase the collection costs over the present pact by $34,000. An ordinance to prohibit parking on the west side of Second Ave. between Pavilion and Dunbar Aves. was introduced at last night's session. The measure now goes to the state Highway Department for its approval before its adoption here. Council also adopted a resolution expressing its opposition to the state Public Utilities Commission of an application by N.J. Bell Telephone Co. to hike its rates in the

r-^

BONANZA

TICEHURST

MHM H»f

SIPERSTEIN'S

SlPtRSTBHS

PAINT STORE No.

EARLE M A W

ROA.O

RT. 35, MIDDLETOWN

LAST 10 DAYS! We just dropped the price of a good night'ssleep

It 3

REFRIGERATOR ENAMEL

VINYL LATEX

VINYL ADORN

M I I • ytllawliq. Holds I h color and cn.-jn well. Rig. S.75 Gal.

Latex b « t Interior wall point. Non-to«lc. Whltt ond colon.

2

$025

On* coat coven. Modi In alhyd Mml.gloii. Whit* and all colors.

"TILLY-

HEAVY DUTY ALUMINUM EXTENSION

•(*;

state.

Jury Awards $5,500 Verdict

\ '«i

Seoly FirmGul REDJJCED IN ALL SIZES! Thinking about a new" inatffess? Now'sthe time to buy it! The only time you'Ji:have achance to save on the same luxury value formerly advertised at much more! Identical features: deep jjuilted'decoratbr cover. Puffy Dura-Lux* cushioning. Heavy jgauge innerspring unit plus exclusive extra firm foundation 'in the'matched' set. Hurry-limited time sale!

WAS ADVERTISED AT $79.95

NOW JUST THIS ONCE

R e c o r d s Bestowal S e t K U A L A LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — Britain will give Malaysia's national archives the personal records of Sir Thomas Stamford Binsley Raffles, a pioneer of this region who secured Singapore for the East Indian Company in 1819, the government announced.

SAVE570 " on King Size 3-pc.set $249.95

SAVE $50 on Queen Size 2-pc.set .$169.95 \ ;

•cotton and ortflwnt fown. .,

FOR A GREAT MGH I S SLEEP SLALY POSTUREPEDIC ml siippiiii.

"V

hi. in1, from

OPEN WEDNESDAY and FRIDAY 'TIL 9 P.M.

ACME FURNITURE

137 MONMOUTH ST. \V



747-2104

FREEHOLD - After a twoday trial before Superior Court Judge Clarkson S. Fisher, a jury yesterday brought in a unanimous $5,500 verdict for a Keyport motorist injured in a five-car accident In Hazlet March 1,1969. The verdict was in favor of Edward J. Ferguson, 6 Warren St., Keyport and against Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Hussey of Laurence Harbor. Complaints against the other drivers were dismissed. Mr. Ferguson was driving his car north on Middle Road and Mr. Hussey was driving his wife's car west on Rt. 36 when the accident occurred. Mr. Ferguson sustained multiple injuries in the crash. John C. Givens of Red Bank represented the plaintiff and H. Frank Carpentier of Asbury Pspk represented the defendant.



RED BANK

CUB TACK 227 BELFORD - Cub Scout Pack 227, sponsored by Belf o r d U n i t e d Methodist Church, held a scavenger hunt at its first meeting of the season. Winners were Daniel Colson, first place; William Fergcrson, second, and Robert Oberle and John Meyers, third. An award will be presented to the pack for its summer activities, which included n family outing in June and trips to Allaire State Park and Pennsylvania in July and August, respectively. A Halloween costume party will highlight the next, pacic meeting, Wednesday,- Oct. 21, in the church hall.

Slptrtttln'i lavis you mart 01) Hil» famous mohir « • tin 1 Ion loddir with un wrlMr's guarontn . . modi • I litavy duty elumlnumi MoturM rubber ihoii, (lot rung.

SUPREME PORCH & DECK ENAMEL For Interior and Mttrior hollh woodwork ond floors. All colors.

$095

Rig. S.50 Gal.

Siies 20 FOOT 24 FOOT 28 FOOT 32 FOOT 36 FOOT 40 FOOT

J

For ihort, l o l l ond dry uiogi. W « h tlii bru.li In water. White only.

I

gait..

SPECIALLY COATEb

$050 CANVAS L DROPCLOTHS PITTSBURGH PURE

$

2

CAULKING CARTRIDGE White or Gray UGL Brand

JOINT CEMENT $C50

ROLLER

4 Tubes

Price 20.95 25.95 32.95 39.95 49.95 56.95

Cictllonf oarorlor trim for wlndowi, franwi, doo[» and rolllngi. Whit, ojd colon.

NEW NALPLEX

WECARRYAFULIUWEOF • DUTCH BOY* IMPERIAL • DEVOE • PITTSBURGH PAINTS

Hog- « • « Gal.

LINSEED OIL

List 50.50 62.75 75.50 89.00 123.00 138.00

l i l l y " Aluminum Stepladders 4'Size 9.85 5' Size 10.85 6' Size 11.85 7' Size 18.85 ft' Size 20.95

SIPGARD

Ml

TRIM AND SHUTTER

Lowest Prices on All Ladders

$100

KINS SIZE 1303

SPRAY All Colors Non Toxic

CAULKING GUNS

60'

69

fl«t will finish Available in 1000 Colon

r

PAN

and

ROLLER 9" ROLLER _

A f

REFILLS S1 f l ( 2 for* "

TURPENTINE 700

PURE GUM

Gal.

BARRETT'S CLOSING OUT 69 PATTERNS All First Quality

VINYL WALL CLOTH

R O II

ROOF COATING and ROOF CEMENT 75

2

LONG BRANCH RT. 35 NEW 128 Broadway MIDDLETOWN BRUNSWICK 222-6384 842-6000 99 Albany Ave.

14-

-THE DAILY REGISTER, E£D BAKK • M1DDLETWN, N. J.i THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1970

to Speak At Tepper Home

Bond Dinner To Feature Joey Adams

SEAL — Attorney, author Jewish people, and was forand American-Jewish commumerly editor of The Ndw Panal leader Eleazar Lipsky lestine. will speak at an Israel bond He has followed in the trareception given by Mr. and dition of his father, the late Mrs. Solomon Topper TuesLouis Lipsky, who was one of day at their home at 36 the founders of the Zionist Roosevelt Ave. movement in America and a dramatist and essayist. The reception, whie' is for supporters of Israel in the Mr. Lipsky has written a Long Branch area, is in adseries of novels, one of which, vance of the annual bond din"The Scientists," was a Book ner on Sunday, Nov. 1, at of the Month Club selection. Harbor Island Spa. Other novels, "The Kiss of Mr. Lipsky has combined Deatlj" and "The People oareer as lawyer and author Against O'Hara," were made with service in many Jewish into motion pictures starring causes. He is former presiRichard Widmark and Spen. dent and now chairman of the ccr Tracy, respectively. A board of directors of the Jew. forthcoming historical novel ish Telegraphic Agency, a . published by The Meredith worldwide, service covering Press, "The Devil's Daughnews of Jewish interest. ter." Vice president of the Amcri. Mr. Lipsky practices law In can Jewish League for Israel, New York City. He was forMr. Lipsky has attended the merly an assistant district atWorld Zionist Congresses in torney for New York County Jerusalem in recent years attached to the Homicide Bu. and is a member of the World reau. He is a graduate of Co. Zionist Congress Court. Iumbia College and Columbia He has lectured extensively Law School. on a variety of legal and political topics concerning the

LONG BRANCH - Joey Adams, television and radio slar, will appear at the Israel bond dinner at the Harbor Island Spa honoring Solomon Tepper Sunday, Nov. 1.

Bar Mitzvah For Greenberg

FENCING? PHONE

WARDS • • • • •

6«f lewar prices Larg* itlectiont Fintil matariali Frt* •itimatti Addtd hamt volut

542-2150

IUJMSON - Caleb Spencer Greenberg, son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Greenberg, will be called to the'Torah at Congregation B'nai Israel Saturday and will chant a prophetic portion in honor of the occasion. He is in the eighth grade of the Long Branch Junior High School,- and a graduate of the B ' n a i Israel Elementary School. His interest is concentrated in the area of music. He plays bass clarinet, clarinet, alto sax, tenor sax, baritone sax. He is an active participant in the Long Branch High School marching band.

Mr. Tepper is being honored for service to the Long Branch community, to Jewry and to the state of Israel. He will receive Israel's "Jerusalem — City of Peace" Award for his efforts in behalf of the upbuilding of Israel. Adams is a world traveler who has been a "good will ambassador" to many countries. He has starred in Broadway shows, including "Guys and Dolls" and "The Gazebo," and In a number of motion pictures, such as "Ringside" and "Singing In the Dark."

Miss Mendelson Is Bat Mitzvah RUMSON - Susan Beth Mendelson, daughter of Mr, and Mrs. Sidney Mendelson, will celebrate her Bat Mitzvah tomorrow evening at Congregation B'nai Israel and will chant a prophetic portion. She Is in the eighth grade of the Markham Place School in Little Silver, and. the B'nai IsraelHighSchoorWWiinHe. brew School, Susan received awards for Junior Congrega. t i o n Attendance, Hebrew School Attendance, Hazaan award, and academic honors being named to the rabbis list. Her hobbies include tennis, swimming and playing the piano. She is a member of the Girl Scouts, Pre USY Girls Club and School Chorus.

Marlboro Sets

Costume Party

MArtLBORO - The township Recreation Commission is sponsoring a Halloween party Saturday, Oct. 31, between 1 and 5:30 p.m. at the C e n t r a l and Robertsville Schools.

party, prizes for the best costumes and live entertainment. A film will be shown from 2 to 3:30 p.m. at the Central School and 4 to 5:30 p.m. at the Robertsville School.

There will he a masquerade

The program is for school aged children.

POOL

With County Service Personnel U.S. Air Force Airman l.C Joel Bendar, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bendar of 9 Hosford Ave., Leonardo, is helping overcome a "feasibility gap" in the training of Republic of Vietnam Air Force (VNAF) personnel for specif. ic Air Force duties. He is assigned at the VNAF center as an instructor at the English language school.

ic Air Forces. He previously served at McGuire AFB and is a 1968 graduate of RumsonFair Haven Regional High School.

Airman Guy S. Regan, son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. Regan of 9 Carlile Ter., Little Silver, has received his first U.S. Air Force duty assignment after completing basic

training at Lackland AFB, Tex. The airman has been assigned to a unit of the Strategic Air Command at Dyess AFB, Tex., for training and

duty in the civil engineering structural ' and pavements field. Airman Regan is a 1970 graduate of Red Bank. High School.

Airman Bendar previously served at Lackland AFB, Tex. A 1963 graduate of Mid. d 1 e t o w n Township High School, he received his B.S. degree in 1968 from Monmouth College, West Long Branch. Airman Gary L. Uhichello, son of Mr. and. Mrs. Glen R. Whichello of 15 Wyandotte Ave., Oceariport, has received his first U.S. Air Force duty assignment after completing basic training at Lackland Air Force Base, Tex. The airman has been assigned to a unit of the Strategic Air Comm a n d at Westover AFB, Mass., for training and duty in the civil engineering structural and pavements field. Airman Whichello is a 1970 graduate of Shore Regional H i g h School, West Long Branch.

The really RARE SCOTCH that earned its reputation...

' A i r m a n l.C. Frank A. Scalzo, son of Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Scalzo of 53 Washington St., Rumson, is on duty at Phan Rang Air Base, Viet, nam. Airman Scalzo is an inventory management specialist with the 35th Supply Squadron, a unit of the Pacif.

You can invest in a sure thingwith a Savings Account at The Howard JUST SEE WHAT HAPPENED TO THESE $100 INVESTMENTS STARTED IN SEPTEMBER, 1969 Howard Savings Account

HOWARD SAVINGS ACCOUNT

Corporate Bonds

•COVER

( A M Standard and Poor's Index)

CORPORATE BONDS

Corporate Stocks (Common—N.Y. Stock ExchangeIndex) •Doei not Includt d M « M f i or inltrttt.

COLD WEATHER COMING SOON...TIME-TO

WINTERIZE YOUR ABOVE GROUND OR IN-THE-GROUND

POOL I I I I 1 I 1 I I I

Invest without worry, without risk. The chart above shows how much better off you were with a Howard savings account during the past 12 months than other types of investments. At The Howard, your money fs safe-it earns dividends-and is always available. Your account is insured up to $20,000 by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. Moreover, The Howard has an enviable record for security—in all our 113-year history, no depositor has ever lost a dollar of the funds entrusted to us.

Hie

HOWARD SAVINGS Sn6titution

D

Route 9, South Amboy

I/XMOND

'. i mile south of Snyre Woods Shop. Ctr.-72l-5588 Route 35, Midd/etown A&P Chapel Hill Shop Ctt. }'.! miles north of Bridge 747-4940

Route 88, Lakewood = .

:

i 7 S" • = J. ;' =T~- x£ :

'.• mile west of Gatdmt State Parkway 364-8383

Chartered 1857* More than 380,000 Depositors ASSETS IN EXCESS OF $980,000,000 HEAD OFFICE: 768 Broad Street, Newark, N. J . : BRANCHES in Newark, South Orange, North Caldwell, Irvington, East Orange, North Arlington and Nutley .„_..,. Imurad by Iht Ftfftral Dapotlt Iniuranoa Corporation

EARN

6

%

A YEAR

EARN

5

%

A YEAR

on 2-Year TIME SAVINGS ACCOUNTS, or 5%% ayearon 1-Year accounts. Daily Compounding. Dividends Payable Quarterly. Interest guaranteed when held to maturity; minimum account $500; subject to regulations of supervisory authorities. on REGULAR SAVINGS ACCOUNTS. Daily Compounding. Dividends Payable Monthly from Day of Deposit to Day of Withdrawal providing a minimum balance of $10 remains on deposit to the Ist.of each month when divi: dends are credited.

THE HOWARD SAVINQS INSTITUTION > P.O. BOX 400, Newark, N. J. 07101 I enclose $

($8O0 minimum) for aTime Savings AecounL

• 6% a year guaranteed (or 2 years. • 5% % a year guaranteed (or 1 year. I enclose $ D Individual D Joint Account with

O Trust Account (or

to open a 5% a year Savings Account as checked:

•TOE DAILY REGISTER, RED BANK. MIDDLETOWN, N. J.i THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1970 .

Highlands Eyes

HIGHLANDS f- Seriously :-'concerned with a growing number of students next year, the Board of. Education has .called for a study on building requirements from the building and grounds committee. "

Meeting last night, the board acknowledged that the classroom shortage here is

acute as enrollment figures vas of the borough to detercontinue to climb. ' mine the projected enrollment There are 402 students in for Sept., 1071. the elementary school this Presently the school has 13 year as compared with 351 last year, Principal Donald classrooms for 15 classes — the fourth grade is on split Shanks explained. session — and Mr. Shanks He said that he is now said at least 17 classes will be awaiting the results of a Par- needed next September "or ent-Teacher Association can- else there will be six to eiEht

Steak a EBri

Middletown

429 State Highway35 Cat Chapel Hill Road)

The Greatest Eating & Drinking Public House Ever

PLUS A BONELESS SIRLOIN STEAK

'3.95 Aii for jut'4.95 12

OSB.

.

X«3 oae.

j%jxno rvxtAacet

XQVP

Axod

FilfltMignonS4.fiB or Lobster Tails $4.95 ' or Steak & lobster Tail $4.95 or Beef Brochette $3.50

»Buy Beer By Tbe Pitcher For Only 75^ A complete selection of Stronger Spirits is available

15

ins School classes on split session," he (he instruments and the tight warned. school budget will not allow Mr. Shanks also pointed to expenditures for them. MIDDLETOWN -The Oak the 120 borough children who The fire chief's wife doattend Our Lady of Perpetual nated a $200 trombone to the Hill Association has come to Help Catholic grade school. school, which was gratefully the support of the Poricy Park Citizens Committee with Those students may be thrust accepted last night. a letter to the Township Cominto the public school as rumittee and a cash contribumors continue of the impendtion toward PPCC purchase ing close ^of the parochial of the 14-acre Cotton tract in school because of lack of the Poricy basin. funds. Mrs. Robert Reid,' trustee The board has been eyeing and president of the Oak Hill a building program for sevAssociation Women's Club, eral years, but has been reread the letter at last night's luctant to impose more taxes MIDDLETOWN - The meeting of the township comon the residents, who this township school district is a year are paying a $5.12 tax participant in the National mittee. rate. "The Oak Hill Association, School Lunch Program, which "I assume we will go to ref- provid'-- *ree or reduced- representing approximately erendum with this," Presi- pric s for all pupils 625 families in Middletown, dent Steward King said. "The whr le to pay the full has come here tonight to endorse the Poricy Park Citipeople have to understand Ium zens Committee efforts to prethat while ratables don't inThe piogram is in effect at serve the undeveloped land crease, kids do." Middletown Township High Mr. Shanks explained that School and Thompson, Thorne surrounding Poricy Brook. the program should be in- and Bayshore Junior High Our association believed that itiated soon because of the 12 Schools. Elementary schools immediate action.. will help per cent annual increase in are not included because Df provide much needed open building costs. He estimated the lack of facilities for space and slow down the excessive rate of housing conthat constuction would cost serving lunch. struction in Middletown. $25 to $30 per square foot. The "A" lunch, featuring "The Oak Hill Association Last year, as the board dis- hot and cold platters and bag is backing its endorsement cussed a possible expansion, lunches, is available at no with a contribution . . . by so six rooms and a library were cost or half-price to children doing, we hope to encourage considered^ The addition whose families fall within the other civic organizations and would be constructed on the income scale set by the pro- individual citizens- in the north side of the present two gram or receive public assis- township to contribute to this tance. story-building. important and worthy cause. B o a r d member Edward A family of four whose "We also hope, by our conDoyle requested and received yearly income is less than tribution, to demonstrate to permission from the board to $4,760 may apply for the pro- the Township Committee that work with Fire Chief Wade gram, as may a family of 10 the citizens are very conDavis in soliciting help from with an income not exceeding cerned about the issues of area organizations for musi- $8,039. Also eligible are fam- planning and conserving our cal instruments. ilies which do not fall strictly natural areas. We shall reThe school is critically w i t h i n established -income gard the township acquisition short of instruments, Mr. brackets, but who are victims of the Poricy area . . . as inShanks explained. He said of seasonal employment, fam- dicating a new, positive direcchildren in many cases can't ily death or illness, or tem- tion in the future planning of afford to pay rental fees for porary disability. our township."

By Oak Hill

Middletown Is inLunch ram

SEGAWS 198 Broadway/Long Branch

GOING OUT OF BUSINESS TREMENDOUS REDUCTIONS ON EVERY ITEM SUITS

KNIT SHIRTS

SPORTCOATS

BELL BOTTOMS

OVERCOATS

BODY SHIRTS

RAINCOATS

REGULAR SHIRTS

TOPCOATS

OUTERWEAR

SLACKS

FORMAL WEAR

SAVE FROM

50% t. 7 4 * ON EVERY ITEM Advertise in The Daily Register

HALF PRICE (& BIRCH BEER) FOR CHILDREN UNDER 3 2

WHAT DO YOU WEAR? ANYTHING! ' O p e n 4:SO 3P.JH. Mon-Sllt; B u n f r o m X 3P.3MC

Steak E-Breiu

STORE HOURS: Mon., Wed., Fri. 9 A.M. to 9 P.M., Tues., Thurs.. Sat. 9 A.M. to 6 P.M.

Come to o u r . . . wonderland of

AN ENGLISH EATING & DRINKING PUB also in Ft. Lee: 2133 Jbemoine Ave. West Orange: 464 Eagle Rook Ave. .

unpainted furniture

n...«lumm ww or MOB, root M I DCITEMHT. uni uuun, r«wiaT; tun ins, nmrnt wt-WBiODrr

I h t country charm of Early American Is evident In

SALE ENDS WED., OCT. 21st

• v t r y ont o f t h e n fint crafted rtady>to» finish t r t g i u n i l

RUSTIC PINE RICH WOODS THAT ARE SMOOTHLY SANDED, READY-TO-FINISH

IPOOL iTABL

Sale Priced CORNER CUPBOARD originally $89.95 SALE 5' TRESTLE TABLE

The Yonkers

originally $49.95 SALE CAPTAIN'S CHAIR originally $19.95 SALE MATE'S CHAIR originally $14.95 SALE 5' DEACON BENCH originally $39.95 SALE

$79.95 $49.95 S18.50 $11.95 $37.95

and many other Early American ' pieces an display to choose from

I! The Aqueduct

jThe New Orleans

3 Best Sellers Nere...Dozens More, Sale Priced in the Store!

8 FT. POOL TABLE

BOUNCE I • POOL TABLE -I

99

I I

Hp

SPECIALLY PRICED FOR THIS SALE

SIZES & DESCRIPTION OF ITEMS SHOWN

Aho Available . . •

THE AQUEDUCT

Reg. 129.99 SAVE $30

Reg. 249.99 SAVE $50

Solid cor* W Slallt* pitying surface. Wool blUlard cloth, walnut Duupantl blt A l I l d d cabinet. Accmorlti Includid,

Solid cor* TT Slatlta b«d withhaxclmlv* cmlv l l Ltl G Mlcromatlc Lavitlnf. Gum rubbtt euihIons. Stindird aecMtorlta Includid.

TRESTLE BENCHES 60" 72" ~

1 8 FT. DELUXE SLATE POOL TABLE THE NEW ORLEANS

i



4AA

a

I/XMOND

Route S, South Amboy mile south of Sayre mt Woods Shop. Ctt. 721-5598 •

Route 35, Mlddletotin



A&P Chapel Hill Shop.

.

Ctr. VA miles north of

Navasink Bridge 747-4940 Route 88, Lakewood

*-•=

...

$26.95

I f •

Vi mile west of Garden

I

State Parkway 364-83B3

_

Complete m »lvoum,

STEUART HUTCH TOP, 45x58x12" STEUART HUTCH BASE, 33x60x17"

Steuart Hutch, Base and Top

TRESTLE TAILE, Thick Top, 30x60x33" alto available In 30x72x33" $55.95 DEACON BENCH, 4 8 " Slxe $27.95

$

CORNER CUPBOARD with (MASS DOORS 84 high by 34 wide by 19 deep

Come See Our Large Selection of Over 50 Desks on Display and Sale Priced.

Full 4 ft. by 8 It. slit, fiaturinf r>l«vy duty construction and l i f t . S" mica rail 3 pc. 7 / 1 " rnatchtd and fltt«d Italian alati b*tf. Complalatly color coordlnattd. All standard iccsisoriu an Included In this low prlca.

,

$23.95

Shop Early While Supplies Last

349.99 SAVE $150

V7T

HUTCH BASE and TOP*

K CM1

199"

THE YONKERS

I

Charge

Come See . . . The Largest Display of Unpainted Furniture at the Shore.

1121 HIGHWAY 35, WANAMASSA (Between Asbury Park and Eatontown Circles)

Phone 774-3456

P r l u i « » Coih I Corry. Our cturtttui «m»l«ru will ksd, prclKt «nd tK ywr purchoit, Small dtpoilt mil hold your purchoM.

16

-THE DAILY REGISTER, RED BANK - MIDDLETOWN, N. J.: THURSfl'AY, OCTOBER 15,1970 •

VI SHAVED PRICES at BECKER

HARDWARE

APPLIANCE BONANZA

SAVE T WINTER GREEN

SAVE on TOOLS

Now i t the time to give your lawn that second -fall feeding. Winter Green will keep your fawn green this -fall and will *lso give your lawn en earlier green in the ipring. Winter Geen builds srirong disease resiVfant grass plants. Has extra higih arpountj of th» root building plant foods so that your l»wn can grow thicker and more dense. .Apply Winter Green now.

6

Reg. 7.95

Steam IRON

12-ROLLER GORLER

15 steam vents give good steam coverage, cut ironing time. Fabricdial.... .(06I/F62

Restores set, adds body wRhout lotions. 8 large, 4 medium rollers. . . . . U . . > M W , J S |

'"-'•'*•*••««

• Values to 12°°

95

'99

JJT Your Choice

COVERS 10,000 Sq. Ft.

<•• -

SEED and FEED YOUR LAWN NOW (Swnbeam

THIS IS AN EXCELLENT TIME TO SEED YOUR LAWN Results will be better now than if you wait 'til Spring.

Becker's Special Blend THE 98 PROOF GRASS SEED

The lawn seed mixture for the lawnowner with discriminating taste. Specially blended for this area. Grows a thick luxurious lawn with a minimum of care. Outstanding purity of 98%. Contains Kentucky Bluegrass, Pennlawn Fescue, Chewings Fescue and Creeping Red Fescue.

(A) UTILITY FINISHING SANDER

BECKER'S BECKER'S

KWIK KOVEK Tha almsit indastuctabU gran. Growi aaiily. Garminat«« In 7-10 dayi. An all parannial hardy lawn laad mixtura. '

6REEH

SHADY LAWN

(B) UTILITY JIG SAW with TILT BASE

Electric CAN OPENER Opens most size cans automatically. Magnet & cutter release for cleaning. ....(06)

59

*149 *149

10-6-4

5-10-5

5-10-10

50% ORGANIC

ALL PURPOSE PLANT FOOD

PROFESSIONAL

Ib.

LONG LASTING

2

OO

50 Ib.

BOVUNG DEHYDRATED COW MANURE LONG LASTING

50 Ib.

SO I b .

LIME

CLAIROL HAIRSETTER

3" TOOL CADDY

18-Drawer CABINET

Keeps tools organized, avail- For home, office, shop, lab. 18 able for instant use. Revolves, drawers. Madeof niggedsteel. 10"H W ) Sfeckable ..(13)

Values to-ttMl"f| Choice - I f Your Choice

GRANULAR DOLOMITIC

SHOT OF STEAM IRON

Long lasting . . . easy to spread. Now is the time to lime your lawn.

3

144

Reg. 3.65

50-LB.

79

©SUNBEAM COUP, 1970 &SUNBEAM MIXMASItt

Set your favorite hairstyle in 3 MAKF-IIP MIRROR MflRt W miKKUB to 10 minutes! 20 rollers in 3 Choice of 4 Jight settings. sizes heat at once Magnifying/regular mirror tilts for lastine set Case. to any angle.......IM-1 (05)

FORMULATION

198

,-f I

Drills in wood, metal, masonry. Use to buff, polish, sand with opt attach (19) % INCH DRILL... 9.99

Dual heat soldering gun,'3 lips, wrench, tool, brush, solder, plastic case. (07)

Ib.

137

HM300

^" ELECTRIC DRILL

SOLDERING KIT

' A quick garminating, fina taxturad grais. Contain! Manhattan rya gran.

A iptclal bland of tolerant g r m a i . A must for thadad

. • Urge full mix beaters • Thumb-tip speed control 1 • Beater ejector • Avocado color

3000 sfrokes/min. motor. Makes straight curved, scroll cuts in wood, metal or plastic Base tilts for bevel cuts. (01)

J?9

BECKER'S

MIXMASTER HAND MIXER;

Easy one-hand control with slide switch. Use in any position. Sands flush on 3 sides. Improved, burnout protected motor.

•Touch a button | for extra concentrated

19" % " Var. Speed DRILL

3999 V/2" Circular SAW

0 to 1000 rpm, 3 amp motor. Big capac, plenty of power. Double insulated, -failure Accurate scales, telescoping proof, shockproof. (11] guard, safety clutch. ....(06)

HAIR DRYER '

steam •Safety heel rest

Conditioned, filtered air flow. Professionally styled hood raises, lowers i/HD54

SO3S

^Helping People With Lawn Problems for Over 70 Years"

A"/V*

SAKRETE HOME REPAIR PRODUCTS BLACKTOP PATCH CONCRETE MIX SAND MIX "...' MORTAR MIX

80-LB. 90-LB. .... 80-LB. .... -80-LB.

2.15 1.85 2.00 2.00

COAL TAR BASE

BLACKTOP SEALER

5-GAL 7.95

f /

197 SHREWSBURY AVE. 4 CLOSED TUESDAYS SALE ENDS WED., OCT. 21st



-

.

*

Phone 747-0465-RED BANK MON., WED., THURS., FRI., SAT. SUN. 8:30 A.M. TO 5 P.M.

17

THE DAILY REGISTER, BED BANK-MIDDLETOWN, N. J.j THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1970 •

Assessor Keeping 2 Boroughs Happy

By PAUL KERN SHREWSBURY - Bernard borough is "delighted because we have a professional; full, j . Marx is Happy, little Sil- toe assessor between the ver is happy and Shrewsbury two boroughs." is happy- He is their new asInitial Step 6esSor and they are being And Mayor Robert C. Law. JappUy assessed. rence. 3rd commented, "This Mr. Marx, tax assessor in • is only an initial step toward Shrewsbury for the last JO more joint municipal ser. years, was appointed to tnat' Vices. Agreements like this post in Little Silver on Aug. 3 tend to cut down on expensive to become the area's first joint duplication of services." assessor. Shrewsbury, he noted, is A heavy-set, crew-cut man nappy with the agreement. of 42, he looks comfortable be. when Mr. Marx Was Inter hind his new desk in Little Sil- viewed by the council for the ver where he replaced Charles position, Mayor Judge stated, Sullivan, who had asked that "we were impressed with his he not be reappointed to the philosophy toward assesspost because of his age. ing." Mr. Marx noted that his "He assesses on the basis of predecessor "had everthing living space," Mr. Judge right up to snuff. There was said, "not the money a homenothing left undone." owner spends on mainteLittle Silver Mayor Thomas n a n c e . An assessor who B. Judge commented that his raises a homeowner's assess-

ment every time the homeowner does something to improve the appearance or durability of his home deters people from maintaining their homes. Mr. Marx believes in assessing living space and ad. ditions." Mr. Marx, however, thinks the important thing is getting out into the field and person, ally inspecting new construction before making his assessment of its taxable value. An example he gave is a homeowner who takes out a building permit to add a twocar garage/and a breezewjiy. After the plans are drawn and submitted, the homeowner has second thoughts and erects a one-car garage, deleting the breezeway, and maybe makes changes in the design of the one-car garage. "The plans may have called for $6,000 worth of work," Mr. Marx stated, "but the job may only turn out to be ?2,000. That's why I have to inspect." Inspections and the time they take is the reason he gives for suggesting that similar joint municipal assessor ventures limit the number of towns they expect one assessor to serve. "A man can handle two towns or three without bejng overloaded, but beyond that, the load is too great." The two towns he how handles total about 10,000 population. A third town could be added

'j Buck Declares Stock Dividend 27 as the date on which the stock will begin trading exdividend. Buck Engineering Co. Inc. and its subsidiaries in California and Canada manufacture and market technical training systems and complete educa. tional programs for the subject areas of electricity, elec; Cash payments will be tronics, power technology and itnade in lieu of fractional automotive mechanics. .shares on the basis of market Consolidated sales of all dityalue as of Oct. 6. The Na- visions and subsidiaries were $ional Association of Security $4.6 million in 1969. The stock .'Dealers has established Oct. is traded over-the-counter. .„• FARMINGDALE - David T. Buck, chairman of the hoard of Buck Engineering Co., Inc., has announced a 4 per cent stock dividend, payable on Nov. 24, to stockholders of record on Nov. 2 ;has been voted by the board "of directors.

to his load but it would require more office help to handle the additional paper work involved, he said. Mr. Marx also feels an assessor should work in the area where he lives and knows the towns.. He dotes that the Marx family has been in Shrewsbury since 1896 and that he was born and lived most of his life there, Mr. Marx graduated from

Long Branch High School in 1946 and attended the University of Miami, (Fla.) for a year before coming home to attend Monmoutb Junior College for two years, majoring in business. In 1950 he opened the Bernard J. Marx Agency, an insurance agency in Shrewsbury. He was 22 at the time. In 1966, he became inactive in the firm, joining the family business, Marx Brothers Ab-

tery will earn not less than 12 million net profit for the state in one year. The offer was reaffirmed at a comprehensive technical presentation made by Compulot before the full commission at the commission's of. Ikes in Trenton.

batoirs, also in Shrewsbury. In 1960, he was appointed assessor in Shrewsbury, took the necessary courses at Rut* gers and passed the state examination for certified assessors. Mr. Marx has been a member of the fire department for 22 years, was chief in 1966 and is currently department president. He has been president of the Shrewsbury Parent Teacher Association, chairman of the Kelly Jean Kerner Committee, is a member of the Planning Board, chairman of his high school class reunion, past president of the Shrewsbury Republican Club, vice president of the County Assessors Association and is a former member of the Greater Red Bank Jaytees.

Mr. Reade explained that he and Henry DuPont had formed Compulot expressly to serve those states and cities interested in lottery and off. track betting.

He Is married to the former Peggy Weisel of Elberon and New York and has a son, Jeffrey, 15, a sophomore at Christian Brothers Academy, Lincroft.

Firm Confirms Lottery Offer O A K H U R S T - Walter Reade Jr., chairman of the board and president of the Walter Reade Organization Inc., and W. Henry DuPont, president of Sci-Tek Computer Centers Inc., announced that ttieif joint-venture corpo. ration, Compulot Associates, Inc., had reaffirmed its offer to the New Jersey Lottery Commission to have Compulot install a fully computerized and automated tottery eystern, called Big Seven, and their guarantee that'the lot-

FAIRNESS — Bernard J . Marx, the first joint tax assessor in the area, alternates his time between his home town of Shrewsbury and Little Silver. He laughi about people not liking assessors and comments, " I try to be fair and that's what counts." (Register'Staff Photo)

IF ITS QUALITY WITHE LOOKING FOR

DAVIDSON LIQUORS £ f ™IceCream ° ° * ^ r BARTONS Howard Johnson EVERYTHING YOU NEED

The Indoor tnrertalnliig tesson i t hire and we hovt tht spirit! you n««d for that dinner party . . . after the game cdebratien . . . or a comfortable evening with good friends. We have your favor He breads of imported and domestic wines and l i q u o r s . . . plus our awn exchnhre labels.

RUM 4:

Ladies9 Suburban Coats

Printed Terry Upper

Aisorted Styles

Assorted Plaids

Rubber Sole

Broken Sizes

Extra Sizes 38-44

Ladies9 Blouses Mini Safari Shirt Mini Fashion Shirt Full Cut - Permanent Press Asst. Solid Colors >Sizes 32-38 Reg. 2.50 ea.

Re

J27

Reg. 2.29

»- 1 O88 14.99 1 Z

Ladies9 Slacks

Service For 8 - 45-Piece DDVNERWARE SETS

Assortment Bells - Straight Legs - Plaids - Solids , SIMS 8 to 1*

8 Plates — II Cupi — I Saucers 8 Dessert Dlihes - 8 Bread * Butter Dishes 1 Sugar ft Creamer 1 Platter Reg. 88 1 Vegetable Dlth 19.95 Assorted Patterns

Reg. 8.00 Reg. 6.00 Reg. 4.00

10

4.00 3.6O 2.00

:

COMSTOCK BLEND

WHISKEY OR

Davidson's Famous Brand

9

20-Piece

COMSTOCK

Service for 4 Starter Sets

Last Call! —Buy Now!

SCHWEPPES MIXERS

Ladies9 Casual Shoes

100 1.00 Pr. 2 Pr. for JL

ENTERTAINING

Comsfock Light or Dark

Ladies9 Terry Scuffs

5-Piece Completer Set

ill I/H

Vegetable Bowl, Platter, Creamer, Sugar Bowl

and Cover

!mk

3i f

100% FULL QUART

Ke

(S-

A 88

8.95 4t

DAVIDSON'S INTERNATIONAL

CANADIAN AMERICAN 8& Proof Blmded Whl«k»y o-y«or-old straight whltklet

69

10%

Velvetina Solid Colors 36" Wide • 100%' Cotton Reg. 2,99 yd.

lchwMMt Tonic and Olii - How J O O C !

II

HI

Schwwpo

Wool and Wool Blends

36 and 45 in.

Solids and Plaids • Some Bonded Smooth and textured 48" to 60" Wide

Nightwear Flannel

Reg. 2.47 yd.

yd.

Bitter lemon and vodka - N o n ; btllirl end mil Cony-llmlM

DAVIDSON'S FAMOUS BLENDED

WYCLIFFE Full Quart

40% Straight Whiskies IMPORTED

6*

IRISH WHISKEY SHAMROCK—10 Years Old *„> Colonel Roy Straight Kentucky

BOURBON WHISKEY B 4 9 Nothing Finer In bourbon available.

DAVIDSON'S

jm

VODKA 4

SCOTCH

Quart

5.15 FIFTH 12.34 Vi-GAL.

49

FREE DELIVERY C A L L 747-3334 DAVIDSON'S WINES and LIQUORS 26 BROADST., RED BANK

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC

BEER BY THE

Sewing Chest and Bench Modern or Colonial Storage Compartment - Accessory Tray Reg. 12.95

Boys' Shirts 100

I77*.

Sportswear Fabric Printed

Dressing Table

45" Blend*

12.88

win

87c yd.

A 1 5 DAT EUROPEAN HOLIDAY FOR TWO AMDIKIKN ixraias

OITICUL ENTRY BLANK N n r t i r r y i 15-Day Holidtr I t r Tw« S v i t a t M t i Nolhini to buy! Juit fill in yarn ittmt ind addreis ind dtposit al your Ntwbtrry >lon or mail te Ntwbtrry 15-diy Holiday for Two SwteptUku, P.O. l o t 7 7 M , Phllidtlphii, P>. 19101 by October 3 l i t .

-Fly roundirip to Europe's 3 major capitals . . . enjoy iuie hotel accommodations.

NtIM

Mdrtn City

yd.

57c yd.

INFANTS'

Short Sleeve and Long Sleeve Assorted Styles Reg. 1.99-2.99

100% Cotton Prints



. _5tltl_

yd.

Boys' Dress Jeans Pre/»«-Me^ot Finish Solid Colon Sizes 8-18

Reg. 4.50

)0O

Wed. and Fri. 9:30 a.m. • 9 p.m. — Mon., Tucs., Thurs. and Sal. 9:30 a.m. -5:30 p.m.

CASE

BROAD STREET RED BANK Amount

18-

THE DAILY REGISTER, FED BANK• MIDDLETWN, N. I: THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1970

LAST THREE DAYS! Shop 9:00 P.M. TODAY and FRIDAY, SATURDAY to 5:30 Misses' Car Coats Warm and Wonderful at

28.75

4.50-$7 Famous Brand Bras

$23430 Big Boys' Famous Outerwear

2.50 & $3

13.50

Soft, contour or padded ciips. Find your favorite styles 'in smooth trfcot or fine lace, with adjustable stretch or lingerie straps. Fine buys!

You can choose from' the- fop

Suburbans, bench warmers, ski parkas, toggle coats'.. . they're all in the sale. Corduroys, wools,' nylons, cotton suede* in new fall colors; 8-2G,

fabrics and most popular looks af the season! Wool meltons,

$10-$16 Famous Panty Girdles |

cotton corduroys and canvas — more! Hurry in for these. Sportswear

$7-$14 Boys' Famous Sweaters

5.50

Youtheraft! Flexees! MaidenForm! Garter less or garter styles. All leg lengths, Light or firm control.

Machine washable slipons and cardigans. Crew necks, V necks, mock or turtle necks. New fall colors. 8-20. (Sizes 4 to 7 ....._.4.25)

$14-18.50 Famous Name Zipper Girdles ...$9-$17

$1 Pastel Nylon Briefs

$50460 Men's Wool Sport Coats

3 for 2.25 90c ea. Nylon tricots, full cut for comfort. Wash and dry in .a wink. Choose from white, pink, blue, mint, maize. Sizes 5-6-7. Buy lots now, and save!

Handsome shetlands, worsteds, saxonies and flannels. 2 and 3-button models with wider Iape4s and deep center vants. 38-46 rag. short, long.

$4 Famous Maker's Half Slips

$7-|18 Men's Sport & Knit Shirts

2 for $5

2 for 8.50

2.75 ea.

4.50 ea.

Ful| cut for perfect fit. Charming nylon tricot half slips with dainty lace trims In White, blue, pink, sand, black. S-M Short; M-L Average.

Long sleeved knits with fashion, placket, mock and full turtleneck collars and morel Long sleeve sport shirts in many fabrics.

Nylon Tricot Gowns

$16-$27 Men's Famous Sweaters

2 for 5.50 Dross-length gowns trimmed with dainty laces and embroidery designs. Some styles with floating sheer overlays. Pastels. Sizes S-M-L.

$2 Panty Hose In 2 Popular Styles
*J

Stock up now . . . at

Luscious blends of wool, Shetland, alpaca, camel hair, Orion* acrylics. Cardigans, V-necks, every important style.

P • M - T or I-size

6.50-$13 Men's Dress Shirts $5ea. Long sleeve cottons and blends with regular spread, button down, new high and pinless collars. Deeptones, stripes, pastels.

3.25-3.50 Children's Sleepers

3.75 Famous Eau De Toilette

2 for $5

1.25

tumn shadas.

100% cotton Paknit *leepers with non-slcid feet. Grows I size at snap waist. Shrinkage controlled. Girls, boy prints, Sizes I, 2, 3, 4 yrs.

Never before offered at this price! Delight, feminine ipray mist in attractive bottle and box. 3-oz. Makes marvelous gifts.

Girls' Orion® Sweaters 4-6X

$44

" 7.75-

Lambskin lined in natural rabbit,

:,

•.' •

Wt-'ivHon-ytrA-

•and. other colors; 6!/i Jo 8.

^.

3 for 14.50

Gowns from mini to max! 'lengths! Shirts with matching panties! A marvelous selection in cotton flannelettes.

stro'tc'H. Lovely au-

••"••

ed palm classic, or 2-bufton slipon. Black, brown

Dreamy Junior Sleepwear

big anniversary savings! Ohoose nylon mesh in

$10.$15 Misses' F u r Lined Gloves Save on Molded Quality

Save On Molded Quality Luggage-In Wanted Sizes $29 Ladles' 22" weekender

......

$27 Ladies' cosmetic case .....

.-...•

$42 Ladles* 26"puHman. ..._..........„.. $48 Ladies' 28" pullman .....„...„-„„„. $32 Men's companion case

..: $17 .. $16 .$25 .$28 $18

$46 Men's 2-suiter .............

.......... $27 j

$50 Men's 3-suiter ..„....._.

..

$29-,

4.50-$12 Cannon Sheets

. 7-14 4 . 2 5

$2 to 4.50

All the important sweater looks in cardigans, pullovers, vasts, bulky knits! Washable Orion acrylic in the prettiest colors of the season.

Save 4 6 % - 6 5 % ! 1st quality- percale stripes and solids in twin, double, queen, king sizes. Flat and fitted. Pink, blue, gold, green. Cases $1

Girls' 4-6x' Snowsuits

$12 Down/Feather Pillows

7.50 Machine washable, and made to keep her warm on* coldest daysl Hooded jackets, zip-ankle skipants for easy dressing.

Choose from 3 densities for your sleeping pleasure. Carnation floral cotton ticking. Soft, 100% down; mad., down/feather; firm, feather/down.

Girls' Gowns, Pajamas, Culottes

Damask Tablecloth

-10.50 Sizes all the way to 60x120," including oval and rounds in popular sizes. No-iron cotton/rayon blend. Soil release finish. Napkins _ 75e

Cozy cotton flannel .s/leepwaar for cold nights a'head. Many styles in pastels and prints. Choose pajamas, gowns, or culottas in sizes 4 to 14.

f

Big savings for travelers! Finely made luggage, a'H beautifully lined. Women's styles in blue, green gold; men's styles rn charcoal, green,

Legislative Battle Forms on Wetlands Control By DAVID M. GOLDBERG TRENTON (AP) — The subtleties of political pressure are being used these days to get Gov. William T. Cahill to kill a bill that proponents consider one of the most important conservation measures to get through tiie New Jersey Legislature in a decade. The pressure is being applied through state legislators, some of whom have been close to the governor politically, to get Cahill to conditionally veto a bill that would give the state the power to regulate development of lands just inland from the ocean. But the sponsor of the bill, Assemblyman Josephine Margetts, H-Morris, says any such veto, which means the legislature would be asked by Cahill to amend it, would in effect kill the measure. She notes that the bill got through the senate with one vote to spare and that at least the key senator who voted for it has now changed his mind. That senator is Frank S. (Hap) Farley, the long-time Republican boss of Atlantic County and one of the powers in the state1 GOP. Farley,, like most other members of the

legislature from South Jersey, now opposes the measure and said he didn't understand its significance when he voted for it. POWER IS PROVIDED The bill is called the Wetlands Act. It would give the state Commissioner of Environmental Protection the power to regulate the development of all lands up to one foot above "extreme high water." That would mean much of the land adjoining the ocean., The principal lobbyist against the bill is State Sen. William T. Hiering, R-Oeean, a friend of Cahill and a political ally from the governor's days in Congress. ^UNREALISM SEEN It is Hiering's contention that the one;foot level is unrealistic because during hurricanes, the water can move Jar inland. That would mean, he says, that the low could give the state jurisdiction over building in a large part of South Jersey. But Mrs. Margetts and State Sen, Fairleigh S. Dickinson Jr., R-Bergen, maintain that Hiering, Farley and the

other principal opponents, are simply speaking for special interests. For special interests they mean builders, developers and others who would not be able to ply their trade in the wetlands without getting permission from the state. The sponsors maintain that's just the idea of the bill. 'ZONE IS ESSENTIAL' "Protection of this zone is essential to protection of the balance of nature," says Dickinson. "The wetlands play an important role in moderating the weather and provide a •home for two-thirds of our supply of fish and Shellfish." The wetlands, he adds, "is one of the most important conservation measures passed by the legislature in at least a generation." So Dickinson and Mrs. Margetts are conducting their own campaign with Cahill. Mrs. Margetts calls Cahill's office every day, urging him to sign the bill, which got final approval in the assembly Sept. 14. She concedes there may be some problem with the language. But she maintains that Cahill ought to sign it and then negotiate with the South Jersey forces for amend-

ments, and says if Cahill conditionally vetoed it, it would be as good as dead. The controversy is reminiscent of one that cropped up two years ago, when the Republican-controlled legislature approved a resolution setting up a referendum on the tidelands - the land covered by high tide. If approved, it would have allowed that land to be developed by private interests. But Democratic Gov. Richard J. Hughes charged that Hie proposal, sponsored by Hiering, was "A billion-dollar giveaway." Using the press to the utmost, he managed to get the legislature to rescind it and it never appeared on the ballot. This time, the proponents of the measure are trying to drum up public interest. The governor's office reports that mail in favor of the proposal is greater than mail against it. Mrs. Margetts likes to think that's what the fight is all about. "This bill," she says, "has the interest of all the people of the state and they (the proponents) represent special interests." IIHIIIIIUIIilHM

Marlboro Water Emergency Is Ended MARLBORO - The Township Council last night passed a resolution ending the water emergency in effect since May 14. Mayor Morton Salkind said that although the emergency is over for the time being, there is a strong possibility that the same situation will repeat itself next year unless the recommendations by the three-member water study group are followed. Included in the group's recommendations are the construction of two additional pumping stations, a larger water storage capacity and the expansion of the main water line. Previously, resident of the Monmouth Heights and Whittier Oaks sections With even

house numbers could water their lawns only on even days, and those with odd numbers on odd days. This e m e r g e n c y affected only those using the public water utility. Injunction Authorized Council authorized Township Attorney James R. Min. ogue to file an injunction in Superior Court prohibiting Deep Run Aviation, Rt. 79, from using a trailer as an office extension. This action is the latest r>tep in court actions spanning sev. eral months. The township said that the use of the trailer for office purposes violates an ordinance, and won a municipal court hearing. But an appeal made by airport offi-

cials to the Superior Court re. suited in a ruling that the township ordinance was too vague, and that the use of the trailer for offices was not in violation. Mayor Salkind said he believes that airport officials have expanded a runway, t h u s c a u s i n g an over, e x p a n s i o n of a non-conforming use. "They may have expanded the runway, but the trailer is the only ordinance violation that we have enough legal ground to move on at the present time," Mr. Salkind said. Hoynanian' Enterprises, Englishtown, developers of Holiday Park, Gordons Cor. ner Road, have filed suit in

Superior Court for Building Inspector Edward Sovare to show cause why he should not issue certificates of occupancy for the 36 houses in that development. T h e building inspector maintains that the developers have not followed the subdivision map approved by the council with regard to sewer drainage. The building inspector can be overruled if the developers present a new subdivision map and it is approved by the council. "I insist that the law be fol. lowed, and that the developers either tell us personally that they are following the approved map or that they will submit a revised one," Mayor Salkind said.

Developers may have an of alcoholic beverages on opportunity to confront the election day. A state ruling council at a special council says individual towns must decide the issue for themmeeting called for Monday. selves. Municipal Court Judge Earle J. Harrington has recomMayor Salkind has named mended to the council the ac. three residents to the drug quisition of over $2,000 of abuse-mayor's panel, (DAMP) equipment, including a $1,500 recorder, for his' courtroom. which brings its membership Judge Harrington maintains to 12. that these improvements are Named were Mrs. Connie necessary for compliance of state requirements regarding Lawson, Morganville; the courtrooms. He hopes that the Rev. Larry Calhoon, Wick, additions will be complete by atunk, the minister of the November, when a represen. Monmouth Christian Church, tative of the administrator of and John Dolan, Whittier the courts is scheduled lo visOaks, director of financial it his courtroom. The council adopted an or. planning for the CBS Teledinance which allows the sale vision network.

RED BANK, N. J., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1970 - 1 9

Tinton Falls School Tax Suit Planned • NEW SHREWSBURY The Tinton' Falls Schools Board of Education will sue Shrewsbury Township for non payment of $18,000 in school taxes. The decision, announced after an executive session last night, authorized Beekman and Porter of Red Bank, board attorneys, "to institute s u i t a g a i n s t Shrewsbury Township for non payment of thfe.tax levy." '

The township is a sending district to the Tinton Falls Regional School District. : When asked why the levy was not paid, Mayor Vemoii E. Field of Shrewsbury Township said, /'Simply because we have no money in the budget. Our only taxpayer, the Alfred Vail Mutual Association, has refused to pay the assessment, in the same amount." Julius F. Frickel, a member of the Mutual Association board of directors, and mem-

ber of the Regional Board of Education explained the Mutual's decision. "The board of directors," he said, decided to withhold payment of the taxes pending settlement of Bill A-741 under which assessment is made on

the basis of pupil enrollment, instead of on assessed valuation. "The township," he said wants to be valued on the basis of assessed valuation, while New Shrewsbury wants to tax us on the basis of pupil

enrollment. Our assessment by the county has been on the basis of Bill A-741 which is pupil enrollment, and so, pending settlement of the bill, the board of directors decided not to pay the tax." The Board of Education au-

thorized its secretary, Michael Hammer, to invite bids for replacement of one boiler and controls at the Sycamore School. Earlier Mr. Hammer reported the two boilers at the school, one 16 and one 12

Court Weighs Tax Break Case TRENTON (AP) — The New Jersey Supreme Court reserved decision yesterday after hearing an appeal by t h e b o r o u g h of New Shrewsbury to reinstate a 1965 law giving the borough a tax break at the expense of neighboring Shrewsbury Township. Chief Justice Joseph Weintraub said that the five-yearold law was special legisla-

tion which is unconstitutional in New Jersey. The issue will be decided by the seven-member court and Weintraub's views are not fi.. nal at this stage. Decision Appealed New Shrewsbury is appealing a decision by the Appel. late Division of Superior Court which ruled in favor of Shrewsbury Township. Milton A. Mausner, attor-

ney for New Shrewsbury, contended that the special legis. lation is permitted because it was not specifically prohibited by the state constitution. Mausner contended that the constitution only prohibits certain kinds of special legislation but not the law passed in 1965. __ Weintraub said he disagreed with that view.

r>

i

The law in 1965 changed the method of apportioning school taxes among the two municipalities from assessed valu. ation to average daily enrollm e n t . Since Shrewsbury Township has about 3 per cent of the school children and only 2 per cent of the as. sessed valuation in the school district, the statute hurt the township financially.

*•

Construction

years old, as needing replacement, at an estimated $2,500 p e r unit. Board member Keith Olson voted against the expenditure. • Accepted with regret was the resignation of Sumner K. Clarke Jr., principal of the Sycamore School. Mr. Clarke has been with the Tinton Falls district for 10 years"and has accepted a position with the Matawan School System. Appointed to replace Mr. Clarke was Joseph T. Giger current vice principal at the Tinton Falls School, at a salary of $14,575 for 11 months. Also appointed were Mrs. Doris Crocker, school-home coordinator for one day per week at $2,225 for the school year; Mrs. Maxinc LaFontante, R.N. as nurse's assistant at a base salary of $550; and Kevin W. Cpyle as custodian at Tinton Falls School at $5,460.

T o.

AT~WORK — President of board of governors, Frank F. Blaisdell, right, looks over plans for expanded emergency facilities with Riverview Hospital's admin«trator, William L Gill, as construction begins.

" W i t h a good weather break and no unforeseen delays, we hope to have the steelwork up and partially bricked in before severe winter weather," says William T. G i l l , Rlveryiew's administrator. "This would mean that work could continue during the winter months with a tar-

i Computer Facility Is started J E M ^ * =-*.*.-.*•

get date for completion set at next fall."

Frank F. Blaisdell, president of the board of governors, described the urgent need for this additional space. "In addition to the growth in the population in the area Riverview serves," Mr. Blaisdell explained, "there is an increasing trend toward more use of outpatient facilities. The availability of the supporting services such as Xray and Laboratory, with trained physicians and nurses on duty at all times,, makes the emergency treatment center a focal point for the ur-

Sewerage, Outfall Units Reach Accord MIDDLETOWN An agreement between the Sewerage Authority and the Monmouth County Outfall Authority was adopted by the authority last night. The agreement is conditioned upon an annual service charge to the local authority not to exceed $15 per single family dwelling. The outfall authority is expected to endorse the agreement at its next meeting. "What this means in essence," Edward Schumann, authority chairman, said last night, "is that the outfall line will cost an undetermined amount of money to construct. It will also cost an undetermined amount of money to Operate. "Taking the total of these two costs and dividing them among the users who will tie into the line, the result is the annual service charge each

homeowner will have to pay," the chairman explained. He said the projected service charge at the moment is

"This figure can change, but it cannot exceed $15 or there is no agreement. It's as simple as that," Mr. Schumann stated. '

Most of the money will be used, for construction debt service with only a small portion needed for operational expenses.

Appeal to Overturn State's School District Lines Aired TRENTON (AP) - A special three-judge federal court has reserved decision on an appeal to overturn the state's school district lines to achieve better racial balance in New Jersey schools. Harold J. Ruvoldt Jr., an attorjiey from Jersey City, contended yesterday that true integration in the state's large urban centers could only be brought about by shifting students across municipal lines. He said that s o m e busing of students w o u l d be necessary to achieve the goal but argued that it would only be for relatively short distances.

"The school population of Newark is 83 per cent black," Ruvoldt said. "The state's attempt to achieve racial balance within the city is therefore a futile effort. It's meaningless." He said the black students must be shifted into the predominantly white suburbs that ring the city to achieve true racial balance. The members of the special federal panel are U.S. Circuit Judge Phillip Forman, wiio presided, and District Court Judges George H. Barlow of Trenton and Reynier J. Wortendyke Jr. of Newark. The case, which conceiv-

ably could reach the U.S. Supreme Court, may provide a landmark test for the legality of de facto segregation in which racial imbalance prevails in schools because it is patterned after segregated living patterns. Ruvoldt contended that the system is sanctioned by the state law which prescribes school district lines that correspond to municipal lines. He asserted that the federal courts had jurisdiction to dec 1 a r e the system unconstitutional on grounds that it violates the constitutional guarantee of equal protection under the laws.

Start Work onFort

i

- - II-

On NewRiverviewWing

RED BANK - The bulldozers and giant cranes and truckloads of equipment arrived at Riverview Hospital last week as ground was broken for the building of the new Kridel Wing which will house a greatly enlarged Emergency Treatment Center.

OF* TO PHILIPPINES — Tho Rev. Martin Murphy, a native of County Wexford, Ireland, leaves today to. rejoin the Columbian Fathers in the Philippines. He't *hown with Mr. and Mrs. Paul E. Brandt and their children, Mkhaal 'P., 8, and Paige A., 4, with whom he spent a short leave at their home at 98 Glenwood Drive, New Shrewsbury. The missionary and Mrs. Brandt have 'been "pen pals" since 1944 when she was a high school student in Brooklyn and he was « seminarian in Ireland. The relationship developed from a news story in the -former Brooklyn Eagle about Hie founder of the Columban society, the late Edward Galvin, first bishop of Hanyang, China, who also was born in Ireland and whose first assignment at a priest w " in Brooklyn. (Register Staff Photo)

The annual fee for local sewer use will be (145 when the system is completed in August. Debt service is $120 of the total amount while the remaining $25 will be used for operational expenses. The first phase of the outfall line, which will run from Belford through Sandy Hook to the ocean, is planned to be completed simultaneously with the local system. Expenditure Okayed A $49,054 expenditure for data processing equipment to be purchased from the Burroughs Corp. was authorized. The equipment purchase was a recommendation of the authority's auditor. Change orders amounting to an increase of $11,601 in contracts were authorized. The authority authorized payment of $4,075 for acquisition of three right of ways.

gent treatment need of the community."

The campaign for funds continues with the workers devoting many extra hours of their time. "At this writing we need an additional {300,000 to successfully complete the campaign," F. Bourne Riithrauff, chairman of the development and public relations committee stated. "We are going to keep the campaign rolling along in high gear until our final goal is in sight. I feel sure there are a number of good citizens in the community who have not yet been reached," he continued, "and we are not going to rest until everyone has had a chance to participate in helping their own community hospital."

struction 3tarted here this brary, and will provide workweek on a new $133,790 com- Ing area for personnel asputer facility building for the signed to the computer oner, Army Electronics Command. ation. / The facility is being erected Construction of the new cite adjacent to Vail Hall, which houses ECOM's large-scale is keyed to the Army Materiel computer, and will be con- Command's five-year autonected to Vail by a passage- matic data processing proway. .The contractor, B & W gram. Construction Co., Red Bank, The computing equipment is expected to finish construc- will be linked to another comtion by the end of February, puter built to the latest state1971. of-the-art at ECOM PhilaCol. Dillon Snell, ECOM delphia via a high-speed, chief of staff, turned the first wide-band data link. This will provide for realshovelful of earth at the ceremonial groundbreaking. Also time communication of digital data between the two loca. present were Joseph Berg, tlons so that the total con. man, of Elberon, director of figuration will be a single Management Systems and command computer system. Data Automation, and Capt. Capt. Manning stated that 1 ' o n-llne encryption equipC.L. Manning, chief of the e l e c t r o n i c Support Com- ment will be provided to asmand's Communlcations-PIc- sure proper safeguarding for communication of classified torlal Office. data between facilities." The simple, modern strueThe anticipated benefits of lure will provide 7,200 square the real-time system are to feet of floor space and will provide faster and more accuhouse the most modern com. rate Information to the many puter equipment available. It users of ECOM's ADP Ber. also will have an extensive vices.

Williams Plans Larger Democratic Party Role NEWARK (AP) - U.S. Sen..Harrison A. Williams Jr. says he Intends to exert a larger role In the state Democratic party if he is reelected in November. "I see a role that I haven't seen for myself over the last 12 years," Williams said in a wide-ranging interview with the Associated Press. Williams said it is difficult for someone whose elected job is in Washington to be in a day-to-day position of leadership in the state organization. Responsibility Told "But I think now that we—the Democrats—have no governor there is now a responsibility for the one statewide elected guy," he said. The senator also said he

would not engage In name calling or labels against Nelson G. Gross, the Republican candidate, who has criticized Williams as a "Ka'dic-liberal," "I'd have to go to a Thesaurus to look for an appropriate label for Gross," Williams said. "I'd have to go tf) the Thesaurus to try to find the word t<> describe the capacity to try to be on all sides at once." On other topics, Williams said: — T h e Johnson administration must share the blame for an inflationary economy b e c a u s e the inflationary thrust was 'War born.' But he said the Nixon adminstration has steadfastly refused to use the tools congress has au-

thorized to curb inflation and reduce unemployment. Charges Rejected -Rejected charges by Gross that he has introduced bills that would double the size of the present national budget. He said many of tho programs are many-year programs such as mass transit which would be spread out over a period of years. -Strongly supports President Nixon's new peace initiative. He said the President has been "reading public opinion" and that, according to the poils, 62 per cent of the people in this part of the na. tlon supported the McGovernHatfield bill for troop withdrawal.

-THE DAILY REGISTER RED BANK-MIDDLETOWNj-N. J.s THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1970.

20

KRDEHLER DAYS

COORDINATED ROOMS Kroehler's "Fall Values" means quality and luxury furniture at the lowest possible price. You can now pick your room groups from Kroehler's Avant or Classic collections to fit your lifestyle and pocketbook. Hundreds of individual styled sofas and chairs to choose from in our custom fabrics. Herculon, Scotchgard velvets, quilts, Zepel, Naugahyde. They are all incfuded. Here's luxury you can live with every day—comfort you^ and your family can enjoy, beauty you'll be proud to show off to your friends. The Kroehler label assures extras: Kilndried hardwood frames, double doweling, downy foam cushioning. These room groups are specially priced right now during our "Fall Value" days.

AVANT ROOM GROUPS START AS LOW AS

489

$

399

CLASSIC ROOM GROUPS START AS LOW AS

SMART IDEAS UVING

IN TODAY'S FASHION WORLD.,..

C-M-13-35

Fashionable Instant Bedrooms...

KROEHLER

These fashionable sleeping beauties keep their secret — and offer day in, night long comfort. Each one is designed to highlight your living room or den to coordinate your special life style. Each one has a long-wearing cover -7- All have Tri-Lux polyurethane mattresses — Specially priced during our "Fall Value" days from Kroehler.

w 72" Traditional Sleeper Loungo in < ilurdy tweed fabric. Kick pleat skirt. Slaapt two.

Sleep- or-Lounge.

'- '

68" Contemporary in gold •weed traatad with Scotchgard; full ilie foam mattren.

$

69" Modern rail arm ilaaper in sturdy Herculon, Tha extra bad i« lull ilia.

%

229,

70" Early American with pull. over limulatad divided button back, welted ihaptd wing with wood trim.

C Y

229.

OCCASIONAL CHAIRS SPECIAL PRICED

for KROEHLER'S FALL VALUE DAYS That special swivel rocker for that

This Early American has sit-on com-

special spot in your home now at a

fort with wood trim and hidden

special Fall Value price.

value at this low price.

$

98

00

139

00

$

"Convenient Monthly Terms Can Be Arranged For Your Purchases"

WEST

FURNITURE COMPANY

"OUR 101st YEAR"

KEYPORT,N.J.

Free Parking Opposite Store Open Monday and Friday Evenings 'til 9

264-0181|

21

-THE DAILY REGISTER, RED BANK • MIDDLETOVN, N. J.: THURSDAY, OCTOBER IS, 1970

ul Paintings on Exhibit at Medical Center By ELEANOR MAItKO The Art Auxiliary of Monmouth Medical Center, Long Branch, has sparked another season with its exhibition of a record number of 78 paintings. Judges for the paintings, which are on exhibit in the hospital corridors and are for sale, were artists Bette Abel, Little Silver, and Anne Kobayashi, River Plaza. Proceeds from each Bale are used to purchase a painting for a permanent hospital collection. Six paintings from t h e previous show were brought by the public — some by patients who couldn't bear to leave Ihem. Winners were named in two categories. In oil and mixed media, first award went to Belmar artist Ann Mitchell for "Windemere;" second to Norman Colson of West Long Branch, for "Melting Snow" and third to John Figaro of Shrewsbury for "Wood Duck." Clara G. Stamaty of Elbe, ron, won first award in watercolor for "View from the Old Incline," and second, went to Yvonne Aubert, Red Bank,

hibiting three Isaac Broome porcelain sculptures of baseball figures. Teacher, lecturer and author of poetry, political articles and a novel ("The Brother"), Broome died in Trenton in 1922. In his early career he executed sculptures for the Capitol building in Washington. Designed for exhibition at the Centennial Exposition of 1876 at Philadelphia, two; of the sculptures are original casts by Ott Brewer of Trenton, and one is a

Palette Talk for "Holmdel Park." Don Voorhees, Lincroft, received third ror "Edgewater Rocks" and an honorable mention went to Kathleen Kolar, Deal, for "Pine Tree." EXHIBIT OPENS The exhibit of 26 oil paintings, water colors and pastels by the late Ray A. Jones, a former president of the American Veterans Society of Artists and an officer of the Hudson Artists, and Painters and Sculptors Society of New Jersey, opened Monday and is continuing to Oct. 30 in a Memorial Exhibition at the art gallery of the Fine Arts Li. brary, Five Corners Branch, Newark and Summit Aves., Jersey City.

SOLO EXHIBIT t A 'one-man exhibition of; paintings, constructed reliefs; and silk screen prints by Bur.; ton Wasserman, professor of; art at Glassboro (N.J.) State; College, is featured here In the Lower Merion Gallery lo Oct. 18 in Green Lane, Pa. Represented in shore-area collection, Dr. Wasserman is well-known in the area as an exhibitor and lecturer.

Now in Red Bank The world-famous

Barbizon School of Modeling Now, you don't have to travel to study professional modeling. BARBIZON has established a new branch school right here with the same faciffttM and teaching techniques as the New York Schoof.

BASEBALL SALUTE Throughout October the New Jersey State Museum is saluting the 67th World Series baseball competition by ex-

PICTURE FRAMING

recast from original molds' done in 1914 by Lenox, Inc., also Trenton. PRIZE WINNERS Janet Schippert of Spring Lake Heights, received a $25 prize in the third annual Art in the Park exhibit staged by the City of Paterson. Winner of a merchandise award in the same show was Don Bloom of East Brunswick, who opened last week in a show at the Charles Press Gallery, Colts Neck.

We have graduated thousandsof girls into brilliant modeling careersand given countless others "The Look" that helps any career. If you're a girl 14 years of age or older.send for our free, 32 page book to help you decide if you qualify. No obligation, of course. Fill outand mail thiseoupon OR PHONE 842-6161

SUPPLIES

VIEW FROM THE OLD INCLINE, a watercolor by Clara Stama+y of Elbarofl, won ' f i « t pri«i in water color in fhs Monmouth Medical Center-Art "Show.

THE BARBIZON SCHOOL OF MOMUNG 188 Ecnt 8»rq»n Place, Red Bank, N. J . 07701

1135 OCEAN AVE.

RB

r

SEA BRIGHT

741,-939$

e«r_

Hour*:

MONDAY thru SATURDAY 10 A.M. to 5 P.M.

YJUQUiK USE OUf! LAYAWM PLAN! SENSATIONAL 3-DAY SAIE thru SATURDAY, OCT. 17lh WINDEMERE, first prize in oils tn the Monmouth Medical Centar Art Show is by Belmar artist Ann Mitchell.

MAY IMG

H A Y MWC

ARTIST OF MONTH — George L. Gurtirie, artist of the month chosen by tha Middletown Recreation Commission, is shown with "Back Street," which is included in his one-man show currently in the Middletown Township Hall, Kings Hwy., through Oct. 31.

'yj

This is the first special exhibition arranged by Phillip Dennis Cate, who was • appointed curator of the Rutgers gallery July 1. ' Gallery hours are from 9:30 to 4:30 weekdays and 1:30 to 4:30 Sundays. It is located on Hamilton St., between College Ave. and George St.

Milk is one of the oldest known foods. Records exist of cows being milked in 9000 B.C.

RarfcarBn

JJERFJALL

JJ rwft they oft i t i l i ' the most popular • • • •**•»•»** T

X John* U g h t n i ^ l l HOBBY

• S*ft,ith,ltV

I. HUQ* MlattioD . . . M a - 1 | I Mtionolfy priood. rVb|KK*al

II KITS ul|

n Mo.., SAVE 3 1 *



O $1

•!i A

li now/, for I——•-<—•.*!*•• • •••• ,,,.,,,i'li|.

I RBR

••••••••

v

^^^

• • !

H ••>

M

Arts Festival Is Scheduled TRENTON — New Jersey will have a six-day Arts Festival in the Spring of 1972 which will culminate a twoyear fund-raising drive by the Association for the Arts of the New Jersey State Museum. The Festival, which will run from May 20 through May 26,1972, at the New Jersey State Museum Cultural Center in Trenton, will feature the best the state has to offer in the visual and performing arts. .The public will be invited to participate in an innovative art education programdemonstration. Concerts and programs will be scheduled in the Auditorium and an outstanding exhibtion of art, privately owned by individuals and corporations 'resident in the state and rarely seen by the public, will be shown in the main galleries of the Museum. The exhibition and additional performing art events will continue throughout the summer. In announcing the festival, Abbot Low Moffat, president of the Association, set the fund-raising goal for his organization at a quarter of a million dollars. The funds will be used to purchase art for the State Museum. The campaign will be climaxed by a gala ball and preview of the exhibition on May 19, 1972. The Festival also has as one of its goals familiarizing the people of New Jersey with their State Museum and what it offers in the arts, the sciences and historical record of the state.

PUT M M BONN

ASSORTED | ;K R . CARS •• «fl°lar

Stella Show at Rutgers NEW BRUNSWICK - An involvement with abstraction, exhibition of 35 paintings and brilliant color and collage. Stella was born in Italy in 68 drawings, pastels and watercolors by Joseph Stella, as- 1877 and came to this country sembled' from private and in 1896; Much of his work public collections in New Jer- was done in his Brooklyn stusey, is currently on view at dios, but New Jersey scenes the- Rutgers University Art are recognizable in some of JiLs works, and his works Gallery,1 were, handled and cataloged Stella, who exhibited in the . by the Newark gallery of Rahistoric New York Armory bin and Krueger. . Show whit* shook the art Copies of the Rabin and world in 1913, is considered to Krueger catalog will be for have been the first American sale at the exhibition, which futurist, 'distinguished for his will run through tiav. 11.

mom* CWPPW

PLAN

Fashion Show

QUARTERBACK COMPUTER FOOTBALL GAME

commnwiiM

kk "W V

w.....»^..|<

BOUNCEROO hctmif

,OTBALLl

Sov«$1.98

_^

Save $1.98 MAfTEl

\

999

ITMITMMMUUI

MYSTIQUE GAMES

Save $1.00

rUv'i

• • • •

P MM

• Big from W K N I for

Unlimited hour* of thrilli A *x(if*nMMt OfftnM and DtftnM u l t t t i plow Computer action on llghtid flold Backboard clocln for tlm«, p«rM, Morr

maximum pedal pow«r

O/ff

J1U5 Sav«$4.46

$l.f9

SALE

HOT WHEELS

O99

COMPETITION SET with POWER COMPRESSOR

• »«»(•faramhwncn dnm Hw hock • $h«». ih/nl ftat- Ikravgli th. air • MH-oW lotpt, nlh and iprinf.

• FBI your J.t r.wK racn with eompniMd air antrgy Irom Irt* power tompftutt and OOI • COMK6II, ItADY 10 «UN

Mr Hf ihiMil W"....|M.tf

SALE

Save $5.00

ALL STORES OPEN SUNDAYS 10 A.M. to 6 P.M.

PIAYKIIG DISCOUNT SUPERMART

SrrhffMd *m*M » J7{~M» ° «>Wm«rrthr«IMM TKH., W*!., firm, md ift M M «

k d

OTf

SKY SHOW

WVMCf ON CIIIIM

V

199

BIG WHEELS

LAYAWAY PLAN

Sav«62'

SALE

• 3-whMkdspMdcyci*

dMM*frne

MrSTKMK PAumsnr MTSTKNE FORTH1 CARDS MYSTKWI ASTKHOGT

>>-

•Child or adult itamh an disc platform • SquMi* 7" ball bitwwii hi* initept • Hoo away in any direction

DAWNMHl

W

v

MAUX

lAtT

A0O - . . . O "

iALt

7

Charge your j * . ^ *

purchase — We Honor-

W&DUTOWN I*^t IS • Oftnif NM*t*in SU«. Clr.

2""V V

IAIT HANOVIR N MiltoSltMtnn • W-HJt rfcM.tiM

ALL STORES OPEN SUNDAYS 10:00 A.M. TO 6'00 P.M

22

THE DAILY REGISTER, BED BANK • M1DDLET0WN, N. J.: THURSDAY, OCTOBER IS, 1970

Qean Today Gives Talk at Rutgers;

Certificates For 2 Aid Men, 1 Cop

N EE WW BBRUNSWICK RUNSWICK N ti ddii James R. Deans, executive r e c t o r of the Alcoholism Council of Monmouth County, •vyriJj breach a brand new topic for discussion during a twoweek program on problems of • alcoholism at the Center cf Alcohol Studies of Rutgers University. Mr. Deans will discuss the

"CoordlnattojiofOfM Resources" today/ It is the RUMSON - Three resi- the First Aid Squad, and Rob- University College of Physi. first time this plrtse of the dents received the Graduate ert Hoffman of the Police Be- cians and Surgeons, New battle against alctyftlism |iatn 4x8 ^k*n 4x8 dance with a change in 'state Committee is supporting As-, before the state legislature COLONIAL WAINUT 9 * t * V M0NTEGO PANtLING-i^EWy WHITE MIST semblyman Joseph Azzolina, setting legal limits on where law has been ignored. Reg. 4.49 Reg. 5.99 Reg. 6.99 in his efforts to minibikes may and may not "You never even acknowl- It-Monmputh, be used. get the limit raised to $8,000' 4x8' 4x8; edged our letter," he told the 4x8 "After that, we'll see what . per company. BUCK WALNUT 149 Driftwood Paneling | committeemen. MADEIRA PECAN we can do locally,". Mr. MalaFunds No Issue Reg. 5.99 Reg. 5.99 • Chance Seen Lost Reg. 8.49 Mr. Kelly explained that vet said. At the suggestion of Comk Consequently, he said, a the fjre.company funds are +>i 'gift* "number of township firemen not at issue. What is needed, m i t e e e m a n Robert P. lUAN DARK CORK McCutcheon, the committee FIRRING J [ j j , . :: i PEGBOARD will also ask,passage of the •'•* MAHOGANY STRIPS """ 8"x24" bill. Mr. McCutcheon com34"x4«"xVi" I"x2"x8' mended the youngsters for "doing things the right way." Protection Wanted The committee also approved a suggestion by ComRUMSON - Jay Guyer of Scouts a chance to demon, mitteeman Edward P. MakeLittle Silver, activities chair- strate their knowledge of first ly that Gov. William T. Cahill man for the Great Northern aid. be urged to sign the wetlands District, Boy Scouts, says the J u n i o r Bouk, Rumson, bill now before him. The mea. Third Coast Guard District, sure, Mr. Makely explained, Governors Island, N. Y., and camping chairman, indicates would protect township wetarea first aid squads will par- that some 27 troops represent- lands until tine legislature reticipate in the district camp- ing 600 boys and leaders will ceived reports of a regional oree at Rumson Country Club take part. In addition to the study. The Poricy Park Citifirst'aid events, the boys will zens Committee and the ConOct. 23,24 and 25. The Coast Guard will put u n d e r t a k e a major con- servation Commicsion have on a helicopter rescue demon, servation project Saturday already endorsed the meastratlon and several boating morning when they will estab- sure. r e s c u e demonstrations off lish a nature walk on Rumson Also endorsed by the comshore of Rumson Yatch Club. Country Club property which mittee at the suggestion of iFirst Aid Squads from Little will be made available to Mr. McCutcheon is Senate Silver, Fair Haven, Port Mon- groups who are interested in Bill S-184, whicJi would proImouth and Shrewsbury al- nature. vide $25 in state funds for "•'HI MM d o l l * 1 * ready are scheduled to par- John Russell, president of each township student. ' ticipate and it is expected .Rumson Country. Club, exEsteves Construction Co. of that squads from Middletotyn,' pressed the pleKsu/e of the Franklin Lakes, low bidder o f Leonardo, Atlantic Highlands, club in having scouts at the three at $32,915, was awardedRed Bank and Fair View will club and will greet them upon a contract for' sidewalk con. also take part. arrival. Members of the club struction on Hurley's Lane, to Main St., Cole Place and KenThe squads will serve as and the public are Invited Per Gallon Interior Exterior Guaranteed One Coal Paint Judges and will manage 10 see "Scouts in Action!1 Satur- wood Drlv« in Port Mon. STARTING AT 6.95 PER GALLON mputh. first aid stations that will give day afternoon, Oct. 241

Seeks Municipal Recognition

FIRST QUALITY PANELS

SAVE UP

r

OFF,

>49

BIRCH SALE 4x8 « ; 6.99 4x8 ^ 7.49

991

M9| 4x8 « s 749.

149

Country Club Is Site Of Scout Camporee

199:

.Guaranteed ICoat INTERIOR and

Paint

BEST MADE

PURE LATEX BLACKTOP DRIVEWAY SEALER & CONDITIONER Protects against cracking

BARGAIN STORES

• • Cleans up with wattr • Ready for traffic I D

gas



OFF

Easy to apply with broom, brush, roller, squeegee Contains No Many Tar sold in 2-gallon cans

J T E R GALLON

RETURN OF OUR GREATEST SALE

"Irish Aqffid

I Take $1 off per ga I Ion on our regula [price . . . on on] of your choic

r#fl

' 3 M gallon

m

clruto Wairtex Look

|Per Gallon Interior/Exterior Guaranteed One Coal Paint] STARTING AT 6.95 PER GALLON

•4 S E L F

STICK

Armstrong

- .SPECIAL PURCHASE VINYL I N L A I D 9 N E W - 1 9 7 0 PATTERNS , Choose from Many Cal»y» Patterns Below Our Cost Must B» Sold As l i . • . Value 3.95

ARMSTRONG

9x12 VINYL RUGS

^ T9 9

SQYD

lint Qualify Colon t Pillarai

Ltdoor Indoor CARPET!

EVERY ITEM IN OUR STORE

ONE DAY ONLY... FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16 STARTING AT 9 A.M. NO TRICKS! NO CONTESTS! NO GIMMICKS! THERE'S NO LIMIT ON QUANTITIES! STOCK UP NOW ON EVERYTHING YOU NEED and RECEIVE AN EXTRA 20% OFF OUR REGULAR LOW PRICES, OVER 1,000 ITEMS! EXCEPT M I R TRADE ITEMS

First Quality ', Peel & Stick 12x12 Foamback

First Quality, Place & Stick 12x12 Foamback

CARPET TILES CARPET TILESl Naw colon, no many putt. I 3 or mort caiai.

Naw colon. No many pattt,| 3 or rnora d m ,

FIRST QUALITY

LARGEST SELECTION in STOCK!

FIRST Q U A L I T Y CUSHIONED FOAM BACK KITCHEN

OUTDOOR/INDOOR CARPET

CARPETS

Polypropylene Olefln-New Decorator Colors

• Spmiih Olid • Miditar. . rintan Blue • Avstad* Ouan f • Mamcuit Hid, ati. • in. ' and V" and 1 It. wMth In i tiiy Initallallon. lagulikly 3.»|

Naw Duoralar calon. Indior/ Outdoir Caipit. o-h. width lor Uvf Inttillatlen. l a g . 4.99

SQYD

SELF-STICK FIRST QUALITY 1 la 2 C I I U

TILE

39<;

Till

VINYL ASBESTOS 12x12 FLOOR TILES

> CASES,

70WNW0OD'PATTERN WOODGRAIN COLORS

OR MOREl

V«ilpl.t. an* .rt.i,n.pa.l.. Ordinal M.»lly,.

|

1 f O 2 CASES - 2 9 « 711*

HAZLET: POOLE AVENUE ON ROUTE 35

THE DAILy.ffiEGlSTEa, EZD BAJfK • MDJ5LETDW. N. J.'i TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1970

,; ,

Qowml Galls Newark Gas Tax Bill 'Discriminatory* By ROGER E. SPEAR Q —I hold shares of North American Car bought several years ago. You have probably read about management and other changes there recently. I am a widow and reed income rather than growth. What is your advice on these shares? P.A. A — The unresolved situation between North American Car and Flying Tiger

Corp. injects a sharply speculative element for • shareholders of the former company. A successful tender offer this summer by Flying Tiger increased that company's ownership of North American Car common to 45 per cent. A newly elected board of directors, with FLY holding a majority position, then voted to. s e e k dismissal of North American's suit against FLY and petition to the CAB. If, as seems probable, North American is consumed by Tiger, a revision in the dividend policy may follow — last year FLY distributed 5 per cent in stock but no cash dividend! Shares should be sold on any rallies

What Is

Successful Investing and funds reinvested in equal dollar amounts of Central Maine Power and Reynold^ Industries-for an average return of S.4 per cent. Q — I am interested in jfassey-Ferguson because, of its $1 diyidend. The, stocjc has recovered from a July low of 8 and is still improving on a high rate of trading. Would you consider Massey. a sound investment,,regardless of the unfavorable industry conditions? W.B. ....;. A — Strikes, reduced sales

and higher costs resulted in Massey reporting I substantial (iO.M a share) loss for the fiscal quarter ended July 30. Despite this, directors declared, on July 29, the regular 25 cent quarterly dividend, a. bullish sign. Massey derives only about 40 per cent of its sales from Canada and the United States, with France, the United Kingdom and Latin America being heavy buyers. The company has a strong arid expanding position in! world-wide markets. More than 3J per cent of the company's products are for nonagricultural industries, off!setting somewhat reduced .agricultural shipments. While these shares are at the present time * speculation, they do have above-average recovery potential, for the. next few years.

A Heat Pump? Chamber A htar pump it a ntaehlnt that utti tlttrrldty •• fcatk tar and cool a hsuit completely automatically, undtr m y •ad all stvert wtorhtr condition!. : Wkot's mere, rht Lntnex Htet tlimp fllltn air all ycaf 'r»in* and Mtiimldlfta If In tht lumimi. Th* remit h i i r i n | . HiM> frMhims avtry day of tin ytar. . Economical? toit-WtTthli-h.bicauit o» K M dap all yen pay for b thytoi) of altctrkily to mivo (war. Y « m , ovtn on tho fanfost dayi, thtro i i Iwat In rfc* avttldt air. Whtn kaar i required, tht hoar pump. extracts Dili heat and pumps tf INTO your home. Whtn eoollna U dulrti • « k'et. mugayjUayf, tht system reveries itself and pumpi heat OUT Of yoir home. On "in-between days," the system automatically provides healing or cooling as necessary to mainJain tha exact tamptraturei yoj select an the tnormeirot. How would you Ilka ta get an average el two pennies worth of heating for |utt one penny . . . especially If yea went t» add cooling to your new or existing home. With a Ltnnet Heat rumpj you'll get both (heating and cooling) in a single system. What other reason could you want far converting 'a a flunw last electric heat pump}

JAC SERVICE Co. HIGHWAY 9. HOWELL TOWNSHIP Mailing address P.O. lax IS, Farmlngdale, N J .

462-2281 I am Interested la Tha Lennei Heat Pump. •

Pleast send new brechart

D Plaasa heva lapraseiirariva call.

LENNOX eeNDfnONiNa a HIATIN
Name . . Address.

. PhaM

CUV,

, Zip ....

KBR

FOR BIG AND >* TALL * MEN

TERRIFIC ASSORTMENT OF SLACKS IN THE NEWEST FABRICS AND COLORS! Big sizes ii to SS; tallaizesS2toi6. PERMANENT PRESS KODIL*

PCHYESTW* COTTON

_

_

9.99

PERMANENT PRESS DACRON* „ „

POLYESTER* RAYON

...10,95

LUXURIOUS PURE VIROIN

WOOl WORSTEDS

*17

mist tow mtcts INCLUDI COMMITI AITIRATIONS [IFF US I'OT YOU ON OUR MAHINOUSI

Rout* 35

SENtllN YOUR N/VMf AND A O D m ' ,

Asbuiy Park

Asbury Park Circlt

MATAWAN* - The Area Chamber,of Commerce has pledged its support to the pro. posed Bayshore Hospital by urging its members to donate dollars and man hours to the $2 million capital fund campaign. The board • of directors unanimously adopted < resolution calling for an all out effort by members to help make the hospital a reality. Charles Mandeville, vice president o t Central Jersey Bank and the first -vice president of the chamber, said, "As members of the Chamber of Commerce; we, perhaps more than anyone else, are cognizant of what a hospital can mean to the economic life of/a community." He said the hospital will serve to help bring new business, industry and residents to the area. All of these, he said, will be beneficial to chamber members. • . . . " M o s t , important, however," he said, "will be that the hospital, will improve Uje safety and well being of all

members of the community;" •C h a m b e r members are bring asked to support the hospital With financial donations, and to make themselves and their-employes'available for work related to developing the facility. .

Carlson Explains Job For Club NEPTUNE CITY-The development of modern communications techniques in response to the county'* rising population was the subjeet-of ah address by Freeholder Axel B. Carlson Jr. to the Rev publican Club here., ^ Freeholder Carlson is campaigning for election to a oneyear unexpired term on the Board of Freeholders. He was appointed director of buildings and grounds to replace Benjamin H. Danskin, who was elected in November. In addition to the population, the freeholder explained, there is also greater demand for services as the scope of county government expands and it has "expanded greatly over the past decade."- ., • . ' . , . . • .,-.,. Freeholder Carlson said the Board of-Freeholders moved to increase communication potential when phone traffic surveys conducted bythe Bel! Telephone Company revealed that equipment was being ever-used by the great volume of incoming and going calls. These surveys are conducted, annually by the telephone company as part of, its regular service. The last one was held In November, lMf, and another survey will be held later this month.

2 to Attend Aid Workshop KEANSBURG *- Samuel T; DeTuro and Robert Currie, chairmen of the business education and language departm e n t s , respectively, at Keansburg High School, will attend a graduate workshop, "Innovation In Public Education Through Federal-State Assistance Programs," it Newark State College. Mr. DeTuro, who was elected ^o a second term 3s treisurer of the Monmouth County Education Association, is county chairman or the New Jersey Business Education Association and faculty ad-' viser to the local chapter of the Future Lawyers of New Jersey. An authority on the historical background of English literature, Mr. Currie was appointed a member of the professional negotiations committee of the county. Education Association; for the lee. end consecutive year.

FA1RFIELD - The N.J. "In addition," he said, "it Aviation Advisory Council nas would cost the scheduled air1 a b e 1 e d as "clearly dis- lines millions of dollars and criminatory" a bill which could well be the end of aviawould allow the city of New- tion growth in the state." ark to impose a five-cent-aThe council said state and gallon tax on aviation fuel. federal taxes on aviation fuel The bill, introduced In the now amount to 14 cents a galstate Senate Feb. 16, would lon, including a new three. permit any. municipality with ,cent federal fuel tax,which . a- population of 100,000 or went into effect July 1.' . more wj'th an airport within ' "If municipalities are perits borders to'levy the new mitted to levy a tax," the tax.. • J Newark is the only munici- council said, "it would mean pality :in the state which three separate taxes on avia. would benefit from the pro- tion fuel." posed tax. M r . Hamlen said the Sponsor of the bill- was Sen. present fuel taxes primarily James H, Wallwork, a Neware on octane fuel used oy ark Republican. Co-sponsorgeneral aviation as opposed ing the bill were the other to:jet fuel, primarily used by . five.Essex County senators, major airlines. , all Republicans. With present taxes, Mr. The bill was passed In the Senate May 4 and since then Hamlen said; aviation fuel is has been in the Assembly's costing from 47 cents to 50 ' • Taxation Committee, headed cents a gallon. by Assemblyman Richard W. While the bill would only afDeKorte, R-Bergen. fect Newark, Mr. .Hamlen Harry A. Hamlen, president of the aviation council, said RESTORED BUILDING letters of protest have' been ; CAIRO,. Ml. (AP) - Cairo's sent to Gov. William I V Ca- police headquarters is housed hilj;. state Transportation in a building that once was Commissioner John Kohl, and the Customs House. all members of the Assembly. Designed by Alfred Mulletl, Mr. Hamlen said Hie pro. who was supervising irehiposed t»x -would discriminate • tect;to the U.S. Treasury D e against all business, aircraft partment .from 1862-65, the serving the ; state through Cairo Customs House reflects Newark Airport-and would his: technique for,-erecting adversely affect ever,y comgovernment buildings ' that pany in the nation which de- were simple classical boxes pends, upon private aircraft with projecting bays or pivi-. transportation and services. lion* on all four facades:

said, "we are greatly concerned-that it wouldn't stop there because smaller municipalities would demand equal rights and it would be difficult to deny this claim."

.:

"The first thing you know, it would be effective for municipalities with 10,000 population," Mr. Hamlen said. The advisory council was farmed two years ago and has "Udtil I see every bird in' a membership of 250, mostly the world, I'll never give up,"; she said. : private and corporate pilots. It was created to help aviaTRAFFIC QUESTION j tion in the state with particuSEATTLE (AP) - A local; lar emphasis on general aviawoman became tired of thV tion. dust ruining her laundry. So; The council is trying to get she hung a sign outside which < tax relief for operators of read: "WashOut." ) small airports, who, Mr. She was arraigned in the lo-: Hamlen said, are being driven out of business, by unrea- cal court on a charge of erect-: ing illegal traffic controls.; sonable property taxes. Her attorney claimed that all: The group also is active in day long cars sped past the promoting aviation education home of the woman on a rural, road, despite the sign. . • programs in high schools.

SANITARY LIQUID WASTE PUMPING OF ALL KINDS COMMERCIAL — INDUSTRIAL — RISIMNTIAL

TRAILER TANK SERVICE TAKE A TANK

LEAVE A TANK

747-44W

. c ,

'.

• • « ,

.

,

'

.

.

,

.

' • !



listened would be a • v. ' . • " . '

in the last ya«r alone, Wfffiams proposed and voted for bills wnicb would have increased federal goMeuwnont spending 220 billion dollars. If tne Congress toolcWiHiaffis seriously, and supported his spending proposals, your taxes would double and prices would soar out of sight Fortunately, the Senate doesn't take W i l l i a m seriously. Of the 130 bifls he Introduced or co-sponsored last year,





.-,

-23

BIRD BANDER ; IRVING, Dl. (AP) - Mrs.! C.J. Bird, 53, is a licensed! bird-bander, trapping and banding all varieties of birds for no pay, but a wealth^? pleasure. She said she began watch-f ing bird's more than 20 years; ago "because I was nosey." ,' "I saw a little bird down In* Missouri and asked manyj people what the name was butnobody knew," she said. ! S h e began investigating; birdlore on her own, and from' the one bird - art indigo bun-: ting — she went o\i to others.,;

:

onry 8 were passed by Congress. . . Nelson Gross hasn't even been elected yet, butwhen he talks, Washington listens. Nelson Gross knows what Williams has yet to learn—that the worst possible answer to inflation is more government spending. Fiscal responsibility is more than a cliche, You have a right to expect it from your Senator.

Nelson Gross for United States Senator You'll know he's there.

THE DAILY REGISTER, RED BANK • MIDDLETOWN, N. J.f THURSDAY, OCTOBER IS, M70 .

24

Big Season Slated By Monmouth Arts RED BANK -Four Broadway hit shows, a national symphony orchestra, an African dance troupe, and a harpsichordist. They are among the attractions offered area theater and concert-goers this year by the Monmouth Arts Foundation. Now entering its 19th season, M.A.F. will present 13 performances through its three subscription series: theater, concert and chamber mucis. Tickets for all three series are available. Theater Series opens the season Nov. 25 with the road company of the Broadway musical "1776." The series Leaves f o r E u r o p e On Research Trip WEST LONG.BRANCH Dr. David S. J_feon, professor of English at Monmouth College, has departed for eastern Europe to spend the current academic year pursuing research in multi-ethnic literature. Dr. Ufson, recipient of a senior Fulbright-Hayes Besearch Award, has been accredited to the Institute of Film and Theater Arts in Bucharest, Rumania, the host country. He will be primarily involved in research in Yiddish theater and dramatic literature. The author of two chapters in "A History of the Theater," Dr. Lifson is a member of the Actor's Equity Association and the American Educational Theater Association. He is also the author of the book "The Yiddish Theater in America," and has written three full-length plays, two of them produced off-Broadway. USES COMPUTER LOS ANGELES (AP) - A leading Western architectural firm uses a computer program to cut by 85 per cent the time needed for interior space planning for new buildings. The program based on matrix mathematics, is called MATRON and was developed by Albert C. Martin & Associates, Los Angeles. Traditionally, architects trying to devise floor plans to put room with specific square footage adjacent or in close proximity, resorted to trial-and-error "bubble diagrams." This job, which by hand could take as much as three days, is cut to as little as two hours using a computer. ______

TONIGHT

also includes "Hadrian VII," acclaimed one of the best of Broadway's 1969 season, and two popular comedies "Forty Carats" and Neil Simon's "Plaza Suite." Dec. 3, The Chamber Music Series begins with the Richards Quintet, a woodwind ensemble in residence at Mich, igan State University. The series/also includes the Ritter-Allen piano and violin duo, the Dvorak String Quartet and noted harpsichordist Igor Kipnis. The 45-member folk dancing troupe from the Republic of Guinea, Les Ballets Africains, is the first concert series attraction on Dec. 7. This series also lists young Israeli pianist Joseph Kalichstein, the 17-member Munich Chamber Orchestra, the widely acclaimed Pennsylvania Ballet, and the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra under conductor Izler Solomon. Theater and concert series performances are given in Red Bank's Carlton Theater; Chamber Music programs are held in Fellowship Hall, First Presbyterian Church, Rum. son. All performances are at 8:30. Ticket information and res e r v a t i o n s are available - through the Monmouth Arts Foundation, Box 458, Red Bank.

DowdOICs TV Debate FREEHOLD - Republican candidate William F. Dowd today accepted an invitation by WCBS-TV to debate on television at 12:30 p.m. Oct. 25. He urged his opponent, James J. Howard, to also accept the bid. Mr. Dowd said Mr. Howard two years ago insisted that his opponent at that time. Sen. Richard R. Stout, accept a similar Invitation for WCBSTV. Mr. Dowd said such a debate is just as vital this year as it was In 1968. He criticized Mr. Howard for rejecting an earlier bid to debate on WNDT-TV (Channel 13) Oct. 23. Because of Mr. Howard's rejection, the program was canceled. Mr. Dowd said he accepted the WCBS-TV and, the WNDTTV invitations because he believes the media give a large percentage of the people In the Third Congressional District an opportunity to hear candidates on major Issues.

Group Director PROVIDENCE, R. I.-John W. Brothers, Jr., 16 Church St., MkMletovm, N. J., was elected a director of the Northeastern Industrial. Developers Association at that group's annual conference here. As manager-industrial development for the Chesapeake & Ohio/Baltimore & Ohio Railways in New York, Mr. Brothers also presided over a meeting and spoke on the subject of "Railroad and Industrial Development." The Northeastern Industrial Developers Association is an organization which promotes the industrial development of those states which comprise Uie Northeastern region.

?80MG from NEW YORK via CH. 17 PHILADELPHIA

SAL'S

RESTAURANT—TAVERN Shrewsbury at Herbert Red lank

Series Remodeled

COME ENJOY YOURSELF Hore't good newt — the wonderful "SPECIALS" are bacii _t B_ker i Lobiter Shanty and Shanty Pub . . . 10 coma «n|_y younelfl All the popular ipecials arc here for Fall! What could bo bettor newt —• VI.il in soon!

SUNDAY BRUNCH-A

popular way to ipind Sunday with your choice* of itenlc and eggi and your favorite dishsji. Eat all you want. Only $2.95 Sorvod from 10 A.M. to 3 P.M. for adults. $2.25 for children.

MONDAY NIGHT _ TUESDAY NIGHT BUFFET _ E.t h..r)y from. Popular ipeclall

Two

complete

lobiter dinners for

luper-dolicioui mlaction of teafood, meats and chicken end join thoio who m
WEDNESDAY NIGHT _ *,, „

,up.r 1 M _ . , , O n . And A half pound ituffed lobster, clam chtowder and beverage* for only $6.95.

THURSDAY NIGHT _ F i , , w , c

h.yw.

— broiled or friod fiih for $2.95.

FRIDAY NIGHT DAILY SEAFOOD BUFFET _unch b .c e m.

—Lobttsr ipeciali are announced every

week.

cial moal at thii daily ro'patt with doieni of choice! for you to mako from the lavish board. Served from noon TO 3 P.M. Only $3.10 for aJulli. $2.00 for children.

JACK BAKER'S

LOBSTER SMNTV M U T / PUB On iconic Channel Drive overlooking the Manaiquan River

PL PLEASANT BEACH, N. J. Telephone: 899-6700

(4) WNBC-TV

(7) WABCTV

( I I ) WPIX-TV

DAYTIME MOVIES 9:00 9:10 10:00 1:W

430

0 O _ 0

a lAREFbOT IN THE PARK (C) "In Sickness and In Heslth." Paul spends a day at home with a cola and almost winds up with sn unwanted appendectomy. _ PERRY MASON •The Case of the Territeif Typiif WO O NANCY (C) -Just Call Us Incompatible.- X computerized compatibility quit causes an upset la the romance between Nancy and Adam. O THE ODD COUPLE (C) -T»a Jury «tory." Felix, overrides Oscar'a oblee> lions, and tella how they met dtirinr jury duty IO.-00 D MAN MARTIN SHOW (C) Guests: Eva Oabor. Joey Heatherton, Paul lyMe, Norm Crosby, Joe Frailer • 0 TEN O'CLOCK NEWS O THE IMMORTAL (C) "HM a>caey." Ban Richards alda a sods] worker la trying to prevent an epidemic In a Mexican mlninr camp. 0 THE AVENGERS (C) "Return of tha Cybemauts." Puriiur the discu»alon nf sn ugly bronze head In tha Bat of a.moneyed art dilettante, news la received of the disappearance of a scientist. _ THE HACK FRONTIER (C)

"The Dart M!rr»r" "Tkeia WilJ.r Yean" "Lett Tram (mm MaaVieT "Tk. Seund Wemei."

O "Sl.g. Dew" Q'-nwSwoflJmMofSW O "Well em tke Wild SioV

EVENING «:0O Q O O NEWS (C) Q THE FLYING NUN (C) _ GET SMART ID LAND OF THE CIANTS (C) The Items discover s, ww _ U » 4 ef sMeetlM. CD WHAT'S NEW? ntOBU I I UdJTMaKIMMO, who cooui to New York to watch Jiar hone e m ptle in an International race, and to ppod Bone, lime with her friend. Mr. Trench. O FLIP WILSON SHOW major chemical manufacturer and He son over pollution. ' Q DIVORCE COURT A wire rlilma that her atiter-ln.law haa takes aver her home. . ,• _ STAR TREK Jnmat'a tike control of a (llltxy'a asylum. 09 NEW JERSEY SPEAKS "Women's U b Guerrilla Heater* tM O JIM NABORS HOUR (C) Uunt: Glra Campbell , 0 TO TELL THE TRUTH (C) O MILLION DOLLAR MOVIE "The Iron Mistress' (1(52) lUrrinr Alan J J I R Virginia Mayo. Adventurra of Jin aVnrie and tha •hvtlojanmt gf a formidable weapon, the I m i knife, IB WASHINGTON WEEK IN REVIEW (C) 1:30 O IRONSIDE (C) f, . "Noel's Gonna Fly." A cHiUliiiionad b _ n _ m a a eiripea Into the world of nipples wltk < _ _ r e t u Itaulu. O THE DAVID FROST SHOW (C) O BEWITCHED (C) "The Salem Riga- Fart XL Carrlit la Jailed for iteillni an antique bedwarraer In Salem, MaaaacbuMttl. a DRAGNET A Nfjrro officer la faced with a potential riot (D N.E.T. PLAYHOUSE (C) "Scrnt Flowera" I.-O0 B CBSofTHURSDAY NIGHT MOVIE (C) "Robin and the Seven Honda" (19M) (latrine Dean Marlln, ¥nn\c Sinatra. A parody of fanKlaftd movita, act In. 192* la a. MldwuUAt city.

(C) Indicate. Color

•Cowherdera"

NEWS. WEATHER, SPORTS (C) PEYTON PLACE _ THE LATE MOVIE •Tha Day tin Earth Caufht Fire" (1MJ) atarrlnr Janet Munro, Im licKsra. Unknowingly, _ n a r i _ and Eaaaa conduct nuclear testa . . .both on Ue •ana day, creatlnr titter Chios and hysteria. O CAN YOU TOP THIS? (C) MM _ N E W S ( C ) II|3O O THE TONIGHT SHOW (C) . Guest: Marilyn Michaela • 11:30 MOVIE (C) "Time Limit" (HS7) alarrlnf Richard Widmnrkv Richard BaseharC An Army colonel investigate* evidence whlen cMarmliiei whether or not onto Jtighly-regirdee! offlcer face* court martial. O THE BDICK CAVE1T SHOW (C) She''* a r b I r l 1 Walters, Melvyn Doujlaa, Robert ID CHANNEL II FILM FESTIVAL •Best of the Bluss- (1939) starrlmr Dorothy t a mour Lloyd Nolan. Famoua Broadway sin|er hides nut oh « river showboat to fain acclaim for Her II:M o"THE MERV GRIFFIN SHOW (C) L w O I D NEWS (C> O THE ONE O'CLOCK MOVIE "Journey to the 7th Planet" (19J2) atarrinr John Af sr. Greta Tbyssen. A iroup ot earthmtn land on Uranu.. a atnnfe alien planet. O THE JOE FRANKLIN SHOW (C) 1:11 O THE GREAT GREAT SHOW "The Hardy'. Rid. Hljh' (1S3S) aUrrinr Mlckey" Rooasy. Lewie stone. Prospactive heir, try to provi their elatma to a fortune. 1:10 O NEWS (C) I.H 0 REEL CAMP 1:30

OTHEIATESHOW(C) n m

I ' _ V _ ° " ?«<*" '»55) etarrlnit Joan Crawlord, Jeff Chandler. Woman marries a man whom

Ml 2:10 2:11 2:35 3:15

oEWS^NDVVEATr O EVENING-PRAYER O NEWS HEADLINES O SERMONETTE O THE LATE LATE SHOW I "Rich. Vouna; and Pretty" 11951) itarrin* Jane Powell, Vic Dimone. A rich Ttian Ukea his 20jear-old daughter to Paris whew, unknown to her, her French mollKr la Uv_(.

Firemen Schedule Halloween Dance BELFORD — Belford Independent Fire Co. will sponsor a Halloween dance Saturday, Oct. 31, from 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. in Independence Hall, Rt. 36. Music will provided by the Blue Notes; costumes are optional.

At The Movies RED BANK CARLTON-

PARAMOUNTNEPTUNE CITY NEPTUNE CITY-

Somethlnr For Everyone 3:00, 7:00,

EATONTOWN COMMUNITY— Myra nreckinrldge 7:00, I,«cly In Cement 9:00.

DOVERC.C. And Compsnj 7:30. 9:29.

LAKEWOOD COUNTRYDarllnf Ull 7:00, t:lt. TOWN-

10:30;

North of Red Bank MIDDLETOWN TOWN-

C.C. And Company 7;», 9:30.

FREEHOLD MALL I C.c. And Company T:2J, »:*). MALL I I R.P.U.

Blrd with the Cryalal Plumaft

C.C. And Company 7:30, »:33.

The People Next Door 3:00, 7:30,

DRIVE-IN-

TOMS RIVER COMMUNITY-

Filllnl aatyricon 7:20, 0:40.

BRICKTOWN BRKK PLAZAC.C. And Company 7:26, MALL CINEMA-

T:<0. «:40.

ASBURY PARK LYRIC-

Darllnl Lllll 7:05. 9:30.

HAZLET PLAZA-

t:30.

C.C And Company 7:25, 9:30.

Darllnj Ull 7:00. »:15.

UURELTON DRIVE-INHanf -Hm Hlih 7:0O: UlUul of

Other lUsnten 1:00.

:|

RT.35 DRIVE I N -

(JetUna Straight 7:00. 10:<5; How ' to«ave Your Marriage 9:00.

KEVPORT STRAND A R T He * She 7:32; 1:14; 10:56.

Howard Praises

EAST BRUNSWICK TURNPIKEOUTDOOR—C.C. And Company 7:00 10:30: Coocana Bluff ! : « [tfDOOR-Mjrra Brecklnrldje 7:J0, 11:00; Beyond the Valley of the Dolls 9:10.

PERTH AMBOY AMBOYS DRIVEINWASHINGTON: - Rep. James J. Howard, D-N.J., sponsor of legislation to control the dumping of wastes into the oceans, has welcomed President Nlxon'i message to the Congress which also proposed such a plan. "The message from President Nixon, coupled with the work a number of us In Congress have already done in this field, assures us of strong bipartisan support for leglsla. tion to create an end to the .dumping of sludge into our oceans," Mr. Howard said today. "The. Council on Environmental Quality, which recommended to President Nixon a national anti-waste dumping policy, is to be highly com. mended for Its concern over this problem and for its strong endorsement of a policy to end open dumping in our oceans. "President Nixon's message indicating his support of such a plan gives us the

added prettifca and weight or

MENLO PARK the presidency behind this legislation, and should result CINEMAin a number of Republican and Democratic co-sponsors If for the anti-dumping legtsla. tion," Mr. Howard said, In a brief letter to the Presi d e n t , Mr. Howard commended Mr. Nixon for his proposal, and acknowledged that he and other supporters of t h e legislation stand "ready, willing and able" to give their bipartisan support to the legislation in the next Congress. Mr. Howard is a member of the House Committee on Public Works, which writes most of the water pollution control legislation for Congress. Mr. Howard, serving as acting chairman of the subcom. mittee on rivers and harbors of the House Committee on Public Works, held a congressional hearing on the subject of ocean dumping at the Sandy Hook Marine Laboratory Feb. 23.

By CYNTHIA LOWRY NEW YORK (AP) - With last night's episode, the remodeling of NBC's "The Virginian" into "The Men from Shiloh" was completed. The second of the series' new stars was introduced — Lee Majors, once one of Barbara Stanwyck's sons in "The Big Valley." He played a paroled convict — justifiable homicide — who was rescued from a lynching party. At episode's end he had been hired as a hand by Stewart Granger, this season's owner of Shiloh. Between the opening lynching party and the finish, there was a long and talky story lacking both action and sense. Granger was escorting the 17year-old daughter of a tycoon out West in a private car on the Cheyenne train. His quick action saved the young man and got him aboard the train. The girl promptly flipped over him. The plot thickened only slightly when four men aboard' the train planned to kidnap the girl for ransom. Tlot Is Foiled Naturally, our hero foiled ..the plot and was revealed as a nice fellow before the windup Shootout, but not too soon to keep the audience from dozing off. The series, even in the "Virginian'1days,has frequently suffered from padding — a passable 60-minute story dragged out to SO. The

I.

High School, (London); and Miss Victoria Taylor, English, Middletown High School (Edinburg.) The national organization is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. The Monmouth County branch, established in 1958 under Mrs. Frederick Frelinghuysen of Holmdel, now has a membership of more than 200. Four members of the original board of directors are still serving the organization on the present board. They are Sir Frederick and Lady Hervey Bathurst of Rumson; Col. Quentin Keith of Red Bank, and J. Howard Burnett of Atlantic Highlands. Purpose of the organization is "to draw together in the bond of comradeship the English-speaking peoples of the world."

p a d d i n g Wednesday was achieved by some of the most uninspired boy-girl dialogue this season.

Pati An Horton Will Teach POINT PLEASANT BEACH -Miss Pati An Horton, 18-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ogden Horton of Point Pleasant, has been accepted by the Board of Education here after an interview with Mrs. James Dalton, co-ordinator of the program to teach dance classes Saturdays in a ltrweek couse for the PTA and the Board of Education. Miss Horton, student of the Dorothy Toland Dance Studios of Red Bank for the past 10 years, won many honors for the studio. She has been Miss Point Talent, finalist in the Miss Dance Competitions for Dance Masters of America in New York City, and last year was presented a gold graduate-student medal by her t e a c h e r , Dorothy Toland Pons, who is continuing Miss Horton's professional and teacher's training. As Mrs. Pons' demonstrator-assistant, she has attended several teachers' meetings of Dance Masters of America and she hopes, with the sponsorship of Dorothy Toland Dance Studios, to have a studio of her own and to become a member of Dance Masters. BOX OFFICE OPENS 6:30

.QO i n m x « _ T | I DRIVE-IN 264 2200

ELLIOTT

STRAND

G

E

T

Atlantic

291-0148

HELD OVER-2ndBIG WEEK TONIGHT AT 7:30

7

<;KIMU;I; H A U L

*

HOW T« SAVE AMAftfilASi

COW MM KEANSBURG

787-0300

Free Smoking Section

FRI., SAT., SUN.

Getting Straight lays it on t*", die line.

WALTER READE THEATRES

TODAY!

ART

Keyport NOW PLAYING EXCLUSIVE SHOWING

Highlands

CAND1CE

GOULD-BERGEN

POWER NEEDED NEW YORK (AP) - The U.S. is behind In building electric power systems, and hasn't much chance of catching up soon, according to Sola Basfc Industries, a company that makes electric power distribution equipment. Frank Roby, president of the company, sees a dramatic increase in electric' power use in the 70s, but fears the possibility of power "brown-outs" and "black-outs" at more frequent intervals the year round. R o b y believes repeated "outrages" might change the country's traditional attitude about regulating electric utilities, and perhaps provide for the expansion required to meet skyrocketing electric power needs.

RED BANK

741-9600

GaryLx>ckwood JACqtUES pEMY'S

'SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE"

Model Shop A Touching Love Story

THE NOW AGE IS HERE GET WITH IT!

with the TOUCH of NOW SAT. and SUN. MATINEE "ANGRY RED PLANET"

iMtmoMtw.Mnnw.uM

"THE PEOPLE NEXT DOOR"

"MYRA BRECKENRIDfir And

"LADY IN CEMENr >.

E-SU Unit to Honor Scholarship Winners MJMSON - The Monmouth County branch of the EnglishSpeaking Union of the United States will open its seasonal activities with a dinner meeting at the Rumson Country Club on Friday at 6:30 p.m. the 1S69 and 1970 scholarship winners of the British Universities Summer Program will be honored at the meeting. They will recount their experiences in Great B r i t a i n while attending courses in the humanities at the University of Oxford, London and Edinburgh. These former scholarship holders are now teaching in Monmouth County schools. They arc Ann Bennett, h1-'"ry at Red Bank Regional i School (Oxford); Sister l*...y Clare, English, St. Rose High S c h o o l , Belmar (London); Miss Susan Graziano, Engl i s h , Rumson-Fair Haven

Television Comment

It now appears that the anticipated three-cornered ratings race between three suspense series late last night isn't much of a contest. CBS's "Hawaii Five-O" is far out front of NBC's "McCloud" and ABC's "Dan August." , The Nielsens would suggest t h a t "Hawaii Five-O" is therefore the best show of the three. That is not necessarily so, hut it is a handsome, professionally produced hour that takes advantage of the scenery of the 50th state. But like all series, it has good nights with stories that work and some bad nights, too. This week things worked pretty well. It was a standard action story based on the theft of a priceless violin from a visiting Russian musician. The thieves - who overacted wildly — tried to ransom it from the musician and his s e c r e t a r y - g u a r d . But McGarrett, crime fighter extraordinary, came to the rescue at the last moment. Jack Lord, as McGarrett, dominates the series. However, he plays the part with such savage, humorless intensity, that it becomes monotonous after brief exposure. . Name Game Held NBC's "The Name of the , Game," which dropped costar Tony Franciosa earlier this season after repeated disagreements, will continue the season without a regular replacement. Robert Culp will star in two Franciosa vehicles, and the rest will be played by guest stars.

JNawHc gum nun (
ASBURY PARK 775-1088 NOW SHOWING Jo* Namgth Ann Margret SOMETHING NEW BETWEEN A BOV AND A GIRL??? YOU BET REVOLUTIONARY - CONTROVERSIAL - AMAZING

"C. C. AND COMPANY"

WARNING!

YOU MUST IE 21 OR OVER

ANTON! OFFINDED IY COMPLETE SIXUAL FRANKNESS SHOULD NOT VIEW THIS MOTION PICTURE.

FEATURE AT 7:30 • 9:08 - 10:46 NO ONE SEATED DURING LAST 30 MINUTES

TOWN 1

MIDDLETOWN

"DARLING LIU" NEPTUNE CiTy »Wt«l CeAr, M t 1$.. 7Jf4271

Held Over "Bird With The Crystal Plumage1

COUNTRY KUIHH •. ijumotn mm

HWM

NOW SHOWING

FREE PARKING IN REAR Of THEATRE

M*A*S*H

Julia Andrews

Rock Hudson

"DARLING LIU"

23

-THE D^ILY REGISTER, RED BANK - MIDDLETOWN, N. J.s THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1970

Tim Young Lawyers: Shun Big Pay to Give Service EDITOR'S NOTE - The big law firm of America offers its recruits a flowing future of power, prestige and money — starting at up to $18,000 a year. But that isn't enough for growing numbers of socially aware young lawyers. The poor need law, too, and they are leaving the legal lucre to see they get it, even if they become poor themselves in the process. A report from AP's Living Today Department. By ANN BLACKMAN Associated Press When he graduated from Harvard Law School seven years ago, Tony Roisman looked like a good bet to become a wealthy taSc lawyer. Last year he earned $800. But Tony Roisman considers himself a successful, man — as well as a happy one. He and hundreds of other attorneys are part of the new breed of lawyers who want to apply their skills to what they feel are the sore spots of A m e r i c a , convinced the phrase "equal justice under law" is often less than that. The new legal breed feels it's no longer relevant to find tax loopholes for large corporations, push rate increases

for public utilities or help labor get bigger raises. Instead, the new lawyers want to see legal aid made available to the poor and middle-class citizens, as well as the rich. Roisman; himself, gave up a lucrative job two years ago. "I decided what I was doing wasn't important — fun, sure — but it didn't matter to me If such and such a company got a tax ruling. I was doing the work, but I wasn't committed to it," said Roisman whose Washington firm, Berlin, Roisman and Kessler, is one of the few self-supporting public interest firms in the country. Roisman's wife, also a lawyer, works in Washington. His decision to forego private practice cut their income in half. The majority of lawyers, however, still sell their skills to private law firms, attracted by influence, profits and prestige. Many feel there isn't the challenge or the diversity in public interest law. "I'd rather use my skills and crafts in the wrong way but to the fullest extent than squander them away with band-aid lawyers," said Jack Weiss; an editor of the 1970 Harvard Law Review. But neighborhood legal aid offices, first funded by the Office of Economic Opportunity — OEO — in 1965, have been HOLMDEL - Barry J . sprouting up all over the Karafin of 19 Indian Creek country. By last June 1, S50 Road, has been promoted to legal aid lawyers worked out head of the computer-aided of 850 neighborhood law ofanalysis department at Bell fices in 265 communities. Laboratorties, here. "The appeal is idealism. In his new position, Mr. They're not motivated by Karafin will be responsible money," said John Adams, difortoedevelopment of com- rector of the OEO legal serputer techniques for use in vices program. the design of communication One OEO legal services systems. lawyer is Daniel S. Press, 27, After joining Bell Labora- a 1968 Yale Law School gradtories in 1961, Mr. Karafin be- uate who works with the Nacame engaged in the study of vajo Indians in the Red Rock timing problems in digital Country of Window Rock, communication networks. Ariz. Later, he was concerned with "It's exhausting work, but the computer simulation of it's ,exhilarating when you electronic circuits and sys- know that if you don't do the tems. He has been supervisor work, no one else will either," «rf the analysis and inter- said Press, who makes $9,000 • action group since 1966. . a year. A native of Philadelphia, Money is- still, the .basic, Mr. Karafin received his B.S. problem public interest lawdegree from the University of yersfece. Top law graduates, Pennsylvania in 1961 and his who can command $18,000 M.E.E. degree from New starting salary at • leading York University in 1963. Wall Street firms, make any-

Karafin Heads Bell Labs Unit

NEW FLOORS

FROM OLD! DO-IMTOURSELF and SAVE 2/3 THE COST W . Furnltlt Evaryttilnj Pint Pull Instructions

Our Floor Rtnlol Plan Moons BrllllonTFIoor gimity Ptton* Today for Equipmant Reservations

A to Z RENTAL CENTER 111 NEWMAN SPRINGS RD., SHREWSBURY (A A P Shopping Center)

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

where from ?4,000 to $9,000 in lize what they're doing and legal services programs. straddle both sides of the "This is the main reason for fence." , the big turnover in public inNot all lawyers who are terest firms," said Beverly struggling with this decision Moore, 25, who this fall will are young. Paul Kaufman, 50, join Ralph Nader's newly or- of Charleston, W. Va., has ganized firm, Public Interest been in private firm for II Research Group - PIRG. years. Recently he told the Many lawyers concede they three other partners in his his interwill eventually enter private firm he is divesting 1 firms. OEO reports most le- est in the firm to work full gal service lawyers leave af- time for the Appalachian HeApple Bed •*- a public interest ter three or four years. search and Defense Fund — Private firms themselves p r o g r a m he started last are setting up their own legal January. , * services branches, allowing "I sent my wife back to their associates to spend anywhere from 15 to 50 per cent work last month and all my of their time doing "pro kids are working this summer bono" work — legal service because my salary will be cut work for no or little com- in a third of what I was making," Kaufman said. pensation. $300 A Month The leading firms frankly admit the new student ferIn July, Apple rfed's three ment and recruitment prob- full-time attorneys, who replems are "a factor" in the In- resent coal miners, blacks creased public interest work and clients Interested In envithey offer their associates ronment protection, received and partners. $300 each. It was the first "It's undeniable that this time they had been paid since has had a fantastic effect on they started. One of the lawrecruiting," said Peter Smith, yers, a bachelor, sleeps on a the lawyer in charge of the mattress on the floor of his legal services branch of Piper sparsely furnished office. and Marbury, a large BaltiA lack of funds distresses more firm. most legal aid attorneys. "The Nixon administration -• Covington and Burling, Arnold and Porter, and Hogan is cutting back in spirit and and Hartson, three leading funding which may put a firms in Washington D.C., al- damper on the ardor of many ready have extensive pro students just getting out of law school," said Harold bono programs. Rothwax, a long-time fighter Bruce Montgomery, Arnold for the poor who for five and Porter's young partner in years directed the Mobilizecharge of pro bono work, estimated the program cost his firm about $200,000 a year. Most private firms doing public interest work are confronted with conflict of interest problems. While one partner is defending a major power plant accused of polluting the waters, another finds himself trying to recover damages for a national wildlife foundation. "One definite advantage rf these pro bono departments in the big firms is that they can provide extremely high quality legal assistance to the poor," said John Ferren, 29, pro bono partner at Hogan and Hartson. "One of the problems is there's a cutthroat competition between the firms and legal services programs to handle the headline cases. No one can" do it alone. In plush offices across the country, many young lawyers are in the ttroes of decision making about whether to give up the security of working for a private firm. "What do you do when you find yourself in a situation which is morally offensive?" said a 29-year-old attorney who asked his name not be mentioned. "It's hard to understand how these people, can rationa-

lower East Side. Many of these new attorneys insist that nothing short of a radical shakeup in the legal branches of government will deliver good legal aid to the poor. Hopes on Schools Instead they pin their hopes on the law schools. "There have been a lot of cosmetic changes in the law school curriculums, but most of the courses are still 60 per cent commercial ones," said Andrew S. Dolan, 24, an edi-

tor of the 1970 Columbia Law Law School, a leader in the Review who will be teaching field of public interest law, introductory law at Rutgers has instituted five clinical courses in the areas of minorLaw School in the fall. . ity economic development, Dolan is going into teaching poverty law, juvenile delinbecause he hopes to convince quency, environment control s t u d e n t s the career they and legal services. chose would be a social deSays the dean of the NYU cision, not just an economic one. Some law schools are beginning to update their curriculum adding courses in pollution and environment control and poverty law. The New York University

ADMITSGUILT FREEHOLD - Gerald B. West Long Branch. County Gerber of Iselin has pleaded Court Judge M. Raymond guilty to charges of posses- McGowan set Dec. 11 for sension of hashish March 17 in tencing.

HIGHLANDS

THURS., FRI., SAT.. OCT. 15, 16, 17

TRIPLE TREAT

LOBSTER POUND

• BIG SHEF • FRENCH FRIES • SHAKE

REPEAT SALE 8 LOBSTERS

79" BURGER CHEF

FRI. & SAT. ONLY

"The Unique Place to Visit" IJ $ M

Feet of Atlantic St. off Bay Ave.

872-9861

*.•--_! T*-U.-* \tntfm,,* Law School Robert McKay: "There's a real spirit of urgency to be a part of It all. There's a renewed sense of idealism. Most don't care anymore about the best paying jobs. They want significant ones and we have to prepare them."

HWY. 35

HIGHLANDS

"1 :^7

MIDDLETOWN

&tlectfrom over 90 different dining room suites!

The Place To Go for the Brands You Know

21st ANNIVERSARY SALE

Cash in on Big Savings at John Daniels' 21st Anniversary Sale , . . Yes, sir — our anniversary sal* f«a« tures discounts in famous name suits, sport coats, overcoats 'and slacks. Come in for the latest and finest in men's clothing. ' ..

"Come To People Who Know Clothing"

SUITS and OVERCOATS

68

Reg. 85.00

99

Thai* two-button tuiti «r« tailored for fashion mindad men with faita for thi contamporary. Soma havi wida lapalt . . . a natural ihapad waiit . . . anglad (lap poclcati and dtaa cantor vent. It addi up to fiihion at iti bait. Rag.—Shorti—longi

REGULARLY

SAU

89.95 115.00 145.00

72.99 : 93.92 116.00

100% ALL WOOL Latest Stylei and Fabric! 2 and 3 Burien Alio Deubla Braaitad Rig. - Shorts - Longs

SPORTCOATS SAVE Reg. 59.95

48

99

a banquet qf g Ityomsjbr the Qourmet Taste t o make dining a fine art . . . start at The Mart Furniture Galleries. We whet your appetite with over 9 0 different dining room ensembles/all on display in our lavish designer showroom. And all nationally acclaimed brands,, of course. Like Thomasville . . . Heritage . . . D r e x e l . . . B r o y h i l l . . . smart company to enhance any home decor. Only The Mart lets you select from so many dining room styles, from mod to Mediterranean, contempo to colonial. See exotic and popular woods,' patrician patinas and new fashion-fresh finishes galore. Look. Linger. Browse. Ask about our famous Mart Guarantee. Enjoy courteous, Red Carpet service too . . . by people who truly care about you. Be a gourmet. It's fun. And it costs so little at The Mart!

DELIVERIES GUARANTEED FOR THANKSGIVING Dining Room Ensembles from

6AQQ

SLACKS REG. 16.95 to 26.95

1359 to 2 249 1949-1970

JOHN DANIELS 50 BROAD STREET • RED BANK The Place to go for Brands you know

FURNlftfkE GAL Route 35, Middletown. N. J. 671-0400 USE OUR CONVENIENT CHARGE PLAN

ROUTE 22, Union, N. J. 688-5500

OPEN EVERY NfTE T I L 9:30 SAT. 'TIL 6:00

26

-THE DAILY REGISTER, RED BANK • MIDBLETOWN, N . J.: THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1970

Stroganoff in a Man's World Is a Masterpiece By MAIIGOT SMITH OCEANPORT - When men cook, they invariably get a huge kick out or it, wliich makes them fun to watch. They take expansive pride in their creations on which there has been spent much time, many expensive ingredients and every utensil within reach. The results are always deserving of loud acclaim, and if you're chintzy with your compliments, the male cook will always make up the difference. For a bachelor, like George Hessel of 159 Monmouth Blvd., the nightly lonesomeness of eating is made enjoyable by perfecting dishes for entertaining. George makes a darned good beef thing which he calls a Quasi-Stroganoff. He was not at all bashful about sharing it with The Daily Register readers. In (act, he also volunteered his own recipe for spaghetti sauce. The beautiful part of George's recipes, in addition to the results, is the parenthetical commentary, the enriching detail that we women are probably too willing to take for granted. No wonder the men must devise their own recipes in their own vernacular! •'• Best of George's instructions: ."Simmer" for (our hours while you go surfing," is a classic. Making Quasi-Stroganoff takes a lot out of George. So much, in fact, that he'd be happy if someone else would take over the salad. That's okay, George. The mighty need not trouble themselves with details. And with a dish like this, who needs a salad anyway? P.S. Since writing this, I've had the opportunity to sample George's masterpiece. It deserved the very finest wines available, and these we had. It's difficult to say

DINNER IS SERVED George Hessel, Oceanport bachelor, cooks his kind of beef Stroganoff for dinner guests including, on right, Miss Maureen Cook of Red Bank.

(Register Staff Photo)

which contributed the most to a memorable evening, the food, the wine, the candlelit atmosphere, or the eight charming people who thoroughly enjoyed the experience. George gives credit to the guests. He's terribly modest. QUASI-STROGANOFF (Serves 8, generously) 1 pound fresh mushrqoms, sliced (large ones quartered, medium ones halved, small ones whole) t tablespoons minced shallots or green onions , o 14 teaspoon salt'"" pinch pepper 4 tablespoons butter 4 tablespoons light cooking oil

5 pounds lean beef (tenderloin tips or London broU) butter and oil as needed to saute beef !4 cup Madeira 1 can (10-ounce) condensed beef broth (crude but effective stock) l'/j cups heavy cream 4 teaspoons (approximately) cornstarch (the less used the better) a very large skillet or two 10- or 12-indi ones

Melt butter in the skillet and gently saute the mushrooms in butter and oil until light brown. Do not overcook. Add the. shallots or onions and cook one more minute. Season and transfer to a side dish. Trim all fat and gristle from meat and cut into %-inch cubes (bite size) and dry on paper towels. Add to skillet enough butter and oil (half and half) to saute beef, but don't burn the butter brown before the meat is added. Saute beef briefly, a few pieces at a time, turning often, about two minutes total. (Object is to keep inside of meat pink.) Transfer the meat as sauteed to a large side dish. Discard butter and oil, but do not clean

skillet. Season lightly with salt and pepper, . Add wine and broth to skillet and boll down rapidly until V, cup or even less re- ' mains. Stir In any meat juices from me . side dish. Reduce heat. Blend the cornstarch with some of the cream, then stir into skillet. Add remainder of cream. Stir. The sauce should not be runny, but should coat spoon. Thicken . with a little more cornstarch, or thin with Madeira as needed. Add the mushrooms and onions ana taste for seasoning. Add the beef and any juices. Heat lightly and serve. Overheating will thin the cream sauce. Serve over rice. BACHELOR'S SPAGHETTI SAUCE (Takes less than 30 minutes to make) 1 green pepper, diced small 2 2-inch yellow onions, diced l'/i pound ground round of 'bee/ - 8-ounce can tomato paste 20-ounce can tomato sauae bay le#f, thyme, savory, oregano Lightly brown the diced pepper and onions in three-quart enameled pan with » cover, about three minutes moderate neat. Add the meat, breaking it up with a spoon, and stirring until meat is browned all through (about 10 minutes.) . Add one bay leaf, >/2 teaspoon savory V4 teaspoon thyme, >4 teaspoon oregano (this makes a spicy sauce, you may use less.) Stir in: tomato paste and sauce. Taste for seasoning. Reduce heat, cover and. sink mer two to four hours while you go surfing. This sauce will keep for days in the refrigerator in the enameled pan. Portions may be frozen in plastic freezer containers for longer storage. • ' A tasty manicotti may be made by stuffing scalded manicotti with '/S cold sauce and half mozzarella cheese, topping „ with a' little more sauce and baking. •

Card Party Set By GOP Club LITTLE SILVER - The Little Silver Republican Club will hold its annual card party Tuesday at 8 p.m. in the Rum Runner Restaurant, Ocean Ave., Scabright. Mrs. Daniel Gallop and Mrs; John Van Wagner are chairmen of the event. Steven Greenwood is in charge of tickets. There will be gifts and refreshments.

TOMORROW'S HEIRLOOMS

LITTLE SILVER

FURNITURE STUDIO This Is a look to live with— hind-rubbed solid cherry furniture by Harden. Harden uses yesterday's designs to ereite tomorrow's heirlooms for every room ID the hbuse. Satin finish of carefully selected wood and painstaking workmanship help to establish Harden quality. The same it true of charming upholstered pieces by Harden. The delightful fabrics will enchant you. Come In, look over our groups of Harden Americana solid cherry furniture—to live with today, tomorrow, tad the many tomorrows to come.

Custom Collected Early American Furniture

Cnlti Hack, 431-1778 OPEN FRIDAY TIL I

MISS VERA BUONO

.,

Associate Inferior Deeereter

Little Silver Upholstery and Drapery 333 Sllvcrslde Ave., Llttlo Silver (near R.R. Station) 747-IMO

THREE-PIECE—ITALIAN or FRENCH PROVINCIAL

LIVING ROOM SUITE

RUMSON - Author Elie ter, Mr. Wiesel was an eye- were visible, the invisible Wiesel, who has achieved witness to evil. He believes it souls of those who died prayworld wide literary acclaim is his mission, as' a survivor, ing for a return even while and is recognized as one of to< to speak for those who were t h e y w e r e b e i n g ex. day's greatest Jiving Jewish killed mercilessly in the gas terminated. writers, will speak on his lat- chambers and ovens of GerHis concern (or his fellow est novel, "A Beggar In Je- many. "Everything I h a v e Jews is further demonstrated rusalem," Sunday at 8 p.m. in written in my 10 books is in his book, "The Jews of SiCongregation B'nai Israel, about the holocaust," says lence," which he wrote folHance and Ridge Roads. His Mr. Wiesel. lowing several trips to the Soappearance is one in a series His novel, "A Beggar in Je- viet Union. Ill this book he of lectures sponsored by the rusalem," has been awarded pleads for the Jews of Russia Jewish Women's Adult Edu. the Prix Medicis. In the book to be allowed the freedom to cation Committee of Greater he envisions the land of Israel emigrate to Israel if they so Red Bank and Congregation and its people as one of the desire. He also documents B'nai Israel. few redeeming factors in the evidence of how much they Interred in a concentration world today. He believes that wish to leave and how dan. camp With his father as a those Jews who asembled at gerous it is for them to say young child, separated for- the Wailing Wall in Jerusalem so. ever from his mother and sis. included, besides those that His other works include: "Night," "Dawn," "The Accident," "The Town Beyond The Wall," '.'The Gates of the Forest," "Legends of o-ir Time," and the soon to be published "One Generation Ladies Auxiliary of the Red After," Whether he Is writing AUCTION . MATAWAN - The Couples Bank Veterans of Foreign about his boyhood in the Club of Trinity Church will Wars Saturday at 8 p.m. in Transylvania town of Sighet hold an auction Saturday, the VFW Home, Mechanic St. in Hungary or of modern day rain or shine, starting at 11 Chairman is Mrs. Rudolph Israel, he keeps the reader a.m., on the church grounds, Vogel, 82 Newman Springs spellbound and deeply InRyders Lane. Furniture, toys, Road. volved. . play equipment and assorted BOWLING PARTY Series tickets are available household items will be sold MATAWAN - The Mata- and may be purchased at the on a cash and carry basis. Hot dogs, coffee and dough- wan Chapter of Deborah Hos- door or by contacting Mr. Erpital will hold a bowling party nest Kretzmer, Blue Hills nuts will be sold. Saturday at 8 p.m. in t h e Drive, Holmdel. FLEA MARKET Strathmore Lanes. Mrs. Jerry S i n g l e admission tickets MADISON TOWNSHIP - Silverman and Mrs. Ceil L.e- will also be sold for Sunday's The Madison Township His- vine are chairmen of the lecture. torical Society is sponsoring a event, which will feature a The series' sponsoring .orgaCounty Flea Market Saturday buffet and prizes. nizations include: The Sister(rain date Oct. 24) on Rt. 516. hoods of Beth Shalom, Red BARN DANCE Individuals, organizations, , Bank; Congregation B'nai Is. HAZLET The Hazlet youth groups and dealers are rael, Rumson, and Monmouth invited to participate by ren- Auxiliary of Bdyshore Com- R e f o r m T e m p l e , New munity Hospital will hold a ting space for a nominal fee. Shrewsbury, and. the Greater Call Mrs. John Low, Disbrow barn dance Saturday at 9 Red Bank Chapters cf Hadasp.m. in the Hazlet Firehouse, Road, Cheesequake, for resersah, B'nai Brith, and the Na. H o I m d e 1 Road. John P. tional Council of Jewish Womvations. Haitsma, Oakhurst, will be en. DINNER DANCE caller. The public is inWEST LONG BRANCH - the T h e committee for the vited. A dinner-dance sponsored by series includes Mrs. Leonard St. Jerome's Church, h e r e , R. Pamm, Colts Neck, chairCARD PARTY will be held Saturday in the RED BANK — A card party man; Mrs. Eugene W. Landy, Squire's Pub. George M. Con- will be held Monday at 12:30 New Shrewsbury; Mrs. Jacob way is general chairman of p.m. in the Red Bank Wom- Silverstein and Mrs. Herman the event, which will feature an's Club clubhouse. Sand- Schulman, Uncroft; Mrs. Ermusic by Joseph Montre- wiches and coffee will be nest R. Kretzmer, Holmdel; doro's orchestra. served. Mrs< Anthony Ches- Mrs. Harold Chafkin, Middle, ney and Mrs. John B. Ed- town; Mrs. Herbert M. ZydTRICKY TttAY PARTY ItED BANK - A tricky wards, chairmen, are accept- ney, Rumson, and Mrs. Jack Salz, Fair Haven. Day party will be held by the ing reservations.

IT'S A DATE

Interior Decorating Service

Also See Ovr Beautiful Line of Reellners • N«w Fumlrure Tables • Accessaries

CORNELIUS ON ROUTE 34

Otsigntr Fobiics • Wall Coverings • Lamps • Floor Covering! • Furniture • Accessorial • Custom Draptrbi • Slip Cavers • Upholstery end Fiimftum Repairing.

Wiesel To Speak Sunday Can wine be used wheni^.. on a diet? Wine is very usefu'. weight reduction. It cai used to replace 500 oak of Jat.or sugar intake,d These calories will be pletely consumed and _ not add an ounce ol b weight. It not only repl carbohydrate calories but in doing so, reduces carbohy- | drate hunger, making it easier to do without the weight producing s u % a r [J foods. To determine caloric !§ count, look at the wine jalj*l I* for the alcoholic voluiflf. j5Multiply the figure by fi%; j3< that's the number of calories $ in one ounce. Elie Wiesel

NO COME ONS - NO GIMMICKS - N O COUPONS JUST EVERYDAY LOW PRICES for THE FINEST DRY CLEANING THE HOME OF "TEXBRITE"

.

, THE PROCESS THAT ADDS NEW TEXTURE
"SERVICE IS OUR ONLY PRODUCT"

542-954?

SUPERAMA CLEANERS ONE HOUR SERVICE at

SUPERAMA SHOPPING CENTER NEW SHREWSBURY, N. J. "At tli* md of rhi Big.Parking'Lst"

Betty says — Eyebrows,-SO important for .'facial exprmion and "animtfion, art governed by a few general Tujts. Remove hairs below the brow and ov»r the bridge of the nose. Tweexa above the brow only if there ara i t n y hairs.Outar tip of brow should be clear cut «nd tapered. Drooping eyebro-wi will age 4

• SOFA • 2 CHAIRS • CHOICE OF COLOR and FABRIC • VALUE TO 529.00

llatrtfck.'lii.laV'' Car

mOnnVfum 9vt

349

face and give a sullen expression — hence —

95

tweeie and pencil so that ends are not lower thin ftart of brow. Brows should begin above inner corner of eye; the arch is above the iris or slightly beyond, End of brow should be in direct lina with

DESIGNER FASHIONS FOR THE INDIVIDUALIST OF ALL AGES. NOW SHOWING OUR SPECIALLY PRICED FALL AND WINTER LINE OF' COATS, PANTS, DRESSES AND JUMPSUITS. ' 3316 SUNSET AVE. WANAMASSA,N.J. 774-0116

outer corner of aye and nostril. Pencil color must harmonize with brow hair color.

LITTLE SILVER

FAMILY PHARMACY MOM-TUES-THURS-SATIO-S Wfc-FR110-9

10ChurchS

'-

LITTLE SILVER 741-1121

27

-THE DAILY REGISTER, RED BAN'K • MIDDLETOWN, N. J.: THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1970

Women Wearing the Pants at Fort

By BARBARA COHEN F O R T MONMOUTH While women across the nation ponder the,, difficult decision of whether to continue with the mini or try Die new midi fashions, female employ, es at this Army post can solve. • the dilemma by wearing pants! , From now on, bright, color. ed trousers in various stripes or prints, belled or straight legged, will grace the femalp legs livening up the usual drab Army greens worn by the troops. For,,according to Dr. Edith J. Tebo, new president of the Ft. Monmcuth Chapter of the Federally Employed Women, inc. (F.E.W.), pantsuits and pants dresses are acceptable attire for female civilian employes. " "The whole issue started

Aug. 26 when the fort women wore pants to work as a gesture of sympathy with the, striking women because the federal employes are forbidden to> strike, Dr. Tebo explained testerday in an inter. Lilac Colored Dressed in an attractive lilac-colored pants ensemble, Dr. Tebo noted that while the women have had verbal perm i s s i o n from authorities, some of the girls continued to wear slacks to work and were being censored by their tupervisors, which they found annoying. Thus, on Oct. 2, Dr. Tebo wrote to Maj. Gen Walter E. Lotz, Jr., commander of the Electronics Command at Ft. Monmouth, requesting advice. On Oct. 6, Dr. Tebo re. ceived a reply from Col. Dil-

LAST .DAYS of our SEMI-ANNUAL

SALE Defara Decorators "Distherivt WeifcmaaiMp" M O M I O O H I St.

Rtd

more popular as the weather turns colder. Dr. Tebo, a physicist at Ft. Monmouth 19 years, is a leader of the Caser techniques team surveillance and target acquisition laboratory in the Evans area. Working with a group of men, Dr. Tebo admitted that she usually dressed in a cqnservative and tailored manner, and that pantsuits would lend to this mode. The mother of three teen, agers, • Mrs. Tebo said her daughters seemed to be rebelling and dressing wen more conservatively since nhe began adding pants nutfits to her wardrobe, and that her husband couldn't really believe she was going to wear them to work. Favors Trend Mrs. Ida T. Douglas, past

president of the employes group and a fiovernment employe 29 yeifrs (eight at Ft. Monmoutti) is also in favor of the new trend in fashions. Mrs. Douglas was dressed yesterday in a fashionable grey* and white pantsuit, as she did her work as a data management specialist, duty of secretarial! to ttie ECOM Data Requirements Review Board. When questioned on tiiis change in the dress code on a traditionally oriented Army post, Mrs. Douglas admitted it was unusual, but said many men felt that the pants attire is much more becoming than the short mini skirts tithe long rriidis. It is noteworthy, however, because until recently, women were not allowed in the library or the service club in

slacks or shorts. Whether this trend in apparel for women is spreading to other forts is hot known, although it's reported that women are wearing pants at the Pentagon. O[ course, some of the soldiers are disappointed not to be able to view all of those legs visible in the minis! Both women admitted that the issue of dress is less serious than most of FEW's goals. But they believe it is of concern to women, particularly younger employes, and that the dress issue might get more of them interested in joining FEW. Dr. Tebo said' the group's primary interest is fighting for legislation to end discrimination within the federal government. "We know It exists," she stated, "especially at Ft. Monmouth."

Girl Has Had Lifetime of Grief

3

3}

lon Snell, Chief of Staff, stating that: "The wearing; 3f pantsuits and pants dresses is accepted. However, the difference between this fashion and that of simple slacks and blouse or sweater combiha. tion, which a lady would wear for sports and leisure hours, should be understood and stressed. A neat, modest, and tailored appearance is always desired and it is felt this can be accomplished with pantsuits and pants dresses." Letter Distributed The letter was sent out lo all female employes at the C o l e s area off Newman Springs Hoad, Lincroft and this week women were ueen in various pants outfits. From there, word spread fast to other areas of the Fort, Dr. Tebo said. She said the new attire would become even

lank

747.4421 Own Friday 'til » P.M. T<*« up to 14 monlfii to pay

Dear Ann Landers: I am only 20 and have decided that I dare not fall in love again. Here is my story and I am desperate tor some advice. My childhood sweetheart was the boy next'door. I knew I would marry him from the day we enrolled together in kindergarten. He was stricken at 15 with a mysterious malady and died a few days later. It took me two years to recover from his death, Finally I became interested in another young man — this time, the handsomest and sweetest boy in town. Our friendship grew into love and I felt so

CoJuirdL 36 FLA VORS • 60 VARIETIES 12 FLYING SAUCERS

lucky to have found someone who- could replace my child, hood sweetheart. Two weeks before high school graduation this • boy was drowned in a surfing accident. I was so torn apart the doctor kept me under sedation for three days. I was not permitted to attend the funeral. Eight months ago r y cousin was shipped to Vietnam. He showed my picture to a buddy from South Carolina. His buddy wrote to me and sent me his picture. He looked very much like my childhood sweetheart. After several months of letter writing, he asked me to fly to Honolulu to meet him for R, and R. I did. We both realized it was more than just a paper romance. It was love. After a heavenly

BPW Parley Is Saturday

main civil toward her. I'd like to know if I am suffering ' from menopausal' jealousy (my husband's name for it), or do I have a point? This redhead is a chain five days we said good-by. He smoker. I don't mind that she promised to send an engage- is destroying her lungs and ment ring within two weeks. smells like a saloon, but I The ring arrived — a beau- loathe the way she taps the cigaret on her wrist, places it tiful diamond — on July 21st. sensuously between her lips, Five days later I received nuzzles up to my husband for word that he was killed in a light and gazes into his eyes. She always manages to action. hold his hand several seconds Why do these terrible things longer than is necessary — always happen to me? 1 am ostensibly to steady it after afraid to (all in love again. I he has struck the match. Get seem to jinx every man the scene? whose life touches mine. What do you think, Ann? Do Please help me make some I have a point? On To The sense out of this. 1 am — Los- Wench ing My Grip With Reality Dear On: That tired piece Dear Friend: You've had of theater is old as the hills more grief in your first 20 and twice as dusty. Anything years than most people ex- so obvious can't be very efperience in a lifetime. I can fective — unless^he guy is a provide no answers, but I can case of arrested development. tell you this: You have prov. Is he? en to yourself that you can Confidential to Want to live through.anything. L e a r n from Experience: Apparently you possess an You've never jumped from a indomitable spirit and a buoy- 10-story window but I'm sure ancy reserved for the jew. you have a fairly good idea Your refusal to be beaten down by tragedy and misfortune shows extraordinary courage. Rose Kennedy is another such person. You are in excellent company. Dear Ann Landers: A cer. tain woman in our crowd has a neat little trick that makes me so mad 1 can barely re-

Ann Landers

MADISON - T h e New Jersey Federation of Business and Professional /Women's Clubs will present a leadership development seminar for women on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Fairleigh Dickinson University. Mrs. Katharine Eastburn of Oakhurst serves as state federation president of the organization which is presenting a panel of speakers in conjunction with National Business Women's Week, Oct. 18-24. P a n e l members include Raymond F. Male of Prince- PTA Council ton, former commissioner of the state Department of La- Plans beries bor and Industry and profesFHEEHOLD - The )Aw sor of political science at Ri-1 mouth County Council of the der College, Trenton; David New Jersey Congress of Secunda of Summit, vice Parents and Teacners will president of American Man- hold the first in a series of a g e m e n t Associates, Inc., procedure and bylaws courses New York, and Dr. Priscilla lor PTA officers, chairmen Ransohoff, education adviser and members, Wednesday. in the Department of the Oct. 21, in the county superArmy at Ft. Monmouth. intendent'g office in the Court Mrs. Elizabeth C. Schwartz House, Court St. of Hanover, state federation's Instructor will be Mrs. first vice president and pro. Oakford Schalick, congress gram chairman, will be moderator. Mrs. Inez Calcerano procedure and bylaws chairof Hightstown, speech instruc- man. Other sessions are slated tor at Rider College, will present a summary after the for Oct. 28, Nov. 4 and a date panel discussion. to be announced. Certificates will be awarded to those who complete the Halloween Show program.

SAVE 50c—1.50 VALUE

Good only at: 462 Shrewsbury Ave., New Shrewsbury 842-5874 OFFER GOOD WITH THIS COUPON 12 CARVEL FLYING SAUCERS

FOR $1,00 Good thru Oct. l?th

BASS TACKS™ ore for going places. Wherever your fancy takes you, great looking, Bass Tacks make the trip. Comfortable and easy. Pick a pair today from lots of new styles.

Slated by ORT

MATAWAN - The Matawan chapter of Women American Organization Rehabilitation through Training will sponsor a Halloween Magic Show, Sat. Oct. 31, in Matawan High School. Mysto the Magician wilt perform at 1:30 p.m., followed by a children's parade of costumes. Tickets are available from Mrs. Edna Coleman. Proceeds will go toward a school of engineering in Israel.

CHILDREN'S WEAR SHop Friday Night 'III » Quality Apparel from HMd to Tot

LITTLE SILVER SHOPPING CENTER

LAMPS

Holidays Ahead

LEES

that it would not be healthy. C e r t a i n things are best learned by taking someone else's word for it. The experiment you describe is extremely risky and I urge you to forget it. When romantic glances turn to warm embraces is it love or chemistry? Send for the booklet "Love Or Sex and How To Tell The Difference," by Ann Landers. Enclose, a long, stamped, self-addressed envelope and 35 cents in coin with your request.

NEW FORT ATTIRE — Mi's. Ida T. Douglas, left, *nd Dr. Edith J. Tebo, Fort Monmouth employes, take advantage of new dress coda by wearing pants outfits to work.

SUPERAMA SEWING MACHINE REPAIR SPECIAL Singer-Westingtouse-

GALE'S

White & Japanese MaKesNecchi Sewing Machines

• Our 33rd Year —

eon Machine — e C n « k Temloni, /J-flolonc* ONI e LybrlcaU all port; . » I n i l a l l raw M i d i * LOW e Intoecl all wlilna P R I C E far lefotv

MARTIN SENOUR PAINTS AUTHENTIC WILLIAMSBUR6 PAINTS COLOR MATCHING WALLPAPER

of fable lamps.

FABRIC DEPT.

Call 264-2000

t t ATUHT1C SUratAMA, New StVtwitay U *.1MI

Frw Delivery—Eoiy Charge Park In Rear 26 W. FRONT ST., KEVPORT

Lush Life Plush Red Bank's Oldest & Largest Carpet Store

John C. Ebner & Sons

Broadlooms • Remnant Dept. • Area Rugs

AN AMERICANtbHbbflt?

Monsanto O D Y S S E Y «crylicflt)erby

LEES mhii oufttanding plush Royal Banquet in a 100%' Acrilan® clean dense pile in exciting colon carefully crafted by Lees

"Perfect' DRAPERY

3»NKAM£fllCASD

Guaranteed: New, bright bluet, yellows, i n d limes;

• EVEN HEMS

LirMe lamps and big lamps — for

• SQUARE CORNERS • PERFECT DECORATOR FOLDS

Come in and saal

244 Norwood Ave,

home accessories

DEAL

daily 10 to 5:30 wed. eve. 7 -to 9

ATLANTIC DRAPERY CLEANERS 13 DIVISION ST. KEYPORT 264*3782

.112.00

12x12

Remaning and Re-Hanging Service Avallabl. Serving All of Monntourh O K M & Mlddlesu CounHti

They all have the "now" look.

S

9x12

• NEW LIFE

Moderately priced!

lamps

RUGS BOUND ALL 4 SIDES

• N O SHRINKAGE

black and dhrotn*.

a desk, nite stand, or corner table.

••*.,

RBR

CLEANING!

Just received — * ri»w shipment

3$. giffi

(Rogistar Staff Photo)

;/

9x15

140.00

12x15

185.00

12x18



„.... 222.00

opposite our ftore.

FREE Customer Parking at Chevron Station ,29 EAST FRONT ST., RED BANK, N. J.

H9.00

P H O N E 741-0302

28

-THE DAILY REGISTER, RED BANK • MlDDLETOWN, N. J.t THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1970

Victory Keeps Reds Alive

ONE THAT GOT AWAY — Peter Rose's throw g . h p*st third bastman Tony Perez for an error as Baltimore's Crooks Robinson slides into third. The bill went in the Orioles' dugout and Robinson got up and scored in sixth inning.

By DICK COUCH Associated Press Sports Writer Has Sparky Anderson discovered Gil Hodges' magic elixir in time to make a miracle for the Cincinnati Reds? The desperate Reds, one step from oblivion in Uie 1970 World Series, startled Baltimore 6-5 yesterday on a threerun, eighth-inning homer by strongman Lee May — after a pre-game chat between their manager and New York Mets skipper Hodges. "I told him, 'I don't know what your magic was last year, but I sure can't seem to find it,' " Anderson recalled. 'MACHINE' IS SAVED If Hodges, whose club lost the series opener to Baltimore •i last year and then won four in a row, passed on the Met formula, Anderson wasn't about to reveal it ^fter May's wallop and the airtight relief pitching of Clay Carroll saved the Big Red Machine from the scrap heap. Nor would the Reds1 manager, now trailing 3-1 in the best-of-7 set for baseball's top prize, name a starting pitcher to oppose Baltimore southpaw Mike Cuellar today in game No. 5, jeopardized by a forecast of rain. "It'll be Milt Wilcox, Wayne Granger or Jim Merritt," he said. "I honestly don't know which one. "I could go for a little rain." The Reds' predicament — no team ever has come on to win a series after losing the first three games — was worsened when Jim McGlothlin, losing pitcher in game No. 2 last Sunday, came up with arm trouble. Merritt, a 20-game winner, also has had arm problems while relief .specialist Granger never has started a major league game and Wilcox, a rookie with only five regular season appearances under his belt, was raked by the Orioles in relief of McGlothlin. SPIRITS GIVEN A LIFT But the Reds' spirits definitely were on the upswing as they prepared to face 24-game winner Cuellar, a knockout victim in his two post-season starts. They had overcome a four-hit spree by series standout Brooks Robinson Wednes-

day and had come up with their own clutch performer — first baseman May. • "We've got more momentum now, we've started swinging better and we're more relaxed," said the 205-pound slugger, who drilled the first pitch from reliever Eddie Watt into the left field bleachers at jam-packed Memorial Stadium to erase a 5-3 Baltimore lead. The homer was his second of the series and gave him eight RBI high for either club. "I think we're going to win it," he said. WHOLE TEAM' RETURNS "What happened today brought the whole team back," said Carroll, who blanked the Orioles on one hit for a threegame relief string of 8 1-3 scoreless innings in the series. "We were a little bit down, but we're going to be way up tomorrow. "I'll be ready. If I pitch again I might hurt my arm. But we're trying to win this thing. So I'll be out there." "We'll use all 10 pitchers if we have to," added center fielder Bob Tolan. "Its going to be tough, but we'll take our chances and let it all Jiang out." Unti the eighth inning yesterday, the Reds were hanging by their thumbs. Brooks Robinson's second series homer and a three-run burst in the third inning sent the Orioles on top and they added an unearned run in the sixth. CONTROL IS PROBLEM Dave Concepcion's triple delivered a second inning run for the Reds, May singled home another in the second and Pete Rose homered in the fifth. But Orioles' starter Jim Palmer appeared to be in command, despite control difficulties., going into the eighth. Then Tony Perez, who has stroked just one hit in 14 series at bats, walked on a 3-2 pitch and Johnny Bench, 2for-14 as he came to the plate, lined a long single to left. Manager Earl Weaver of the Orioles lifted Palmer at that point and Watt, a stocky late-inning stopper, got the call for the first time in the series. His first pitch was a belt-high fastball — which May deposited is the seats. •t

OUT OF REACH — Baltimore leftfielder Don Buford; leaps for Pete Rose's deep fly, but can't get it as it: goes into th» seat* for a home run in th« fifth inning.;

[AP. W i h t l

.



Casey's Pinch-Hit Chore Stirs Words of Wisdom

DOIN& THE BOOG-A-LOO — Baltimore Orioles first baseman Boog Powell makes the catch of Johnny Bendh't pop up near the Cincinnati Rads' dugout in the first inning. The ball 'hits Powell's mitt, bounos into the air before hi grabs it with his bare band. The Reds won yesterday's fourth game, 6-5. (AP Wirepnotosl

Short Notice Lures. Flood COPENHAGEN (AP) Curt Flood, controversial baseball slar who tiucd baseball for $1 million this year said yesterday he will negotiate with the Washington Senators — provided baseball "comes up with something that can satisfy mo." Flood commented on the Senaiors acquiring Uir- rights from Philadelphia to nego. tlate for him Tuesday. The :14year-old outfielder has been in Denmark for two months on business and is expected to return to thn United Slates later this week. lie declinr-d to elaborate nn what would "satisfy" him. But said that "for a million

dollars one might do it." He added, however, he might settle for less. Flood refused to report to the Philadelphia Phillies last fall after belnfi traded by the SI. Louis Cardinals and sued baseball, chiifRiiiR baseball's reserve clause ^violated his constitutional rights. However, in August the suit was denied by a Federal Court in New York.-Flood is appealing Ihn verdict, Flood said yesterday ho was not particularly anxious to return to baseball. "1 played baseball for 13 years with St. Louis and 1 had fun. Rut II was quite enough." Flood naid. "Still I would be Rind to

play If they would let me. But baseball Is such a monopoly, and it won't let me work and choose where I want to work." Bob Short, owner of the Senators, arranged the latest deiil for Flood. The transaction involved one "minor" player, who will become Philadelphia property regardless of whether Flood agrees lo return In thn same with the Senators. II Flood joins the Washington team, the Phils will net a second phiyer. The Internal Revenue Service In SI. Louis, citing non. payment of $6,888 in taxes on V 1 o o tl' s portrait business, auctioned off a camera and stand from his studio on Au'g,

3 to recover some of the money. The IRS said taxes were owed for unpaid withholding taxes on employes. In Baltimore, Short admitted that he had not been in contact with Flood but said that he was confident that he could sign him. I'll sign Curt Flood, you can make book on it," Short said. Short said he was interested to hear that .Klood would like to negotiate with the Senators. He indicated I hat there is no reason to believe that he would not be able to sign Flood. Short said he was told that he could not meet with Flood until five days after the World Series has ended.

BALTIMORE (AP) - Casey Stengel, 80, performed his greatest pinch-hit role yesterday. He subbed for Vice President Spiro Agnew in tossing out the first ball of the fourth game of the World Series. The craggy, crochety octogenarian, winner of seven world championships as manager of the New York Yankees and later pilot of the New York Mets', was sitting in the National League box beside the Cincinnati dugout with his wife, Edna, when he was approached by Joe Reichler, assistant to Baseball Commissioner Bowie Kuhn. " I f the vice president doesn't show up today we want you to throw out the first ball," Reichler said. The snow-haired Stengel, b u s y signing autographs, hardly looked up from his task. "You shoulda told me sooner so I could put on my make-up," he said. "It won't show on the TV cameras," Reichler advised. "I ought to at least get a chance to warm up," Stengel said. "Bring out old 37," a spectator nearby yelled. "Yah, I'd like to get my uniform," said Casey. Rumors of Nixon A couple of hours before game time the Baltimore Memorial Stadium was flooded w i t h government security men, wearing white buttons in their lapels, and rumors buzzed that some VIP — proba b l y President Nixon — would be on. hand for the game. '• Later it was learned the surprise guest was to be Agnew -rjust maybe. Five minutes before game time, the commissioner was advised

Agnew would not be able to make it. Stengel, dapper in a dark business suit and blue shirt, and wife Edna were escorted to the third base end of the field for the ball-tossing ceremonies. The gray-maned Grand Old Man of baseball, who seldom is at a loss for words, had a few choice ones to say for Brooks Robinson, Baltimore's flashy third baseman and the hero of the 1970 series. "He's spectacular," Casey said. "He's the best third baseman I've seen in the last 20 or 30 years." Stengel said he has seen all the greatest over the past 50

Rebel Soccermen Rate 4th in State Hackensack moved into first place in the State Soccer Coach Association's Top 20 after last week's action, replacing Stelnert, which lost and tied during the week. Hackensack is 7-0. Howell (7-0-1) moved to fourth after a week at fifth, while Point Pleasant Boro dropped all the way down to 11th after tying Raritan in a match last week. Toms River South jumped to eighth from 12th. The Indians are 6-0-1. Howell heads the Shore Area's' Top 10, followed by Toms River South and Point Boro. Shore Regional (6-1-1) is fourth, while Neptune is now fifth after two consecutive losses. The Scarlet Filers are no longer in the State's Top 20.

Monmouth's Runners Win W10ST LONG BltANCU Monmpulh College's crosscountry team won its second meet in two days here ycslprday by defeating Jersey Cily Stale College, 20-42. The Hawks arc 5-3, :md will take (in Cheney State loday In Pennsylvania. Moliniinilh ( i l l . ({(II . Jcrnry Ctly (I1!) I Jiilm .. rl 1 J i , '.M:."iO; P l r r e e 1H1. '1:.V1; ::. n i c n Jnlitininn (Mi. •-'••i::ll; Htivlr Mnzrn i Mi Nnliiurr 1 Mi, p.'ii:;fl; i " n l y 1 M i , ?(j:i)S; 7. i, 'n-,nH; H (ifni'KO OHiy r i m . . M•Si: I Mrili MMiirJmuunlllu 1.1 Ik-M; " 10.f). rhnrlr* .Mi:brnmil (Mi, Hnmey I J I ,

?•'&& "X,

76ers Suspend Darrall Imhoff PHILADELPHIA (AP) The Philadelphia 76ors announced yesterday that veleran center Darrall Imhoff has been placed on the suspended list. Imhoff, a 10-year vctcrtinof the National Baskethall Assn. elation, has been a salary holdout. He met with team offl c i a 1 s Monday but was unable to. reach an u^ruument. The76ers also asked waivers on backcnurl candidate' Pat Frink. The actions cut (he 76ers roster to the maximum 12 for last night's NBA opener here against the Chicago Bulls.

years, from Home Run Baker what the batter is going to do through Pie Traynor to Eddie before he swings at the ball," he added. "He has wonderful Mathews. "I don't say this fellow is anticipation. better then they are," he "Also you got to give him said. "But he compares with any of them, Remember he is credit for his desire. He has a playing on artificial surface running start when the ball is in some places, like Cincin- hit. He has made some amaznati, and conditions are dif- ing plays. ferent. ',1think he's faster than he "The ball was deader and the fields were not as smooth • was when he was 18." Casey was disinclined to in the old days, so, it's hard to make comparisons." compare the current Orioles B. Hobby's Traits with the great Yankee teams Stengel said the two charac- of the Babe Ruth-Lou Gehteristics that make' Robinson great are "anticipation and rig era and of his own championship teams in the 1950s. desire." "This man can surmise "There's one thing about t h e m , though," he said. "Even the pigeons have confidence in them. When Cincinnati is at bat, the pigeons fly down and start eating peanuts off the field." Cincinnati

(«) I Baltimore (t) >brk *b r • 3 1 1 1 Burord.l! 400 .5 1 '2 i Blalr.cr 3 O0 44 1OI J.PowelUb 310 1O 111 F.RobM'n.rf 4 44 31112111 B.Rot>ln'n,3l> F.RobM'l -• 4• 2-1 4-1 3 03 20 1I H B.Rot>lnn,3l> 4 02 2 edlk 4 0 0 I Hendrlckl.c 4 0 2 3 0 11 n.Johnion.JD 4 0 0 3 0 11 Belanger.ss 3 0 0 1 0 0 1 Crowley.ph l 0 0 1 0 0 1 Palmer.p 01O1( ' I O O I Watt.p 0 0 0 1 Drabowaky.pJ0O< 1 0 0 1 RettenUph 1 0 0 10 0 1 34 6 8 l' 34«l lnclnnatl ..,.011 010 030—S altlmore 1)13 (KH 00" -5 E—Tolan. Rose, Perei. LOB— Ota. NATE COACHES SOCCER TOP M ' elnnatl 6, Baltimore o. ou Uonciv Team W L T clon. HR— B. Roblnsnn (2), Roai (1), May (2). B—'Blair. Hlckcmack 7 0 0 Stllrurt 7 t 1 Nolan _IP.. HRERBBSO . . Lawrence 5 1 1 gullet. (W, l-oi 3% 2=4 ,3i Howell 7 0 1 Carroll pinery ...: 7 0 1 Palmer 7 « 5 5 Weal B U M 7 0 i Watt (L, 0-11 1 2 11 Trenton n l o Drabowaky I ODD Tom» River South 6 0 t" T-2:26. A-53,007. 1 0 Harrlaon 7 l o Verona 7 o l Point Boro 6 0 3 Kearny 6 o l Jamerturg 4 0 0 Bait Brunswick .... 6 I o WMt Morrlx 6 0 1

Monmouth Regional, Toms R i v e r North, Middletown Township and Henry Hudson Regional are sixth through n i n t h , respectively, and Ocefm Township, a new member of the elite 10, rounds out the list.. ^

Tolan,c( Rue.cr Pe«2,3b B e n c h Bench.c D.May,In Carho.il Helnu.Jb Concep'n.if Carroll,p Nolan,? oullet.p Wood'rd.aa Bravo.ph Chaney.sa

S

M

Wntrieid

s

o

t

Morrla Knoll A i i Mllburn 6 0 1 SpirU 6 0 1 Outturn . g i i SHORE AREA SOC1KR TOP 10 Team w I. T Howell .... Tom's River South Point Boro Shore Regional Neptune Toma RiverRegional Norlh . 4 Monmouth Mlddlatown 5 Toma RiverTownship Norl Hinry Hudson Rt». 4 Ocean Township .... 3

Fullback Mercein Sighs Jet Contract

NEW YORK (AP) - the New York Jets of the National Football League signed fullback Chuck Mercein to their1 taxi squad yesterday. Mercein was cut by the Washington Redskins six weeks ago.

Michaels Has Kicks Coming By JONNI FALK What do old pro kickers.do when they lose their Jobs? You spend all your life grooming one foot and manicuring Us nails, babying a kicking shoe and squinting downfteld at a pair «f silly posts sticking up from a goal line. All of a sudden you are out of a Job, and it's against tho law to keep in shape by booting your wife or kids around Uie house. If you have read 'about Lou Michaels, or know him, you would hardly think that he would be the typo to turn to teaching his trade to youngsters. Yet, that is what the former Colt (and Ram and SteeliT) left footer is doing these days. I/(Mi, who was said to have destroyed numerous West Cuast bars while with the Rams — and almost destroyed an.offensive tackle teammate while a Sleeler — is known for his run-in with Joe Niiniath before the 100!) Super Howl. That, of course, was a put-on. Erratic ixiu was bettor known for walking into bars that only had one customer and demanding that one seat. If Ijrotlier Walt (former Brown linebacker and currerilly .let assistant coach), was in the bistro, Um would leave. But. marriage and responsibility changed Lou IOIIH before lie was cut this year by Ihc Colls after 13 seasons in the 'NFL as a defensive end and kicker, Lou is back in Swoyersville, Pa., and spent

Valley West kickers did not kick any extra points Saturday night. When, was the last time you heard of a junior varsity player getting the game ball, especially at an away game? lllIHIIIIIIIilllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Well, it happened the other day when Red Bank's Jayvees gained some measure of relast week working with the kickers at Wyoming venge for the varsity's loss to Toms River Soulh. Valley West High School. At the game Saturday Alan Burgess made two fine catches of Teddy night, Lou did a radio commentary on defensive Taylor passes for Buc touchdowns and somehow play. wound up with the ball in his hands at the end of Always a controversial figure, Lou holds no the game. Jove for any of the NFL. owners. "With everybody telling Alan to give the oall "If they had called me into the office and back to Toms River South, Ron Signorino, TRS told me the score, I would have retired graceathletic director and varsity coach, came up to fully," he said. "But the way they did It stunk." the youngster and said, "Anybody who can make Tlie former Kentucky All-Amerlcan was cut pro catches like that deserves the game ball. in favor of Jim O'Brien, kicking whiz out of You keep it." Cincinnati who can also play wide receiver. Lou This may start a whole new trend. After a had slowed down as a defensive end and was freshman cross country meet, they could give only used in short yardage situations. the winning runner a compass. Or how about a ' NO TRJUT1I IN AGE boot for Uie soccer star? Erratic Lou lists his a«e at 112. Don't you believe it. Jiut he can still kick them through John "Jeep" Bednarik, former Neptune those silly posts. ' coach, is still turning out excellent football teams at Allentown-Dieruff High School* His sOn is What next, IJIU? "I'd like to coach somethe quarterback on this year's club. where," he answers. Pro, Lou? "Nah, I was thinking about high Bednarik's first quarterback at Dieruff, Ross school. Those owners wouldn't have me," Moore, is at Ohio State and should be Rex Just to keep the Michaels legend alive, Uie Kern's successor next year.

Looking 'em Over

cu n3

"' *"*c"l r*n1l of the world's fastest selling chain saws

g

Easy to start.'easy to run. easy to handla • Cut9 8" hardwood log in 6 seconds; an 8" softwood log in only 3'/ 2 seconds • Takes up lo 20" bar; (ells trees to 3 feet in diameter

j SEE IT NOW AT

MONMOUTH MOWER Inc. O t t N MON. thru SAT. S A.M. Is S P.M. FRIDAY EVES 'TIL 8 P.M.

For the licit in Yard Care Equipment HWY. 35

671-1073

MIDDLETOWN

-THE DAILY REGtSTpt, BED BANK • WJDDLETOWN, N. J.j THURSDAT, OCTOBER 15, 1970 .

Knicks Race Over Royals

Giacomin Gains His First Shutoutas Sabres Tumble

NEW YORK (AP) - The Buffalo Sabres, one of the National Hockey League's two new expansion dubs, were outplayed by the New York Rangers last night but they certainly weren't disgraced. The Rangers blanked the Sabres 3-0 at Madison Square It was the opening game for Garden, outshooting Buffalo Russell Leads Attack the Royals, led by Tom Van47-19 as Ed Giacomin racked Cazzie Russell led the New Arsdale with 22 points, up his first shutout in New "The Royals had a 12-6 lead York attack with 29 points York's home opener. and Willis Reed worked both in the opening four minutes Punch Imlach, Buffalo's ends of the court brilliantly but three minutes later the general manager and coach, Knicks poured in 12 straight w i t h 23 points and 16 said, "A few things pleased me rebounds to wreck the Roypoints and led thereafter. and we were in the game all The Knicks had four other als' debut. the way. But it was simply an Cincinnati opened a 12-6 players in double figures in. inexperienced club playing a eluding Dale Stallworth, 18 lead but the Knicks retaliated veteran club. with 12 successive points and points, Walt Frazier, 17; Imlach praised the work of Dave DeBusschere, 14; and the Royals never caught up. RoberCrozier, former Detroit Tom Van Arsdale had 22 for Dick Barnett 13. Red Wings' goalie.' Crozier the losers. Rule Ready to Go had 44 saves and kept the Buffalo, one of the NBA'B Sabres in contention. Bob Rule said lie didn't Ex-Rangers Hold Out want to play for Seattle. Then new entries, had no trouble SMACKIN" GOOD — New York Kniclci' Dfv* D»he took the court and showed handling another expansion The undermanned Buffalo the rest of the league why baby as the Braves outscored Busschsrs and Cincinnati Roy i l l 1 rookii N«U Archisquad has several former the Cavaliers in each of the they should try to get him — bald balance on their right lagi tfter colliding in a Rangers including Don Marand showed the Sonics why first three periods before s h a l l , Phil Goyette, Reg fight for a rebound as th« bill tails fr«» fait night. clearing their bench in the II they'd better keep him. Fleming and Allan Hamilton. nal quarter. That's the Royals' Tom VanAndaU and Kniclu' W*lt The 6-foot-9 center for the Marshall and Goyette, howDon May's 24 points led the SuperSonlcs, unable to accept Fraiiar locking lags, lower right. Th» Knicks won handiever, are holdouts while HamB r a v e s while Cleveland's the Natiorial Basketball Assoilton is recovering from a broly, 128-104. "• (AP Wlr»pWo) ciation team's contract offer, Bobby Smith scored 21. ken bone in his foot. said last night he wanted lo Fleming, however, was his be traded. old rambunctious self. In the Several hours later he faced second period, he knocked fh.-. Dp^roit Pistons and, desDave Baton unconscious for pite sitting out a large chunk three minutes with a crossof the game with foul trouble, check. He tangled with goalie still managed to pour in 37 Giacomin behind the net in points, 21 of them in the first the third stanza. half. Imlach was pleased with But with all this the Sonics NEW YORK (AP) - Ron 133 attempts for 1,050 yards pass receivers with 24 catches Fleming's aggressive piiy still lost their opener as De- Johnson's run to daylight has and eight TDs. for 373 yards and two touch- a n d lamented only that troit, with a balanced attack opened some room for him Baltimore's Ed Hinton re- downs and Bobby Howfield "Fleming didn't hit Balon led by Dave Bing's 25 points among the National Football tained his lead among AFC continues as the conference's hard enough." and 22 apiece by Jimmy League's top rushers. E m i l e F r a n c i s , the top point-maker with 38 on 10 Walker and rookie Bob La. The New York Giant sophRangers' general-managerCL L -J field goals and 8 extra points. nier, withstood a fourth-quar- omore ace gouged out 142 u n eDpn n en r Q S t . Louis and Oakland coach, enthused over Gil Per'-- surge and beat Seattle 123- yards Sunday in the 30-23 jumped to the front in offense reault, Buffalo's 20-year-old 117. victory over Philadelphia and and Minnesota and Kansas rookie who was the top-rated In other .NBA action, Buf- lifted his season total to 271, amateur selection last June FARMINGDALE - The City on defense. falo bombed Cleveland 107-92, good for fifth place among the Jersey Shore German Shepand cost the Sabres $50,000 in The Cardinals of the Na- the draft. National Conference ground herd Dog Club, Inc. will hold gainers. He was 10th last it's 4th annual Specialty show tional Conference and the deFrancis said that the youngfending Super Bowl champion week. and Obedience Trial on Sun- Chiefs of the American ConLarry Brown, Washington's day, Oct. 25, at Allaire State ference made the biggest adsensational second-year back, Park here. vances, each moving up from MIDDLETOWN - Mrs. added 101 yards Sunday to his Judges for conformation fifth place last week. Min- Thomas Gopsill and Mrs, National Conference-leading are Percy Doane, Ontario, total for 399. The figure leads Canada, who will judge dogs nesota of the National and James Quinn won Tuesday's Oakland of the American best ball competition at the both the National and AmeriWEST LONG BRANCH - can conferences, NFL statis- and intersex competition, each moved up one place. Bamm Hollow Country Club and Irvin Apelbaum, Akron, Winless Monmouth College tics showed yesterday. The Cardinals were aver- here. ' Ohio, who will judge bitches. held a sixth nationally-ranked aging 341 total yards on ofMrs. Harry Charpek teamJohn Brodie of San FranPhiladelphia Textle soccer On the obedience side will fense, 153 on the ground and e d w i t h M r s . Richard cisco continued to lead Na. team to a scoreless tie for the t i o n a 1 Conference passers be Mr. and Mrs. Frank 188 passing. San Francisco, Schwartz and Mrs. George first half here yesterday bewith 66 completions in 99 at- Thrall. Mrs. Thrall will judge despite its 20-6 upset over Los Skinner for second and third fore yielding three goals in tempts for 830 yards and six Novice "B", Open "B" and Angeles, fell to second at 332. places, respectively. . the final five minutes of play The Chiefs have allowed Mrs. Gabriel Molnar and touchdowns; Johnson kept his Utility. ThraJJ will judge Novto lose, 4-0. their opponents only 218 yards M r s . John Santoro were lead among pass receivers ice "A" and Open "A". The Hawks went down, 1-0 with 23 receptions for 229 The show will be superin- per game, 107 rushing and 111 f o u r t h and Mrs. Charles three minutes into the third yards and David Ray, Los tended by Keller Dog Show p a s s i n g , while Denver Chadwell and Mrs. Frank dropped two places to third. period, and then again tight Angeles' picture-perfect kick- Organization of Reading, Pa. Tourine fifth. ened up and held the invaders er, led in scoring with 42 until the last five minutes of points fashioned on 11 field ••••lllillillllllHllilillMlllllll the game before being over- goals and 9 extra points. whelmed. . Floyd Little of Denver rePhiladelphia . (6-0) s a w placed the New York Jets' Hawk goalie Jim Reed make Matt Snell as the American 28 saves, while Bob Spring, Conference's top rusher. man, Mark Reed, Les Palmer Little has 304 yards to 281 for and Ed Smock did out- Snell, who is out for the rest standing jobs in the losing of the season with an injury. cause; Lamonlca Passes Joe MonmouUi's problem was Daryle Lamonlca fired four that it could not generate a g u b s t e n t i a l offense. The touchdown passes Sunday and By CHUCK TRIBLEHORN Hawks, now 0-6, may h a v e stepped into the AFL's No. 1 played the kind of game here passing spot; replacing the Register Sports Editor yesterday which could start a Jets'. Joe Namath. The OakSouthern Regional High School has gone new trend — winning. land ace has 72 completions in one step ahead of Ocean Township which utilized closed circuit television and the instant replay to examine mistakes during its practice sessions. All Southern football games are taped and televised on Island Cable Television, a closed circuit operation thing's certain, each school plays th< perto subscribers within the community. Bassonnel game differently. , ketball games and wrestling matches may If you're a weekend golfer who would also be aired during the winter months. like to dignify the term "duffer", the newlyformed Garden State Chapter of the U. S. Additionally, Southern athletic director Duffers Association may be for you. In Art Criss, a boyhood buddy and high school fact, the first annual GSC/USDA "Duffers' teammate of this writer, has his own TV Classic" — the only really open golf tournashow, "Sports Spectrum", on the same ment — will be staged Saturday and Sunchannel every Friday at 6:30 p.m. How day at Hanover Country Club in New Egypt. about that, Mel? ; Eight additional chapter tournaments have CAGE COACHING CHANGES been scheduled for 1971. If you're interested, With all eyes on football, two significant contact this writer for additional info. basketball coaching appointments have been COLLEGE PIPELINE made. Bob Kitson takes over as head •Darrel! Willis, freshman halfback from mentor at Mater Dei hoping to develop a Long Branch, has helped the Susquehanna new winning image for the Seraph cagers, (Pa.) University's junior varsity football while Bob Dziadosz has been elevated to team get off to a winning start. With Willis the varsity spot vacated by Dick Fosko carrying the ball 13 times for 57 yards and when the latter was named principal at catching three passes for an additional 33 Enjoy the comforts and protection Henry Hudson Regional. yards, the "Little Knights" defeated the of moisture-conditioned air in It seems to be a foregone conclusion 1 Lock Haven State College freshmen, 2O-0. your home. The New General 990 that Marie Lombardi will be settling down lets you feil warm at lower temJuan Roth of Matawan had a goal as in her native Red Bank when she returns peratures, cutting heating costs— Seton Hall University's soccer team dropped from a cruise to the Caribbean and South mak«s your home feel "garden its season opener to Drew University, 5-2. fresh," plants flourish —enjoy America. "It's just not the same without Pete Glleberman of Deal is a sophomore health, avoiding throat and nose Vinee," Marie was quoted by Washington member of the Rutgers University soccer irritations—keeps furniture from sports writer Bob Addie in a report that squad. "dry-out" and fabrics from becomshe is selling the Lombardi home in PotomRaritan's Ed Resch, all «-5, 230 pounds ing brittle, they last longer. The lELECTOI DIAL COM-', ac, Md. IDOL! HUMIDITY UP TO of him, has earned a starting offensive ttneril 990 will pay for Itself in A GALLOH M l HOUR CAPSULE COMMENTS one season. Does not affect furtackle job with the Lehigh University fresh• CLOG FREE solenoid valve — nice operation. Installs easily. man grid team. Resch, of course, was last Its almost official that Tom Ulozas will cleanable monel filter preyear's Daily Register choice for the Thorn join the pro tour early next year. About the vents clogging • NO MOVING PARTS—no pump, McAn scholar-athlete award. only question that remains is whether the fan, or float to wear out • COSTS LITTLE to operate-less , Randy Rose, former Ocean Township 27-year-old Bamm Hollow Country Club than night-light bulb • NO SPRAYING—no calcium resgridder, continues to draw raves from the pro will be granted a two-year-leave of abidue to irritate nose and throat • REVERSIBLE installation — on coaching staff at1 Gettysburg College. The sence or be forced to permanently sever any forced warm »ir furnace, —no "white dust" to disturb 6-3, 240-pound Rose is a sophomore tackle ties with the club. Tall Tom has pledges either left % right sidi houttkiaplng who has been elevated to a starting berth. of support of sponsors to cover about 75 Pat D'Onofrio of Little Silver, ex-Red per cent of the $40,000 he will need for a Bank Catholic performer, was cited for his fling into the big'time for about 24 months. play in the University of Connecticut freshTake little or no stock in the records men's big 40-7 opening game victory over or team performances in junior varsity footthe Coast Guard. D'Onofrio, a pile-driver ball games. The ground rules governing when he has the ball, carried 13 times for who may participate in the Monday after65 yards, noon contests aren't set by the N. J. State Stephanie A. Kessler, a sophomore at Interscholastic Athletic relation, so it's Northfield School, East Northfleld, Mass., not unusual for a boy u see considerable is on the junior varsity hockey team. She action In his school's varsity game, on SatSouth of the Krummy Krupp is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Howard F. urday and come right back to shine in a Kessler of 119 Lincoln Ave., Fair Haven. jayvee encounter two days later. One On Wonderful West Front CINCINNATI (AP) - Cassie Russell sank 29 points and Willis Reed added 23 as the defending National Basketball League champion New York Knlcks outclassed the rookie, laden Cincinnati Royals 128104 last night.

Baltimore blitzed San Diego 12 3-105 and Philadelphia edged Chicago 110-107. In Uie only American Bas. ketball Association game the Utah Stars opened league play by walloping Denver 13499.

ster would become the leader of the Sabres. "He's a heckuva hockey player and has the size, range and stamina to become a great one." • Perreault, who scored the winning goal in Buffalo's 2-1 victory over Pittsburgh last Saturday night, almost ruined

Giacomin's shutout late in the third period. His close-in shot was smothered by the Ranger goalie. New York scored one goal in each of the three periods. Rod Gilbert opened the scoring with a slap shot, Jean Jlatelle made it 2-0 on an unassisted goal and Balon con-

verted a rebound on a power play. The Rangers' record is 1-1. The Hawks routed the Vancouver Canucks 8-2 for their second straight victory while the St. Louis Blues bowed to the Toronto Maple Leafs 7-3 Wednesday night. '

Giants' Ron Johnson Dashes To Daylight in NFLFigures Trial Oct. 25

Hawks Lose, But Show Soccer Sldll

UP GOES THI SHOT — Detroit's Stave Mix, 23, puts up a shot over Seattle Su•perionic Dick Snyder, 10, during last night's NBA game in Seattle. Moving in for • poitible rebound is SsatHa's Don Kojis, 22. (AP Wirephoto)

Gopsill-Quinn Team on Top

Around V About The Sports Beat The Chuck Wagon

ONLY BEER, BOOZE and BABIES SHOULD BE DRY!

The nine-hole participants were led by Mrs. Thomas Brydon and Mrs. William Badecker Jr. with their net 36. Runners-up Mrs. John McHugh and Mrs. Herman Kurre had a net 38. The University of New Mexico swept i three-game baseball series at the University of Arizona in mid-April.

SKIERS FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE

40th Annual

HUNT RACE MEETING sponsored by

Monmouth County Hunt Racing Association SATURDAY, OCT: 17th GATES OPEN 11 A.M.—POST TIME 1ST RACE 2:30 P.M.

YOUR HOUSE AIR SHOULD BE WET. HERE'S H O W ! !

MINER SUPPLY CO

••INMl^^

5 RACES featuring

THE MONMOUTH COUNTY HUNT CUP THREE MILES OVER TIMBER—40th RUNNING

THE MONMOUTH COUNTY GOLD CUP TWO MILES—STEEPLECHASE—26th RUNNING (lino THE HOLMDEL THE NAVESINK

;.:.. VM miles, hurdles ;

THE MON. CO. MIDDLETOWN CUP

.... 6 furlongs, turf l'A miles, turf

WOODLAND r ARM estate of Mrs. Amory L. llaslivll. Red flunk. New Jersey Follow the markers north of Red Bank on Route 35

Admission - $3.00 (Including Tax) - Children Under 12 Admitted Free PONY RIDES. OTHER FEATURES FOR CHILDREN Profits Donated to Load Charities

THE DAILY REGISTER, RED BANK • MIDDLETOWN. N. J.J THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1970

so

Junior Loop In Scramble

Tiremen Hold Lead In Business League

NEW MONMOUTH - The N.J. Shore Tennis Association's Junior League is close to being sewn up by an undefeated Rumson squad, but the real scramble is taking place between four clubs for second place. . Navesink, Long Branch, Little Silver and New Monmouth all have a chance for second best. Rumson (27-0) is almost out of sight, but Navesink, Long Branch and Little Silver are all tied for second at 18-9, while New Monmouth is 17-10. In yesterday's action, Rums o n defeated West Long Branch, 30; Little Silver b l a n k e d Middletown, 3-0; Long Branch shutout Ocean Township, 3-0, and Navesink edged New Monmouth, 2-1.

In the Middletown "B" Jim Harding rolled a 607 League, the league-leading series for Hancher and Satter in the Red Bank BusinessNorco Construction took four men's Bowling League last points from Suburban Gulf. week, l)ut Red Bank Tire Tom Isaksen, rolling for Nor. maintained first place in the co, had 203-244-642. Bob Byorloop by two games after takick's team took tour points ing three straight from Circle from the Keyport Cleaners, over Jersey Shore Line StripChevrolet. „ while R.S & M Builders, with The high, game of the week ing. Al Van Vliet rolling 243-211J.H. Kaufmann and Son Is went to Airport Inn's Bill Golson at 222. High team game third at 9-6 after a 2-1 triumph 627, took three points from Bill Thompson's team. Mike was scored by Briody's (980) over Can Cans. as was the top series (2,585). Rounding out the action, D Schmidt's TV, with Mike rollNationwide-Nill Agency has and D Tool Co. upended ing 225-219, took 3% points J a l /4 game lead over Red James Nannini Inc., 3-0. from Middletown Lanes pro Bank Auto Imports In the Shop. John Savage had a 204,; Peggy Richards had high Sunday Nite Early Mixed game of the week at 199, Bob Kenner, 214; Walt SalmLeague. Jack Weber scored a 587 while Mary Carney rolled a on, 216; Ed Matuszewski, 208; Keith Hogan, 205; Tony Belseries, while Lorraine Horla- 502 series. I.F.F. has the top spot in lezza, 205; Bill Walker, 209; cher had a 544. Bob Kirchner posted a 232 game, and Carol the Airport Plaza Commercial Larry Scott, 210; and George" Last Original Net . League with a 16-4 record. Barnes ran up a 229. Fennell, 214-203. Traded to Colonels Three games separate the Colfax is second at 15-5. The top series was bowled In the Middletown Women's WEST HEMPSTEAD (AP) first three teams In the Elm —The New York Net§ traded LINCROFT LASSES — Holly O'Hern of Middletown, Star League. Terwilligers, af- by Stultz Fuel Oil's John Staf- E a r l y b i r d s League, the league-leading Gentile's MarWalt Simon, their last reter defeating Al's Turf Club, ford at 235-177-235-647. on "Zsa lid," owned by Mrs. John J. Freyer, Willow Best game went to Dutch ket took two from Bob's Su. maining original player from 3-0, has a 12-3 record, while Hill Farm, Middletown, is being led by Lisa Goldar, 1967, to the Kentucky second-place Legal Beagles Streich of Ye Cottage Inn at noco, while H. Wasserman & ' Son took two f r o m J & M also of Middletown. Both girls are looking forward Colonels for a future draft are at 11-4, aftera J-0 verdict 267. Hardware to move into a first to the 14th annual Lincroft Horse Show to be held choice yesterday. place tie. The Keyport CleaSimon, 29, a 6-foot-6 guardSunday at the Thompson County 'Park (Old Brookdale ners took two from Middleforward, averaged 14.4 points Farm) Rt. 520,. Lincroft, beginning at 9 a.m. town Lanes and the Middlea game last season. town Pharmacy took two from Clarksburg Inn. Buck Smith's took two from t h e Keansburg-Middletown National Bank. 61 Lucky NujMt (M. Kelly) UW-1 M.I Trot; M M , 101 In the Monmouth County Blytlm Victor (L. gperendl) Pop ionf (V. rorrltro) 121 Mr B B IM. Puiey) T?«d«r oral <»• ««•>«) Woman's Major League, Uie 121 Oo Bye (R. Irujralalal Demon Duat (H. %\icmi 50-1 Irishman Pick (A. ThornM) -?lck :--. Little Photo Studio took three O«k Orov« Tu (C. C M * *'l 5-1 Whirl Oil <». Mai•Held) ' T»e IMrtH Pirdn.r (L. Boll., 8 1 6-1 from Wychwood Associates, Birilde Fury (R. Oroiman) 81 STH—I M.; F M » J MIDDLETOWN - Crisp but a few of the features the Monmouth County Gold while Ev Walker's team took 8-1 I) 2 1 The Commliilorrer (A. 10-1 5-2 Levl Row Oil (X. Hiraari two from R.S. & M Builders. weather and flaming autumn planned by the committee for Cup. 20-1 7-2n Mac o Chee OR. Stratton) 5-1 J M Win (M. lamb) Lorraine Bellezza's team took foliage will be the backdrop a spectator's enjoyment. The Holmdel, a 1 34-mile 121 SurlnK Bye (J. Oluliml 1ND—I'M.; r u n •••mo. two from Eleanor Gulino's for the exciting five-race proArdbro Jajuar (M. Martynlak) 12-1 Two feature attractions will test for the hurdle division, Edgewood Ml«»ly (No Driven 5U-1 Poplar Direct in. Baldachlno) Admiral Perry (H. rlllon) t e a m a n dGill T r a v e l Oregon! PlaymeW (No Driver) M-l be the 40th running of the was won by Profile, owned by Late Call (F. fiavoil Jr) Hot Cargo (R. Hpd«er») Service took two from Lil gram of sfeeplechasing Satur- Monmouth County Hunt Cup, Augustin Stable. Two flat 10-1 m l — 1 M.j P a w : fi,700. Alton Mite (C. Tl»»j KM 8-5 Mr. Touchdown (W. Poczai Amadio's team. Cobblestones, day at the Woodland Farm es- a three-mile test for timber races on the turf course round Ll«a Ace (J. JtlJJpi 2-1 Henry Allan iN (0. Kovlan) Blllle B«» Bow (M. pioufet) in Prldei Pomp (F. Bavoai with Betty Kirwin rolling tate of Mrs. Amory L. Has- horses, and the Monmouth out the afternoon's racing onip Abb* IL. WuniUrllUl) 121 Joan St. John had a 204 and a "Fun for all the Family" outright property of an owner honorary chairman of the exSuccefli Time iK. Jntertfonato) -l-l Flaihy Kect I No Driver) 1.11 Bjla (H. Flllon, 6-1 Juliet W (W. Roberlll 20-1 Irene Shelly, 203. Taaay Scott 10. Sftlklal, 101 winning.it three times, not Ml«i Twinkle (B Mamlleld) 201 theme prevailing throughout ecutive committee. Members Joey l.art Ml. Stoltel 10-1 Mlddlcbrook (. MIchaelH) 12-1 JTII-I M.) Vmx; »,9M. Jim McCaffrey took scoring the hillside overlooking the necessarily consecutively. include Richard G. Metcalf, Cloudase (R La Polnte, 15-1 2-1 Camden Ailta (H. Fllleni h o n o r s in the Monmouth race course. Pony and hay- Redmand C. Steward Jr.'s president; Mrs. John C. Ellis, 41 Farrlor Boy (No Driver) li-1 Major Slack IP. Conaol, 41 Tamar Ben Joe (C. areenei County Tri-Major League at rides for children, martial Haffaday was the Monmouth vice president; Mrs. Alfred T . Churchy Craln (1 Me Oovernl 6 1 6-1 Captalnn Daughter (No Driver) «-l Strathmore Lanes, rolling 232- music provided by the Keef- County Hunt Cup winner in King Jr., vice president; Mrs. Selections Hlg» aim (BT lohraeyer Jr) in-i Doctor Kllrinre (U Sperendl, 612. Frank Devino totaled !03- fer Memorial Band, and re- 1969, while Mrs. William C. Metcalf, secretary, and Mrs. 1—For* Hone, Demon Dual, Trader 12-1 Ava Java (M. DeutsRh) 225-609, and Pete Piccarriello freshment tents scattered Riker's Georgia Joe account- Amory I. Haskell Jr., trea19-1 Red F U i IB. We Kenna) 5—Admiral Terry, l « l a Oil, Hot Kappa Kay (No Driver) . . 15-1 throughout the grounds are ed for last year's running'of surer. 235-600. 3 - K a w h V * Heel, scamp Trapp,

Bowling Roundup

ROLLERS' CHECK — Mrs. Charles Stout of the Monmoutft County Women's Bowling Association checks lift of entries for the first mixed doubles tourney with Clemens Jacobsen, MCBA director, and co-chairman of i n * event. The tournament will take place at Stfattimore Lines, Matawan, Nov. 21-22. A doubles' re-am will consist of a man and woman, and is open to all bowlers. Squad reservations can be mad* by , league members for small groups or even an entire mixed league. Entries must be filed fey Nov. S. (Register Staff Photo)

Walking Competition Set For 4 Straight Sundays LONG BRANCH-The N.J. Amateur Athletic Union's 10mile walking championship event will be held here Sunday and *ill kick off four consecutive Sundays of championship competition. The AUU 10-mile walking event will start at Takanassee Lake at 1:15 p.m. with competitors making the rounds of an Elberon course five times. This race, and the three to follow, will be staged by the Long Branch Summer Festival and Winter Activities Committee in cooperation with the Shore Athletic Club. On Oct. 25, the N.IAAU 15mile title will be on the line at Takanassee Lake in another 1:15 start. Slated for 1:15 on Nov. 1 will be the NJAAU 20mile walking title event. Completing the slate will be the NJAAU 10-mile handicap

walk at 1:15 on Nov. 8. The events are open to all a m a t e u r athletes with trophies and medals awaiting the leading finishers. Novices to the sport are encouraged to give the races a try. Set for 11 this Sunday morning at Monmouth College will be a special high school and c o l l e g e two-mile walking event. Competitors will have their times submitted lor national recognition on a postal basis. Entry information on any of these races is available from Elliott Denman, the NJAAU race walking chairman, 28 N. L o c u s t Avc., West Long Branch.

St. J o h n V i a n n e y liunnerg Triumph HOLMDEL - St. John Via. nney upped its jayvce crosscountry record to 5-1 here Mrs. Maura Wins yesterday by easily defeating St. Peter's of New Brunswick, Grandmother GoJf 18-46. EATONTOWN - Mrs. Jo- St. John's freshman team is teph Mauro shot a net 35 to 6-1 this season. win the Grandmothers' Tour, 81. .l«hn'> (IS) • HI. 1-mrr'a ' 1 0 nament at Old Orchard Coun1. l)»n Crnmpr U i , M:<5: 2. Hub McfiRUly (J) ]4:ft2; 3. ntch Oimntry Club. mnno |P>, 15:06; <. Clary HUlr-y '.Ii. 15:17: 5, Mike Moore [Ji, Mrs. Leo Levin, whohad low lfi:28: B. flli-ve Svallwo I J I . I.VM; 7. Frank Htianalian (J). 16:48: 8. putts with 13, was second with Jim FlUaptrlck (J>. 1VM: 9. f/inn!o Mpiwrt . 16:03; 10. Andy a net 36. i McDonald
Freehold Today

40th Annual Hunt Meeting Provides Five-Race Card

Entries

ATI!—I M.i Pace; »1,*». 2-1 Btr-plicn Jamen (No Driver, 3-1 Butler Time (A. Nllem 4-1 Smolicy Byrd IB. Hlgflml 3-1 Pal It (H. flrayi B-l nrtimmer Pick (J. RIEXO) 8-1 Nan Cherle IE. Mualleld) 8-1 (linger Wine IM. Proman) Elwood Pace IB. Lohmeyer Jr) 10-1 15-1 Rlllfl Special (A. Thomai) 20-1 Kalldanlia (Q. Silklal)

1TII—1 M.: Pacr; K!,90l). • •ft tlnn Jtian (F. Tagarleltol 5-2 KAilnn Row ail (B, Hnnner, 4-1 dnehemfl Dad (R. Feah) 6-1 Noble Hope (R. Interrlorato)

Tom Qnlck 4—I.lnda l.fe, Ijidy Perlorntanee. 6—Tamar Ben Joe, Clamden Ailra, Captains Dsuthler (—Builer Time, Drudder pick, Mrphfn Jimea 7—EMon Row oil, Don Jaao. Lucky8-Uvl*Bow Oil, The Cammlialon» - K ' l r y AllnnV Sally W . Prldei Pomp 10—Klrnrdo Pick, l^niburn, Kenor mix U-TanMi, SnecMi Ttom, Homely Beat Bet — R*whln>a Heel

-SPECIAL-

FREE GIFTS

Early Bird

GIFT

DURING OUR

Yesterday's Results 111— r»™j l m.t at,4«o: T-l: 1)6.3 HUh Fly Syrd (Molnar) 12.00 4.41 j.flf) Carpathian (Sield) 3.00 !.«) Brenzas Demon (Foaten _ 7.80 Hid—rarr; I m.i 11,400: T-!:OT.! Ctilpmnnii DlrccL (Fillon) 4.30 2.fifl'/00 Peter Brooks iRnlla) 3.60 2.80 Church Key (no>p(ner> „ 3.40

SPECIAL HALLOWEEN GRAND OPENING Thurs. Fri., Sat., and Sun., Oct. 15-16-17-18

TIGER GLIDER TO THE FIRST 1000 CUSTOMERS

llallr Doutiln ( U ) KSM 3rt—1'«»; 1 m.i 11,800; T2:M.| nood Reanon (Smlthi ... 13.20 7,20fi6(1 Tar Foot Mlml (Oagilardl) 7.00 7.80 Qulqk Dottle (Hclii) 8.20 IC»«rla

gKI.no

llfc—Troll I m . ; 11,11*1: T 3 : ( » Prince Yoniicr I Flllon) 3.WI .1.20 2.80 Oeorgani* Wyn ( C a m ' fi.20fi.W) Noryork Cheer (Carey) : fi.io Mh—Pace: I nt.l 11,800; T-3:n«.l Honorable iFlllon 3.80 2.40 2.20 Ethyl Brook (Floyd! ' 3.002.IO Yankee John (Plourre) ....2.(0 Eiacla

WIN A GIANT

PRIZES

JL SURPRISES J

TOY FILLED Y

0

Sliver Strike (Olamanco)

^

BROAD STREET AT BERGEN PLACE

741-3700 Serving this area since 1887

I

C

E

0

F

;

VINYL INFLATABLE

Trick or Treat Witch

Tiger Toy

IMh-Tral: I m.; M.nooj T-UM.I Irtean Hannver (Uan'o) 17.203.20 4.(10 Palm Trudy (Quarlltrl 1.1)1.41 Floodlight tFerranto) 5,Jo

and Loan Association

O

or

t l h - r a w i I m.i i!,000; T-lllH.I Jnanle Baal (Serbeil ....11.60 4.(10 4.00 Junle Hinover. (Huebneh) , J.Oo .1.00 Bella Kenyon (Oagllardl) „ .f.so tx«rl» ( l .

Bed Bank Savings

H

deluxe

Kiact* (3.7) I87.to Wh-racei 1 m . : 1:1.Jon: T-J:OI Warrior Hanover (H'nen 8.00 l.«0 3.oo w .1 w lechiomri ...3.00 2.«o Oranil Jewel (Greene) 1.60

Where you save does make a difference*

C

Tiger Basket

2.80

lib—rare: I m.s »MW>| T-t;
Since 1934 when Congress established The Federal Savings end Loan Insurance Corporation no one has ever lost a penny in a savings account insufedbythis agency of the United States Government. Your savings witb.us are insured up to $20,000 andwe offer excellent earnings too, '•/...

R

(3.1) glo.00

«lh—I'acet I m . ; 18,200: T-J:OJ.I DlamondR Bet (Harner) 4.80 3.80 2 HO Afton Rliot (Knlly) 7.803.W)

Not apenny lost.

U

« ' ! ! ' f ' " ' ' " i "••! Midrn T.iioi.n DMTIma iaer«li (l.io «.2O3.a» •«n»fl H u e lOarharlnol ....IS.eo 3.60 fdaLady ( P o r w "

Cage Clinics Set in Hazlet ' HAZLET - Saturday basketball clinics for sixth, seventh and eighth grade boys .will be held Oct. Wand 24 from 10 a.m. to noon at Rantart High School. Sponsored by the Iteoica. tion Commission, the program will have as instructor John Hyan, head basketball coach at Raritan, Registration may be made at the first session. Coach Byan invites mem. bers of the Hazlet-Holmdel Athletic League to observe the clinics, which will be followed by refresher classes for coaches.

Vi

HOT POPCORN and CIDER and KIDDY FAVORS

hxtra Gift ONE JAR OF

SPICE FREE START YOUR ENTIRE SET NOW!

BONUS



$5.00 WORTH OF EXTRA PLAID STAMPS TOO!

£sso HUMBLE OIL & REFINING CO. Cor. WHITE ST. and MAPLE AVE.

Red Bank, N. J. Phone: 741-9641

HALLOWEEN PUMPKIN or ONE OF THREE GIANT 48" PLUSH

TIGERS or

2 ATLAS SNOW TIRES We Give

PLAID STAMPS

FREE TRICK or TREAT BAG FOR THE KIDDIES

31

THE DAltY REGISTER, RED BAflK • MIDDLETOWN, N. I.} THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15. 1970 ANNOUNCEMENTS LOST AND FOUND t o s T — BladTLaVador, white cheit vicinity Little Sllver-Runuon, about 1 weeks aBO. Answer! to came "Bunky." Reward. 747-0338. LOST — M»le ahepherd.collle type, vi. clnlty Leonardo. One ear stands up one down. 381-2178. LOST — IrUh terrier pup. Five-month, old female. Blx heartbroken kids, cliff, wood area. Reward. 566-0307. LOST — Blue Point Slamene, male, vl. c,nl.yL,ncro,t.Ca.W LOST — Pendant watch. Area or Broaa St., Red Bank. Reward. Call 201-3875. "FOUND — Gold wedding band, In vk-ln Ity St. James School. Initials a . F E.S.P.O. 741-0721,

PUBLIC NOTICE pLAy GROUP — There's room In our play group (or a three-year-old girl. Holmdel only. 846-4285.

AUTOS FOR SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE

AUTO FOE SALE

AUTO FOR SALE

AUTO FOB SALE

AUTOS FOR SALE

AUTOS FOR SALE

AUTOS FOR SALE

FORD SQUIRE WAOON — Low 1968 CORVETTE COUPE — 427-43S h.p 1970 BUICK SKYLARK — To settle esF * H Motors Inc. " ^ FORD GALAXIE — 1960. Very good 19B8 CORVETTE —Two tops. automaU 1M3 • - - full power, new Ur^r t like new. engine. 3.60 Posl-rear. AM-FM. New tate. 4800 miles. Air conditioning, radio, Hwy. 39 • .1 Eatontown. N. I . condition. $200. Call 26I-H32 between 8 ic. (2795. BAILL.Y BROS., INC. If you need a uied c a r and bav« bad belted tire. 20.000 meticulous miles. whltewall tires, automatic, etc. $2900, 747-0596. - . 542-11U — 842-4219. • * _a.m. and 2 p.m. credit problems In the past or never Forest green, fawn Interior. A jewel. 671-3392. ECONOMy C A B — 1OT Bulck Skjiark. . TOWN * COUNTRY DODBE 1M6 BUICK ELECTRA — Convertible. 1966 TOYOTA CROWN — Bxcellept con. had any credit before and are told by Must sell' $3695, Discriminating buyers BUICK SKYLARK — 1668. Two-dom transmission. Excellent confll. Air conditioned, fully equipped. New dition. $G00 firm or tRfce over low Standard 60 Main SI,. Matawan everyone that you need a co-signer, try only. Call 741-5599, ask for Henry. tlon. Bcstofier over »3U0. Call 2M^O23; hardtop. Vinyl roof, full power, air conUrea. Excellent condition. 51650. Call monthly payments, 7*7-j379. 5966100 us now. BUHLER 4<«ITTER ditioned. AM-FM radio, lmmaculatr _owner. 842-5041. TJt.4 — Excellent eondl. | 1358 CORVETTE — 4-3pecd, new Urea, 1965 TRIUMPH S80O. CO YOU NEED A CAR? CALL NOW condition. 74M355. PLYMOUTH - CHRYBLER If you are 21 or over and riave had proh. 19G8 DODGE" ^~ Coronet 500.~Two.door" mags, blue metal ilako paint. Call after Uon. MuBtHCll. 3280 Hwy. 35, Hazlet. 264-0198 Phono Jim, 264-3760 Y 1S65 FONTIAC Tempest. 6-cyllnder, lems obtaining credit—but have a hardtop. Air. Minister's t a r . 842-6466 5, 872-1CD8. • . standard shift. Excellent condition. Ra- ateady job—I will arrange financing for Town* Chevrolet 671-4543 between 5-7 p.m. FOR IMMEDIATE CREDIT OK DTTNE BUGGY — 1070. Rebuilt enclne Atlantic Highlands dio, heater. Good transportation. 1650 von. PAID. QARNISHEES AND JUDG- First Ave. BUICK GS 400 - Convertible. E x . and frame. ConvL'rliblc top. Custom firm. Call after 6 p.m. 531-1798. 291-1101 A small down payment may be re- 19C8 MENTS ACCEPTED: i-ellent condition. Radio and heater. acals, and more. S245O. 264-0380. AUSTIN AMERICA — 'twodoor. four- VOLKSWAGEN — ~1964.~Oood station quired. Power steering, brakes and ton. P.emo. ENGLISH FORD — 1059. Very good Transportation Call 842-6466 MANOR AUTO ACCEPTANCE speed, J1.S72. P.O.E. slightly Mgfcer car. J375. 1965 OLDSMOBILB 88. Four, vable tape- play optional. Call 81--1886 condition. ExcelK-nt Htatlon car. $200, MANOR AUTO ACCEPTANCE SERVICE wkh automatic. Also Sprites. Midgets, door hardtop. Factory air. Cull powe Specials _afler(i p.m. Call 741-2375 after 7 p m. • SERVICE 162 Newman Springs Rd. Red Bank MGB roadsters — GT, A&G MOTORS, S795. Call 842-3052. 162 Kcwman Springs Rd. Red Bank TOYOTA ColtOLLA — 1969. White with BONNEVILLE—Convertible Aabury Park. 775-3483. L E 1IANS — Tempest, Power 11)63 1M3 RAMBLER WAGON—«, «ulo. . tinted class. 12 000 miles. Four-speed, 1066 1967" VOLKSWAGEN FastbacK, —„ Bicering, power Drakes, automatic. Very Kroll Motors m e 1963 RAMBLER WAGON—6. stick CIRCLE CHEVROLET blue. New tires and battery. Excellent Long Branch, N. J. Mustjsull. Best offer. Call 812-5212. clean. Asking $1100. 741-3288. 1061 CATAL1NA—2-door'Jlartlop 325 Maple Avc Red Bank condition, 51350. Call 775-6328 before If 270 Broadway 222-360O AUTOMOTIVE REPROCESSED a.m. or^ after 6 p.m. 741-3130 OLDSMOBILE — 19G8~ Luxury se- 1B65 RAMBLER—i-door, 6. autoinatic NO <'ASH REQUIRED 19&1 DODGE—2-door, 6, automatic DATSVn AUTOS FOR SALE dan. Top at line. All extras. Cream puff. THE FINEST SELECTION — OI new BEE A "RU83ELL MAN" — For the WASHIMOTON'S AUTO SERVICE Call 812-fi4li(i for lnstanl Credit K l M . Call 222*8333 or 7*1-7748. and used cars In Monmouth County. best car buys. RUSSELL Oldirnoblle- 370 We need room TOP TRADE ALLOWANCE — SuBroad St. 264-1323 Keyport l!»70 _CHRY3LER convertible, laclory PACKARD — 19ST. Uluc-grHy. four. Over 100 alr-condltloned new cars In Cadillac Co., 100 Newman Springs Rd., perb Service. DOWNES PONTIAC, «J Btock. McGLOIN BUICK-OPEL INC., Bed Bank. 741-0910. IMOBILEOS Luxury four-door door, pood running cnmlltlon. Tires, raKIT3ON CHEVROLET CO. RASSAS 'PONTIAC Lower Main St., Matawan. 568-2299. Shrewsbury Ave., New Shrewsbury. hardtop, factory air, full power. dio. $110. Call 843-4893 afte.H. 395 Broad St. 741-51S0 Red Bank BAYSHORE CHRYSLER-PLYMOUTH 741-6200. ]%(i CHRYSLER Newport eedan, full CAMARO 307-1069. Automatic. Power Eves, until 9 $800 First Aye.. Atlantic Highlands RAMBLES 440 — 1901. Sports conTWIN BORO MOTORS Excellent condition. $2100. Call 1061 GTO — TrI power. 4-speed, with 201-9200 1063 FORD* Falrlane 500 station wagon. Hlcciing, 8 MUST SACRIFICE vertible. Power brakes, steerinp, top. Jeep Sales and Service *--°20_Sa!tcr 6 p m . many extras. Best offer. Call alter 6, full pOWfE 1069 AUTOMATIC — Austin American. A-l. Must be seen. $550. H1LLMAN 1565 Buick Conv. 340 cu. 30O t).T. Price start at 12630 plus freight 1964 CHRYSLER four door hardtop, HITI CK~H FORT WAGON — 11165. An to - 402.7814. Excellent condition. SHOO. Moving. 812. MINX — 1CG2. Convertible. Looks end Air 747-0010 Shocks Tape Dec, V a n y Extra: full power, miitlc. Nine paHsenger, Loaded. Good 1960 FORD — Convertible, Running con. iaB7 runs fine. J175. 812-1005. Call 493-4064. 1!)C6 KORI) wagon, full power. condition. $750, Call 872-1886, dition. $50. ]i)6fi FOKD, nalfixle 500. hardtop, factoSCENIC CAR SALES ^ i T!W8^ONT rv air, full power. Call 741-1069. , Hwy^36 872-0221 Highlands l!)(iti DODGE, Sedan, fully equipped. Must sell. Call VOUCSWAGEN 1959—Engine "perfect. l!M55 VALIANT V-2O0 sedan full power EXTRAORDINARY VALUE Good station c a r . S10O. 1364 GRAND PRIX — 5325. Call 542-7835 I!)fi5 DART GT-Hardtoj), a i r coniil- CHEVROLET lWJ6~Xlr. Power steer741.0271. tlonlng. full rower after 5 or on weekends. InK. brakes Ext-ellent .tomUtlun. Best 1082 BUICK WAOON Iflii.i OLDS 88, hardtop, full power _^ Snow (Ires. J250. 1966 VOLKSWAGEN— Fastback ecrtan. \W1 CAniLLAC, convertible, factory ^iH^YSdL???: 671-l749evcs1 Extra tires and rims. $895 or best oirer, air. full rower. Call 431-2830. 1070 r L Y M m r f l Y F U R Y I i r F n u r Call T87-05O8. 1002 FORD Falrlane, hardtop, full pow. rinnr hflrdtop. Power Htonrlne. Wld« MUSTTBLL — 1968 Pontlac LeMam. ovals. Factory air. $'i.9O5. 797-1983. 1 1968 FORD — Galaxle 500 fcur-tloor Aulnmalk , power Bteertne. Two new infil RUICK, Kiviera. factory air. full hardiop. Automatic. liO.OOO original tires, chrome reverse wheels. ;i950. 291. ' 1961 CHEVROLET miles, new c a r condition. White with Four-door. Good transportation. black vinyl roof, factory air, full power ]9fi'J CHRYSLER, New Yorker, hardtop. 264(5895 five new whltewall belted tires. £66-riGSt. full power 1902 TEMPEST — Passed Inspection. ]
CREDIT PROBLEMS —

UNDER $500

AUTOS FOB SALE

AUTO FOB SALE

AUTOS FOR SALE

AUTOS FOR SALE

100%

AUTOS FOR SALE

MECHANICALLY GUARANTEED

USED CARS

1470 COUGAR

1969 CAMARA

1968 FALCON

1967 BUICK

Light blu* With black vinyl roof automatic transmiision, power iteering and air * condition.

Z28, hardtop, 4-speed transmission. White.

Two-door, 6-cylinder, automatic transmission, air conditioned, . . light green,

LeSabre, 4-door hardtop, white with black roof, automatic transmission and power steering.

$3195 1970 MUSTANG Hardtop, red with black vinyl roof, V-8, automatic transmission andv power stesring.

$2795 1970 MAVERICK Two-door, grain with standard transmission.

$1895 1969 T-BIRD Two-door Landau. Full power Including air condition. Gray with black vinyl roof.

$3895 1969 FORD Salaxia "500", 2-door hardtop, green, power steering, automatic .transmission and air condition.

$2895 1969 MERCURY Marquis, 2-door hardtop. Burgundy with black vinyl roof, automatic transmission, powar steering and air

-condition.

$2795

$2495 1969 DODGE Pick-up truck, 6-cylinder, red and black.

$1795 1968 DODGE Dart, 4-door, 6-cylinder and automatic transmission. Green.

$2295 $1595 1969 BARRACUDA 1968 VOLKSWGN Six-cylindar, standard tranimission, green with tan vinyl roof.

$1995 1968 CHRYSLER New Yorker, 4-door hardtop, whit* with black vinyl roof, automatic transmission, power steering and air condition.

$2695 1968 BU.CK Skylark, 2-door hardtop, blue, automatic transmission and power steering.

$2295 1968 MERCURY Monfago, 2-door hardtop. Sold with black vinyl roof, automatic transmission, and power steering.

Sedan, 4-speed transmission. Beige with tan interior.

$1495 1968 CHEVROLET Impala, 2-door hardtop, Cray, automatic transmission and power steering,

$1995 1967 CORVETTE

1967 A I I S T I N H E A L E Y B P R I T B — Con.

verttbU'. dood condition throughout. Low inlleHRe. Must be seen. Reasonatilc. 8t2.!lH43. iwiVUKVY II~-^Cond t-ontlltlon, p e r . ff.t fin- atnllim cur or itudcnt. »25O. CHI 842-7880 nr 8J2-7881. _, 1S67 MKKCEI)B8~~BBNZ — DIOBel (.'rciim Puff. Dealer serviced. 7<7.3034 alter 5 p.m. ^

$1895 1967 FORD

1963 VONtBWA(TEN~BUB — <15 online, Gooil ciMutlllnn. nerds work. $400 or Delt offei. After 6.J^.8927.

Galaxie "500", 4-door. V-S, automatic transmiision, white with blue roof,

$1495 1966 FORD Two-door hardtop, blue, automatic transmission and power steering,

LAST OF THE 70s!

$1495 1966- FALCON

Convertible, 4-speed transmission. Green.

$2995 1967 PLYMOUTH Fury III, 2-door hardtop, green with black vinyl roof, 8-cylinder, automatic transmission, and power steering.

1962 KOItrfFALCON — Sedan. Blx cyl. Inrlrr. Ktfllutard. $100. Call 787-7697 after 4::i0p.ni ; 19B8 NOVA~^n' r our-door, six cylinder, nutnmatlc trnnsmfsBlon, power Dr&kei, Cold. Good condition. 741-9470. t!W2 C11KVV NOVA — Station waion, Good condition. IleBt ortcr. M2-9385 af. Ivrji rujii. 7»«s"~voLi
$1695 1967 FORD

Eight-passenger Club Wagon, 6cylinder, standard transmission.

Convertible, 6-cylinder, 4speed transmission, blue with black roof.

$1295 1952 SEAGRAVE

Eight-cylinder, automatic transmission, white with red interior.

Country Squire station wagon, Maroon, V-8, automatic transmission, and power steering.

Fire Engine, 12-cylinder, pumping engine "750 G.P.M., pump and hose,

$1895

$1995

$1595

ifilioB luitT — 1964, stick »lx. On« owner. Low mllr $M5

CI hracllBVIloXET IMPALA 8 8 — COH. verllblc 3'J7". Wldo ovals. Factory » l r . l t sc^e to appreciate. 741.715T

WHILE THEY LAST

$1295 1965 MUSTANG

$2495 1967 FORD

$1995 1968 MUSTANG

l l ) 5 3 " n u i f K - - Original 347656 m l l M . Kxccllcnt condition. J40O, B _ _ C l l jj M ^ r t ^ ;

LTD, 4-door, Blue, automatic transmission and power steering.

BRAND NEW

(More Classified Adi On The Next Page)

DUSTER

AUTOS FOR SALE

C. Douglas Alan MERCEDES-BENZ Sales & Senrie* Fortign or Domtitic D«llv«r/

MANY OTHERS TO CHOOSE FROM

BIG SELECTION OF 1971 FORDS

DAILY FORD RENTALS

ALSO: "MUSCLE PARTS" "HI-PER PARTS"

POPULAR PARTS FOR ALL CARS

® 0 D D • •

TOM S FORD

HWY 35

264-1600

PREPARATION & CONDITIONING TRANSPORTATION AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION RADIO WHITEW ALL TIRE5 UNDERCOAT

1N0aanpartAv«. LlltltUvtr

842*5381

CATALINA — TEMPEST

298

DOWN PAYMENT OR TRADE

KEYPORT

COMPLITI LEASE flAH

;1 9 7 0 I PONTIAC SAVINGS

u MAI Mommr rAYMHrsAmovumaii; AHHUAI mcMACt RAH 11.01: TOTAl UHAHCI CHASOt U79.28; SUM Of 1M PAY MINIS U1St.lt

NOW SHOWING FOR 1971... GREMLIN

ILOWEST USED CAR PRICES IN THE AREA

AND NEW FOR 1971

U A B U CT n U M l CI

\

ALL USED CAR PRICES HAVE BEEN SLASHED TO MAKE ROOM FOR THE 1971 CHRYSLERS & PLYMOUTHS ARRIVING THIS MONTH! NOW'S THE TIME TO SAVE HUNDREDS! PAY US A VISIT NOW; YOU'RE BOUND TO FIND THE CAR YOU WANT!

SPORTABOUT 4-Dr. Wagon

'62 DODGE WGN

$297j '65 FORD WGN. ..: $997 !'67 POMTIAC •;:;.

$1597

Station Wogon, radio & healer, auto. Falrlane, 9 passenger, air condition |Cotclina 2-door liardtop, air condiautomatic, power steering. R&H tioned, outomatlc, power etc,

'62 OLDSMOBILE $197 Four-door.

SB,

R&H. Automatic.

'63 MERCURY ORDER YOURS TODAY! IMMEDIATE DELIVERY ON ALL 1971 MODELS

$2599

$1899

r

*

PLUS FREIGHT

BIG DISCOUNTS ON ALL 1970 LEFTOVER MODELS! JAVELINS • REBELS • AMBASSADORS HORNETS-i PLUS FREIGHT

Station

UP TO $800 OFF!

ALSO...

1

SAVINGS AS HIGH AS $995

,

$1475

1967 OLDSMOBILE

$1695

1967 MUSTANG Automatic

Automatic, radio* hflater, two-door. Green.

1969 OPEL KADETT

Two-door station wagon. Automatic, factory air' conditioning, radio, healer.,

1968 JAVELIN

$1575

Two-door Sports Cor. Standard, radio, heater,

1968 VOLKSWAGEN

«

Two-door. Radio, heater. Red.

1968 AMBASSADOR

.».

1968 MERCURY i

$1875

Montego MX. Four-door, ouforriallc, radio, heater, P.S. factory air.

1968 RAMBLER

$1295

American, Two-door,, radio, hooter.

1967 REBEL 770 .

, Automatic, radio and htottr. 33X00 miles.

$1375 $ 595

Twn-door convertible. Red.

$1395

Two-door hordlop, automatic, power steering, power brakes.

:$ 875

Falrlane 500 two-door, V-8, radio, heater,

1966 RAMBLER

"..

$ 895

f^nor-door wnnon, automatic transmission, radio ond heater

1965 CHRYSLER

CREDIT TERMS

'67 MUSTANG

$1397

Convertible, automatic, power steering, radio and healer.

tc suit your budget

'67 CHRYSLER : $1797 New Yorker, four-door hardtop. Air ~....$1097 conditioned, lull power, Wagon, Country Squire, 10 pt '67 CADILLAC $2797 automatic, power steering, etc. '63 BUICK $297 wildcat conv. BJ.R, auto., p. 5. |'«5 IMPERIAL $1097 DcVUin conv., air cond, full powe' Four-door hardtop, air conditioned, '6S VOLKSWAGEN 51397 power, '63 BUICK $597j full Two door stick shift, rodlo & hooter. LcSobrc A dr., radio, heater, ojto '66 DODGE $497 '68 PONTIAC mollc, power steering. ..$2197 Coronet, i-tir., radio, heater, auto,, Tempest Custom 3-dr. hardtop, air '63 CHEVROLET $797 power steering, while conditioned, outo,, PS, radio & healer, Impala convertible, radio and hooter, '66 BUICK WGN $997 68 COMET $1497 automatic* power steering. Special station wagon, automatic, Twodoor h d l o , oulo, R1H, PS. power steering, rodlo ana) heater, '63 DODGE 5797 69 TOYOTA $1397 M 440 4-cJr. sedan. R&H, cuto,, P. S. '66 CHEVROLET $997 Corolla two door icdan. £ '64 FORD 5497 Two-door hardtop, automatic, R&H. '69 OPEL $1497 Convertible, radio and heater. '66 DART GT $997 '63 CHRYSLER $197

4-dr. sedan.

Ri.ll,

'65 FORD

Two door

hardtop, automatic, R&H.

Two-door

hardtop, outomatlc, P5.

5497 '66 CHEVROLET

dr. iporl coup*, R&M. ispe«d, etc.

$1097 '69 TOYOTA

automatic.

$1497

Corolla stoflon wagon, radio I heater.

$697 '66 MERCURY $1197 '69 PONTIAC $2397 lustom 5 . 1 dr. hardtop, radio, healer, Parklane 4-dr, air condllionod, IUIO., power storing, bucket srats '64 VOLKSWAGEN $897 ma'le, power slocrfria, R&H, Rodlo and tieoter. 69 ROADRUNNER $2497 '66 CHRYSLER $1197 our on thp floor, rodlo, heuler. Newport, 4 dr., air conditioning, R&H, '65 CORVAIR $197 'power steering, brakes, automatic, Convertible/ rodlo & heater, auto. '69 CHEVELLE $2597 PONTIAC $1397 Malibu two-dr. hardtop. Rodlo, heater, '65 DODGE $597 '66 Bonnevllle convertible, rodio, heater, 'auto., power steering. Must he seen. Coronet. 4 dr./ radio, healer, auto- automatic, power steering matic, power steering, '69 CHRYSLER $3597 CHEVELLE $1697 :ondltlonlnf|, 'own and Country slollon wagon, air '65 GMC $597 '66 power ttccr Ing. Mollbu 2 clr liardtop, radio, healer, Panel truck. flutomollc, power Peering, vinyl rool 70 CAMARO $3097 '65 MUSTANG ..$697 '67 RAMBLER Sporl 2-door' hnrdlop, 4-\pct
2-dr.

hdtp. Rod, A must we value.Rebel

2-dr, oulo.,

power

ileerina.

mlleofifl IKt price 14500.

'65 PLYMOUTH $797 '67 VOLKSWAGEN ....$1197 70 DUNE BUGGY $1497 Ml tonv., R&H, outo., P. S Two-door illck uliftl A real buy, must bo seen '65 CHRYSLER Newport 2-dr,, hardtop, automatic, '67 CHRYSLER $1197 70 TOYOTA S1697 power iteering, brakes, R&H. Ncwptjtl four-door, oulo., P.S., R&H. OPEN EVES. "TIL 9:30

Radio and hooter.

4 PARTIAL

$1450

1965 AMBASSADOR

$1475

1965 RAMBLER

:

S 895

Four-door sedan, power steering, air conditioned'

$ 5?5 woo»n,' nidlb, li«ol«r.'

FROM

n

< S

I TOYOTA! - ^ CHRYSLER • PLYMOUTH TOYOTA 7O O RT. 3 6 , EATONTOWN S42-SSOO

PONTIAC I 62 Lower Main St.

MATAWAN

566-2299

§ <

Open Daily Til 9 P.M. J 1 U

BRAND NEW ]

$ 795

JO

IN STOCK

5 I

IISJING

$1150

Newport Iwo-door hardtop, air conditioning, power steerlrjg, power brakes.

1965 COMET

COLORS TO CHOOSE

a roll a 2-aoor, only 4,000 ml, (Ike new.

Kormann Ghla

MODELS and

|

"'66 VOLKSWAGEN ..$1097

Four-door, Automatic, rodlo, heater, V-B.

Two-door hardtop. Automatic! roHlo, healer,-vinyl top.

1967 MUSTANG, Air Conditioned. V-8

$1575

:•

$1497

Radio, tiffoter.

Six-cylinder. Rodlo, t-.«of«r.

1966 FORD $1495

Four-door iedan, Automatic, radio and hfrator,

$1097 '67 PLYMOUTH

oulomallc. Fury I I I , 4dr, hardtop, air contflloned, auto., PS, radio and healer.

$197 ARRANGED

'64 VOLKSWAGEN

Convertible, automatic, full power, radio and heater.

1966 T-BIRD, Air Conditioned $1395

Two-door, ronio, heour,

Station wogon, rodlo & tieotir, auto.

300

RED BANK

1966 TRIUMPH

'65 VALIANT ...„;

R8.H, P. S.

'64 DODGE

TWIN-BORO MOTORS

1969 VOLKSWAGEN*

auto.,

'63 CHEVY WGN

New Yorker, 4-tlr.# automatic, rodlo, heater, power steering.

Extra Savings On All Executive Demo's!!

747-0040 NEWMAN SPRINGS RD. RAMBLER SELECT USED CARS

wogon,

$197

Wed. & Sat. Til 6 P.M. Between Hwys.

51726 at Parkway Overpass >J

lultlty t o r n FiM H.V ll.>«liH SldlH 1'4 Milt till V K » « « ! l SkippitgCNHr

BONNEVILLE—GRAND PRIX •r 1 "•'

i

32

. THE DAILY REGISTER, FED BANK - MIDDLETOWN, N. U THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15. 1970 AVTO FOR SALE

AUTO FOH SALE

THE

1971 VOLVOS ARE HERE! SEE THEM TODAY . .

RED BANK AUTO IMPORTS AUTHORIZED DEALER Newman Springs Rd.

741-5884

Red Bank

WHAT A DIFFERENCE A DEALER MAKES!

AUTOS FOR SALE

AUTOS FOR SALE

AUTOS FOR SALE9

TRUCKS FOH SALE

BUSIVKSS NOTICES

BOATS AND ACCESSORIES

TOP BERV1CV - , 9 ^ 1 « PLYMOUTH - 1969 J U R Y Jit. Four BUICK GRAN 6PORT — IMS, Blu« conCHEVROLET - J m p t f a Super ANTIQUE — 1930 Chevrolet panel 26* OWENS CABIN CRUISER — Twin BLACK Jr. You m m e it wi'U tart S2<. automatic l*ow milcajrc. Excellent con. paws. V8. J9O0. 842-282S after A p.m. radio, heater, good condition, $500, Call 100^ rebuilding motor. Best offer. Call after 6 p.m. 671-277* dltion. fall .-•fj-ififjo Mon. through F r l . , ifffiS VOLKSWAGEN - - Excrllcnt r u n . after 5:3(1. 741-15.12. 871-2149. 32' N A U T A U N E ' H O U ' S B B O A T v With or 'J22-M77 after li p.m. MIDDLETOWN . i H t l o n , Mustnell, inovlnn. 52000. 1969 CHEVY — NovaTMii»TKlL everything including flying bridge. Jn water. $10.300. M'i-0033. , A/tcrftp.m. ZONE MARKING C O . , MOTORCYCLES 6834203. BOSTON WHALER — 13'. 40 h.p. John- Parking lots, recreation area, traffic KARMANN fiHIA— lf»67. Low mileage. Good condition. THY ALL THE OTHERS FIRST YAMAHA — 125 Encluro. 197(1. sonBon. Boat and motor In excellent condi. control layout stencil work. Phoni 747Call 7-H-fHPik THEN T R Y I'S «06 or 747'IOEK. •.-•• milm. Good corallllon. Asking S475. A 90 — O'lrJlninnlriK conci- wheel. WeiLiiry controlfi. $150. Call i4\new rear tiri!». 767-J610. 'J22-5728 or 229.14*4. -• ilnn. wllh lielmrt. J100 or bent ofler. 842 itl 7,W> ,i_fter 5 ji.iTi. __ _ .-link BI'irK 73J1! it'ttc 6 |i m. FOR SALB - " "jD66 8iinneam~Afpirie7 BACKHOB AND DUMP FOR HIRE • Ift>1 r ; K A N [ > PtTlIX Jl.inr tTwoi WANTED - - \,i'.V Boston Whaler, Good condlllon. TRUCKS FOR SALE Coll 1070 YAMAHA — 17r> r c E n i i u r o HportH mndrl. Call if>8i n r i r n .spivim. i-jimr, 6 stick "41-0691 Call li\-'l\m. monlhK old. cxcplhTit condition. *.' 747-37.il after fi. inW STl'hKKAKKR V-V automatic irHifj HONDA. :!05 cr, Hcmlcu.stom, PONT]AC K O N N E V l L L B ^ ^ ' c o n v r r t - 7 E r s t V p V a n ; Experienced in cochIfMW r H K V K l , L E - C n n v , . V-8, atlclt ll)l<; t.%1 Good 'onilltlon. V8, power JmmaculatP condition, low mileage tras, a s Is, *;il!5. !t2'.'-lfl!(7 arter 6 week, "BLUE J A Y ~ - Piicpcl to noil. New mast. DRESSMAKER— tall ami evening apparel. Will make 1965 1)01X1 K HT- *i stick AnklnR Si;iM. Call fl-fi. 787-07fi1. days; sat., -Sun., anytime. Atccr-lng. $230. S42-5173. hardware. Hull and Interior reflnishrrl. clothea from original design. 264.8768. Twn sulta sails, spinnaker, new trailer, We need room ]!>6H YAMAHA — 100 <•('.r Kxre\ lent con. f a l l T*7-9r>*ifl. __ __ pLYMfrUTHFURYl]Ii96i.ag3iur _ dltlon. Low mileage. S'J7. j. In. Kour-Hpecd. utoik-imfil, four barrel RASSAS PONTIAC Asking JilIM). 747.4482 after 6. _ Call 7I7.440,~i after 7 p.m. "IB'(;LASPAR"CITATION" - with im EMPLOYMENT ;i.'« Broad St. 71).;,1MI Red Kank 197(1 HAIILEY I>A'VlrisON~ R X P T D I h p Evlnrudr. Exreltent condition. Plus 1.940 FORD PICKUP — 327, RlgerKon, 1961 RinCKSPBCI E\v«. until il flrhtffer, ('raepr. Hurst, Excellent con- Trail and street. 135 miles. Like ne« ai.:tr(»siirles. %A'2-2Ui._ HELP WANTED - FEMALE Automata. $175. fixi-i'llerit fur hunter}.. C a r v a n l r r Ir dltjon. Call 787-rrJ7:t. ~ | 9 * " F L E E T C R A F T — 75 Johnson 1!)64. 10fil> \1GA~-- l"«m."Flt«!rBlHrio«rnt'r" VWm\m eluded, 5425. Call after 4:15 p.m. until Used -1 years. Ideal family fihl. fishing SECRETARY — Experienced, for AebUrtianiynMv In good condition, C a n day* TosY CHEVROLET — HRirtorTprckiip". li.m. 7473562. hnat. Planes beaulirully. Extras. 1 rt wa- ry Park accountnig orfice. Good Shortfiorid condition. Call between 6-7 p.m. ter at Coast Marine. SI200. Call after 6 hand a n d lyptnK skills. Salary com1966 r A P I L L A ' c ^ E E T W O d b Brmig. 7H7J454 ~13(S1 cORVKTTK " ~ H f l r d t o P r 327-:i(W num. (31'>i Mil 8-3J)84. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ „ mensuiatf with ability. Spnd resume t o owner, Low mileage. Stereo h p., 1 upcid. AM.KM. $1300 firm. 046- Blr. tiltOne MOBILE HOMES U-197. T h e Daily Register, H e 4 wheel, lealher Interior. 747-4599 "WANTED — Inlernatlonai~~Sr.out or" 4fi18 after 6 [.in. "i6'"~FiBERGLAS DAY SAILER - - Se Bnx Ford Bronco with full top In good Jlank. ' o JM23586 tiaiiirK Dae con natls. Cuddy flotat jMlVi>LKBWA condition. 1967 o r later preferred. Plow Best olfer. Call MOBILE HOME SALES JloattjfHllcr, 741-4262. HOUSEWIVES — Supplement family In. not nctiird. Will alno conilder Toyota HOLLY" J eHILL r s e y ' s Finest Selection" come earn $m for aiiours work or SI00 Land Cruiser or Land Rover. Call 8*2- DELTA - HOLLY PARK - WIND- 27*~~FTBERGLAS — Fly bridge, rl _ L_ L for lShnurn. For perwnnal Interview call 7292 e v e n i n g controls, 225 MrrcruiRfr I/O. hxrfl SOB HOLIDAY — KITZ CRAFT AinsTANH — JM77sijircyiindprrnadi(r l!)6< PO^TJAtT™"TwoVfloor'"hardlnp. r a . r o l l e d G09-822-702B o r 774-7622 after.-5 Large selection or uaed fl a n d . ronriltfon. Two .venrn old. Short- lln< INTERNATIONAL TRUCK SALES hrotfT. Power step ring and hrakr.i. Inl dio. heater, automatic transmlsnion p.m. ^ widen excellent for eummer homefl. dinette and bunka. Call 747,-4428 lielw Rarltan Garage Inc. m i l e s two xnnw tires, $1125. Call 7*1. E x t r l l c n t *CIIJ74!1542[ " P E R M A N E N T AND TBMPORART.". .»fj;i:t aMrr .1 p.m. 5.._Ma[n_8t_ Keyport 2S4-O361 Rt. 35 Shrewsbury River Yacht Club. Shi Open 9 to 6 Xion. thru Sat. ACE EMPLOYMENT AQENCT Iflftf IMPALA WAOON — 327 VH. rower r : to-Shore radio and extras, Aski 721-5858 1967 FORD PICKUP — I9. i3 PONTIAC "- ATitr)malicrfcnrr-door7 sleerlnit, Aut6mallr.. clean. J725. 20 Tliomas Ave. 747-3404 Shrewaburt >B,3M; OrlBtnally $11.500. Wlll_nc|jqtlal Call 747-4770._ blO, Cflll »1 ton, 5900. MOBILE HOME — 10 x 50. Fully furniRhed. Two bedrooms, a i r conditioned. ALCOnT SAJ"LFI8H — Sailed this mn EXPERIENCED NURSES' AIDE "lffli] BUICK WACOM - Snrclaf (Vrna"lir ^ l S'lKRCKHKS RKNZ""230H • Tftfiis"TrmdHT Good runnlnu condition. WOO. mer and Just rcflnlshetl. Very good cc FORT) iries • - EconoMne van. Plx^yiln. 54.700. Call 787-8138. U.dfKi mllfn, txccllpnt iiotidltfon. Call Day and Evening Shifts ;: dltlon, $170. 747-1300. Alter 5, 741-30J5. Call 787.4(01. (\er. larftc enjtlne, heavy duty, radio 1970 STARCKAFT TRAVEL CAMPER ? 101, OW ~ CAABBITN N ' CRIIISER EENNSSC CRUISER — 1 Applications now being accepted. CW tMii'Rlar alarm. Good condition. fSDO, Sleeps six. New floor model. S400 nff "225 '6~W 1962 CHEVROLET""— Four-doorVrd'anT Can be seen a t Dante'* CltKO Station list. Little Sliver R e p a i r Center, 747-0573 h.p. Flagsl (or appointment. 671-0177. Hilltop PriFlagship. Head, dinette, galley iMUBTBAriUKi"rB---"|ii66"fih"*vy"Novi" Running condition. ( Needs some repair. cornrr nf Pnole Ave. a n d Rt. 35, Hazlet. or 741-3888. vate Nursing Home, Middle town. Klx fvllrirlc™. two-done, tilark. Rnrll/t canvas, as hlnK $240(i. 747-4829. or call 2S4-I697. «n f | hcalrr. Autnmaili-, JGXi-pJIctit i o n d l . WANTED—Clerk, medical office. V*10x45 NEW YORKER t l n n ^ Orir owner. $4. Call 7H-I7lf», IM4 PICKUP ried duties, light bookkeeping S i p * Contact Claire Good motor. $125. STORAGE AND SERVICE rlence preferred, but not nec«s&ry. 787-422:! before 2 p.m. llffifl PONTIAf,' "•• Flirhtnl asorFoiir" wllh' red raidnjr 'olrliic. ned interior! Call 787-2997, Vinyl, bucket seals. Excellent condition Writ* to Box Y-122. Tha DUly ReHa* new ttrr-H. Snow tirp«. Rlrrco tapf deck 20' TRAVEL TRAILER — Completely ami, tlrco. F«ctnry air mndllloiiiiiK. ter. Red Bank. WJfXl. c.iJl Hiiylime aftor 8, "JM-SL'M. 1962 FORD ECONOLINE VAN itell contained. Sleepx j*lx. $2,500. over J S milt's per sallon. J'our jhlflj fl.V). Call 842-6532. Tall after « p.m. 291-1952 1M8 r n U H A R XR7 — 3M (jonvprlihtr nn_loor. Hartln jind hentpr 741 -5472. BROOKDAUE WINTERIZING AND STORAGE Air, s t r r r o tHpr. niHjr whrflin, rniiclai — 10x55. two bedrooms. — Convertible" 1982 CHEVROLET — 14&.ton flat body. VENTURA Heafontihle rtili'fl. tf>o». W«nv r i t r a n . Excellent condlUnn. SryHUNDERBinn COMMUNITY COLLESE; Asking $5,500. Call Kxi'i»lle.nt flhnpe Inside and o u t . F i r m Very good conrtitlon. NPW Jeraey'B LarRcKl S2.40O, 7 to 2 rctarfal sklllH required. Salary und 1 TOR, 3434 Hwy 35, Hazlet. 264-1918. benefits a r e excellent. For further JhMONMOUTH SAILING CENTER rormHtlon call o r visit persOniTel MONMOUTH MARINA 765 Newman Springs Rd.", West St. Monmtmth Beach 222-349: Office, 1 Uncroft, N. J. 07738. 842-1UOO. E x t . WANTED-AUTOMOTIVE WHY HAUL YOUR BOAT? — Man' 273. An equal opportunity employer. imall repmlra can be made, botlomi LADIES — Earn 550 for 9 houra worK. GET CASH FOR YOUR FOREIGN— xr.ra.opd I" the water. Try our Dlvl N o e x p e r i e n c e necessary. I»lo inAND SPORTS CARS AT MONMOUTH Service. Reasonable rates. Call 9t vestment, canvassing or collecting. 'Vkn MOTORS. INC.. Hwy 35. Eatontown. 3231 or 566-C184. or car helpful. Bpeline Fashions, phon» WE PON'T BBLIi JUNK — 22!>-264)Tor 222-0494. WINTER STORAGE Nor rit> we buy ft — SALESLADY — Experience pre/errod ?3.50 per ft. W« do bur clean, late model cart In ladles' and children 1 ^ wear. Full at top dollar. See o r c&ll WALL Pn your own work time. Apply In peraon, Muriel's, 13 w . LINCOLN-MERCURY, 7«MO0. H. J. WILSON BOAT WORKS Front Bt., Keyport. OCEANPORT 22S4466 CARS WANTED — We p a y top « C O U N T E R (ilfiLB — And checksri. for clean tued cars. Call Mr. Vincent Experience not necenxary. Full tlina employment. Must he neat anri personBUSINESS NOTICES able. Apply Little Silver Cleaners. 601 JUNK CARS Branch Ave.. Litilfi Silver. :' J. C. & SON PICKED U P BEAUTICIAN — Short hours. Excellent Cellars. Attics. Repaln working condlllonn. aood pav. Star Twinbrook Auto Wrecking PanelingFrei; estimates. 671-1711. Beauty Shop, m Hwy 36, H i z l e t 261Eatontown 542-2235 PAINTING — Interior and Exterio 291a. ROOFING GUTTERS REPA1REI CHAMBERMAID — Part-time, Call lor CASH FOR USED CARS - True*!, Free EMI ma ton 787-303! appointment 291-2677 foreign or domestic. Dean, opposite Leonardo Motel. Two GUTS, MlUdletown. 6719144. A befter-loolcing, batter-performing ear at a price lower than RETIRED CARPENTER - Want •mall Jobs to supple men I income. N you expected to pay, plus top trade allowance on your old car job too nnriB.ll. Cabinet-Form lea ape DENTAL HrSIENIST . AUTO RENTALS clalist. Call for estimates. High qiifll . . i. that'i the happy difference. And that'i the difference you Ity work, reasonable rates. 22!!-5259. Part-time o r full t i m e . Call 946-4441. KEYPUNCH OPERATOR - Full tlm«. DAILY • WEEKLY • MONTHLY get with a RUSSELL trade. CHARLIB ~ Short tiau rlnlRhing ahop, downtown Red Prle*» start at I6.B9 and up Eeono- ODD JOBS Yards, cellar*, and- attlci Photo Bank. Must be able to punch 12.000 key Car of Red Bank, 210 E. Newman moving. cleaned, etc. You name It. wa will (reel} fltrokes per hour. LI'jeral bcnefltff ApSprings Rd. 7(7-0173. estimate It. 291-3867 or 7S7-1643. 1965 CADILLAC ply «t ii Linden PI.. Red Bank. i 19*7 MUSTANG 1969 OLDSMOBILE TOM'S FORD EXPERIENCED Nur.e'. «lde. 11 ti" SEDAN DtVILLE LAWN CARE 2-DOOR SEDAN DELTA CUSTOM " • • " 7 shift. (Ive-day week. Nurae'n aide on.7 Wnllt wllh black vinyl,,lop unit Power Raking 2-door hardtop, chestnut brown to 3 flhlft, 3 or 4 days a week. ConUct RENT A CAR Yellow wllh brown vinyl bucktt Fertilizing black leather Interior. Full/ Bayvlew Nuralng Home l«r Intervieit. with matching vinyl Interior and Scots, 3-jpetd transmission, V-B, 200 Hwy. 35 264-1600 Keyport Seeding And ReseedinR between Pnnd 12. 2!)l-(>440. equipped including Tilt-tele *ttl 7 3 EXECUTIVE SECRETARY/t t * 5^*« ° Lightning SJJ50 787-540! Jet 14 » 5 0 Penguin 5200 GIRL FRIDAY ' ALL TYPES OP HOME REPAIRS Rliicjiya 1969 CADILLAC ALTERATIONS. PAINTINO For large construction company l i 1968 PONTIAC USED LISTINGS NEEDED 1968 MERCURY cated in Adelphla, just off Rt, 9. Promnt Service Pre« estimate! SEDAN DeVILLE LeMANS Typing and shorthand light, but r * MARSH MARINE BCOTTO * SONS. S42-O850 COLONY PARK

$50O-$80O SPECIALS

OUTBOARD MOTO

Drive The Best! THE HAPPY DIFFERENCE

RELIABLE - DEPENDABLE SALES and SERVICE Our Customers Agree—Experience Counts!

LUSTROUS FLOORS

Monmouih County's Oldest MERCEDES-BENZ DEALERSHIP

Murphy & Davison MERCEDES-BENZ HWY. 9

462-5300 FREEHOLD (Just north ol FREEHOLD CIRCLE)

Says... "WE HAVE ALL MAKES & MODELS" SHOP AT OUR . . .

9 ACRES of NEW and USED CARS ALL USED CARS COME WITH

100% - S r GUARANTEE

Two-door hardtop. Yellow wllh black vinyl lop and block vinyl bucket seats, V - l / automatic transmission and power steering. An exceptionally C ^ clean car.

Black with black vinyl root and Interior. Excellent condition throughout, fully equipped Including electric door locks, stereo, radio ond FACTORY AIR CONDITION

$5495

Tan with matching Interior. A Nine passenger station wagon, exceptionally clean family car. Fully equipped Including FACTORY AIR »KI CONDITIONING.

1968 CADILLAC SEDAN DeVILLE Turquoise with turquoise cloth Interior, tlll-wheel. A . beautiful car In every tespect. Fully equipped Including FACTOR/ AIR . C430C CONDITION. 9"3Y9

1966 CADILLAC

1966 FORD

FLEETWOOD COUNTRY SQUIRE Gray with black vinyl top and 7'Possenger stalled waaon* blue black leather' Interior, an exwith .matching Interior. Fully ceptionally beautiful car, fully equipped wllh oil the extra's Inequipped Including FACTORY cluding FACTORY tf A B C -C9A0C AIR CONDITION.


TION _

1967 CADILLAC SEDAN DeVILLE Green with areen cloth Interior and black vinyl roof. Excellent condition throughout. Fully equipped wllh all the extras Including FACTORY C 9 9 Q E /UR CONDITIONING.

196B VOLKSWAGEN 2-D00R SEDAN Blue with (notching Interior, 4speed transmission, radio. Excellent condition ClilOC

throughout.

9 • t'9

RUSSELL OLDSMOBILE-CADILLAC C O .

MALIBU Two-door hardtop. Blue with blue vinyl Interior, V-8, automatic transmission. An exceptionally clean-sporty tor.

$1595

741-0910 100 Newman Springs Road RED BANK

"Over 100 Used Cars to Choose From"

WOW! RUICKS

JmeNCal? ~ 2M

chevrolet

* 711-2382 COLUMBIA SAILING YACHTS RANRER YACHTO O'DAY SAILBOATS

THE YACHT SHOP

uSu.f&W*''1^

atler 6

' '"•

I"' ™ H R Y " S E A S K I F F _ oood fishing

Joal. All open. In water. $125. Call 8 4 f

Chv.^r^,,fhr,|f,e,fe;

1071 Ctirynlci-R a r r h e r e ' Buy Nnw anri Savp Outhoard ntnrnicp nnd service. 872-0367

WANTED-AUTOMOTIVE

'

Foil Is HERE!

and w« need 100 Used Cars Hwy.35 2*4-1600 Ktyporf

1947 COUGAR

1967 ElECTRA 4-dr. hardtop. Fully equipped Including, factory air cwiduioiing and vinyl top.

S1995

1948 WILDCAT Two-dr. hdtp., V-8, auto, trans., power steering, vinyl roof.

$2195 1967 LeSABRE

c A R

$2095 1968 OLDSMOBIL!

tiiMasi Sunrrmr, V-fl, automatic transmission, power it serin a loctory air coiirilMonpd,

$2395 1967 CHRrSLER

Four-dr. fidip., V-H, auto, trans., Vmy| top, fociory ofr cond

$2193 1967 WILDCAT Two-donr tiordlon. V-H- automatic Iran^njlsftlon, vinyl roof, factory* air cnndillon

si ?« FORDS 1764 FORD

S H O W R

Falcon, lour-rlonr, rjulomalle transmission niuj rrjrtlrt.

Inwn nnd Cnuniry Gallon wagon, V D; m.tnmalk transmission, power sWrlnq.

$1895

1967 CHEVROLET fmpnln. four-rionr, V fl, automnllr IrnmmtMion and power MMrina

$1295' 1968 PLYMOUTH Hiry I I I . v-fi, nutomoiic irnmmission, power slaenna nnr. vinyl roof, Excellent condition.

$1895 19&7 PONTIAC

If68 MUSTANG

0

Y«Na» wllh block vinyl root, v-», oulomnlk Irnnjrrmjlon. KM

" I auto-

WHY BUY A*

VH, oulomoHc IronimiiMort, power peering, factory nlr conditioned, vinyl root.

Temped, 2 door hardtop, ou|.ntnnllr. trommlulon and power steenttq.

$995 1966 RAMBLER Ambassador DPL. V.-R, outn : , mntlc transmisirton, power \teerIna • •* " -

$1095

• • • •

e»ft 117 off Pky.

Hiway 35 Keyport. N. J.

TOP SOIL

Single needle, raerrow, and bllndi stitch operators, to work on cap coats. Union shop, 35 hours per weeki Shore Coat Co., Inc.. 28 Bridge Ave.. Red Bank. REGISTERED NURSE — Also two Lit wo it ccensed e s e d Practcal Nurse 3 p . m . to Practical Nurses. to II II p.m. Alno u p p.m.-7 u pm m 7 a.m. m. Information, I n f o r t i on, u J:™,.^ p.m. Rlvercrest Nurilnj Horn* N orn* 31 Chapln Ave,, Red Bank. ™ HAIRDRESSER - . F u l l time. Snull

EARL F. JAN1S (alio known a j "Runt") 787-807P

in Bayahore Area now NEED HELP? Cull Riverside Secretar- PHARMACY Jal Servicps, 74 Shrewsbury A v e , Red taking applications (or lull time work. ~ n k . 842-7783. Stenography-Olfsei Cierkn, Cosmeticians. Apply In writing Idvlnc backiround and experience t5 |ox k O-2«l. Th, Dally Register, B e l

PERSONALIZED CHRISTMAS CARDS

Wide selection of atyles —'from hut.,... priced to luxury class. Avoid the ruin — order now CRANE PRINTING. 071-0838.

WOMAN — Part-time. General onl( duties including typing. Excellent wor InK contlitlona. conditions Hours. Hours Monday M d th InfC throug F M a y , 6 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Salurdi; 9:30 ».m. to 6 p.m. Call S71O40O. U i i Phillip, for appointment. *

AUTO PAKTS-REPAIRS

COUNTER OIRL — Experience! not necessary. Ludwlg'. Delicatessen. T«i B O O K K E E P E R — Experienc •'lUjrh iteneral ledger. Write" Box The RaJly Register, Red Bank. KITCHEN HELP — Women only

AAMCO

wy 38. Leonardo, DENTAL ASSISTANT — Holmdel artt Part-time Tour arternonns and 8a; mornings. Experience helpful, but wl 1, GUARANTEES HONORED AT ANY ;r«ln rlihl jnerson. Send resume to Box T-186, The fially Register, Red Bank • •« RED BANK — 842-2500 WAITRESSES WANTED * - • i. 193 Newman Springs Read Apply in person, Rex nlnsr 'I 117*. Front 91.. Red Bank S ASBURY PARK —774-6800 WOMAN — Part-time, to do llfht'coo ln«f. 8 a.m. to 12 noon. Ctll Jerry'i c " 809 Railroad Avsnut nul Inn. 717-1)803. AAMCO SHOP NATION WIDE WAITRESSES — Experienced only. Al ply In person. Martini's Diner, Hwy. 36. KeaniOurt. . • WOMEN - c . i h i c r and kitchen helm Tito shifts open. 4 p.m.-li p.m. and U p.m.-7 a.m. Call 842-5012, ". NURSES' ES AIDE-7 to 3 shift. Appl Apply lit' PMJjn , Brookdale Nursln« Home Home, H w i BEAUTTciAN^Experlenc«d. day only. Stephen HHlrdrenaerB. Call 787.0655. PREBSEFt —For women's ^ lieB. —'In person, O /HO _(;_cntpr. MJdillelown, or ca ^Lt*.^ L ^ ! ! 1 '? — We're looklnf for a a a l with knnwledge nl riling numerically/ mphahctlrallv, and, location with a c curacy, Llijlit typing. Apply Ebscl _BltlK. L npp_llc Red Bank Airport. 7 HOUSEKEEPER — Live In. five days i Thrpfi older ctillrtren. Rumson.ares: W m ^ B n x G.203, Th« Dally KaffilM

1970 Now Z

MAIDS WANTED - • Transporlatloi provlilcd. Fully Insured. J1.60 per h r Call HEnni-MAID. 2S4-9021. ' HOllSEWIVBsT^~p«triciirOsll« C o l ; meth'« needa you, Part-time. Earn ex< tra money before Chrhlmaa plus v a l m 5Ml J""" Incimllnit quality Wl»s. M2i67RS hetwpen^6 p.m. ^ T t i L K P H r S i B i b L i c i T o S a — Earn « > f tra money lor ChrMtmaa. Work Hi wpcltj. dnvfi or evenings, for National Healtn^ARrnry. No experience required,.,

WE HAVE A N AMPLE SUPPLY OF 1970 LEFTOVERS IN STOCK

DRASTICALLY REDUCED! JIM

a Typical Wall Value

1970

MONTEGO

$2316

WILL YOU SAVE SO MUCH ON A NEW 70!

SECRETARY — Pra'fMsioiufl o!llc»; Mldrtlplmvn »r5B. slenn. typing a n * •rood "kill.. Call 21)1-1049 between 9 a n t ».

2-door hardtop with power steering, radio, and regular Montego standard equipment, MANY MORE MERCURY MODELS TO CHOOSE FROM

WALL

(More Classified Ads i 4 On The Next Page)

1970 MALIBU, V-8, Sport Coupe turquoise with white ronf, Powergiide tronimlsstan, powtr sleerlnq, AM push-buiton radio, belted fiberglass wtillftwoll tires and full wheel covers.

t

HOUSEKEEPER _ MatureVoman tot. hoiiRekf-epInK Hutl^a Ealurrtay anri S u n i day. 8 to 4 p.m. Small nursing unit. Apv ply M2-34OO. :,

UQMV

'2895

AUTO RENTALS

DELIVERED

Need a Special Car \

IN SPITE OF THE STRIKE

for a Special Occasion? \

OUR PLANNING HAS LEFT US

RENT ONE FROM USH

WITH A GOOD AVAILABILITY!

• Quick • Easy

SHREWSBURY, N. J . ! SHREWSBURY AVE. at SYCAMORE



747-5400

Economical Dally . . . Wt.kly . . . Monthly J

264-4000 Advertise in The Daily Register

SEWING — MACHINtP OPERATORS f

LIGHT HAUUtfO SMALL MOV1NO JOB* F R E E ESTIMATES 4 l i o some clean-up work. Call after & p.m.

1971 Autemoblln 5% hlghtr 1971 Warranty for 1 ytar only Additional ytar-tncj lavlniji W* want to do bmlntii with you now

If You Don't See The Automobile You W a n t . . . Tell Us, and We Will Try and Locate It for You.

BUICK-OPEL

fi, paid holldaVH a n d vacation; Salary open. Call 431-2402 for appointnicnl

4O PURNITURE MOVING - Attlci and DIESEL — M l OM' Comnlet7lvVeiraih Milan* cleaned. Free Mttmatei. Call Asking J2IKW ror engine. S.500 for 2-1 re 747-3002.

TOM'S FORD

S2495

G E N E R A L CONTRACTOR Masonry, carpentry and painting. 264-4468

Trees and Hhrubs moverl. Sort, fiepd Ing. Rototllling. Gravel driveways, Fi MONMOUTH SAILING CENTER west , St. Monmouth Beach 322-3492 rlirt. 747-5806 after 6 p.m.

W» will fradi or buy out right — Call or com* in

B"lv«der», two-door hardtop, auloinotlc transmission, powar lleerlnrj, V-a.

$2595

SI 095

7*1-6767

1970 PLYMOUTH

Two door liarritop, V I , automatic tronsmisuon, power steerin{i Vinyl roof. WAS 52995

Twodonr hordlop with mollc transmission,

Red Bank

INVENTORY CLEARANCE NEW AND USED SAILBOATS

Your Choice.

— * • Special * 1949 LeSABRE

$1895 1966 MUSTANG

J> 4 4 7 9

1967 CHEVROLET

65 Orchard St.

WALL Atlantic Highlands

MNWSIURV. N. J. J Shrtwibury Avt. ar Sycarmn j

747>5400 .»>•

I

THE DAILY REGISTER, RED HELP WANTED-MALE

HELP

WANTED-MALE

HELP

TWIST FULL OR PARTOTMB NIGHTS oriented Individual

"RECEPTIONIST — For law olllce. E: perlenced. Call foMntervlew, URE WOMAN - mm love im dren. Babysit three diyn a week. Matawan area. S88-J(fin.

^J&'tVX/" ELECTRONIC

Rudimentary knowledge of industrial welding, electricity, plumbing

.HELP WANTED—Male-Female

b

"U

TECHNICIAN

Experienced laying out printed 3circuit ? Aboards'Infrom schematic diagrams as well a s construction and trouoe shooting of development models. Liberal fringe benefits. Apr1 in person.

eiiential. Steady work. Overtime. L i b t n l benefits. Call 5-H-S000, or apply 10-4 p.m.

RADIO MARINE CORP.

"HOUSE CLEANER — Three days week. 11.75 per hour. Also afternoon ai , mint shift worK- C»U 828-1200.

WaysiJ. and Shafts Rd«., New Shrewsbury

HELP WANTED —FEMA'E AITRESS — Full time

pay. Call

& s S g

HELP

ARTHUR MURRAY School of Dancing has openlnjri fi tranteei as dance specialist! an Junior interviewer*. No experlenc needed. Salary plua toonus. Part-tin, evenings. Aleo reception work ave able. Apply In peraon; MO p.m., Broad St., Red Bank. 741-5S58. SUPERINTENDENT — For email Sa den apartments. Three-room tpartmen avaliitbic. Woodbrldge Area. Write Bo: U-199. The Datly Regigtcr, Ked Bank. WANTED — Buyer for chlldren'B cloth. ing store opening aoon In mlrt-Monmout County. Send resume to P.O Box 27 Uncroft, N.J. 67738, KITCHEN HELP WANTED - Ap| oerson. Cookle'e Bar. Hwy 70 boro. (Qppoalte FJre Houae.)

20 Bridge Aye. Red Bank An equal opportunity employer YOUNG MAN - Learn the advertising business from the ground up. You'll be a driver, mesaenrer. mall clerk and Jackof-ail needs. Driver's license a must Start Immediately. Apply In person, Gtt floor. 12 Broad St.. Red Bank. PORTER AND MAINTENANCE MAN — Full time. Benefits with national SITUATIONS WANTED-Femali ••company. Call 284-0800 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. INFANT AND CHILD CARE — In In TWO MATURE MEN — To pump gas, borne for working1 mothers One for Sunday and one night. One Phone 741-8KW. for flaturday and one night. Apply In peraon, Red Bank Esso, 102 E. front MATURE WOMAN — Will babyBlt (o one pre-schbol child. Keansburg or Po St jvcd Bank Monmouth vicinity. Call after 5:39 p.m MAN —• To aeilst superintendent with general maintenance work In lnduatrlil WOMAN - Will care for elderly pcrsoi center. Steady work Call 666-2400. Red Bank.Ncw Shrewsbury-Little 81 ver-Llncrolt. 747J332. DISHWASHER^ Part-time. 6:30j to closing, four nights a week. have own transportation. Apply In per. MATURE WOMAN desires hnmewoi widow or elderly couple. Phoni son only, after 1 p.m. The Colony Res- with taurant, Ridge Kit. and Ave, of Two T47-1591 between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. ItEOISTBRED NURSE — Wishes ti take care of elderly person In her hom< SERVICE STATION ATTENDANT — Experienced, daya, full time, per- Phone 261-0343. manent. Apply in person, BRITTAIN'B RELIABLE WOMAN - Wants da' SUNOCO, Hwy 35 and Laurel Ave.Mid. work. Cleaning. $17 a day. Must be o dletown. fcua line. Call 7J1-365S after 5 p.m LIFE INSURANCE SALESMAN — MEDICAL ASSISTANT — Experienced Daytime selling, Leads supplied on a Part-time, to-*, no Saturdays. Middle, dally basis. Our ajKentB average one town vicinity. 291 -3092. $15,000 permanent life application per day. Call (201) 676-1709 between 0 and l i a.m. lor appointment. FINANCIAL TAXI DRIVER Fart-time days. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES Call 787-2344. PART-TIME BOOK BALEBMAN — CAR WASH EQUIPMENT High commission. Call CAMEO EDITIONS. 671-41K. Sherman equipment. Used only fou IT — monthH SERVICE STATION , . Available at FANTA8TJ Apply In person, LINCROFT GU •,WT i3A VINCrS! !! ' Newman Springs Rd. 741-8874. OIL CO. 37<-8866 9 a . m - 5 p . m , SALESMEN — Part-time days. Good ALLEN APPLIANCE STORE - Bulldlni and commission for a service that can be business for sale. Terms arranfedaftei d b every business. Call Idr. Clinton down payment. Call 787. m from 9 to 6.

ESTEY METAL PRODUCTS INC.

BEAUTY SHOP. Llncrott. 741-0022. "HAIRDRESSER — Parl-tlme to i W JJCROFT HAIR FASHIONS. TH SEAL ESTATE SALES Looking for a "live wire" Heel.. -aleswoman with experience. Many a *antage«-come talk It over. Aalt fc i[ra. Drake or call 741-3344 evenings. A Inquiries confidential. JOSEPH 0. McCUB INC. SO Ridge Rd.. Rumson _ B12-27I IDES — Experienced, 3 to

WANTED-MALE

DRIVER WANTED — Wholesale deliveries to stores and restaurants. Ex-

MAINTENANCE MAN

production

M I D D t E T W N , N, J.; THURSDAV, OCTOBER 15, 1970

WANTED-MALE

SALESMEN- Manufacturing company needs distributors In the New Jersey area. Investment securedfcyinventory.

BABYSITTER — 7:4Sto3:4S. Marlbort

SALESMAN _ j o r established life In. HELP WANTED—MALE -jurance route. Full training ;ram. Many benefits. An equal c .unity NEW CAR SALESMAN — Experienced employer. Call Mr. Cucela, 87: man to sell Ford line. Applyfn persf __i pu SECRETARY-BOOKKEEPER — F t only TV REPAIRMAN Mount-English Bales Part-time, eve. 1 active real estate office. Experience Bunk. Co., Red nlngs. Experience t preferred. JOSBPH O. McCOB INC. Rumson. 842-2760. PLUMBER - Eiparlence necessary. ed, Qood pay. 284-601 $4.50 an hr. Must have driver's ft- - DOING YOUR CHRISTMAS n % Christopher Bros. Plumbing. DRJ1AMIN0? If, not too early to start . . . build profitable business of your own a; CLAM OPENER WANTED — Week' an AVON Representative, and m»ki end;. Frl.. sat., Sun. Excellent working those dreamB «ome true. Call now conditions. Must be over 18. 747-1686. ' i. Blrchall, 7(1-4343, 462-3317, 774 MECHANIC OR MECHANIC'S HELP1220. ER — Apply In person, Werner's Au. RN — 3 to 11 p.m. lull time. Emer tomollve, Hwy38. Beltord. • Distributor Manor Extended "— Care Facllitle: Jlatawan. 666-6400. REAL ESTATE JOB — Interesting And ...- diversified, WAITRESSES — Over 21, for weekend doing enjoyable . . wori. Beveral TRAINEES NEEDED Apply In person, BACHERT'S HOP: openlr enlngs in East Brunswick, Key•sftAlJHAUS. 301 Ocean Blvd., JUlantlc Join aa professional poi irt, Woodbrldge. professi and last growing •Highlands. 2ftl-O221. nization ion wh I willing illi to trai organization which Is train t b W A I T R E S S E S — All shifts Ex you to become a, professional. Earn EXPERIENCE - Not necessary, we train you. perlenced preferred. 16 and over only while you learn the biggest busine 1 or Apply In person, Mermaid Diner, » 291 less""" "'" ' Wtat if, AtHntlc Highlandj. ' H O U R S — Part-time weekends, either 1 or 3 days. Weekdays, we have MURSES" AIDES — 7 to 3:30 p.m. Em.. EXPERIENCED AUTO BODY MAN mornings, afternoons, evening Manor Extended Care Facilities, For>r large aM dealer. Ton salary. Paid hours available and combination cations. Fringe benefits). 40 hour Itawan. 566-6400, of above. week. Apply Monday through Friday, 8 PORTERS — Floor waling. Full lime, CAR WASH - &AS STATION EXPERIENCED WAITRESS — APPU - p.m. McOloIn Bulck Opel WAGES - Not a sales commission Part-time days and evenings, Work In In person, MAT A WAN DINER, Hwy34 one building. Oood starting salary. Brand new multl.pumn Mobil gai position. Five day week. GARDENER — Experienced, station with complete California car Fringe benefits. 747-S5S6. WAITMss round. Full charge, small estate. estat wash Installation for lease. Route 36, W e r tni a i>a Must be over 21. Full time. position. Sales and de- Hazlet. N. j . MAN — — Steady 8t< ern 3-bedroprn cottage Icluded. l d d """preferred. " ° "' 261-1164. livery.r. A Apply In tereonV MARINE LUM. AL.LEN.O1LC0, 37<-8668 8 a.m.-5 p.m BKRCO CO., 1136 Ocecn Ave.. Sea Bright. BNS — Weekendi, all shifts. Emer' Call anytime between • a.m. andFRAJJKR3 — Experienced, Year round FOR SALE — Italian Restaurant an.1 Manor Extended Care Facilities, Mati EXPERIENCED _FLOOR WAXBR 10 p.m. for appointment. nlzzpria. Write to Box T-188, The Dull wan. 686-6400. work. Call after 9 p.m. SALARY OPEN. Call Register, Red Bank. J87-08H 566-561!. N LADY TO WORK IN DRUG STORE — OWN YOUR OWN BUSINESS — B a n 264.6700 Experienced In cosmetics. Five day __ JSSBNOER-CUSTODIAN — For a II. SMO0 a month In spare time. Investmen FULL TIMS! BARTENDER wteK. Oood pay. Bed Bank area. Write, Over 30 y e i n•a old. Call 9M-11M after 6 nanclal Institution located In Monmouth secured. Call S<8-&9«8 any time. stating all qualifications to Box T-I87 p.m. Monday through Sunday intv. Write Box 2. Station B, Long The Dally Register, Bed Bink. N.J TEN PEOPLB NEEDED — Part.tinv full time, to start on the road to fl TRAILER SWITCHER RECEIVING AND SHIPPING — For or HOUSEWIVES — Complete persona nanclat security. No Investment re mill supply business In Perth Amuoy; .quired. MANAGER care >roducta. Direct Belling. Guaran Prorlts . t a r t when you tlarl, N Preventive maintenance ', on tractor Oood benetlts. Ask for Mr. Van. Cut teed 56 per hour or commission, Cal obligation. 787-2608. and trall«r.> Must be able lo handle now. 26(-2109or63«-221B. Full service oar wash. Should bave 13 and 15 speed Diesel. Qood salary. 442680O. WAITRESSES — For lunch hours. Mon aome mechanical ability. Good atart- Steady work. All fringe benefits. Nllfit PAINUBR WANTED — Eitertor work. salary. Apply ' through Frl. Uniforms provided Aput shift 4:30 P.m. to f a.m. Apply a t Ladders. Day work or contract, INSTRUCTION In person, Friendly Ice Cream, 74 222-S5OI, X BlTDSBR CAR WASH Berger Industries. Inc., V. B. rfwy 1. Broad St.. Shrewsbury. ffldlson Industrial center, Metucnen, MIDDLETOWN One toddler and light homework. Ow .transportation. *1.6B per hour. Call 46; 4162 between 4 and 7 p.m.

PART-TIME

1001 Auto Pants

S

MEOHANICAl PASTE-UP ARTIST

WAXERS & PORTERS

COMPUTER CAREERS

BOYS - TRAVEL CALIF.

MEN WANTED - For auto wrecking yard. Apply Marlboro Auto Wreckers Full time Twaltlonn now availably Over 18, single, 6 H.3. grade or better frennentfid,.Morganvllle 222.00M • with, immediate .placement for quail* xpe preferred, educational service, comfled penom. Experience In floor NIOHTS MECHANIC — A-lmaintenance helpful, it h l f ul, l but b t we will ill tlio l No experience necessary but artslete training at company expense. steadyBURNE1 Job. W "ot F-198, The Dally Permanent only. Must be free to train Uwse who qualityOood itartbackground helpful. Requires person l Register. Red travel Immediately to Calif.. Hawaii ing utilary, employee discount plan with neatness, accuracy and desire end return, assist Selss Manager. Ex.lui other benefits. Apply to atora to learn. Skilled detail work. Only SECURITV OUABDS salary + bonuB start: all Fall !those looking (or permanent employ- cellent all time positions available availabl e IIn modern danajer. ransportatlan paid •+ company bone- 'rowing ig H an evening Hospital day and pital on Uie day and ev ment need apply. Call tor appoint- •'" For „,- shifts fits. ~ Earn T1178-223 —-_- weekly' -. pl cants must be be reliable shifts, ippl ina ment to be Interviewed. 747-S880 lible ina" i TWO GUYS polntment call Mr. O. I* Senger, vidualj dualj willing illing to work w o kw eked and weekends eekends and 218-B68-C842, 9:30 a.ro.-l v.m. rotating require d. We r t t i n g ahlft when required. Mlddletown required W Invite Ivite i t Rt. 36 * Twlnbrook Rd. In t took I t our good ssalary, to took Into pleas An Equal Opportunity Employer la le HELP WANTED-MALE MATURE MAN WANTED — For man- you ant working conditions and lull fringe ajrement position li. In young eo benefits. Contact, Personnel Office, Jfiv. DESIGN DRAFTSMAN Full or part-time. Call all 787.8785. ervlew Hospital. 741-270O, Ext. 2M, for experience In laying out printed EXPERIENCED CUTTER — Andpersonal Interview. An equal opportun- With circuit boards from scnemattca, elecSpreader on car coats. Union shop. Ap- Ity employer. tro-mechanical assembly and design ply. Wall St. Fashions, 37 Wall S t , Red liy-Dut. Liberal fringe benefits. Apply 3ank. DRIVER — CLERK Retail store in Long Branch Call 222.1381 for Interview HELP WANTED-MALE Red Bank ACCOUNTANTS - Public, for Asbury 20 Brldre Ave. Park CPA firm. 1 to 3 years recent pub. An equal opportunity employer Hr Imported automobile firm. Thli lie accounting experience necessary .position offers the opportunity to Bend resume and salary requirements MAJOR APPLIANCE earn a good salary for eagir man, W Box U-1B6. The Dally Register, Red

EXPERIENCED AUTOMOBILE SALESMAN . . .

All. frlnoe benefits, yew round job, Apply In person . . .

'"RADTO MARINE CORP.

ASSISTANT MANAGER

SALESMAN

•rei 'eat

•s. Call BCPI a t ~>I, 2M Monmouth ig Branch.

Typing Keypunch

Train with us!

m&tassatLP"- » m FOR SALE

.

' .

CML..MACARR, INC. . .

Editor., N . J . An equal opportunity employer

S N K A M -

you In men's hair-

ind

SAL JR'S.

An Equal Opportunity Employer

HAVE EXPANDED TO 3 STYLUiO SHOPS Call 741-381S after 7 p.m. or write Barber, P.O. Bog 178. Shrewsbury, N, • J .

MN8HAW

The SHERWIN WILLIAMS CO. 560 Broad St., N.v/ark, N,J.

HOUSE OF ANTHONY

WE OFFER • High starting salary • Overtime • Semi annual increases • Liberal company padd benefits. • Permanent full-time positions. Qualified applicants call Mr. Runnels for interviews. 287-2810

Present openi nings exist In Mlddletown and Old Brid i d I n l e r « i l « d ? TVPBWROTW, ADDINO machines. All raaJtes new or used. Ouaranleid.

BARBERS NEEDED We will luln ityllnj.

.

MATURE MAN — Reliable, honest ana comfortable with arithmetic for nice •leady dark work In pleasant atmohere. Apply Mrs. Slezak, McFaddln ours, 251 Broadway, Long Branch » t.ro.-6 p.m.

S

HAMMOND ORGAN STUDIO

IBM 3 6 0 Computer

741-5886

WELDER Experienced man with electric arc. irfust be capable of reading blueprints. Work will be with light gauge . steel angle iron.

R

ON PREMISES FOR STUDENT USE

• •

PR 5-9300

!00 Main St. Asbury Part Open daily 'Ml I: (at. 'til 6:30 'ANABONIC AM.FM — FM Storoo-Ra. Ho. Call between 4:30-S p.m.

TOP SOIL 711-2483 FURNITUHE AND ArPLIANCES — Welfare n i people people with ccroilt r o i l t nrob. nrob. re a ani l e m s . Immcdlnte I m m c d l n t e clcllvtry n t l cred. ed clcllvtry. IInsts.nl It. Callll Mr. 373-661 M Qr»n. Q 3736611. HAE1B DRUM — 16x22 plus pcdiil. All H a n k receiver, n m a t p u r transmlltpr rqiilpmfint rackii. Call 741-22W after 7:3( T.M. RACKS — Wrounht It w wtoe, J:O (jcn. 7U-ODO2 or 2S4-2242

2BINITH — 23" Colonial colors J TV.

""SMS111*

TV-S1_., lO-AM/FU nut ([nisi Ike new.

I allar 8

HUMIDIFIERS Sold and Initaliad Humidity Control Co.

IN STOCK no waftlni for heavy duty whlti aluminum combination windows, 6 bat " •" on hand. Brim your mauura-

' PROWN'S

33 Broad at. Rsd Bank 741-7(00 AUTOMOBILE MECHANIC FUBNITUBB LOVEF Monmouth County'« oldest Pontiac itov« ismp with han deaJeratiip has an Immediate opening for an experienced mechanic. Top Ihantlo flax wtie il7 »7"V76>\'Mrfs, salary for me right man. All nene- condition. |1!9. ir1 lampshade covered fitH including Blue Cross, Blue Shield with Revolutions,ir P'lm In red, white and Profit Sharing. Apply only \t and blue. Call 747,f-4062 lor appointment. interested in a permanent popiiion. See Aaron Hassan, RAflSAS PONTIAC, 395 Broad St., Red Bank. 741-

FOR SALE

FOR SALE

BIKB — New rings. Ignition, gas. OARAGE SALE — git.. Oct. IT, J(K MINI Brlggs A Stratum 8 h.p. SO mills p . m . Small J i n Items and ml kits, perlir. 74T2970. cellaneous. 68 Dogwood Lane, Fal Haven. FREE DELIVERY ALLSEW SHOPPES BROWN BUBDB COAT — With mini condition. Size 12. 1 — On ordera over $100. Church St. < OS-0177 K«an*bur| collar. Excellent 776-0335 after 6 p.m. PUMPKINS — 10c and up. Pick you •i — It's cheap, enly S3 delivery c h i r t e ACCORDION — Like new, Bernini, fu own atrlngbean*. tomatos. 51 peach ba on local orders UNDER {100. Hlze. Cost new IfiOO, will sell for S2O0 ket. Laurlno Farina, Sycamore Ave, 291-1427. New Shrewebury. 3-Casino^ ^ ^ L U M B g R GARAQE SALE — Drapes, bedspread, Pcsrl and Wall fted Hank 7(l-5aou NO NO NO clothes, ctt. 1 Tllton Rd., Mlddletown, LADIES' SNUQGIEa — And Snuggle Oct. 17 and 18.12 noon to 6 p.m. Y E S , Y E S . Y E S . . . We do liavi Vcati Built-up Shoulder Slips finorL ttic nix bent otzci In stock, WTilti RUMMAGE BALE — Et, James Paris] Sleeve Undcrihlrts and Blaitlc Leg Blg-M h e a v y duty Aluminum C o m House, 69 Brosn St.. Katontown. Frl. Uloomers ar» In stock a t COHEN'S Deblnatlon Windows, only 513.05 e a c h partment Btore, Shrewsbury Ave. Oct. 18. 7-0 p.m. S a t ,fla.m-2 p.m. PROWN'S OARAail BALE - Bedroom set. tablea. YARD S A L E ^ l a X T o c t . 17, 9-5 p.m. Hwlmmtng pool, many other Hems. Frl 32 Broad St. Red Bank 711-75W antique chairs i\h each. Mlscellaneoui sat., 0 to 5 p.m. 33 Princeton SU (OH YEAR OLD HOTPOINT WASHEtt — 622 Hopplni Rd.. Belford. FREEZER—13 cu. ft. Hotpolnt. Up- Oak Hill Rd.) Mlddletowa Maytag dryer. Phone rl«M., Excellent condltloiin. in. "Call " 8(2. OARAOB BALE — Copperlone stove. 842-7126. refrigerator dlnhwasher, dining room, HOT WATER CAST IRON RADI. t a b l e , bedroom, bar, much misDESK _ Walnut, two club chslrn. B« ATORS — Modern type. Various sl cellaneous plus clothing. Bat. and 8un. calounger. floor lamp. Phone after Call after 6:30 p.m., M4-OW2. 12-6 7( Kings Hwy. Mlddletown, TAPPAN WALL OVEN — Electric p.m. 741-4301. GARAOE SALE TIKES — Four. 88SX15 whltcwalt. Four, Wevcr used. JI00Oct. 17, 10.4 p.m. ply. Never used. Call alter 6 p.m.. 747. ( Bennett Lane 842-7361 Little Silver ONE SOFA — Two chairs, two end ta. SALE — 40 Monmoutil Av»., ble«. $,0. One Inrge dlnlnp room For. PORCH SALE - , Friday, October 16, OARAOB Navealnk. Bat.. Sun.. mlca.top table, six chairs. $39. One bod. Baby equipment, baby clotllrfl. larrtlK irolil 10 to 4 p.m. room suite, bed with box springs and and much more. 15 Elizabeth Parkway, m&ttress, (ireusing table with three-wa\ otf Broad St. !i ml. west of Wykoff Rd., WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE Eatontown. mirror and bureau with mirror, $T' of Hcaiui-Tex Boyi and Olrla1 Clothes at Coldspot refrigerator, excellent cond THE WHITE HORSE — Antique Shop * sensible prices at COHEN'S Departtton. S40. Cal! 5)2-^11. lift Shop, etc. iprlccB low.) D • iw.l Dally 11 to ment Store. Opposite River St. School onjBhrewabury Ave. Established 1912, and Sun. 781-2836. 117 Main MAPLE ROCKER — With cushion; PIANO — Baby grand. Good c u e . Jilts. maple high-riser. $30, Double bed. mat 'ort Monmouth Flreliounp, off trcos and box snrlng, night table anc BROADTAIL LAMB JACKET — With rlor needs work. $200. cheat. $30. 787-4623. CSII222-S531I. mink collar, size 10, never worn. Be«1 FISH TANKS — Tropical M»h and ac. offer. M2-6O57. ANTIQUES — Mahogany bureau, otto. ccsBorlcs. Also 'jaby carriage. 55* Clr~ WE BUY AND BELL ANYTHING — man and mirror, al) in good condition, Ave.. Union Beach. Contents of homes, stores, estates, Moving must sell. 071-2(05. HOSPITAL BEI> •*- Good condition cellnrs, attlcH. China, glassware, CRADLE S15. Crib S7.60. Car bed 13, Original price $300, loll for (150. Used ttquca, art objects and all brlc-R-br Pink and cnalr $7,50. Clarinet and case Huscll's. 25 East Front St. 741-1693. two month*. 2644138. 575^8^1 512-(00a. 21" QET.V. — Nc dd Fome repai BUASSTEA CART —Tray floor lamp. BARGAIN BASEMENT 25' white renclng. I . Two maple c Pick and chooae. Small quantities 57. 7414621. e(!-(6S6 hard board, plywood, molding!. »hii lKENMORE WRINOER WASHER. tere. door Bflconds, $3.05 each, shelves, MEN'S — Long Tall Flannel Shirts, Almontnew. $i5 maiiy lumber ltema. No one to bother heavy weight, only 53,08, sizes WA to 291-0427 17. Wu also Imvc Btics 17',i to 10 for J4.(S you — shop A» you pl^ane. a t C O H E N ' S Department Store, CRAFT8MAN — 10" radial saw and a< RED BANK LUMBER ahlewshury Ave. Opposite River I t . resflories with 2-draw«r bane enmne SIM. Ofl-Cart, two-aeater. $75. Call 741 Pearl and Wall. Red Bank 741-8500 School. 9374. VICTORIAN — Two-piece hall tree. SIMMONS 7' BOFABED — In good dttlon. Redecorating, must aell. 330. 9(6. rockers, spool cheat, old trunk, antique hooked rugn, maple sideboard, office KITCHEN CABINETS B8((. bra.ia.lrmi bed. Cryatal and 20% off manufacturer'! lint. In hand- OVERHEAD — Oarage door »20. Brl desk, china. Shore Furniture, Hwy 35. Lau. some walnut, pecan, etc.. flnlnhea, J r . 10S5, fan. Boy'n bike IIS, rence Harbor. R*ady to Install yourself OP have annlca Girl's 3-»peed bike Hi. 6714627. us Install. Stop by . . . ice dlaplays. — Krlj. 9 lo 4. I4O Hud. Also ovens, ran gen, rilnhwR*h«ni, eta. ELECTRIC RANOE — 40" wide, wltli OARAtlsfSALE Bon Ave.. Red Bank. Furniture, house, double oven, nood condition. $(0. hold Items, toys, etc. RBD BANK LUMBER Call 8(2.6278. TV«rl nnd Wall. Red Bunk HI-.VSOO OARAOE SALE"— Aliio co"ntenti home. Living room, dining room. „ MERCHANDISE WANTED GARAGE SALE torn ntereo, mlscellaneoui furniture and appliance. 8 cedar m.. Matawan, cfoLLfiCTOR PAYS TOP CASH FpJ Ftirniturc, toolfl, tirlc-n-nrac, olc. 3R'. 10 a,m. to S p.m. Oct. 17. ISIIi. OLD TRAIN? or will trade'HO.. Ml Oct. 17, 10-4 p.m. 16 Lennox Ave. O or atandard gauges. 774-3710. Rumaon. Kaln datn But.. Oct. 24. HCA RBFRIOERATOR ANTIQUE JEWELRY GARAOE 8ALH — Fluorencent llghtn, electricnl flxturca and equipment. Play paid. LEB DEUX, 7S9 River ™ , , room couch, dining table, a|x chalrn TREKS — 11 per ft. Mnpln. evurjreen, Havtn, Kast Tuss • fiat, 11-S, 741 Clothps. MlncQllancouR. Toys, almos birch, Dlj your own. Locust ire». ANTIQUES- Tillany Items. I o n new. Triple width lined drapes. Ouitnr, Cnll291-142T. ltura, china, paintings, painting ataluan- — etc. Turn, through Sat,, 23 Lone OaV future, Carved oa ghtlng future,. oak lnlng Road. New Monmouth (oft Cherry Trei PABEMENT SALE — Colonial llvln F a r m Rd.l. room set, new full alee mattrenn and ho: room plecM, Copper Kettle A bed, other edds and ends. Ca O.khur.t 531-1809 or 22S-MM. FREEZER — Refrigerator. Mntohlm ter 8 p^m^ black leather flreBJde chairs. Kltchcr ilBsd Oriental Rugs table, four chalm. Plni-pon P l n i p o n j tabled Z Plni-ponj Zlth ~OAilAaif~8ALE — Sat.. 10-4. Ttiy«, Chinese and Persian games, organ, bicycle, scout unllorms. er. Rugs, other Ru oth Item* Item In farajie ialeale i iale 100' of 1" pliistlc nlnp, etc. 52 Rosalie p m . every day this week, 234 Pell t i ) Ave,. Lincrott. 747^005. , Mlddletown (Oak Hill SSection). WANTED — Vending machines, l * m l . WALNUT niNINO ROOM BBT natlng, pens, atamps. horses, aoaies. Table, with extra tear, six ctialra. v.\ t . r?ccd pipe stands, bto-om. clonrt, '.nirtel. Very good condition. V87-875T. "WANTED — Silver coins, war nlcktls, KIRBY VACUUM CLEANEIJ — With silver dollara. Will pay top doflarl. Mr. workuhop and attachmonln. Five years Romeo. 7»7.»C51. old. In ported condition. S6S. 2B4-1P47, PIZZA EQUIPMENT WANTED 1

LBARN CERAMICS — In a fortable worlahop studio. We thingfl German shep hlngfl such &• a i handrome h n d o m e Oe herds, elegant Canada geese, brlgni sMny -red apples, tall, j d applei. .. _. fierce Vlkingn „. Conijulstadora Nautical '-- Wlial Spanish Conaulstadora, .nr fltelns, oteins, old salt, z inir Zodiac ash travg OF ASBURY PARK authentlp - - " reproduction - • * • is or Colonial pot tery ni +v* j and:' n u n , well, TTCII, you «uu iiamo it. B&Tnplei NEW HAMMOND are on display to visualize and sufKen p yourr projects. -' Alno " taught • • Is elementary CADETTE ORGANS !Ci throwing. Limited number of be. Kinnera'or more advanced "atudVnts" an $565 welcome to join Tuesday or Wednesday bench, delivery, Initant-play nfRht classes. Class 'hours ..._,. -- re7:30toltf Idcludei For more Information call book (leti you play fongi on your own 47-9540. from the gfart) »nd 1 weeks of lenoni

Full time and part-time. me and t • Office Automation 1 salary Experience preferred, but not es- Plenty of workt o'ood'*Balary.'^iuit"be Red Bank Auto Imports experienced. Appl? Little silver cleasential. Salary plus commission. Blue • Computer Programming nerj, 601 Branch Ave.. Little Silver. Newman Springs Rd., Red Bant Cross and Blue Shield. Company in E X P E R I E N C E D CARPENTERS business In excess of SO years. Phone Jobs waiting for qualified Brads. Day Wanf to laarn RetailWANTED 747-0825, Mr. Ferroro. or evening classes. Tuition loan o Call after 7 p.m budget plan available. Approved fo ing from +h» ground up? 787-3125. veterans. YOUNO MAN — Over 18. to train as drive-In cashier. Apply In person, comNortheast Computer Institute munity Theater, Bttontown. SHEET METAL MEN, ELECTRONICS 60 English Plata Rad E CAR DETAILHK8 - Full or part-time. 14MNT We have immediate openings in our sheet metal deCountry sudser Car Wash. We will prepare you for a career In Mlddletown Sales, Credit and MsnaKement work. CHRTmUD TBACHBR - In secondpartment for the following positions: ary •dueatlop will tutor a llmllad HAN ~ Shopping cart return and park, And offer top benefits too. number of students In Trench, from ins; lot . 8 a.m. t o 6 p.m. five lot cleanup. clea LAYOUT MEN d&y a w e k Ideal I d e l fo t d t o d&ys week. for student or person We're A l In paints throughout the country, and this avails you of the •upplementinc Social Security. Full • u l m n t i n c S al Securiy l Experienced men capable of taking manufacturing bluec o m y b f i t A l y In In person, finest Itfe-tlme careef and advancebenefit pany benefits. Apply dd Monday, Wednesday. Thursday, Friday ment. You'll progress as fast as you prints of chassis, panels, etc., and laying out sheet metal between S a.m. and 6 p.m. DELICIOUS can make It. All wa asK Is, that you MERCHANDISE ORCHARDS. Rt. 34, ColU fcleok. ior production runs. Must be able to operate with miniare amaltlcnis and dependable.

mum of supervision.

FOR SALE. PINO PONO TABLE — Standard roll, away, In excellent condition. Call Haz let. 739-0693. *

842-5811 AFTER 5 WINES QHAPES—And wlnt barrels sale. Call altar 4, VlT-SMB.

innpAcm cm W WOO

r. Call pair Center. YI7.0573 YI705 o BUFPBT - (12x20, fine nusJIty, so nialmsany. excellent condition. Oc< slonal cnalr. Lees all wool carpeting, rpetlnR, 35 sq. ycl». with loam padding. M tut sell.

BABY LAYETTE FOR SALE — Olrls rtreiuea. stsea 4 to 10. Everything fr nood condition. Phone before H, 741-8378. SNOW TIRES — 1.25x14 Flrcnton whttewall tubeleis. 4n>ly Town am Country. Llko new. JJB pr. 747.1180^

COLLECTOR- - Beaks antique dolls.

SEASONED FIRHWOOD -- «4» a trucl load. SI0 a trimkloart. Locust area. 201-14277 OVEHHBAD OARAOE DOORS — «'X7', f

PETS AND LIVESTOCK

284.S73I. LAKOK OLABB FRONT BO0K0AW

.7X2

Alao fireproof door 2 8"x«'B", Good — ditto.. Call 741-33OJ after B p.m.

PltOFXsalONAL CIROOMINO — All breeds, pick up and delivery isrvlci. Also AKC registered puppies for sale. All alias and ages, seven days a weak from 1 a.m. lo » p.m. Call W-tHf). 4 LARGE BOX STALLS TOR ItBNT PRIVATE FARM IN MIDDLBTOWN PASTURE LAND FOR ORAZINO.

SAXOPHONE Call 5<2.3b7« WBSTINaHOUSEi REFBIOERATOR — f reer.erron ontop. 'Llko now. 'Large free/.f II 284-7304.

PORCH JALOUSIE" — And scre«m complole. Reasonable. Call 842.0123. KAT? Borrow your way to slim ness—borrow Vibratory bell, exerciser, masssger, all lop quality exercise equipment from A to Z Rental Center lai Newman Springs Rd., Shrewsbury ItUHCIL'S

TIIIH

WJCKK

BPECIA|.fl

741-2382 1TALU FOR RUNT - LlncroIt-ColU J ec k-Holmdel area. Private farm. Countryside riding and trails. Hay straw Included, Call 747-3311 or 747. evenlnga.

Meple rolltnn dnsk I2D.B0, Typewriter atand |4.7». 3-pr- kllrhen net $12.o0. Car. pel runner with otlte 14 78 roll. BiMl

OOOD HOMIB FOU] - 5 5 s — cash p i ' ;tars, Itan Lerner. lai 1

nnA

hhim

R0FIB8I0NAL, D o n O

complete »2u. Upt • ""By appointment only. A1 che * 2 ,TV lfl p , x l Couches »20, ..... China China t'li rioiDt Un. BOOKCRFIBH »IO.V», and aohnausar pupplas. — fVl.M. .M. Apartment-nlM Apart rnrrlgcrtttor |4f) EDEN ACHX INNEL potH, ppBnn, dl»hr«, nrlp-a-bmc o For "Heavinjy11 Alsoo pots, and ry rtcur.rlptian, every desc.rll'tlot., nuncii^B, S& E, Boardlns. S43.4M9. Front 8^, Red Hank, 7(1-1' COO GROOMINO-ALL BRXED1 iTivTSdnfooM B E T ^ c i i n i e n i r o r a r y , Wa groom tpplease, s.nd Mrs, Belli or Monroe sofa. Mr. s.n 642MW harra. ottoman, t t n like lik ne-w. w IS80. IS80 Ph charra. ENdLIHH HKTTRR — Beautiful two 162S T41-62SI. year otil male, Hottsehrokfln, affoc.

MEN'S HOODED BWBAT'HIRTS (lonate and food with children. I3f>. 291. Full zlppnr. InHtllatrrl, Ali colora and •lies only KM. We havn the « n » In IJAHRAUORB — AKC. Nine weeks, double weight for JII.IWI COHEN'S Dm. Shots, wormed. Champion blood line, PARTMBNT Store, Store. SbrewsDiiry Avp. nood nets, also hunting, 9411.4139. Open plghts OppoBlle Rlveiir St. _ . hrhool. FREE TO HOOD JIOMK! ONLY — until 8 p.m. Friday » pjn. mallie klttcnx, All thota. Will pay for LADIEB -r Are you tlret or buying <'oa. Two neuterin metlcB and not bfllng ~~' nClccIT Why noi try befcire you huy? — , - _ . . . ,B PIIPPIKR — Five weeka old. AKC registered. Five males, show. Call now for appointment. malo, W and up. TWO BAR 21011 or 63H-28itl. JJUlfc CHLOR hALEB. Call BAT11RDAY8 UNTIL «IOI,r> — r«lr~i>l green glaas fampa, 19. nraas andirons, Fouii-YBAIt-OLI) — Jleglnlored mars. »5. T.V., IB. Record player, II. Mlrrora, Hoaullrul fllaiioBltlnn. Ideal for child nr c h a i r s , table", toys, jars, dishes adult. Kngllnh or Westarn. Call 747-32H, frames, travfl, all sires, loo to $10. 6, TWO BWK'V T T F DIP Peters PI,. Naar Bt. James. TICRED MALE VIZBLA M A P t F T E A WAOON - I2«. Colonial Six weeks old. Champion sire. Perfer.1 nlna sofa, small fliie, checked ctlnhlons, companion, natural rtirlevir, trains ISO. Black i Decker 18" eleotrlo lawn. eaHlCv. Phone 74I-37DO eves. Kb. 2IH481O MINiVTimB^Cr}NAUZ«5ft~PiTpir^' Champion Rlred. Pepper and salt, DockMT0N'« U B A V Y W B I O H ed, cropped, shots, stud sarvlca also BWTCAT S I I I H T S . sliea l>4 and 88. "nl avalliililc. 741.7M7, X.1.D8. Also full r.lpper hooiiril Inaula'p swrnlahlrta to alr.e W. only (7.0s at Vr> SIAMBHB KITTENS - C F A reilslerellT HEN'S Department Store, S h r e w - ' - '"lamnlan bloodline. Also stud service, Ave, Opposite River Si. School,

rtUNB — New anfl used. Buy. »rU o trade. MANNY AND MARY'B s r o R T B SHOP, nt. 31, Ea»t Koanatiurj 787-OSOS. 1070 LAWN MOWERS — And Garden Tractor*. ]fl% to 25% off. LHtlo flllva Bnnalrcienter. 74.T-OM3or 741-3IHI. THREK-PIBCJ! BEDROOM SET —batr- hare tn Rnri Bank alnca 1012. Bookcase beartboartl and mirror, W0. DALMATIAN PUPS — 8 weeks old. RINE 7fJ7.flll6 between 4-B p.m. four females, four males, wormsd. pa. 150. per trained, W2j3O57. - Transistor? 0AWN MOWER BHAUPBNKn l 8(j.3 lie Silver Repair Center, 7(7. OLD ENClLisiTsiTHEP DOO - Cham, 88»°rlf!cs, us! 057.1 or 7(1-31811. riARA(lB HAI.E — Marchindlae. Comr pion aired, show quality female. Tour In and see us, I^oad* and loads oi brlc-a months, show dog at stud. H18-MJ5. lirac-low fnw p r l c n ! China, ttnim ware. pots, psns, illahes, hooks, knlrk T k c FEMALJ1* COLLiaTPUP — I .. ; Oct. IT, 10t(. a Bo. Cherry La., knacks. knacka. Savn Bavn time t m e and andgaa—all undel months old. Champion slreil wlUi ehow rtumsun. Furniture, mirrors, dishes, one roof.• RUSCIL'B, 25 " g . Front at. pntenllsl, Bessonatile. MB..11911. » miscellaneous oilier Itrms. Red Bank, N. J. PBIISIAN KITTENS — Binclia uni ATLANTIC TKADINO avU fjX ^* 'ITS creams. Also two proven Oreedsrs. All •oFAnnn — BIIII Grand Ave., Lonl Brancn. c Antlnjiea. IM. fiurclired, Papcrasvallabls. 48J.S5O7. _ china, glass' and 'usfd'furniture" V>*H! (.'all M6-<»^ even. "WEST liiai'LANDTEnRIBR - - M a l e and rrf. e-io p.m.. sna «at. and 8nn 13 weeks. Champion line, AKC regls. MUJN'lTcdTTOjr'iwiON Bl'ITB '"« p.m. Buy and sill 12B-113H I^ong sisevea, long l«ga, nlfiss IM to 4 1 fcml. Paper trained. Hlioll B(2-9Bfl7. BABX I»nAND PIANO onlv • $.14 ",49.«l COHEN'S _. ^ bEPARTMBNT OREAT DAN«» - AltC. Quality Miicki" tAUTBR STOns,I, Bhrrwibury Bhrewabur/ Ave. Opni Oppewlto Blv. vlth sound structure and femperamsnl. AFTEIt S, 7 er St. School. Dstabllahed m i l Jtrayecl clurJI2B.tW7. ACTION COMBINATION JBINATION -- TV, rarllo and CUSTOM STOM HAR —8 x 8'x3'. 3 . Plus quarter, IMboTJiHAIRET) COLLIE - negi»T cooler, Boih for X2T5 X2T5. reco:»rd " player. 38" Olympic*, TV needs kagg cooler lersil. Two years old. Asking 135. Call a repair. |35. Call 7(t-«l)S5 aflar 8:110 Call 2M-1307. ^17.1872 between jj£ jj£p.m. _ _ LAlilEel lh« «

HELP WANTED-Male-Female

LB RADIO ATTRACTIVE POSITION!! SURVEYING A Marshall Field family-owned pubUshr S?0 ?8l rS?0??8l PARTV CHIEF — For houslnr devel Ing organization la conducting a nation, opments, municipal work, private sur> wide expansion program. Opportunity veys. Many beneflti IndudTt llnf pension for part.tlme or full time outside, Inter, ITEMS YOU NO LONGER plan. » 8 0 to 1225. «2-02C' viewing, Flexible hours with guaranteed 192. Income. For local Interview write Mr, NEED OR USE W I L L . . , 10 MEN WANTED ft. Coe, Box U-1B0, The Dally Register, Immediate opening!. Full time work. Red Bank. No experience necessary. Advance.. ALL-AROUND, SKILLED TOOL ROOM MACHINE ment positions. $3.So per hour plus PART-TIME DAYfl Atplj In person, 7000TOWN, Mala HANDS IN THE AREAS OF MILLING, LATHES AND bonus. 7UH(0> wan. 12« Main 8t. SERVI0E 8TATI0N ATTENDANT •DRILL PRESS. MUST BE ABLE TO SET UP, ROU&H HELP WANTED 1 WANTED — Permanent poslflon. i-nrmiimrr-"" Apply 'Ave* • ' • Oarage, M7 Branch OUT AND FINISH TO A CLOSE TOLERANCE WITH at' ~ Burdpe's MCDONALD'S DRIVE-IN Little Silver. 055 Hwy 35 Ulddletown WITH A QUICK ,, A MINIMUM OF SUPERVISION. U B B D , CAB MECHANIC — EX.We need full or part-time workers for pcrlenceil. Excellent salary. Oood hen. days and evenings. Apply In person. LOW-COST ellta. Call Mr. Jortensen. 741.6200. WE ARE STARTING A SECOND SHIFT, HOURS DAILY REGISTER MEN — Full and part-time, t o work in automatic car-wash In Uata4:30 P.M. TO I A.M., WITH A 10% PREMIUM. IF modern wan. Top pay. Call MJ.72T2. -YOU QUALIFY, A GOOD HOURLY.'WAGE AND YOUNO MAN— To learn aulo and «en. PART-TIME ersl glass work. Permanent position. EMPLOYEE BENEFITS ARE YOURS. Paid medical and hospltallzatlon, llfi Msny employee benefits. We will 3 LINES • S DAYS train, ,/ppfy In person. 0:30 to B:30. Robert flail clothts, ni. M >nd ll.ln FOR $O (\(\ St.. East Kennsburf. An Kqual Op. ' " Call •for an appointment: AUTO SALESMAN — Bxperlenced pre. portuMty Brnploycr. ferred but not essential. We will train you. contact Mr. Longo. Town Sc Coun. riniihsri and prsmrs. for work m Available for 14a re hand tit For Bile trv Dodge, 60 Main HI., Matawan. iiittf and oUUlM's ooiij. JUaiV only. Article muit originate from a time work. »frhour wask. Ca!r?!l»oa. Jor houathold and may not cxcMd a aal* Ann Coats. 31 Willow St.. R«d Bank prloi of 190.00 per article. COFFEE AND BEVERAGE MAKER Price Mu8T be advertleed. Vaoti idTAXI DRIVERS WANTED — Part-time — Orlll men and cooks. Five days a dlllonal Una $1.00. No cony 'ehin|ei week. Apply In psrlon, Bell Labs c a n . may be made and no discount! or riturni win be made If ad ti cm"htcn m.u». cttMl before ecplratlon P U c . Your Dally R.gtil.r REAL ESTATE man for motel. Oood salary, teneflts. and Telegraph Corporation Apply in perion to Mr. Kerbel. HOLI. FAMILY AD, CALL . . . TRAINEES NEEDED DAY INN, n t 35 Haalct. ^ ^ ^ _ _ Join a prorensIons! and fn«t crmvlns 300 Halls Mill Rd. , Freehold, N. J. organ I ration which l i willing to trtln you to become a profemlona), Earn HELP WANTED-MALE 24-Hour 5srvlcs while you learn the blggeit bustntis :.. AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER In the country. Call for appointment, TABLE — Msplo, wrought Irnn legs, 291-1865. two clialrn. |18. Urly'i inke fur cont, BIIIRT PRBS8ERS — Muni be ex-sl^c 18. l?.l. HIn ft A, like perienced. Full lime work. Good salary. new. M Wool Jackol. $8. Harnllian. 13. Apply Little Silver Cleaners. fifll Branch -MEN HI Local affiliate of Intonation-1 Ave,, Lltlfe Silver. 12x36 POOL HITCHEN HELP WANTED — Apply In al Company has opening for pcraon, Cooklo'ii Bar, Hwy 70. MarlUtfir, Indiler, iklmmer Bent offer sales-minded person to sell boro. (Oppoilte Fire Home.) USHER AND USHERETTE Call 747-1681

Machinists — Immediafe Openings

GARA&E SALE

SELL FAST

CASHIER

FAMILY AD JUST

431-2300 •••; ITT ADVANCED ,-. MECHANIZATION LABORATORY

Z.UU

741-6900

.[SALES-MINDED

WE ARE EXPANDING OUR OPERATIONS AND WE NEED

MACHINE OPERATORS HELPERS and LABORERS WE ALSO NEED:

1st CLASS ELECTRICIANS PIPEFITTERS MILLWRIGHTS The opportunity you'vt bttn waiting for is her* NOW! Take advantage of itl GOOD SALARY AND EXCELLENT FRINGE BENEFITS For Intarvaiw, com« to our Perjonntl D»p«ftmtn» • nytims from ¥ t.m. *o 12 noon or I p.m. lo 4 p.m.

GENERAL CABLE CORP. 26 Washington St.. Ptrth Amboy. N J . Tel.: 826-3800, Ext. 27S on equoi opportunity employer

product in demand by retail businesses. ,.

FULL OR PART-TIME — Opportunity to earn I1M a weeK. flood frfnge ben. PRODUCT TRAINING (1 ta and atnolc purnhaiiei1 ile« ft Service. Phono 741PROVIDED COUPLES — Need ChrfitrriM moneyr Four figure income montMy atari your own ounines9, operate from earn a* much ai you want. Call Phone Mr. Holton at 842-6262 homo, 787^070. between 9 a m and 11:30WAITER OR WAITREBS — Over 21 Exporfencedin Italian roods. Apply m pftr> «on, Phliomeana'i ncatauranf, Hwy M, a.m. Friday arid Saturday. Hfihlandi, or call 072-1322.

8

HELP WANTED-Male-Female HELP

WANTED-Malc-Fcmale

PRODUCTION EMPLOYEES W t need people to work rotating ihifti. We offer: • Stead/ imploymenl clmt l» homt ' • Excellinl wogn • Hospltolliotlon

Including shift dirrsrsntlol

ooynnnli

• Llfs Iniuronct • Diioblllly ond sick bemllli • Retirement plon • Opportunity for od«jne«mint

'

,

Apply ol

KBRR • u s * KM»p«etumw a* MCKAOHKI n W D U O n MVfMON B n r t m d Froncli 51s. An «quol apportunlr/

Ktyport amplBver

TUBB TESTKp — Like new. JCIco moil, al 60", dynamic conductance luhr. and tramlstor tester. IM. Call 6i2.48tn. VICTORIAN FimNITUnE — Love seat. Lincoln rocker, four dlnlnf chairs. dropleaT table. Nnwly upholstered, ex. cellont rondlllon. 171-214.1 OLD FABIIIONBD RCHOOL DESIIH Decorative scroll work, from Ili.. i.lfht. Inn (hituros. 15. 2M-HHH:'*:04-20}D. SOFA AND M A T n i m r l CIIAIIt — filx monuis old. Sacrifice, I4S0. Contampo. rary. 320-8401. riAIlY ORANI1*PI*NO Excellent cnndltlon. S700 Call «7|.M:«. MOVIK CAMEI'.A — » mm nnii lights 120, frosted (all. Human hair, hand made, »3I>. Call rtOMOM),

JtUMMAfiB BALE — Women's, men'e and children's clothing, toys. Hour of 103 Newman BprlngH ltd., Shrewsbury •Hiurii,, Frl.. Bat.. 10-3 p.m^ Monll-K and BASE-CltlMn Band nadlos. sxcellent condition. Hotn can be seen In operation. Both nave 23 chann«la. Cal afttr 0 p.m. MJ-O031. FRIOIDAIRB — ID cu. 't. Coppertone. Very good condition. fJO.

2L??ij_

iT'if T T n r work outt of buying your roomette*, iATTi'ifii ponDLsTTiipiniTTr isve a beauty snriw. Try before you t shriw. week" old. Anrlrot color. 115. No buy, W«-8IO»arM»»ll. _ _ M«I21i rB, 7l7-IO4t or t n - f j o a ^ SPANIEL jjegTfleriifi, 30 X n'/," KIIMl'/Nf) TKLnBCOPFl —"Sfsl l j iTTANy AM shots. Could ba hunted fixtures. Modern, "."orifice. power Msnolux microscope with pre. his months. fall. 7(1-B,il4, mred Bltdr-s and Imtrumnnls. -Ti rail, 872.0(05. ier Winchester rifle. 8 »hot boll. Two W p > E i 7 L o w MINK JACKET - Fully let out male rod* and roela with tnrkle hnx Kkln« and very darli ranrli mink. Hire ft. fishing wllli II trolling lures and tnulnmml. — Nine wtekB, S, Pfrfi-ct condition. Writs p 0. Do» call 74I.BI123. 33, Atlantic MKhl Hlghlsnds. Include rama YnlTNO LAVINfJ HENsl L anil phone n umber. r -Phone ipvun twEAiimriTir p IKJ-MI7 after 8. •on SAI.E-MnRniricrnt 6J1" hutch for In Nsvy, ofeei. Wh»e. L In Nsvy, ofeei. vlng room or dining room, gimllsr r V only 1101 h l CO. n only 11.01 esch ritom... | B N ' sT'liIlPAnTMlINt""" litPh, carnetlnK, BMorled ritrnfturs and (More Classified Adi OR*. Ihrewnbury ilKPApTMBNT Ave. Open nlgnta Suntil ». creanorleii. Allporrprt condition Re-lo- Frlday»p,m. A O l t On The Next Page) :atlng._Hustsacririri>. IW6-7JOS. ' D » C I C ~ Amiwi'Caiseit•"" TAPE ipes.1 Amp mfcronhnnes. Only ten 1*1. upright piano, '•hairs, rugs, leak. nurs use, JIM. (iall 323H247, •mm, table, nCA TV, old witlnul i es£ -•- ' id», palnllnis. Call SBI-SK) for itlTnT HFjIjf. . linxwnor)Tahrnhh*ry7 SKI'DOO SALI ppoint ment. NEW 197U IN STOCK NTIQlIEH ~~liorira|irlngnnilms(lri>as«20. rainier hitft. I17B. Other Itcmn. (3J^!l,10. Iller verygnoil irinillllon 120. Hoy's 1970 LEFTOVERS! 2H'' ID. Twr, lar,<. u h l r lump., ID -ADY/g"PREBS'COAT ~ MlnkTnllaT blkf lif !(, Man's «utt, ]-plai%, Ai* m. l,lkj pnlr. KOuldrair grill »l». <4fiiildwlllAve, i"!. ,"i!"""* '"• "al . Bun., n d l«lew. Call between 8-7 p.m. 741-7303. 17, IS. lO-flp.m. ~iSi riAItAOH BA|,IJ~ " II'iVuriirii.T iiiriiinh'. ngs, plants hearli'H nld. Irlryr-li. manv ny«, clolhlnK, few nntlmirn. Frlrtnv Newman Springs M., Ritf ftny onnii A N D jcNnB lalnrday anrTnnnday. Oil. lit. 17 and 170 Illfhway U. Belfnri 10 a.m. on. II Lakolde Avo., Hum. 741-5884 Wed,, Thurs.. Frl. !!•( OOURns _ Wlinlmle a n d retail Cerllonn's Orennhoiises Mwy35, Holmdel HARIIBrUIMOP EQUIPMENT

RED BANK AUTO IMPORTS

CIA«IFIFD RIKINKS DIRECTORY A HANDY GUIDE OF BUSINESS SERVICES TO SUIT YOUR MANY NEEDSI Adding

Machlnes-Typcwrltfrs

ADDINO MACHINEB - Typewriter) sold, rented, repaired, Borploo's 101 Monmouth Bt., R*d Hank. 7(7-0(15.

Diamonds Bought or Restylcd Let us buy tha diamonds you don't wear or let us restyle them for you personally. ItfliiasllleB'. 3fl Hros/1 8t

General Contractors BUILDER - Additions, Alterations.

General Contractors TI1IC WRKIirr m i n i ' - Cn rnf nlry and cublnnt wfirk. Mn/lrl. 7,'lfl-llillfl. Kltclien fiililnrlB. riiuiii iIlvHi-rJ, VAtilllrH, nnok CJIBOB. etc. Krfc ciitlinfilfM

Roofinf;, Siding & Insulation OLHKN CO. INC. ItonflnK. siding * Innillntlnii Inntu llrfl rtr,'l Rilartnteed for 10 v e i m . 77,r»-O7t>.ri 20l-fl6ln,

Odd Jobs

OAltPK.NTMV - Additions, paneling, HOOVBR UpnlOHT VACUUM — Al- steps, sidewalks, patio, odd lobs. LK1HT HAIJLINd - Cellars, gamost new. tagrlrjce. 110. Call Reasonable rates. BIJ-llW, itl'a* rages cleaned up. Irrea eitlmnles JOSEPH V. PANDURB—Alterations, 741:140 After 3 p.m. AMPLIFIER AND E E S c f i l l n O additions, rspalrs, new homsi. We TAS - 130. St' r Rottry mower, »1B, do the wiiole job, J22.0274. Call «n.ril«8. Painting and Decorating C A R P I ) NTKH—HtriLDBn DIB KB 111 up, n u i , Ubiti, chair*, CARL II. JONKB - Palntlnf and Complola lmmo ImprovrmcntB. attddlnf machlnei, typnwriten, offfca tcrnllonFi, addlllons. Hoofing. nldttiK„. wallpapering. Fully Insured. For fre» 787-0103 • - . » esllmatts, cal; 2 » :W3J. A.. »Ouarlno M C A Oakburit. N1-3M0.

«i. .%A Dl?8f

Pearl and Bead Heslrlnglng ItKporlly on braided nylon. II.M a Btr.ind, Blprluig clnnpi from 7Sc IlKlrsSILLES1 3f) Broad gCI Its*

Plumbing and Heating

CORRIGAN'S 127 Oakland St. Rod Bank 747-2706 PLUMBING . Hs.tlng. Bathroom

remodeling.

Sewsr Tronchinj and Installation Work.

-TOE DAILY REGISTER, RED BAXK • MIDDLETOW.N, N. J.: THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1970 . PETS AND LIVESTOCK

COMMERCIAL RENTALS

LABRADOR RETRIEVER PUPPIES — Black. Also yellow ones. Ready s e c ond week to Nov. 671-5840. P O N I E S LOOKING F O R GOOD HOME. One m a r e , one (illy. Gall 291-0758, ENGLISH SPRINGER SPANIELS — F i v e m i l e s . $75-$8fi. AKC registered. Call 741-8000 or 671-2548. GROOMING SPECIAL At CANINE COLLEGE INC. you t a n h a v e your toy or miniature poodle groomed for only 57.08 throughout the fall a n d ' winter months. This offer in. eludes a complete Job. your choice of any style and mir extra louche.-* tn please you and your pet. Call /or an an. polntment today. \lW-89Xi, HUNTERS — Two 7u!!y trained, AKcT female Basset hounds. One six years old, other 3'/I*. Sold separately or as f a i r . Also pups for sale. 787--47I. SEALPOINT SIAMESE KITTENS — 8 weeks. Litter trained. No papers. Jl'i.

STORE OK OFFICE SPACE _ 800 i q ft. Rent reasonable. Clmwood Beach area! W8-3632 or 727-9399.

FOR HENT OR LEASE 4050 sq. ft. Very convenient Keyport location. Leaac required for this NEW BUILDING. Inquire M. J. Oliver construction Co. V39-O75O. SHOPS FOR RENT IN FAIH HAVEN'S MOST UNUSUAL SHOPS, VISCARDI'S FAIIi HAVEN MEWS. I-'KOM $75. 7^7ODSfi.

EAST KEANSBURO —One hionk from S t . Cfllherlno'/i Church. Klvcroom BRADLEY BEACH house. Nov. 1. Adults preferred. {169 E F F I C I E N C Y One and two-bedroom jmo. 787-8.W4, » p » r t m e n U . High rise, new elevator building. Broker-Agent 774-4956, After S lJXEClJfrVK~RBNTAL - T h r r n bedrooms, twq batlm. Mnnnlflcert view of river plus dock for boat. Unfurnished. USD BAKK — Luxury S'^-room Apart. ITD tier ninnlh, J!AH 115 R E A L ES. tnent n e a r Broad St. Air conditioned, TATff. 872-1600. 741-1063 or 747-M66. MATAWAN-STRATIIMORE — I-'our. 35 T F I C I E N C Y APARTMENTS — bedroom twn-nalh Cape. Immaculato, Ocean and river view. Utllltlen paM. rnnvenlpn! commute. All appliances. One m o n t h ' J security. Occupancy Si>pt. Extras- $3W per month. Call M6-848S. 7, J1R5 month. Studio efficiency. carpet- RUM3ON — WatcrfronTcoionlal. Four Ad. Utilities pairi Adult!) only. No peLn. brdronmn, |r>ur bathfl. Yc&t'lt leane. 842-8807 or 291-23/5 after 6 p.m. $.'),-f). HALL BKOH. Hrnllor^. 7J1-76B6. OIBSON APARTM ENTfl — Vtitnr. BfTXUcrA, WEST I N D I E S —• 1! acre •nlshed. Amboy.Key port Rd.. Cllffwood estate 300' high on hill. Newly furnished, Beach. N . J . _ ^ _ _ _ four-bedroom, three-bath home with KKAKSBURQ — Buetneiis couple only. mnld and caretaker. Terrace* overlooking beautiful C a s t r i e s Harbor a n d K e a r trinvporUtlon. p r i v a t e . Call 4tfi tlip Caribbean. Three mfnutoa to town, per week. SHOO wr Adults only. One-half Mock he for ^ Hi((h. month, llnve jiintitren. If interested. Call lands B r l d t c , Hlghliuitis, N . J . Local and days 7fi7-OO26. Evan. 220-0250. N.Y, bujies a t door. Call 671-5262. MONTHOUTH BEACH — River ft Surf Club Apartments. On* and two bedroom a p a r t m e n t s tn modern build* Center imll Colon.ni In the heart of IDKI, Air-conditioned, aclenee kite hern. town. Heavily wooded !nt assure* pri4156 a month up. Call Retidant Uan- vacy, circular drive. Living room with •flreplane, dining room, eat-In kitchen w e r . 222-8309. with adjoining family room, fntir bed* B U M 8 0 N —Three-room apartment and roomit. Colon!»l trend In rfccnratln bath, with balcony, all utilities, (or m a . Basement, Short walk to all Behoof, t u r e working woman. No pets. Lease •tores nnd hun linen. Junt Haled a t and security required. Phone rinlly 842- 169,500 nnkltiK. Hnr It todaV. M20 mornlngn until 1 and after* p . m .

RUMSON

HALL BROS. Realtors

413 River Rd, 741-7(K6 Fair Haven Member Multjplo Lindner

O A K l T u r a T r ^ r b T r t f M m i t , tw bnlhs, bainmcnt, garasr. Jnimo'llatetwo o r>ancy. $230 $290 per'hn "ipancy r month. 4fl1n227

M A f A W A N ~ T h r e V o r ~ f o u r bedroom*. 2Vi bathfl, living rncim. formal dining ami aarnfKv $II7fi a month, Lrane ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS - L a r g e fur. room, necurlly required. Available Nov. nlshed three rooms, hath. High on water and CUFITIN AGENCY. 67M4O0. After f r o n t . G r a c 1 o ii « living. Spacious 15. ground!, quiet, refined, privacy. All hpurj. f»i2-7768. utilities AdultH. 201-3014 or741-M4 RANCH — Four bedroom*, two bath* RED BANK —Three large room aparl. banement. In country jetttnu. Available ment near Rlvervlew llonnital. Recently Nnv 7 Tor 30 monthi, WOO mo. No b r o . r painted. All uttlttlcB Included, S\* > & kern..Call 741*2934. month. Write Box 0-202, The Dally Reg- DELUXE r o i ' R ' B E D R O O M RAISED Inter. Red Bank. RANCH — In ctoitt location, Three dtntng ri>»srj. ^ r g f faintly room BEAUTIFUL, moden 3-room furnished batlis. two.car g a r a g e . Eir-*{>*i neifthborhoon iatontown. No pets. 74T. for apartmenln. Sal chlldre.^ N In one Vftr. 741^500. Apartment, Each has private bedroom, living room and entrance, hut ithnrt; — Thrn-hrdroamii. kitchen. Convenient to trarmportation MIDDLBTOWN tnd fthonitlng. lmme
^?iL^£.____

dAT

utTmnil

WANTED TO RENT

ird. Convenient ioration ties lupplird. per month. 747-4033. Red Bank. 985 985 pe month 7 ED BAXK — 2'i rlvale bath anr ?couple. 747-M2O.

rooms, furnished, entrance. Adult

"ATLANTIC HIOHLANPB — a p a r t m e n t , all utilities, (130. 291-1423. porch, view ami FOUR ROOMS ply own heat. yard. Under | M . Buppl Adults only. Call ST2-O398.

HIGHLANDIA APARTMENTS 10 OCEAN BLVD.

WK N E E D — jriva o r a n , 3-3 badroom Rental Homes, furnished or un* furnished from IflS to M M p e r month U r Incoming personnel. THE BBRO AOTNCY. Rt. S. Mlrtdletown. «7MO0O TIAfLY REGISTER B P n R T S W R I T E n flpeks hou»e to rent. Contact 7i7.2.'!M). _Alterj>juii. 812-SflIJ^ . SMALL HOME - - Or morlefn tinfnr. nlntird jtnarlmrnt In fine Area. Cnnvrnlenl tn N Y. trnln JIM.J22I) In. rlmllnB iitllltlra. RI3.(i»8O niter 10 a . m . or M3-2MI.

ATLANTIC' HIOHLANIXI. N, J.

TW7).REr>ROOM . - / f l m i i i l Immr" or a p a r t m e n t . Brlfnrd I nrnii. for utility company supervisor.'rail 787-7201.

FINEST LUXURY APARTMENTS

FURNISHED HOOMS

HOLM DEL RANCH Jajianose Rarrlrn, fish pond. Sizeable lot. Three liL'drourns, two baths. Twocar g a r a g e Air conillUnm-r and other coiling drvices, A.sHiim;it>le iniirtgaRe. Many extras, Asking only S42.000.

RIVER PLAZA COLONIAL

marina.

'< •T.SXSr'f'ri Ji FORT A HI. K~ linn M S ~

Near hua line 30 Hwy 3<1 HlRhlands. VA *nd FHA Approved r a i l »7!-(aH0. Oellghtful custom built ranch In su"LOVELY BOOM >r)R™nENT~ - In priT vale dome, f e m a l e (inly, r a i l perior condition. Contains large JivG7M.M:i betwren 5-7 p m . mB room wllh stone fireplace, dining ^irBl7ARnRFi!RNI3HKnltOOM room, Iwo lovely bedrooms, full • i t * M a t u r e Kcnllfrnnn, Centrnllv Irxatpfl nff Hwv :ix Rpfi-rpnroFi. Call after ft, 2f)|. romlc tiled bath nnd wood paneled T2i>r family room. Many oiiirr feolures Included such as refrigerator, washREAL ESTATE FOR SALE Inu machine, dryer, and wall-towoll corpeMrtg. Hot water o-l hrol. Ortc HOUSES FOR SALE car ortachod oaragn, Over onr-hall "iFTs.""LK T" -'>nlNn ocrn wllh large iliarln t r r r v Near whrntilfP't nnd wurroiii,
TEICHER

FOR REAL SERVICE

542-3500 Established 1949 287 Ocwnoort Ave., Occanpori, N. J

741-2240

IN REAL ESTATE Consult a Member of Rod Bank Area MLS

mL

OPEN FOR INSPECTION SUNDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1-5 48 SPRUCE DRIVE, SHREWSBURY

See this charming and friendly three-bedroom home plus 29' family room. All this family comfort for $32,000. Directions: Route 35 (Broad SI.) turn on,Patterson Ave., and. left on Spruce Drive. Look for the yellow flags. Welcome! JOSEPH G. •

REALTOR 30 RIDGE ED.

RUMSON

842-2760

With conventional mortgage available. We have an unuftual home which Includes three bedrooms, the largest of which in 12x19 with adjoining huge •bath. Down s t air» Includes 27x14 Bamcroom large enough for large pool table and piano, wllh adjacent l u u n a bath and nhowcr. Upstairs Includes large hltchcn and dining room with 27x14 living room and fireplace. .In the lli/Jng room large picture window unfolds your ] ' / . a c r e i which in totally wooded, with absolutely no lawn maintenance. Many, m a n y more extra* Included in this matveloun home which Is within walk* ing ritatancB to the train station, Owner anxious a n d ashing Low Sixties.

R<*» Bank E v e s . -Him. 747-40j»

MIDDLETOWN

EXTRAS APLENTY

RAY VAN HORN

W4.000

747-4100

f

264-3456

LOTS AND ACREAGE HAZLET LOT. Approximately 100'x t65'. T>ad-end ttreeL Nice residential area. Convenient. Call 757-4080. HOLMDEL One acre fully Improved lot Call f" ' '

671-5070

$5,500

Thin .owily ranch home In mint c o n ' riltlon hit* a 'breathtaking netting among m a n y shade trees, nliruhbrrv, patln a n d |unh, lush lawn. Jlemarksbty low prfccri when ynu ronsldrr the hotifif! nan neven moms Including ttirec bedrooms two full tmth5, lix'JO family room, full basement wtlh nut* fide e n t r a n c e nnd m a n y extra*, immediate poflNonflton. A»K h £ 737,000.

RUSSELL M . BORUS REALTORS K»lr Haven

FREEHOLD 7MMED1ATE POSSESSION Tmmnculatn ftJUr-bertroom Colnnlal In excellent rentrientinl a r e a . Plus matd'a ronm o r additional bedroom. Large family room, country ntylc kitchen, utility room, full basement. Centrally air condlllnnprt. Tliltt unumial opportunity will nol IIHI, Call nrrw! *41,000.

FEIST & FEIST Entontnwn

201-542-4445

Approved KuJldlng lot, Navealnk. A i r LAIBE-FARnOW AGENCY. Real tor». 7(1-3(50. 671-2590.

Centrilly air conditioned. Two*aths, four-bedroom Ranch. New dtgii* wMher. larpe gcreenerl porch, csrpetlnf, drape?. Immaculate condition. Immediate poafleaalon. No split Aenftlons, good schools. 5 minute* to Little Silver. Ita-llroad Station. 1Tjl» won't lantl •.

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY UNION BEACH — Tvo-rw>m office and warehouse. Approximately 1.800 sq. ft. Slx.rooin apartment. Rental possible. 2M-5508. EXCELLENT INVESTMENT — Oood Income. Four stores. 100x100 lot. Park' Ing. Heart of Keansburg. Pays for Itself. Must sell, 120 KO. M a l e offer. Owner

CHAR1K « . TINDALl Affcncy

741-9030 "We u»« Holly — the Homcflnder"

OAK H i l l COLONIAL

&RING ALONG YOUR GREEN THUMB

Rfflllnr Monmotilli Rhnp[>liiK ( ' r n l r r

117 Hwy 35, Keyport Realtors Member MliS Open 7 days We have Holly-The Homellnder

$35,000

Immaculate Gold Medallion on wooded lot one block from nchooi. plna paneled kitchen-family room with firelace find rarllant heated flagfltona loor. AIBO air conditioner. Formica hmnch bar, dishwajthcr, jfye cabinets. Carpeted din Ing room, living room with fireplace and bultt-In book caie. Largo Master bedroom with full bath and one wall of louvercd closets. Carpeted ntafrway leading to second floor with two bod roam (i and full bath. Two-car garage And large utility room. Immediate occupancy. $35,900. Call after 7 p.m. weekdays or weekend*.

We have the key to this attractive throe-bedroom, 2 % -bath home which Includes wall-to-wall carpeting. Wood* • • — ' " " fireplace in living room, din* ing room, n. wm-ii eat-In kitchen, cozy den. Asking $45,000. 545,0m. .

E. A. ARMSTRONG AGBNCY 555 Prospect Ave.

Little Silver

741-4500 •JUST1 LISTED 5 BEDROOMS*. 2Vt -BATHS Centrally air-conditioned split level In top location. Lovely bow window In living room, formal dining room, fireplace In paneled den. Attached two-car garage. 40x20 In-ground swimming pool, Be the flrnt to use this attractive home. Anklnji 548,500.

RUSSELL M . BORUS REALTORS em Klvtr ]W.

NEW

747-4532

Fair Haven

SHREWSBURY

A "MUST" FOR AN EXECUTIVE h b l m air c o n d i t i n d R h

LOVE, BUT MUST LEAVE

llent buy. In mid

FEIST & FEIST Bcaltor Won mouth Shopping Center Eatontown, N. J.

(201)

REAL ESTATE WANTED BUY OR R E N T — 4 o r B-room bun. Kalow. Reasonable. Rumson, Sea Bright or vicinity. Euilness adult. 842-3045.

LISTINGS OF BETTER HOMES

Rpnclnun fnur-hedroom, thren-balh homo nn one «i;rr. 2'S living ronm. formni dining rnnm. dnltixn kitchen, large jtnnir ronm. Transferrprt owner

COLTS NECK-HOLMDEL W« ha.va ready for fast efficient ROCHE. Realtor. 462-2741. Member Tlce.

Little Silver

"BUSINESS 'iiry • A rharmlnft hrlch ...luni: nnd a Inn, nn the property, a hulMIng (or . nn antique nhop or fitnragr nf nmnll Imninprts. Excellent pnrkltiR nnrt Incntlnn. Klnanclng avail"

EAST KRANHnUfir; Ufir ._ si. Cathcrlne'lt purlnh. p u r l h Two T b i brvirnnirix. Irlrnl for rettrpri cniiplp. Prlr.pd » t $UMQ

KfVimrt

^B1-2nifl

WANT INCOME?

BRAND NEW — $24,250*" PINE LAKB PAHIC •- 21) nillcn ncmlh or Rrd p n n k . Nont Inkn with prlvatn hcitclt. New L-nhni>p«l ranch. 'Hirer hcdrftonm, full tiled hnth, han!wood tltmrn, UTKP illninjt nrpn, IHTRP fiimlly ronm. m. ntnrm window* i\m\ pcrernn | e n , npar|nii?i kltrhrn Tolnl r l r c t r l c nn 100 x IOO lot, Direct from hit Idler, MnrtRaRO a v a i l . Atilo. RI2-0M0 Ncnttn H Thrrr-fird romlltl'in. HlnlriR rrmni Kamu r o ger. A l-o. It nnrch. Nfri'ly . . . ropfifly. filtfn-wnll rarpctliiK Vacntil. Un vv hry, will nhow nnytlmr. S.17.WI0

Y H. STUlMANjRlii+ir AN,

Rrnok mul woods, quiet "Ireet, D?n with fireplace.. Thrr.r bnrtronmn. U h e new condition. Qualified buyer mny anniim \ fgnKr, .Tint ftnt ftt Hi In <\% morfgnKr, listing, rt won't't llast t long long. $,12,f)flO. ng $1 $,12,f)flO. AIJ/AUIR-PARROW AGENCY R l NCY. Realtors. -7I1-3IW. (171-2500,

BITTNER & CARTON 5fl MHIII 81,

soc..

buy«n. m call J. D . Colts Neck. Listing 8«r-

detalu and caan •0MP80N A AS-

IN A HURRY TO SELL?— We buy homes for top dollar. Ask for Bob or Shcl. BOB SHELDON AGENCY. 2577800.

WE

BUY" HOMES DIRECT

Condition unimportant. Call Four S«i> motiB Realty. Broker. 229-7183. For horaei, estates, farms, a c r e t f e , waterfronta, buslneaaes, IndUfltrlaJ and buitncM properties.

RAY

This turrp-famllv homp n r n r and transpnrtallnn can m a h e you rich! AsklnK EM.tSfl Call tiO2. THE SWEENEY AOENCY. n Horn HWI Ocpnit Avfnue nn enrnpr lot,-Throe lipdrnnmn. llvlnji rnnm with rlronlarp, rtlnttiK room, fcltcli. nn, hath, nnspmciit nnd Raragp. r n r . venlrnt tom-hoots nnn shuppliB. X2H.«rKl. <'AR1.TON II, POI.INO. REALTOR MM Hwy W, lljiilrt. EeH-l!>l«.

H. STILLMAN,1 Realtor "Our 02nd Year "O 0 2d Y - ~ LISTING 0 S h e b

741-saM

LEGAL NOTICES

BRIGHT

"ASSUMABLE MORTGAGE"

KEYPORT - Two borlrfiomfl, filll baKomrnt with Inumlry nrrn. Aluminum pldtng. ntninin nnd Hrrrrn windows. P r i o r i lit S17,fion.

Call todi price. ~

SHREWSBURY

"Our 5»n«l Year" *4ft *4ft HwrHwr- % Stirrwflburr 741-MOO % Stirrwflbur RED RED BA BANK — RUM SON ON AND MILKS AROUND - Multiple Llitinxfl. 9end for free catRloi of modest home", farm*. palatial Rumson eat at eg. waterfront*. acreage. Iota, buwtnewt opportunlllna.

AfiENCV Rt.

n

Sh

711,5212

Available Nov. 1 to June 1. Owncru leaving on extendod vacation, Immaculntn tirlck ranch, completely py furnldhed inRlurllnR TV «nd carnrt c t inp. 200' from »"-•>•* * * morttji nnl JOf 30 ,_ fi42-27B0.

RA

, irt.oon

qualified service, Rt. 34. Multiple

WE CAN MULTIPLE LIST YOUR HOME

WALKER S WALKER, R.altors 1 SEA

741-4500 _

TAUL

irst floor
1CWY 35

E. A . ARMSTRONG AGENCY

-

In Kwnsburg • Mlddletows • Hailtt • Holmdel. The imolko Agency. 7B7-O12I.

BUYERS W A I T I N G

JUST"REI>UCED

revaluations I cannot say; however, I would not be at all surprised if everyone were suddenly made aware of their new assessments some time after Nov. 3," Mr. Lynch rem a r k e d . "After all," he added, "the boat is rocking quite a bit more. Why tip it over?" Mr. Lynch charged that if the Township Committee is delaying the revaluation re. suits, "this is tantamount to playing with the very pocketbooks of the citizens of this township." Mr. Lynch said the extended deadline for announcement of new assessments was Oct. S, set to allow time for a p - '

LEGAL NOTICES

OFNKWJKB8EY CIIANCKKV DIVISION MONMOUTH < OI..VTY Civil Action .VOTK.K 0 1 ' IIEAHINO BALING. MOORE, O'MAilA & COOOAN Crystal Brook prolcsslonal BulldlnK Highway 36. P.O. Box E feULontuwn, New .jci'Hey 07724 (201) 512-2236 attorneys lor Plaintiff In the Mntler o[ Lars Larscn. to be a Lunstlc. . _ ^ . J E TAKE NOTICE that b j an nriler of this Court dated October ,\ 1071), this Court haa fixed November 2. 1D70 a t Uie hour ot 8:30 a . m . In the fore. lioon, a t the* Court Houne In Freehold. flow Jersey, as t h e time and place cf Ilic Hearing In the above entitled m a t t e r to determine the mental competency of Lara Lar.ien and whether he In unable to vern himself and his affairs and for e appointment ol & guardian for Uie said Lara Larscn. , l . . l > T . . ^ c .• URTHER NOTICE that U the said Lars Laracn deBlres to oppose the action, he may appear therein either in person or b y a l t o r n e y . and. If he desires a trial by Jury, he may demand the same. BALING, I1OORB. O'MAFIA 4 COOOA'N Attorneys lor Plaintiff Emily Larscn Hy: MICHAEL D. FARREN Ocl. U _ $B.75 N O T O K T O BIDDKRS SnalDd bjds wf ^

S

nnilil POKII mirrnitiidlnirn and low IflTtrn. Fotir-hndrnnm ranrli wllh full h s s r m c n t nnrl r r n t i a l s i r fnnriltlonlnK. $f10.7>VI, fiTBnLL I N O T i i n M P s n N A Aafltic. K-nltnr 40W. Rlvrrftd.. Hum«n , 7<7. n

July 1970 to the date ot sale and the costs of sale, at public venduB to such persons aa will purchase the same subject to redemption at the lowest rate of interest, but In no case in excess of eight percent per annum. This sale Is made under the pro. visions ot Article 4, Chapter J, Title 5) of the Reviled Statutes of New Jersey 1917, entitled "Sale of Real Property to Enforce Liens", and acts aupplemontary thereto and amendatory thereof. The aald lands to be Bold and the names of persons against whom said taxes have been lain on account of each'parcel for unpaid taxes are as follows: Elizabeth L. chandler. Blk 1A, Lot 13. 452 Shrewsbury Ave $ 828.68 Oulaeppe A' Almerlnda lengo, Blk 3 Lot 35. 81 SI NewNew man Springs Road 645.36 Harrj Harry A Gl Gloria Klrby, Blk 10 •' 85 Sprlngdale AvenueB Lot 16,_ _ 416 34 Josephh Montano. Blk 11A M t Blk 11A

Lot 19, 112 Sprlnidale Ave Richard Lyons & Alnerta P W i l l i a m , Blk 12C Lot 49, 65 Cherry a t Gilbert * Lucille Qrant, Blk 13D Lot 53, 29 Peach S t r e e t . . . . 3S7.62 Essie Chatman. Blk 13D Lot 56 Cherry St :... 2M.S2 arry A Betty R. Stafford, Blk 13D Lot 62, 13 P e a c h Street Charles E . J r . . A Alice D. Bteen. Blk 32F Lot 113. 126 •lenwood Dr. 1,319.16 Clifford K. J r . & Ruth R. Bttiout, Blk 65A Lot 2, 829 Tlnton Ave 1,221.01 Unknown Owner, Blk 67A Lot 2A, off Sycamore Ave 2.70 James W. P a r k e r J r . , Blk 67B Lot 38, 161 Woodland Manor „ „ 64.M Edward V. A Gloria Moro, Blk JOB Lot 7. 73 Old Mill Rd 123.08 Lillian Drumgoole. Blk SS Lot 2, 11 Squankum Rd: 266.08 Allen A Josephine Anthony, Blk 97, Lot 3A. « Fins Brook Road . . . 613.79 Plners. Inc., Blk 103 Lot 4, 50 Squankum Rd 32,92 Plners, Inc., Blk 105 Lot 5. 67 squankum Rd. ; 112.49 Plners, Inc., Blk 105 Lot 6, 75 Squankum Rd 1,031.16 Squankum Realty Co. Inc., Blk 105 Lot 7 S3 Squankum Road 1,012.27 Clarence F . * Alia M. Hnore A Its. A K. Sullivan Blk 103 Lot. 45, 216 Hockhockock son Rd 353.99 Equankum Realty Co. Inc.. n Blk 10SA Lot 7, S, 9 Squan, kum Rd 737.04 Squankum Realty Co. Inc., Blk 1OSA Lot 16, 17 P o r t e r Ave 5S.6C Squankum Realty "cb. Inc.',' Blk 106A Lot IB, Benson St., A Porter Ave. .„ 371.56 Charlea A Catherine Leonard, Blk 1080 Lot 5, 6 P o r t e r Ave 295.79 Ruth Maccontco. Blk 10AD Lot 11, Benson St 5.41 Julia Watson, Blk 1060 Lot 12. Squankum Rd S<.9< Sarah B o g i s . Blk 109 Lot 22, orf Wayalde Rd. 137.10 J a m e i Washington, Blk 109 Lot 30, Hamilton - ' 51.27 C. Wat. |son Est. Blk 109 "Lot 31. Hamilton Rd'. •4.70 Clem WIllllamion!" Blk i i o B Lot io, 41, 42, 4JA, Wlngo Terrace .. Clarence Wat'soi)!""B'ik""ii6B 30.:; Lot 43B, 44, 45A, Wlngo Ter-

^

^.jey, -, . » publicly opened and runri it'loild lor the lollowlng Item: I ...„„ IP6R .Ford police car ..m i«»in;c c a r Vehicle may be I n p t r i rrmo. Vehicle may be Inspected anytime at In K»irndnf M r v r n finer hnmrn Ihl tiln iiunlnt New Kns- IMMKl)[ATF!~6(7criP"ANPy'""'nr"7toli)(v' Ilic Manalapan Township garage at lh« i . 1K Esther MafsnTBikin 1 Two lioilrnnmN. living ronm. kitchen, Inri'l Iwo-ntury Coin rpar of the municipal bunding. Lot 27A, 1028 Wayside R d . . . lottlal IK A niniirinui. Int. uMIIty rtKim, hnll Living room, flrpphiro. mrmnl l l l „ utility room, hfllll. BnraRP nnrt a linlf. Rids must lip cnclosnl In n flnalrd rn- ,. Mary Esther Marsh, Blk 117 rnoni, <\cn or llilnl hedrnom nn first r i t y wnlrr nnd vplnor an,' mtrlrnflspd to Pohpr! P, Lot 28. Wayside Rd. t floor, Two llghl nlrv ln'ilrnitmn on w-V- flHqjumill . S h o r e Machine Service, Blk Langhlln, Township rlnrk, Munlrlpnt nnrl flnnr. 1'i- butlii, I'lrkfl (price en. US Lota, West Park Ave J3ullrllng Township nr Manalafian. New rl'iMcd yard h f l UR I'tinn^h tn imllnr TRANniTERnEn" OR JUST" OUT. j ravy anil pLiliny rrii-iic (he outShirley M. Leonard, Blk 12» OIWWINfl W t l R H r i M B V r CaYl" Hide wllh the nsmp nf th» .ilddcr. Lot S7, 1513 West Park Ave The the Tnwn. TnThe townshin committee 0/ the fitr Itnlitiv in rfrn-nllnn nrrn. W2 WKI Edward 4 Kathryn Rackle-' ship ol ManalapaManalapan reserves the " right lo THK nnWHrfiA AflRNCY, RPBltori". fll m Li m any or all bids If In Its nplnfnn reject nr . _. tt .. K Krnnt HI., Hi") 11Hnk T4I-H7IHI. . . le best nf the township so Is to the UV-PI Intercuts imercjits nr llor.MDPI- • • Foiir-bpdrnnm ColinfiilT Double (enragr, lull bitrionirnt. panrin) ROBERT B. LAUOHLIN den. fireplace, fnrmnl dtnlnR room. «'enTownship Clerk t l vjpu" Worth,"' Bik" m'ho'i' 22; Oct. 15 ttnl ulr r*i'li!ltlotilnB Fullv liiiuhrHprd Aflrnrl pp ntl. _ J7.IH1 11 Rod A Qun c l u b Rrl. M'irt«iiRf> iiiotmy ,-ivnilnblo l>v ownnr l fft 1 LarKr pl . NOTICK l'Hndpiiln only, jrtl.WKl. T»lfi.f»7ft7 after fl family Cnmt>l''tc irlvm La Unknown John Doe, Blk"i'24 AI1VKHTIHKM tl't!!y wnotlrd lot, Three 'jpilrnoms, IS I1VKHTIHKM 'KLATIVT. TO l I / u 3, off Went Parkk AVB. Ave. P rn l'KOrOSM FOH Fl IIMSIII.NG hath* llvinp mom, rilnlnr room, patio l'KOrOSM.S Co llKAnTIKlJl/TtH)OIt • -- On'infl'"i~\M r r l r H tft nrll. Asltlnir $.11,200 CKII'1' I -I ' T ' l : ll/,l NvInK rcinm. nstlo. Dnifl.pnrt f>lni,i>,l Ave.. Ultlf Bllvrr. T4I-H3:M. t Kxccllnnl K l l Htrir-t. r.nntllllon. .'HO.OM. (U2471111. 0:t K, Rnnsr-vr-H Clr. No hroknr's PAUL R BTRVKER. Rfiltor. F»rmi — Two.ntory frame liomp, and farm entstAs. Rtsta IllRnwsy 34, rcrncr.ItANIv rnrnplrtplv fenrpd. Wpl.l land-

WALKER I WALKER, Realto rs

H W Y 3.1 .

fl'I^MI

M l h T

tis&pghS*

° »•

es3.es 54 73

600,78 1B1.04 105.75 150.81 76.9! 27.11 •12.92 331.18

143.32

45 56

Hnlmiicl. Phons l i M I I I . ailUKWailUHY - • .1 or A h n i . vS". l '.', n k l l r l " ' n , " " I Inncmi-m. VA n FHA flnnnrlm: nrrn nRfd f ual. jnd ntlMflON _ I'-our lii ilrnnms, Inrec i wllh flrnplnriv Hr wri |mrch Viry denn lnl. j l II'linvl 'l ii'low c V l h i M J42..1O0, AI.I.AII1K-I' -FAKRnW AOENOV' Ki-nllnrs. ^94 Hitnirl' •" J!cd Ilank 7111

n

TAX SALE NOTICE Of Real Estate In the Borough of New Shrewsbury for N o n p a y m e n t of T a r n and' Assessments. Public notice Is hereby riven that BUSINESS PEOPBRTY — Hwy M, JOOnW) wllh 20x20 cinder block bulldliw. I. Ruth B. Crawford, Collector of Also three-bedroom house on SOx 100 ad< Taxes of the Borough ot New ShrewsJoining Highway property. Buy icp&rate. bury, Monmouth County. New Jersey, will sell at Public auction on the 20th ly or to»elher7T87-82M. day ot October, 1970 at 10:00 A.M., In the Borough Building. 556 Tint on GARiDEN APARTMENTS Avenue. New Shrewsbury. New JerNewly listed and six years young. sey the hereinafter described lands. 12 units, all or which include living Said lands will be sold to make the room, bedroom, eat-In kitchen and amount of municipal liens chargeable bath. Little maintenance. ApproxU the same on the 31et day of, matel? 12% return on Investment. against December 1969 as computed In the Priced at 1112,000. 671-2544. PAUL tax list, together with Interest on P. BOVA, Realtor. said the ffirst id amount" o t ffrom m th i t day off

542-4445

Weekends (2OU 77S-8871.

i

BUSINESS PROPERTY

i.! fun, you'M \rtvp. lit In foiir-bndroom, Jl'jbftt'h ciifilom-biillt Colonial 2*. ypum young. Wp'ro b r i n g Irftiisferrpd nnd h a v e rediiL-ed the rrlco $,1,000 from a p p r o It H I for inlck HHIP. In crnintry urttlriR on one treed aerp with cHtnbllHheil lawn, only I1/, nillrn from Monmniith Shopping Center. Laundry rnom. brautinilly panrlnrt family rofim. .lennrntc dining room, two-cnr g a r a g e , Mnny extra*. Transnorlnli-m tn excellent nclionts. Cull M2-t77.t to Intfpqct

i

FREEHOLD - Council President Alfred E. Sanders reported yesterday that a newly adopted ordinance restricting truck traffic on local streets here cannot be enforced until it has state approval and signs are posted. Mr. Sanders said he had ordered police to enforce the ordinance, adopted Oct.- 5, after a resident complained Tuesday night that he had seen 59 trucks on forbidden streets in a four-day period. "I did order a crackdown, but it was premature," Mr. Sanders said. "The state has

BETSY ROSS AGENCY

TURN TO TINDAtT

FAIR HAVEN CAPE C O O

DOO Blver n d .

SPANKING NEW

bath*. Luxurious closet spice. If that's not enough, there 1s a pomler room conveniently located to all living areas plus a separate laundry/mud room with half a path on the main floor. Pull basemen . Walk to .tatlon. Liberal cSnventlonal financing available.

Opi^n 7 Any*. Call 24 hour* a day. 801 River Rrt f a i r Haven

i

!• •

... the Secretary IncntPri Mcmoriii! Si-lmol, MortiipRAlrir A \ T W TOWNSHIP - Flvr ncrr nup, L'nion n<*nt'li, N. J. bntween Hie furm. tioum or P A.M. iintl 4:00 P.M.. Monh rwn flrrplm-rn. fninltv rnnm pntio. nttnrlipi! Iwn-cnr unrngp wllli hf. l.ln.' U rtpnrtmrnl x Imx-ntnll barn, frm-rd TIIP Hoard cf Kc|ilucntton l-Pflprvrs the p n (1 (I o r k , Nrnr nnrkw "fy.-pnH'wny. mtrance. Tiltht to rcJeci nnvy or nil tilrtfl nnd tn wnlve nnv dpfPfl n (nformnllty of hid Ahoiilri It h P ,!(.(, pflfor the th hhenfinAOET.EH.S CHARM - Ulll<> fillvrr r.ng- IprcBt of thr Bnirrt" or EdiiTBtlon to ilo Hull Tnrinr, Lnrco living room, (lorn wntiribiinilnfr flrnnlmr. formni illnlmr riifini. wnii-pinnnpd Kltrhrn witti nnntry d^n. friiir linlrnnmn, full Imtii'mpni, Over nnc Imlf in-re. Wnlk In mtinol 30'n. C,\U

'ndliMHEIi Vnur rlinnrp lo n n n i l r r '"IKILI.Y.' TIIK I I O M K I ' I N l l K I t " ~ ~ " Iliis newly listed rnnch linmr In IOWOHInrdf r nf thn Hoard nrKdilcatlon of Npvrr fttrKclB n liiniMr. Upnltorfl wlin HHP. l«x bcst-m'l.m.l townshitt. Ttirrr bot|. t^n yUoroiiRli of tfnlon Bench, Union I n r run «r'i-vp you lirllrr. riKiniH. two hritlin, dlninK rnnm. nnnr- Bench, MonmouUi County. New Jersey. inriil. Imnmculftlp. Twn.cnr Rnrnftc. l.iNCHOl-'T — RPlIt lrvi.'i. lhroP~bPi'l7 Lnrpp Int. Tinti'l inisfl tillH rnrc tmv n rnoms, '.Jnth. rprrpnllon rnnni. J'' .OO0 MiV.ftOO, HB3RITAOK AGENCY. 36 Hwy IIDWIN H. MAKTIN. Broker. fl(2-«25o. 34. i l a i i i w a n . 606-7040 or 264-1027. Ocl. I t

peals to be made by dis- ALLENHURST - Miss Wlsatisfied taxpayers. nona E. Darrah presided at "We are now into the the annual business meeting middle of October, and to my of the county unit, American . knowledge, no one has yet Cancer Society, at headquarbeen apprised of their new ters in borough Hall, Dr. AUen B. Kendall, Red valuations. Many people that I have spoken with are labor, Bank, chairman of the nomi. i n g u n d e . r t h e m i s - nating committee, announced apprehension that the recent the election nf: Miss Darrah, Little Silver, tax increases they received were the results of his reva- president; Dr. Norman T, Sauer, AUenhurst; Vincent T. luation. "I ask, are my Republican o p p o n e n t s allowing these people to be misled, or do we have another example of gross inefficiency on the part of the Township Committee?" Mr. Lynch queried.

75.81

At nny time before the sale, the collector will receive payment of the amount dm* together with Interest und contn Incurred to the datf* of p»yment. Payment mny he matle by cash certified check or Money Order only. Witness my hand and so&l this 1st day or Ocl. 1970. RUTH B. CRAWFORD

Park, as unit delegate to the1 New Jersey Division, Ameft can Cancer Society. \,j

to approve any traffic or motor vehicle ordinance and you can't issue a summons unless a sign is up saying what is forbidden." Will Post Rules The signs to be posted by the borough will carry the message that trucks weighing more than four tons are prohibited between the hours of 9 p.m. and 7 a.m. The law does not apply to national, state or county roads which pass through town. Mr. Sanders said as soon as the measure gets state approval, signs will be posted and the code will be strictly enforced. He said he appreciated the comments of John Van Arsdale, 58 Mechanic St., the only member of the public to attend an open meeting of the borough's Streets and Roads Committee Tuesday night. Mr. Van Arsdale, who lives near the entrance to the Allied Concrete Plant on Mechanic St., has complained at s e v e r a l Borough Council meetings about heavy trucks rolling in and out of the plant in the early morning hours.

Plant Blaze Spurs Arrest

Hirsch, Spring Lake, Mrs, Edward T. Doyle, Sea Girtj a n d Richard F. Ulbrich, Spring Lake, vice presidents; «• Ernest T. Hall, Asbury Park, treasurer, and Mrs. John Jones, West Long Branch; secretary. >

Dr. Charles L. Zukankas^ Long Branch, will continue as chairman of the executive; committee, and, with Mrsi Bernard A. Seiple, Asbury

Action Is Delayed On Trucking Curbs

MIDDLETOWN Beautiful three-bedroom split level nestled among apple and weeping willow trees on quiet residential street. This Gold Medallion home features & l a r g e living room, full dining room, recently remodeled total electric kitchen with self-cleaning oven a n d dlflh* winner, paneled recreation room, VA b a t h s , patio with barbecue, and a huge fenced-In yard. Won't last a t $34,900

J h s magnificent air conditioned Colonial In Southvlcw Estates on T/t wooded acres offers elegant foyer leading to living- room and «cP»rale (orrnal dlnlni room. Huge kitchen wllh dlnelte. Walnut paneled family room with atonowalled fireplace. Four very largs

Immaculate hofne In fine area, deadend street. • Spacious tien, full basement, wall-to-wall carpeting. AwnIngs. Central atr conditioning, rilihwnaher, Beautiful Inndscaping. Transferee aiklru' 535,000,

n

JUST LISTED

Realtor 35 Cherry Tree Farm Rd. (New Monmouth

REALTOR



HOUSES FOR SALE

PAUL P. BOVA

SCHANCK AGENCY A Unrlcn PI. 7470.107

Again Headg

671-2544

LITTLE SILVER TUDOR — Four hMrnomn, living room, fireplace, dining room, den. Half acre plot. {34,900,

On »illlol 'Inul-i'nrl ntrcpt. Iv. Mntiy IrcrK. l.uvclv cimvprt l fjinn hllllrllliK. T I H I T hrtllttdlllFi. pan ril ilrn, Irirni, living rixim with rtrcplfi . :i!l.\10 llii|iiloii|. inirch. lH'llHht'iilly ilri-ornlfil l S1H.M»1 ICIiI.KN S IIAZIOI.TON. Krlll. tor. KIW K l v r r ltd., itmrimili. Hr.'.II'Jon,

McCUE

UNCONVENTIONAL HOME

THF1EK- BEDROOM SPLTT — Mk« new. Living; room, eat-In kitchen, den, g a r a g e . .Park-like location. $33,000.

w T*I

Speaking at a fund raising dinner in Buck Smith's Restaurant, East Keansburg, Mr. Lynch castigated the Republicans for "either directly or indirectly delaying the results of the recent tiwnship wide revaluation program. "Whether or not they are deliberately delaying these

Member of Red Bank Multiple Listing Service

OAK HILt> COLONIAL — "Four her!rooms, two hatlis. living room, f i r e nlacr, dining room, family room, base m Tit. douhli* garage. High wooded lot, J49,flOO. ,

ALPI^MANOR HOTEL"

REAL ESI/lTE INDEPENDENT LISTING BROKERS

.102 WEST FRONT ST.

three-bclroom Hi-hath. Bitrifniciit, attHchfd RarHgc, FHA mortgage Rssurnablc for 50% of anftlriK priiT. $3|.fif)0. This agency, having two nlflrrs, m e m b e r s of lioth Mulliplt* Listing Services, h a s fiver :»n active listings. Tt will pay tn visit IIR.

Mfe Darrah

MIDDLETOWN - The AllRepublican Township Comm i 11 e e , says Democratic Township Committee candidate Thomas J. Lynch Sr., is playing politics with the pock, etbooks of the people of the township.

REALTOR

NAVESINK SPLIT KxrcMrt

Candidate Says Middktwm

Is t laying rocketbook Politics Cancer Unit

WEART-NEMETH & NICOLETTI , AGENCY

Five ttpdrnnms. V-. baths. Cnntral air cotiflltionerl Fireplace Full collar. Attiicficr) garner, arner, Wfilllo-ivali csrprti Near marina. A hnrgaln a t S4-.-

S55 Prnspfnl A \ T

• • Luxury three bedroom*. Vh hatha ROOM FOR R E N T • • Luxury two bedroom*. 2 baths Onntlcman nnlv. Non-nninker prelerrerl • • Luxury four rooms, one bedroom C?BI| 787.MJ8I Featuring terraces overlooking t h e hiRhent, most rxonlc point on the T X R n n ~ R 0 O M ™ Wllh private lavatoT Atlantic coantilne adjolnlnjc a beauti- rv. Nlrclv ftirnltthPrl. f'nnvenlrntiv ]n. ^iitetljn rteriJlMiI^TIJ.aifl^ _ ful mnrlna. Includesi air rnndltlonlnR, nwlmmtng pool, parking. All spacious, truly luxury apartment*. Special nff upannn raten. Hotrt ronmi Call or visit mi perl Men dent. 2U1-D237. w with malr) nrvlec, 125 week. w e k Motet Mtet ith m a l ) ("nrvlec, Broun«lt-Kramrr ManaRemenl Co rtp . 1 PPo r t l al n d rnnmn. $ifl pnkk nnrt u JM., Hlirhla l 87M773RET) HANK - - Room for gentleman. HOUSES FOR SALE Call between 12-1 or 5-7 p.m. 7ll.fi.1TO. _ _ LAROR RODM — With shnWir. F i r s t rtoor. P r l r a U t n l r t n e e . Call 7i7-l
PORT-AU-PECK

large bedrooms plus paneled den, Vh baths, baseboard heat, full basement. Just reduced to $43,600.

USED CAR LOT F O R RENT — new hnllrtinn, liirue lot. N'par Fort Mon. mouth,_rxcPllenMocatlon.j;2!>^420. MIDDLETOWN — Qood for~phop, nfl rice, stnre. or antiques. Liirge parkins. ALLAIRE-FARROW AGENCY RcaannaMe to right party. Call eves, MM die town ft Corn era 671-2530 747-3770 ReA Bank, Broad & Be 741-3150 SHREWSBURY - Shop or Unlit manu. facturlng space I c a l l a b l e . Ample p a r k . "MTTLE SILVER - - For~HiiiTcoior Dal. lnK. 531-9301 Dial. Three bertrmimB. llvinp nwin with i h fireplace, dining room, kltetwn, MODERN PROFESSIONAL OFFICES b eni garage, screened porch. 200-900 flq. ft.: unlimited free p a r k t n r anil a i r conditioning: reasonable. 747. 539,500."

APARTMENTS

RO0Ma

Dock, deep water. Magnificent view. Three bedrooms, threft fireplaces. One Ot f e w waterfronts. 559,MK),

AIR-CONDITIONED OFFICES Reasonable rent, immediate occupancy. Apply Berptco'a, 101 Morunouth St., Red BanK. next I* Carlu>n Theater. MODERN AIR CONDITIONS)) OFFICES — Reasonable. 30 Linden PI., Red Bank. Phone 747-3520. FACTORY SPACE — Two 7.000 sq. ft. floors, one 3.500 Bq. ft. Door. Suitable for light manufacturing. For lease, call 747-1100.

GERMAN SHEPHERD P I T S - - AKC. E x t r a large-boned beauties. T e m p e r a ment guaranteed. One male S65. one female tit STAN LEK.VER, Dog T r a i n . O F F I C E S U I T E - R I D BANK - 7 5 8 H . «r. 2M4933 or :?9-778l. ft. In excellent location. D*flrable (or I R I S H SETTER — Bf autllul m a l e , U anr proftulon. Call 747-3730 between months, AKC, obedlenre trained, ex- > and 1. cellent health and disposition, loves chll. dren. 741S375. HOUSES FOR BENT OUINEA PIUS — Two Abyssinian, m a t Inc a g e . Three Peruvian, one m a l e silky, plus small babies. 671-3076 Sat. £ 2 5 to $330 Per Month pnty. THE BEEG AGENCY GERMAN S H E P H E R D - AKC. Light Rt. 36 colored. Obedience trained. 18-month old male. 345 to a Rood home. STAN WIDE SELECTION OF RENTALS L E R K E & Dog Trainer, 229.8933 o r 229. Purnlihed and unfurnished. Immediate occupancy. SAMUEL TKICHER AGENCY, Oceanport Ave., OcoanporL TWO-STALL BARN — Plus 45x80' I n . 5i2-3500. door riding hall available until J u n e lOn. 1100 n o . Call 741.2934. R E D BANK—Furnliiherf. Seven rooms, throe hpflroomn. g a r a e g . % block from Red BanK H.8. Newly decoratdrl. Available Immediately. Call 711-1262 REAL ESTATE 'FOR RENT between 5-8 p.m. only.

KED BANK — Luxury high r u t ApartncnU. immedlftU and future occupancy. Monmouth County'a finest centrally, alr-condltlooed bull dine. Stu. dloa, one. two and three bcdroomi. • w l m m l n f pool, sauna roomi, boat m i r l n a and garacei on premlsea. 24br. doorman. Rlverrlew Town-a, 28 Rl veralde Ave. 741-1732.

HOUSES FOR SALE

- ALLAIRE-FARROW FAIR 'HAVEN RED CARPET OFFERINGS Attractive brick and frame NAVESINK RIVER WATER custom built Rancher. Three

INDUSTRIAL SPACE

J J ^^ hj M j M H B S *

T P O O D L E P U P P I E S — Miniature. Black. AKC. Bix weeks old. CIIMII6-42I9. TWO COAL BLACK~klTTEN3— Free" to good homes, inter trained. 7(72939 MINI SILVER POODLE — F e m a l e , 8 weeks. Call 7S7-TOI F R E E KITTK.NS — To g o o d h o n n Phone a r t e r S p rn.jind weekends.

HOUSES FOE SALE

KC Council | Has Installation ENGLISHTOWN - New d fleers of Prince of P e a q Council, Knights of Columbus, were installed by the district deputy, Robert D'Ambrosia; in the council home. ; The officers are the Key, John Petri, chaplain; Edward Wargins, grand knight; Joseph Dormi, deputy grand k n i g h t ; Anthony Morelli, chancellor; William Greitz, recorder. Also, George Timmes, treasurer; George Keavney, fin a n c i a l secretary; Jamefe Flanagan, advocate; Gerald Peterson, warden; Joseph Landwersiek, inside guard. : Also Henry Dougherty, ouf. side guard; Rudy Billia Jrl, inside guard, and Jack Dolce, Mr. D'Ambrosia and John Desmond PGK, trustees.

Medicare Deadline Dec. 31 ASBURY PARK - Dec, 31 is the deadline for filing Medicare medical i n s u r a n c e claims for services received Oct. 1,1968, through Sept. 30, 1969, according to James J. Caivano, district manager of the Social Security office at 611 Heck St.

MADISON TOWNSHIP Robert McCloud, 18, of 12 Becker Drive, Sayreville, has been arrested and charged with arson in connection with the fire which ravaged the "Under the law. Medicare S. and M. Building Material can pay your medical instirCenter, Rt. 9, Sept. 8, accord- , ance claim only within a eer. ing to police. tain time after treatment or They said an extensive in- other service. If you hive vestigation by the detective Medicare medical insurance bureau led to the apprehen- and received covered services sion of McCloud and a juve- during the period of Oct. I, nile. 1S68, through Sept. 30. 1969, McCloud is in Middlesex claims must be filed before County jail pending arraign- the end of this year," Caivano ment in municpal court, The said. "After Dec. 31, M&H. juvenile' has been released to care cannot pay on his parents. A juvenile com. bills." plaint will be signed against him, police said. Heading the investigation •* r l ° were Detective Striffolino and Joseph Guzzi and • Robert - •- • ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS •(Nickolaus. Three local teenagers h w e been charged in connection with the break-in of a h # e last Saturday. ' -; Sgt. Samuel A. Guzzi yesEAT0NT0WN - Stanley A. terday arrested a 15-year old Temple, biologist from the girl and charged her with Cornell University LaboratoOry of Ornithology, Ithaca, breaking, entering and larceN. Y., will present a slide lec- ny of the home of Ray DePalture entitled "The Decline «f mer, 55 Ave. A. • • •% the Peregrine Falcon" at the An undetermined sum. ^f Monmouth Nature Club .meeting, Wednesday, Oct. 21 at cash was taken in the break; . !| 8:15 p.m. in the civic audito. in; Two 17-year old girls were rium of Monmouth Shopping' arrested and charged with Center, here. Mr. Temple is working for aiding and abetting in the his PhD in vertebrate zoology same burglary. All the girls at Cornell. He has done re- were released to their parsearch on the effects of pesti- ents, pending juvenile court cides on the peregrine falcon hearings. and studies of the ecology and breeding biology of the falcon, in arctic Alaska. Fear for the extinction Df the peregrine and other birds MIDDLETOWN - August of prey has caused growing concern among ecologists and Maltz, 19, 5 John St., Keansburg has been arrested here conservationists. charged with being under There is no admission fee and the influence of drugs, adand all club meetings are cording to police. open to the public. They said the arrest was •r, .I -Hamade at Rlverview Hosnital,

\S*

In House Entry

Club Schedules Talk on Falcon

Drug Charge Is Made

Bethany Manor

Open House Set

Red Bank, by Patrolman Den-

nis Vaspory. m The suspect is being hel&ih local jail under ?I05 ball pending a hearing in inunldlpal court.

K E Y P O R T - Bethany Manor, Main St., a housing project for the elderly sponsored by St. Johns United Methodist Church, Hazlet, will have the first in a series of open houses Sunday from 2 to 5 p.m. Although the 230-apartmcnt, RICHMOND, Va. - Fred: 12-story building is still in- eric P. Simon has joined The complete, many of the service Bank of Virginia as sales rooms are usable and will be manager of its municipal open for inspection. bond department Hosting the event will be A former resident of Fair members of the manor's Haven, N.J., Simon has been board of directors and the a municipal bond Balesmari c h u r c h 's Social Concerns with the Harris Trust and Commission. Savings Bank in New York Dedication ceremonies and City. He is the son of Mr. and group tours are planned for Mrs. M. Frederic Simonlbf future open bouses. Asbury Park, N.J. •"••

Simon Joins Virginia Bank

-THE DAILY REGISTER, RED BANK • MTODLETOWN, N.-J.i

Peannta

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1970 .

35

Children's Letters t» God

Puzzle

135 Scholars 37 Snow under 38 Leave out 41 Philippine island 43 Black-tie affairs 45 Mouth wash 46 Substantive 47 Mothers 48 Decorate 49 Wreath 50 Humid 52 Girl's name 53 Italian citj 55 Henpeck 56 Rake 57 Peak 58 Digit 59 Inclined

10 Exist By Edward M. Gallen Jr. ACROSS 45 Crisscross 11 Twisting 1 Roll of metal work 12 Lodging bills: si. 46 Negative house 4 He of the quantity 13 Ermine golden 47 Quite a 18 Always touch few 19 Short drink 9 Lanes 49 Endure 23 Upright 14 Metallic 50 Hearts 24 Sheepish rock ' 51 — and 25 Groove 15 Nut subtract 26 Hitches 16 Implanted 52 Poetic 27 Bird 17 Piano opus contraction 29 Enemies byA-37 53 Astringent 30 Worry 20 Kiln 54 Another by 32 At this 21 Humor A-37 place 22 Ocean 60 Tapestry 33 Eager 23 Prophet 61 Pillages 34 Straighten: 25 Stair 62 Cut ' var. 27 Droop clumsily 28 Again 63 Sephardic Solution to Yesterday's Puzla 'I 29 Ran away synagogue 30 To and — 64 Creepy SI Free 65 Social 32 Jeer group rannnri nnrc nnrara 33 Circus DOWN ranm nnnrn r.innnn 'rings 1 Trouble 36 Article 2 Fortify . 37Ludwig3 Unseated raannra I «• 39 Musical 4 Female note horses xfarann rannc 40 Nocturnal 5 Statue anmnra ranrcrc mammals 6 Click rannsramnrtnn nr 42 Discharge beetle 43 Fruit 7 Curve 44 Choler 8 Showered

THAT'5 THE 50RT OF THINS rt> RATHER NOT THINK ABOUT £N6U*H iWFFlNEVW AWRNIN6?

CORA IS t-EAVINS -TOWN FOB TWO WEEKS

in flakes 9 Concordat

IS THAT WHY VDU UOOK so DOWNCAST;

MR. DITHERS?

amm

TONIGHT, MAGGIE? I WANT TO MEET YOUR. PARE.N75,OARLING!

(APA AND MAMA HELD A MEETING AND VOTED TO UKE YOU, WARD.'..." .f^ MEBEFORE MAMA DECIDESTOA5K FOR A RECOUNT!

OKAY! T i l SHAVE, PUT ON « y SINCERE. SUIT AND A W1NNIN6 SMILE.-ANO RING TOUR DOORBUL IN EXACTLY 47 MINUTE5! AND P A BUTLER ANSWERS I PROMISE NOT TO I PUT OUT MY HAND ANO SAY:"

nrann n onniH ammaa nnrnra r

* Fwluret Syndicate, I n c 1970. TRYVER/HAR0T0 8E COUTH,MY SWEET! YOU MIGHT EVEN KI5S MAMA'S HAND! ~ 5EE VOU SOON!

COMPUTERIZED ASTROLOGY FOR FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16 IF TODAY IS YOUR BIRTHDAY-Yool be nnnetDtiaM and sentible than usuaL Great gans can be made but some pleasarts « S have to be sacrificed. ARIES MKcfc2M|«i2O Gossp ^ U s yo« w » t to keep secret can be W O K easily stopped by friendly b lion ton by anger.

LIBRA Sept23-OcL22 FmxBy Libra dtsfik« taking met aurtijority, but you'd be unwise to pass np Jetdership opportuitits that «ise today.

TAURUS April21-May20 Beware of showing true feelings to those arottnd you. Your moodiness could bring adverse reaction.

SCORPIO Oct.23Nor.21 Discretion is required in dealings with others. This includes not voicing opinions on cither personalities or ideas.

£&i

Andy Capp 'ERE 'E COMES - WHENEVER'E SEES ME* BORROWS FIVE B O B VOU WATCH/

m

Hl'YER,PE*CE -COLJL&YR

SEVEN AN1 SIK?

. m GEMINI ^9fV>May21-Jn fl HfROMANCE. Rol l (I mancewisc, yon have "nothing to fear but fear it* sell," so proceed boldly. CANCER June 21-Jury 21 Restrain urge to give sympathetic advice 'unless yon're sure of facts. Otherwise you could do more harm than good.

The Wizard of Id

jfllNT OL' BULLET

TERRIBLE JEALOUS OF LEETLETATER?

NOTINTH' SLIGHTEST, SUESVBIL

I MAKE IT ft POINT NOT TO SHOW FAVORITES

r

^

I'M NOT GOING TO ) THATRMACE < CUKNER.

THIS PRINCE HAS ABSOLUTE POWER N THIS tlTTlE ODUMTRV; VOUCAM'T REFUSE YOU'RE PIAWNG WITH FIRE.

Bridge Advice

Dennis the Menace

The Phantom PIAMA, youfat NOT DRESSED?; 7IWE TO

CAIWCORN . Oec.21Jin. 19 Bad day to push your ' .uck even a little bit. Stay carefully within accepted procedures.

By ALFRED SHIC1NWOLD South toler Every bridge player should know Murphy's Law: If any. Eut-Wettvuhmbk thing can go wrong, it will. NORTH * QiS When your contract looks unLEO OJ932 beatable, it is your job to see July 22-Ang. 21 AQUARIUS 0 762 that it remains so — that What you put in writJan.20-Feb. IS * A64 nothing can go wrong. Profit ing should be conLetting your thoughts BAST scientious as well as creative, to % i wander too much by the experience of South in WEST • K986 4 732 today's hand. be sure important points are could undermine fine foundaCA65 OK10I7 not overlooked. tion you've built. Concentrate. West led the seven of clubs, 0 4 OJ9«3 and South counted his tricks: + 39 VIRGO PISCES five diamonds, two clubs and SOUTH Aug. 22-Sept. 22 Feb. 19-March 20 two spades even if the finesse • A 104 MONEY. Money put PURSONAL. If you lost. The hand was unbeaOQ4 aside for future could & fee! that something table. So South relaxed by O AKQ10S cause temporary* anxiety, but about you needs changing, this taking the first trick with the • KJ2 it's unwarranted. You're in taie is good day to start forming ace of clubs in order to lead position orer alL new habits. W«N North E*rt the queen of spades for a fi- 1 0 P»J« I
m

Snuffy Smith

m

, SAGITTARIUS (••Nov. 22-Dec. 20 •CAREER. You Buy not- be in mood for working, but much can ba gained U' you cairy on regardless.

YOU'RE A POCTOR TELL HIM I ' M SICK. TELL HIM , AUYTHIM6. I CAM'T STANP HIM. I WONT GO.'

WHEW/WAIT TILL TOE PRINCE HEARS THAT.'

Beetle Bailey

WON'T THOSE THINSS EVER

WHAT£ YOUR BEEF, ZSMK6TO "/OU, DIDN'T I ? I SALUTED you, RIGHT? I MEAN, HOW/AM OF THAT MSKCT CHOP, CM y o i

eo our

TROUBLE,

NOW WE COMB TftOlBLS..

DAP, VOU'ftE HOOKS* OH RESPECT/

STOMACH?

Hi and Lois SAYS IF I'M

GOOD ALL My LIFE I L L GOTO HB4VEN

THAT IS, IF I 6ET INVITBD.

-9?ie akteri&tiumn Stapy, The aokienAilwnnQhry,

SA UNPW6WOT

"- 9\t you

SH*AUU»BUTTJ IN ATTHM-ePOT

THE DAILY REGISTER, RED BANK • MIDDLETOWN, N. J,» THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1970

safe LAST THREE DAYS!SHOP TO 9:00 P.M. TODAY A M ) FRIDAY, SATURDAY TO 5:30 89 Practical Umbrella Totes

$9 Misses' Orion Sweaters .

for

475

Pullovers and cardigans in Orion acrylic-completely washable Fall colors. Buy them now for holiday gifts! 34-40.

Heavy duty plastic tote carries its own umbrella. Grain .feather look with chain handle, patent leather or 'gator grain bags. Spice, block, brown.

820425 Misses'Casual Dresses

812-820 Famous Sport Shoes

5.75 each 2

12.75

9.75

Beautifully tailored styles for home or business wear, Many styles, all with important detailing. All wools, 'lovely blends. Styles galorel Sportswear.

Sandlerl Korleel Sebogo! Other, great names, too! Crinkle patents, foam-lined kidskins, chunky and flat h e e l s . . . all at one incredibly low price.

$25"Brash&Go"Wig

Sfl6 Novelty Stitch Cardigans

8.75

15,75

A wonderful assortment of cardigans, all beautifully detailed. Choose from new pastel tones. Silk lined. Misses' sizes.

Gives you that instant new look you'll lovel 1 0 0 % modacrylic fiber washes in a jiffy, drips dry, needs no. setting, shaping, styling

$150 Mink Trimmed Coats 810-$15FashionWatclies

7.50 Strap watches, chain ,'n leather straps . . . all the great looks) Styles for men and women. Super valuel

$112 Magnificent Forstmann wool crepe fabrics, heaped with luxury mink! Black with natural mink, gray with natural cerulean,* brown with natural autumn haze.* 10-20. • • fur product! toWrd to J W country of origin of faipattdfin.

S1-89 Gold Filled Jewelry

$38-850 Top Fashion Pant Coats

2for»5

28.75

12 kt. gold filled pendants, bracelets, pins, earrings. Genuine stones and pretend pearls in the group. It's a "best buy"!

You'll find cozy piles, slicker/ wet-looks, cotton corduroys and wool m e l t o n s . . . all with a lively helping of bright detailing. Misses, Jrs. '„

$4-830 Better Sample Jewelry

$46-890 Misses' Prestige Knits

30.75 Save Vi on famous maker's necklaces, pins, earrings, dog collars! Simulated pearls and matching earrings in the group. Tremendous selection! -

Double knit wools and polyesters in 3-pc. suits, pant suits, dresses with jackets. Imaginative styling sparks this collection... and the savings are astounding! Better <*•»«!.

$10-814 Dresses and Shifts

$7 417 jewel Boxes

3.50-8.50 Save Vi on beautifully detailed and lined jewel boxes. Wooden frames. Gold, white, pastels.

,

Just the answer to "what to wear" day-in, day-out! Assortment of dresses and shifts with long or short sleeves, sizes 10-20; 14'/j.24V5. Daytime dresses.

$18-824 HaltSize Dresses

815 Sumrt Leather Handbags

12.75

8.75

JIMORAMT JR. PETITE DRESSES

15.75 Splendid styles you wear so well, in popular fabrics including lots of knits in wool, polyester, acetates! hurry. . . they're great. Sizes 5-15.

7.25

Choice of vagabonds, pouches, swaggers! Most with inside zippers. Black, brown, navy, colors.

Beautiful Coloray rayon knits, Arnel® triacetate), polyesters and more in one and 2-pc. styles. Many jumpers in the group. 12 '/J-24 Vi.

$ 10412 Fine Italian Kid Gloves

$10-816 Junior Sweater Special

6.75 Here's o great opportunity to own lovely, classic kid gloves, novelty styles too, all lined with silk or acrylic. Black, brown. 6'/a-8.

86 -#8 Misses' Famous Shirts

,





, « 7



Pullovers, cardigans, turtlenecks in wools and orlon acrylics. Even skinny ribs and bulky knits included. Sizes 3 4 to 4 0 . Jr. Sportswear,

88-S10 Gav Plaid Pretecn Skirts

425 each 2 f o r $ 8 Famous name in classic styles. Roll and long sleeves. Misses sizes. Sportswear.

FASHION BONANZA! MISSES'DRESSES JUST 1 2 . 7 5 The best labels from our budget dress shop . . . all at special anniversary savings! Find all the styles you love, colors you favor. Misses' sizes. .

Adorable dirndls done up in wool and wool blends. A thoroughly lovely selection in sizes 6 to 14.

Budj.tdi.isei.

Loading...

1 - There are a few of

Pick Ocean Grove Site for Nixon Sjieech FINAL THEBMLY EDITION SEE STORY BEIXW Occasional Rain Occasional rain and cooler today and tonight. Clear a...

10MB Sizes 1 Downloads 0 Views

Recommend Documents

1 - There are a few of
Apr 1, 1982 - with the Easter Bunny Saturday,. April 10, 11:30 to 1, at Water- town High School, The after- noon will in

1 - There are a few of
Dec 23, 1983 - Vi cup packed brown sugar. 1 cup Bisquick baking mix. 1 package (8 ounces) cream cheese, softened. 1 Tabl

1 - There are a few of
Jan 26, 1989 - very few positions in a community that offer such a direct way to improve the future ..... This group of

17 - There are a few of
Mar 17, 1999 - Chinese School in the Satz School library. Staff Writer ..... The Best IRA! 18-month CD. 5.502: 15.00%„

U - There are a few of
Jan 18, 1991 - consuming process that willtio! ifford Innncdlate solutions and. \ ould cost some SI-fThillllon for the m

23 - There are a few of
first toll booth in operation by De- cember. It will be located between. Irvington and Union on the section now under co

30 - There are a few of
zel Dr. onto East Rd. According to police, Holmes said he did not see the other car when he started to rrtaka his turn.

23 - There are a few of
FOR SALE—Steel inboard motorboat and motor, excellent condition, $110. Cost $485. Also two racing sloops cheap. See Mr

22 - There are a few of
John Holobinko, Sr. John Holobinko, sr., Keans burg, who died Apr. 23, 1957, left his savings In the Keans burg National

23 - There are a few of
Sep 23, 2010 - Rahway, and Leslie's sister-in-law, Susan Clement, participate in a fundraiser to ...... lived in Elizabe