17 - There are a few of

Loading...
S p rin g H o m e & G a rd e n It’s time to spruce up your home inside and out

S te p rig h t u p Aberdeen step dancer is heading to Ireland to compete

Page 37______

Page 17

G e t lu c k y , e v e n

i f

y o u 'r e n o t I r is h ! !

Play G reater Media 's St . Patrick 's Day C ontest Look in todays Classified Section for the contestrules

Environmental queriesslow NavesinkHighlandsproposal Concerns about flooding, steep slopes dominate 7-hr. hearing Properties Inc., Rochester. Following a special sevenCorrespondent hour hearing last week, the nvironmental issues Planning Board decided that have prompted the latest the developer, Ocino Inc., delay in the develop­ Brooklyn, N.Y., must supply further information and it post­ ment of a large senior citizens housing complex on Route 36 poned the hearing indefinitely, near the Atlantic Highlands probably until May at the earli­ border known as Navesink est, according to the board secretary. Highlands. The board determined that The project, part of the Middletown’s affordable hous­ the lawyers and witnesses for ing plan known originally as the Lenape Woods Coalition the Vaccaro proposal, has been and Atlantic Highlands had surrounded by controversy for raised significant concerns the past 10 years. It is strongly regarding public safety and the opposed by Atlantic Highlands, township’s liability. “I was astounded (by the as well as the Lenape Woods Coalition, an alliance of 12 decision),” coalition Co-chair­ neighborhood associations in man Paul Boyd, Atlantic Middletown and Atlantic Highlands, said later. “For 10 years they have not Highlands. The property was acquired gotten into the whole set of about a year ago by Home environment issues,” he said. BY AMY SOKOLOFF________

E

“(Last) Wednesday night, they finally got into it.” The proposed Navesink Highlands community, a devel­ opment of 375 units of afford­ able housing for senior citizens and 92 assisted living units, would be built on 25 acres of land in the Lenape Woods, a hilly 250-acre tract primarily in Middletown near the Atlantic Highlands border. The coalition is not against the affordable housing or the senior citizen community but is concerned about environmental problems the proposed com­ munity they refer to as “Sudden City” would cause, Boyd said. The nearly 75 local resi­ dents who attended the meeting disrupted the testimony of Ocino Vice President John English with jeers and shout­ ing. Many thought the proceed­ ing was one-sided and that it leaned in the developer’s favor, they said. The board finally issued a Continued on page 12

J A C K IE P O L L A C K

The Holmdel Hornets defeated Mendham Sunday to become repeat State Group II champions. For the story, see page 55. Here Hornet Jeff Baccash is sandwiched during a win over Asbury Park last week.

New rail trail in the works NJ Transit agrees to preserve Lake Matawan, other trestles of Route 36. One of the trestles traverses the S taff Writer upper end of Lake Matawan. nonprofit group that has Young people use the 425-footbeen promoting a recre­ long, 50-foot-high trestle to cross ational path along an inac­ from Matawan-Aberdeen Regional tive rail line between MatawanHigh and School to Matawan Borough. According to J. Wandres, presi­ Freehold has received news that six wooden trestles along the rail­ dent of the Marlboro-based road right of way will not be Monmouth Heritage Trail Inc. (MHT), Stanley Rosenblum, acting demolished. Also, NJ Transit, which owns executive director of NJ Transit, the right of way, and the has directed his staff not to demol­ Monmouth County freeholders are ish the trestles along the 12-mile working on an agreement to let the rail line. The group learned in January county turn the 12-mile right of J A C K IE P O L L A C K that the agency planned to tear way into a trail which would link Middletown Village School first-graders Michael Gallagher and Jeffrey Chapman examine a starfish during a special up with the 9-mile county-owned down the wooden structures, pur­ Henry Hudson Trail, located north portedly to alleviate the threat of exhibit at the school last week. BY UNDA D eNICOLA

A

____

____

liability if anyone fell off one of the structures, and went to work immediately to try to halt the plans. As it turned out they were suc­ cessful. In a letter to Rosenblum, the Monmouth County freeholders urged the agency to begin the process of discussing how the abandoned railroad right of way could be conveyed to the county for future public pedestrian and bicycle trail use. “We are in the process of work­ ing out an agreement now,” NJ Transit spokesman Ken Miller said Continued on page 14

2

INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999

The Best Checking: IN V E S T O R S S A V IN G S T here is n o com parison! T h i s i s w h y y o u d o n ’t s e e In v e s to rs o n th e c o m p e t i t i o n ’s

Annual percentage yield Investors Market Account

Sum Fun

Int Che

50 Che

2.50%

Best Years Checking*

50 Chd

Features

Limited, but with instant access to funds.

Deposit and withdraw at any time without penalty.

Unlimited.

Deposit and withdraw at any time without penalty.

Unlimited.

Keep $500 in the account to earn interest and avoid service charges.

Unlimited.

No charge for: writing checks, personalized checks, money orders, or American Express® Travelers Cheques®.

*2,500

2.65%

Interest Checking

Int Che

Check-writing privileges

3.50% *2,500

Investors Fund

Sov Fun

Minimum deposit requirement

*500 $50

2.50%

c h a rts !

*

I

*

All four accounts feature: • Instant access to your funds in a variety of ways, including an optional Investors 24-hour ATM card. • Access to account information with The Best Telephone Information System. • The Investors Card, which will enable you to cash checks at any of our offices throughout New Jersey. *Y o u m u s t be a t least 62 years o f age to have th is a ccou n t. In ve sto rs M a rk e t A c c o u n t, T h e Investors Fund, S terling In te re s t C hecking, and Best Years C hecking are n o t availa ble fo r business a ccounts. AH rates are s u b je c t to change.

IN VESTO R S CORPORATE OFFICE:

SAVINGS R A N K 249 Millburn Avenue, Millburn • 1-800-252-8119

Other offices: •

COLTS NECK:

NAVESINK:

Highway 34, P. 0 . Box 127

Highway 36 and Valley D rive*

DEAL:

SPRING LAKE HEIGHTS:

88 Norwood Avenue, P. 0 . Box 227

FREEHOLD: Highway 9 and Adelphia Road*

* In ve sto rs’ 2 4 -H o u r ATM Loca tio n

Chatham

Madison

Clark

Millburn New Providence

Highway 71 and Warren Avenue

East Orange

TOMS RIVER:

Edison

Bay Plaza, Fischer Blvd., (Shop Rite C enter)* West Hills Plaza, Route 37 W est*

Hillside

LONG BRANCH:

WHITING:

169 Broadway

77 Lacey R oad*

Plainfield Roxbury Twsp.

Irvington

Scotch Plains Springfield

Livingston

Union

Deposits FDtC insured to $100,000

MM

INDEPENDENT, M ARCH 17, 1999 3

Mid’town police now 99 strong

In d e x :

BY LINDA D eNICOLA Staff W riter

Welcome to historic Matawan. Page 20

• C lassified s . . . . . .Page 65 • E d itorials

. . . . . .Page 24

• E n te r ta in m e n t. . .Page 28 • L e t t e r s .............. . .Page 24 • M ark etp lace . . . .Page 59 • M ileston es . . . . . .Page 34 • O b itu aries . . . . . .Page 54 • P olice B eat . . . . . .Page 53 • S p orts .............. . .Page 55 • Y esteryear . . . . . .Page 36

Phone numbers: Editorial 254-7000 Ext. 8226 FAX 254-0486 D isplay A d vertising 972-6740 FAX 972-6746 C lassified 1-800-660-4ADS C lassified FAX 432-0016

Delivery problems? Call circulation at 254-1755 before noon on Thursday.

In d e p e n d e n t Managing Editor Marilyn Duff Sports Coordinator Lindsey Siegle Executive Editor Gregory Bean Publisher Kevin Wittman

A Greater Media Newspaper

SK \ GS

m i™



' AUDIT CIRCULATION

The Ind ep e n d e n t is pu b lish e d W ednesday by th e G reater M o n m o u th P ublishing Co., P.O. Box 1080, East B runsw ick, N.J. 08816. F irst-cla ss m a il s u b s c rip tio n a v a ila b le at $72 fo r 26 weeks, 40 cents a copy.

J A C K IE P O L L A C K

MARCH MADNESS — A Matawan man shovels his walkway Monday morning after the worst winter storm of the season dumped wet snow during the night.

Holmdel boardproposes 5.9-cent school tax hike Rising enrollment, ratables slowdown, state aid decline blamed BY BEVERLY McCEE________________ Correspondent

HOLMDEL — The tentative 1999-2000 school budget includes a 5.9-cent tax in­ crease. Introduced March 3, the $28,706,439 spending plan includes a net increase of $1,081,378, or 3.9 percent, over this year’s budget. If adopted following a March 24 public hearing and approved by voters April 20, the tax rate will be $1,615 per $100 of as­ sessed valuation, which translates into an increase of $118 for a home assessed at $200,000. A public hearing followed by a vote to adopt the proposed 1999-2000-school bud­ get is set for March 24 at 8 p.m. in the cafetorium of Indian Hill School, Holmdel Road. Board officials attribute the proposed increase, the lowest school tax hike in the past three years, to continued enrollment growth, a major decline in state aid, slow ratables growth in the township and the dis­ trict’s already lean spending practices. With enrollment expected to increase by more than 5 percent next year, the already below average cost per pupil, now $7,526 per year, would further decline in 1999­ 2000. In addition, state aid will drop to $1,776,400 next year, an 8.9 percent de­ crease over this year. And while enrollment continues to in­

crease, growth of ratables in the township remains slow at just 1.4 percent this year. As for spending in the district, officials say there are no easy cuts. Of the 20 New Jersey high schools with the highest SAT scores, a list that includes Holmdel High School, only one school spent less per pupil in 1998-99, and just 1.1 percent less. The average cost per pupil of the other 19 high schools on the list is 23.6 percent higher than Holmdel’s. Board officials say the proposed budget focuses on educational goals by adding staff to meet increased enrollment, and enhances bus safety with features that include adding new buses and one additional driver. The budget also advances instruction by adding books and materials to the schools’ libraries, new textbooks and classroom resources, and provides expanded opportu­ nities for students in the fine and perform­ ing arts. The budget also funds building en­ hancements, including new parking lot lights at Satz Intermediate School on Crawfords Comer Road and new ceiling tiles in the gym at Village School on McCampbell Road. The proposed budget also makes progress on the district’s five-year plan to infuse technology in subject area instruction by providing computers, software, library automation, and Internet and distance learn­ ing access at all grade levels, officials say. Three budget presentations are sched­ uled for April 13: 10 a.m. at Indian Hill School, 2:45 p.m. at Holmdel High School, and 7:30 p.m. at Village School. A fourth budget presentation is planned for 9:45 a.m. April 17 to the Jersey Shore Chinese School in the Satz School library.

MIDDLETOWN — With the swear­ ing in of three new police officers on Monday, the township police force is back up to its authorized strength of 99 officers. The three new policemen are replacing officers who have retired. The starting annual salary for new officers who have completed training at the police academy is $30,000. Felipe Benedit, Robert Shannon and Lawrence Seymour follow three new hires who took the oath of office last month, bringing the total up to six new officers. All three are veterans of Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm. Benedit, 31, lives in Monmouth Beach with his wife, Kelly Ann, and their three children. He comes to the township from the Monmouth County Sheriffs Office Law Enforcement Division. Benedit received his original police training from the Monmouth County Police Academy, where he graduated in November 1998. He was born and raised in Georgia, leaving there after his enlistment in the U.S. Army where he served for eight years as an air intercept controller. Benedit, who has completed one year of college toward a business degree, is fluent in Spanish and Portuguese. Shannon, 24, is single. A veteran of Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm and Desert Strike, he was bom in Brooklyn, N.Y., and moved to Middletown with his parents when he was 14 years old. Immediately after graduating from Middletown High School South in 1992, Shannon entered the U.S. Air Force. Prior to his deployment overseas, he was assigned to the Air Force security police. Shannon is scheduled to attend the upcoming 199th basic course for police officers at the N.J. State Police Academy along with probationary officers Andrew Micalizzi and Carl Roth, two of the men appointed last month. Seymour, 29, lives in Eatontown with his wife, Judith, and their son. He comes to Middletown from the East Orange Police Department and is a graduate of the Essex County Police Academy. Seymour is a U.S. Army veteran of the Gulf War, where he served as an infantry­ man. He is presently a staff sergeant in the U.S. National Guard and plans to con­ tinue serving his country as a member of C/Company, 2-113 Infantry. New officers who have not undergone training will attend the N.J. State Police Academy class which starts March 30. Those who have previous police experi­ ence will begin a 3-month field officer training program during which they will ride with another officer, Police Chief John Pollinger explained. “These officers are the cream of the crop,” Pollinger added. “They began the arduous process over one year ago. They rose to the top of the list and then had to pass a large number of background checks and a complete medical and psy­ chological evaluation.”

4

INDEPENPErJt 'MARCH 17. 1999

.v

?

«

,•/

j

Board hires firm to fix H.S. South sink holes BY MARY DEMPSEY S taff Writer

1

l l i l f 1 .

1 r

.

. j§j

:

Hr

Silk vElf*



^

i



■;

■:

'

m* JE R R Y W O L K O W IT Z

ON A ROLL — Raritan High School students Stacey Schulte and Jerry Sanfratello, members of the class of 2001, model after-prom wear during a class fund-raiser March 10 at the Hazlet school featuring the latest in prom wear and after-prom wear.

MIDDLETOWN — At a special meet­ ing Monday morning, the school board appointed a contractor to fix the sink hole problem at High School South’s football field and running track. The Board of Education voted unani­ mously to award a contract to Jomac Builders Inc., Belford. Schools were closed because of the Sunday snowstorm, and no members of the public were pre­ sent. Board members Sherry Gevarter and Jeanne Osborne were absent from the 8 a.m. emergency meeting at New Monmouth Elementary School’s all-pur­ pose room. The field repairs are expected to cost at least $52,000. Jomac’s bid of $129,000 as a cost to fix the field was the lowest of

three the board received. The board anticipates the cost of re­ pairing the field to be less than half of Jomac’s bid. School Superintendent Dennis Jackson said at the Monday meet­ ing that some existing projects the district had scheduled would have to be re-evalu­ ated in order to cover the costs of fixing High School South’s field. The sink holes were caused by a bro­ ken drainage pipe 17 feet below the foot­ ball field, according to district officials. The pipes carry a small underground stream that runs down the middle of the football field. A preliminary investigation revealed that a small portion of the underground pipe has collapsed under the football field. The repairs will include excavation above the area where the broken piping was found.

H a z le t s c h o o l b o a r d

BIKE LINE

l

p o lic y o n t h r e a t s , v io le n c e BY RUTH CALIA Correspondent

S

P

R

I N

G

T

S

&

R

E

A M E R IC A N B IC Y C L E

I E

K TEC H N O LO G Y"

3 D A YS O N LY F rid a y , S a tu r d a y , S u n d a y , M a rc h 1 9 , 2 0 , 2 1

Save BIGon Every Bicycle and Accessory In-Stock! Visil Our NewBMX Underground

Stop in for FREE Color Sales Flyer

O ld B ridge

E a s t B r u n s w ic k 1177 Rt. 18S. imfront ot Macys)

3058 Rt. 9 S. ( mi S Dl Rt. 516)

(7 3 2 ) 6 5 1 -8 0 8 0

(7 3 2 ) 6 0 7 -0 1 5 0

HAZLET — The Board of Education last week voted to adopt guidelines to deal with verbal harassment and terroris­ tic threats. Broken down into three levels, the guidelines are designed to help the princi­ pal and other school professionals deter­ mine appropriate responses. Level 1 is characterized by threats communicated in a benign, generally nonaggressive manner. Responses include consultations between principal, parents and other professionals if needed. Level 2 includes threats spoken by stu­ dents who are known to be emotional or impulsive, seem to be socially isolated, depressed or self-abusive. The response to such threats will involve conferences with the student and

C O U N T R Y R O A D S C A M P . . . "G o tta Go T h e re !" O P E N M A R C H

H O U S E

2 0 T H

&

#1 TRAVEL CAM P

2 1 S 1 I

G rades 6th - 10th

1 1 - 4 p m

m

p.#

O VER N IG H TS

♦Club Med, Florida ♦Virginia, Washington ♦Ohio Amusement Park Loop

fun-

C1T PROGRAM

W E R E , S O H O T ... W l'R E c o o l; ♦ ♦ ♦ 4♦ 139 Pinebrook Road Manalapan 446-4100

the student’s parents, the victim and the victim’s parents, and the school psycholo­ gist or social worker. Level 3 will apply to any action or situ­ ation requiring immediate intervention, such as direct threats made to other stu­ dents or staff members, possession of a weapon or claim of weapon possession, or exhibition of behaviors meriting drug/sub­ stance abuse testing. In these situations the student will be isolated from class and after a conference with the principal, social worker, police and the student’s parents, the student will be placed on home instruction, following recommendations from the school psy­ chologist and social worker. Board members also discussed a poli­ cy regarding transport of students to baby sitters or caregivers. The policy will be implemented in some form by May or June. Parents may establish an alternate stop provided it is along the same route the student would normally travel. This will pertain to eligible and subscription trans­ portation students. Further board discus­ sion will address problems such as emer­ gencies and caregiver illness.

FUN DAY T R IP S &

FRIENDS

an

c la r if ie s

Heated Pools—New Waterpark 8 IIO R S E S -T ra il Riding Flying Trapeze Incredible Special Events Sports Clinics by the Pro’s

Check us out at: WWW.COUNTRYROADSDAYCAMP.COM

lint. Grades 7th-10th

BANKRU PTC Y

C H A P T E B 7 ■ *70 0 C H A P Tplus E Rfiling1 fee3 ■ *900 Keep Your Home and Your Assets In Many Cases! forfurtherinformationcall

7 3 2 -7 4 7 -0 1 0 0 WHERE FRIENDS MEET FRIENDS!

Leadership Training P lu s Trips

,

D o u g la s E. F re ib e rg e r, E sq ." SCHNEIDER FREIBERGER PC

INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17.1959 5

Holmdel permits bigger buildings in Rt. 35 zone Environmentalists oppose changes; town hopes to attract ratables BY BEVERLY McGEE

__

__ _____

Correspondent

HOLMDEL — The Township Com­ mittee has approved zoning changes that will allow the development of larger, “big box” retail buildings along Route 35. The unanimous vote from the four committee members present at the March 8 meeting followed close to three hours of public comment both for and against the changes. Committeeman Gary Aumiller was absent. According to the changes adopted by the committee, the allowable size of a building in the RO-3 Retail Office Dis­ trict zone will increase from 40,000 to

165,000 square feet. The change also increases permitted building heights by five feet, from 30 to 35 feet. With additional footage permitted for ornamental architecture, the increase totals about nine feet. Committee members took the oppor­ tunity to address what they called misin­ formation being circulated through the township about the ordinance changes. Committee members said that while the ordinance changes will allow the con­ struction of larger buildings, the maxi­ mum amount of square footage that can be developed will not change. The increase in allowable height will add to the aesthetic value of buildings to be constructed, they said. The floor area ratio permitted by the ordinance will remain at 15 percent and impervious coverage allowed will remain at 50 percent, Mayor David Chai said.

“Both have not changed,” he said. Committeeman Terence Wall com­ mented about misinformation that the committee would approve zoning changes permitting the construction of towers of unlimited height. “That issue is in the existing ordi­ nance,” Wall, said “It is not an addition” he said, adding that he believes the com­ mittee should revisit the subject of towers at a later date. Committeewoman Mollie Giamanco also spoke in favor of the changes, saying the township has a responsibility to bring in increased ratables that the changes will promote. “The traffic is already (along Route 35),” she said. “The surrounding towns are getting the ratables and we’re getting the burdens.” While many in the audience agreed, others worried that the area is being de­ veloped too intensively and too quickly. “We recommend not adopting the

ordinance in its present form,” said Sam Shramko, representing the grassroots Citizens for Informed Land Use (CILU) organization, noting that the changes are not consistent with the township’s 1993 master plan. But committee members criticized CILU for circulating a flier about the or­ dinance and proposed changes. “The master plan called for something very limiting,” said Wall. The Environmental Commission, rep­ resented at the meeting by Chairman Larry Fink, also opposed the zoning changes. ' Before adopting the amended ordi­ nance, the committee unanimously ap­ proved a resolution, noting that certain aspects of the ordinance are inconsistent with the township’s 1993 master plan. “I believe it is a reasonable change,” Deputy Mayor loseph Speranza said. “It will also help with our taxes. Route 35 is the place to put this,” he said.

C o r r e c t io n s o f f ic e r c h o r g e d w ith s e llin g 'c r o c k '

ABERDEEN — A corrections officer at the Monmouth County jail has been charged with selling crack cocaine to undercover officers from the Bayshore Narcotics Task Force and the township police. According to police, LaShawn Mealing, 27, of Juniper Lane, Jackson, was arrested on March 10 at 10:30 p.m. at the Cliffwood A&P supermarket on Route 35. At the time of her arrest, she was al­

legedly found in possession of crack co­ caine. Charges include possession of cocaine, possession of cocaine with the intent to distribute, distribution of cocaine, and distribution of cocaine within 500 feet of a park. Bail was set at $25,000. Seized at the time of the arrest, was $2,169 in cash and a 1999 Mitsubishi auto­ mobile as well as two pagers and a cellular phone.

Neighbors areLosing Lost90 lbs., Waist w to 34" Kevin Teehan, Iselin

Lost 63 lbs. Ann philips, Spring Lake Heights

Lost 46 lbs. Nicole Goldwyn, Middletown

Lost 195 lbs., Waist 56" to 33" Vincent Petrosini, Parlin

SU N D A Y M A R C H 2 8 * 1 1 A M - 3 P M F r e e R e fre s h m e n ts . C o m e S ee O u r W o n d e rfu l F a c i l i t i e s & M e e t O u r G r e a t S taff.

MATAWAN 1008 HWY34 (Pine Valley Plaza) 732-441-3333 WOODBRIDGE 825Rt 1 S. (OppositeLomanFord) 732-326-9100 M A R LB O R O 17 2 RT. 9 NORTH 732-972-9604 HOLMDEL 2124 HWY 35 (at Laurel Avenue) 732-671-2300 OCEAN TWP. 1813 HWY. 35 (Next toCarvel) 732-663-1444 W A LL 2175 HWY 35 (Sea Girt Crossroads) 732-974-7655 B R IC K 512 BRICK BOULEVARD 732-262-1777

• P reppys for 2 & 3 year olds M ini D ay and Midi Days for 3 ,4 & 5 Year O lds Full D ays for 3-12 Year O lds T een Travel for 11-15 Year O lds (2 program s) Leaders In Training (LIT) for 10th Graders

$

if, 1 5 ,0 0 0 S q . F t M u lti-L e v e le d , A ir C o n d it io n e d ARTS & THEATER COMPLEX

Extended Hours til 6pm • Tutoring Service Optional Hot Lunch • State of the Art Facilities Door to Door Transportation CaU f o r b r o c h u r e , V id e o & D ir e c t io n s

Ivy League Day Camp _

140 G o rd o n s C o rn e r R d . , M a n a la p a n Operated by The Leiser Family, Accredited by The American Camping Association: : E-mail info www.ivyleaguedaycamp.com_____________ ;

“ I LOST 60 LBS SIZE 18 TO 6 ” Lorri Goldman, Old Bridge, NJ

NO PREPACKAGED FOOD NO CONTRACTS NO MEMBERSHIP FEES NO DRUGS OR CHEMICALS NO MEETINGS OR WEIGH-INS

HOURS:M-F: 10-6, TH:10-7:30, SAT:10-5, SUN:11-2 • VISA,MASTERCARD,AM EXANDDISCOVERACCEPTED Visit our w ebsite at

w w w .f i t a m e r ic a d i e t .c o m

A M

E R IC A

6 - INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17,1999

Track condition worries winning South coach Board looking for way to fund improvements at both tracks BY MARY DEMPSEY Staff Writer

MIDDLETOWN — The surface of High School South’s track is wearing thin and may be causing injuries to stu­ dent athletes, according to the coach of the girls’ track team. “The track is way overdue to be resurfaced,” coach Karl Torchia said at a recent school board meeting. “There’s supposed to be a quarter to half inch of rubberized surface on the track, which is worn down and in some parts of the track, it is just blacktop.” The school that boasts the No. 1 ranked girls’ high school distance med­ ley team in the country also has a track that is eroded down to the asphalt in some spots. On Sunday, High School South run­ ners Cate Guiney, her sister Maggie, • Joanne Bradley and Tara Frohjlich placed first in the distance medley relay race at the National Scholastic Indoor Track and Field Cham pionships in Boston. In addition, Cate Guiney broke the New Jersey high school two-mile run record by more than eight seconds. Guiney’s second-place finish in a time of 10:27.20 for the two-m ile race

M A R Y DEMPSEY

SLACK TRACK — On the surface, the track at Middletown High School South looks in good shape, but a closer look reveals spots where it is worn down to the asphalt.

G ia n t

smashed the 13-year-old record of 10:35.66 set in 1986. “The kids in the last four years have won six state championships. They’ve put a lot into this, blood, sweat and tears, and they don’t ask for anything back,” Torchia stated. Torchia, an exercise physiologist, said the High School South track has the potential to cause injury. “I’m concerned about the kids. A lot of them are getting shin splints; some are turning into stress fractures and this is costing a lot of them their running ca­ reers, and in some cases, it may cost them scholarships,” Torchia told the Board of Education two weeks ago. Board Vice President N. Britt Raynor Continued on next page

Here Comes The Bride.♦♦

" O R IG IN A L M A D N E S S "

Dressed in H er Beautiful Veil from

EXTRA 10%OFF! M

A R C H

T H U R S .

S A T .

1 8 th ,

2 0 th ,

BRICK SHREWSBURY FREEHOLD 262-0777 747-1900 780-0007

S U N .

2 1 st

OFF KIDS MATAW ANp . W INDSORK H 50 SAYREVILLE 566-94881(609) 443-9191 5 2 5 - 0 7 3 3 Kids locations • Some Exclusions

B y Ja im e Custom & T radition al Bridal H ea d w ea r a t Wholesale P rices. by A ppointm ent

706-1652

»NE^PHNDBNlt'l(AARC^i'lV; ' ^ ' 7 * Continued from previous page

School has a rough, uneven surface with missing cinders. asked Torchia if the track should be Torchia added that the straight-aways closed down for safety reasons, but he are uneven and the track’s width varies said, “No, I’m saying that the tracks from 10 to 20 feet in spots. need to be redone very shortly.” “If you find you have a need for the The track was last refurbished ap­ Thompson track, if this becomes a safe­ proximately 10 years ago, according to ty issue, and the board can’t respond, Torchia. The district is currently looking into certainly let us know what we can do as raising the money for track repairs at an alternative,” Johnson added. Last year, the board approved a rec­ ommendation to refur­ bish the running tracks at both high schools. B u t to avoid g o in g over its budget limit, or state cap, the fund­ ing question was placed on the ballot as a separate question and included repara­ tions to the High School South football field and the High School North football bleachers. The cost of the projects totaled $700,000 and would have added 1.5 cents per $100 of assessed valuation to the tax rate. Voters approved the budget but defeat­ ed the question by fewer than 500 votes. Because the measure was defeated as a sep­ arate question, the dis­ trict could not allocate any funds to repairing the field this year. M A R Y DEMPSEY CINDERLAND — The Thompson Middle School track in The district now faces Middletown has an uneven surface and varies in width emergency “sink hole” throughout the length of the track. repairs at the High School South football both high schools in this year’s budget, field and eroding tracks at both high district Communications Director Karen schools. Kondek said Friday. Throughout the school year, the High Board President John Johnson sug­ School South track team has anywhere gested South’s runners use the cinder from 80 to 180 participants. track at nearby Thompson M iddle Approximately 180 students run in School on Middletown-Lincroft Road the spring, 120 in the winter, and 80 to until a decision is made regarding re­ pairing the high school track. But 90 participate in the fall. Torchia said, “That track is not really “There are more participants in runnable, and we cannot have meets up cross-country, indoor track and outdoor there.” track than any other sport in any other The track at Thompson M iddle school,” Torchia said.

M A R Y DEMPSEY

TRACK HOLE — A portion of track surface at Middletown High School South is worn down to the asphalt. • H O M E A N D R O A M * A Q U A T O O L S » C U S T O M R E S IN * M U S K IN • S E A S O N M A S T E R •

POOL PATIO & SPA S A

L

E

NOW ’S TH E TIM E TO B U Y LO W EST P R IC E S IN NEW J E R S E Y

UP TO

5 0 %

O F F

A LL CLEARANCE PO O LS

TO 6 0 %

O FF

1 9 9 8 F lo o r M o d e ls Shop with confidence. Bring all competitors’ advertisements, coupons & quotes. Compare our prices, selection & service. You’ll be glad you did! It’s our policy to maintain the lowest price in New jersey.

C h a n g in g T h e » W a y Y o u F e e l .®

P o w c r t d b y BC M t t w n

S ta r tin g a t

$1999

IN C O M E T A X D IR E C T O R Y

• H O M E A N D R O A M • A Q U A T O O L S • C U S T O M R E S IN • M U S K IN • S E A S O N M A S T E R •

S K I

S A L E !

UP T 0 1/2 OFF OF EVERYTHING H U G E S E L E C T IO N !

GREGG BERNICKER & ASSOCIATES, PC CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS Dounuqualify lor these newlax breaks?

ChildTaxCredit EducationIRA Interestoncollegeloans HopeScholarshipCredit Over 10 years experience, reasonable rates

New Location

950 HIGHWAY36, HAZLET, NJ 07730 (732) 739-8800

CHRISTINE GISONDI, PA Federal, NJ & NY Returns

SKIS • BOOTS * SNOWBOARDS JACKETS * PANTS • GLOVES • SHELLS AND MORE

Specializing inSelf-Employed Clients

My Office or Your Home Roth IRA vs. Regular IRA Tax Advice Year Round 7 3 2 -6 7 1 -1 6 1 0

H x

I*

S e e s to re fo r d e ta ils W h ile s u p p ly la sts!

E A S T BRUNSWICK SU PER STORE 1020 ROUTE 18 • PELICAN CENTER 18 MALL • EAST BRUNSWICK

POOL & P ATIO 2 5 4 - 5 1 1 5 1-8QO-862-POOL MON

T O F R 1 1 0 -9 • S A T 1 0 -6 • S U N 1 1 -5 F o r m e r ly M o v ie C it y 5

O ' INDEPENDENT,-MARCH 17, 1999

Hearing onopen space plan set for March 24 Middletown will use list to determine future land acquisitions BY LINDA DeNICOLA_______ __________ Staff W riter

MIDDLETOWN — The township’s Open Space Preservation Plan is ready for public view. The ad hoc Open Space Committee has scheduled a public hearing on the draft plan for 8 p.m. March 24 at town hall. Copies of the proposed plan are available for review at the Township Clerk’s Office and the Planning Department in the munici­ pal complex and at the library on New Monmouth Road.

Voters approved an open space tax of 1 cent per $100 of assessed valuation in November which will enable the township to raise about $454,000 annually starting this year. The fund, officials have said, will enable the township to bond for up to $7 million to acquire open space. Having a plan in place also helps the township qualify for special funding under the state Green Acres program. The new open space plan contains a list of more than 40 properties identified as having potential value to the township for preservation or recreation purposes. Committeewoman Rosemarie D. Peters, who chairs the special committee, said that this does not mean that the township will be interested in acquiring all of the properties, nor be able to do so with the limited binding

available. “What the plan will do is provide the present and future governing bodies with a new menu of options from which they can select parcels which will serve various needs within the township,” Peters said. Deputy Mayor Joan A. Smith, who also serves on the committee, added that a major factor in determining which parcels are pur­ chased will be their availability and the abil­ ity of the township and the owners to reach agreeable terms. “We are not interested in condemning properties or forcing unwilling owners to sell,” Smith said. The properties included in the plan range from large tracts of hundreds of acres to small parcels of just one acre and are located throughout the 40-square-mile township. A further list of 100 small properties is being

IN

T r a d it io n a l? R O T H ?

Get yourself The Best IRA! 18-month CD

5 .5 0 2 : 1 5 . 0 0 %„ Until Ju n e 30

reviewed by the standing Open Space Preservation Committee for use as pocket parks. These are primarily in the older, more densely populated areas of the town. The plan also includes a rating system which will help the governing body to eval­ uate the environmental and aesthetic charac­ teristics as well as the potential uses of each parcel. Members of the ad hoc committee include representatives of the Township Committee, Planning Board, Environmental Commission, Recreation Advisory Board, ad hoc, Open Space Preservation Committee, Monmouth County Park System and Monmouth Conservation Foundation. The township’s Planning and Parks and Recreation directors have assisted the committee in working on the plan.

T hereafter, until m aturity.

BRI EF

Register children lor kindergarten in Keyport The Keyport Public Schools will hold kindergarten registration on April 21 from 1-3 p.m.; on April 22 from 6:30-7:30 p.m.; and on April 23 from 1-2:30 p.m. Registration will be held in the Central School Cafeteria. In order for parents to reg­ ister their child, they must be 5 years old on or before Oct. 1. The following items will be needed at the time of registration: • child’s birth certificate (with raised seal); • child’s Social Security number; • proof of updated immunizations - four doses of diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus (DPT); three doses of polio - oral polio vaccine (OPV); measles-mumps-rubella (MMR); and a tuberculin test (TB) is requested; • proof of residency must be notarized (deed, mortgage, lease, utility bill, etc.) • in cases of divorce or separation, sub­ mit property settlement agreement or final judgment Children must be enrolled on or before Oct. 1. For information, call (732) 264-0561 or (732) 264-0647.

M in im um d e p o s it, $500

Your IRA deserves The Best, and that's what it w ill get from Investors Savings Bank. And w hat’s even better is that the sooner you invest, the more you’ll earn, because Investors is paying a premium rate until June 30,1999! Our special 18-month CD is available for Traditional or tax-free+ ROTH IRAs, so if you have questions about the one th a t’s right fo r you, stop by any Investors’ office, then open The Best! There’s hardly a better tax-saving investment than an IRA, so act fast! Funds transferred from other Investors' IRAaccounts not eligible. The annual percentage yield (APY) of 5.50% is effective March 15.1999 throuqh June 30.1999; after June 30, the account will earn a guaranteed APYof 5.00% for the remainder of the term. This offer is subject to chanqe without notice. 3 D is tr ib u tio n s f ro m R O TH IRAs a r e f r e e f ro m f e d e r a l i n c o m e t a x a n d IRS p e n a lt y if c e r t a in r e q u i r e m e n ts a r e m e t ; c o n s u lt w i t h y o u r t a x a d v is o r . A p e n a lt y m a y b e i m p o s e d f o r e a rly w i t h d r a w a l . .

WA sponsors breakfast buffet Sunday in Keyport The Bayshore Area Chapter No. 721 of Vietnam Veterans of America (VVA) will sponsor a breakfast buffet from 8 a.m. to noon on Sunday at Keyport Veterans of Foreign Wars Post No. 4247, located at Third and Waverly streets in Keyport. Cost is $4 for adults, $3 for seniors and $2 for children under age 12. For information, call (732) 203-1900. IN C O M E

$ e & l/

T A X T IM E

IN V E S T O R S C O RPO RATE OFFICE:

S A V IN G S

B A N K

249 Millburn Avenue, Millburn • 1-800-252-8119

N AV ESIN K:

Highway 34, P. 0 . Box 127

Highway 36 and Valley D riv e *

Madison

Clark

Millburn New Providence

D EA L:

S P R IN G L A K E HEIGHTS: Highway 71 and W arren Avenue

East Orange

T O M S RIVER:

Edison

Bay Plaza, Fischer Blvd.. (Shop Rite C enter)* W est Hills Plaza, Route 37 W e st*

Hillside

P. O. Box 227

FR EEH O LD : Highway 9 and Adelphia R o a d *

LO N G B R A N C H :

WHITING:

169 Broadway

77 Lacey R o a d *

Income Tax &Financial Sendees

Chatham

88 Norwood Avenue,

Federal N.YVN.J., Any State Reasonable Rates Days, Evenings & Weekends

Plainfield RoxburyTwsp.

Irvington •Livingston

H E R E ! V in c e n t P a s s a r ie llo

Other offices: CO LT S N ECK:

Scotch Plains

N e w C l i e n t D i s c o u n t w ith A d

Springfield Union

C a ll T o d a y !

in v e s t o r s ' 2 4 -H o u r A TM L o c a tio n

IS

Deposits FDIC insured to $100,000

ti)

SB

732-671-8153

1

INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999 §

Hazlet residents to get free computer training BY RUTH CALIA Correspondent

HAZLET — By the 2001-2002 school year there will be a computer in every classroom in the Hazlet school system, promised Schools Superintendent Timothy Nogueira at last week’s Board of Education meeting. In an effort to promote computer litera­ cy throughout the community, the town­ ship and school board have formed a part­ nership with Comcast Online Internet and a series of Community Computer Nights is planned. Together they are offering the use of 25 computers in the Raritan High School library with free Internet service for stu­ dents’ use during the day and for other res­ idents of the town on designated Thursdays, from 7-9 p.m. Student and adult volunteers will serve as “web guides” for anyone needing assis­ tance. The March 25 Community Computer Night will be designed for senior citizens. April 22 is set aside for parents of K-3 children, while grades 4-5 and middle school parents are invited to attend April 29. Police, fire and first aid personnel will have access on May 13, Raritan High School parents will attend May 27, and an open night for everyone is scheduled for June 3. The board has provided the funds to upgrade the electrical service in the library in order to accommodate this project. In other action last week, the board voted to add one day to the end of the school year to compensate for a snow day used earlier in the year. This will alter scheduled final exams and graduation cerE a t a ll t h e p a n c a k e s y o u c a n a t b r e a k f a s t S a tu rd a y The Matawan United Methodist Church will hold a pancake breakfast on Saturday from 9 a.m. to noon. The meal will include all the pancakes all you can eat, plus servings of sausage, juice, tea and coffee. Cost will be $3 each: children under age 5, free of charge. The event is being sponsored by The United Methodist Men at the church location, 478 Atlantic Ave., Aberdeen. For information, call (732) 566-2996.

JU ST G ET YO U R H EALTH IN S U R A N C E RENEW AL? If you have US Life or HIP we can help! Call th e H ealth In su ra n c e Specialists at Y our Financial Resource C enter FREE QUOTES fo r all m a jo r ca rrie rs fo r G roup a n d Individual H ealth In su ran ce, Long T erm Care In su ra n c e a n d M edicare S upplem ent In su ran ce

emonies by one day. Because schools were also closed Monday after Sunday’s unexpected snow­ storm, the calendar may have to be changed again. Also, in response to concerns about morning traffic problems on Middle Road at the exit and entrance drives to Raritan High School, including a recent accident, the board discussed possible solutions, including having patrol officers direct morning traffic at the school intersection between 7:15 and 8 a.m. when classes begin.

ContemporaryFrench& AmericanCuisine

Tues. to Fri. 11:30 am - 2:30 pm Dinner nightly

5 pm - midnight Sun. Brunch RESTAURANT AND CATERERS ★





1/2 the S ta r L e d ge r

“Truly towering achievement...

1998 Winner Asbury Park Press

\

Reader’s Choice Awards "French Food”

B r u n c h w it h t h e EASTER B U N N Y * ! SUNDAYS IN MARCH/14, 2 1, & 28 Sealing Times 9:30am, ll-.'iO. & t-.lOpm :

.

58 Oakland St., Red Bank, NJ 450-9091

1102 Highway 34 Aberdeen, NJ 07747

(NexttoMcDonalds)



..

:

Children 4 & Younger $4.95 Reservations Suggested

L e t B R O C K F A R M S H e lp Y o u D is c o v e r t h e V a lu e o f A N e w L a w n A n d A m e ric a n G a rd e n A t O u r

H O M E

&

Rt. 9 North FREEHOLD Location Only

G A R D E N

SH& WPLACEW.

(732) 462-27

S a t. M A R C H

&

S u n .

2 0 th &

21

9 AM- 6 PM Come and meet manufacturer’s representatives from many different companies to answer questions throughout the day Saturday and Sunday

FREESEMINARS

ROUTE 9 NORTH

s FREEHOLD

P r e s e n t e d b y H o rtic u ltu ra l E x p e r t s a n d P r o f e s s i o n a l s in t h e G a r d e n i n g I n d u s t r y

SAT., MARCH 20™

SUN., MARCH 21

10:00 AM

11:00 AM

KainrsgI I C

“CaringForYourLawn”byBruce “CreatingABeautifulLandscape” Green,JonathanGreenCo. byDr.NormanD.Hungerford,B.S., M .F.,Phd. 11:00 AM 2:00 PM “Creating&EnjoyingWater Gardens”byBrockFarmsWater “TheProgramApproachToA GardenSpecialist BeautifulLawn”byMarkArlotta, ScottsFertilizerCo. 1:00 PM “SeasonlongColorwithAnnuals PM &Perennials”plus“TipsForYour 3:00 “ M a in ingABeautifulWater VegetableGarden”byBruceNeary, Gardenta”in b y BrockFarmsWater HorticulturalConsultant GardenSpecialist 2:30 PM “Planting&Maintaining BeautifulRoses”byJamesShearer, Jackson&PerkinsCo.

25%

ROUTE 9 N, FREEHOLD

462-2700

O FF

J&P B oxed ROSES LITTLE GIANT

WATER GARDEN STARTER KIT

Ret. Value

$199.99 .

includes: £ M Pump, Filter, Fountain Nozzle, 9 . / I L f l v 9 Tubing, 8’x12’ Liner

5 6 6 - 1 3 0 0 F m a n c ia lV ^

9:30 am - 2:30 pm Fri. & Sat. til 2 am

ROUTE 34 N, COLTS NECK

462-0900

'

t fr 6e9f \ t l-'LEAiV T jjB O v J f'f3GI41 1 Q INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999

■EH

IE F

Temple Shalom sets ’Tribute to Rabbi' Temple Shalom has scheduled a series of six events paying tribute to Rabbi Henry M. Weiner, who is retiring in June following 32 years of service to the con­ gregation and the Monmouth County community. The events in the “A Tribute to Our Rabbi” series will be held as fol­ lows: • March 19-21: Scholar-in-Residence program with Rabbi Alexander Schindler, past president of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations; • April 24: Lee Gura Concert of Remembrance featuring Debbie Friedman; • May 7: Shabbat evening service with three young rabbis who attended Temple Shalom returning to honor their teacher and mentor; • May 14: Community Shabbat evening service and special Oneg Shabbat in honor of Rabbi Weiner; • May 15: Gala Formal Dinner/Dance at Temple Shalom; and • May 23: Community open house re­ ception and presentation by religious school students. The temple is also creating an ad jour­ nal honoring Rabbi Weiner that will be distributed at the dinner/dance. For advertising information or details, contact (732) 566-2621. Temple Shalom is locat­ ed at Ayrmont Lane and Church Street in Aberdeen.

JACKIE POLLACK

SHARK PUP — Middletown Village School student Steven Burns, 6, pets a dog shark as his first-grade teacher Sandy Douglas points out some of its features. Looking on (l-r) are Jamie Esposito and David Levy.

P a r k S y s te m o f f e r s tw o a d u lt/c h ild p r o g r a m s

a n a ( j f

i n

i e

W e d . th ru M

a r .

The Monmouth County Park System has scheduled the following two programs for parents and their youngsters. For in­ formation or registration, call (732) 842­ 4000 or (732) 219-9484 for the hearing impaired. • “Legends of the Com” will be held on Saturday from 4-5:30 p.m. at the Holmdel Park Activity Center, Longstreet Road, Holmdel. Participants will hear Native American stories about com, make

a doll from com husks and enjoy a snack. The fee will be $6 per child with adult. Preregistration is required. • On Sunday from 1-3 p.m., parents and their youngsters will make an oldfashioned kite at Longstreet Farm, locat­ ed on Longstreet Road in Holmdel. Using sticks and newspapers, youngsters will create their own kite to take home. Admission and parking are free of charge.

S un.

1 7 - 2 1

01 1 OPtW

All B ra s & P a n tie s

Buy3 Get 1 F R E E Lowest priced item FREE

C A R

W A S H

A Friendly Neighborhood Car Wash BALI • VANITY FAIR • WARNER'S MAIDENFORM • CARNIVAL GODDESS • OLGA • LILYETTE A N D MUCH MORE.

S t a t e - o f - t h e A rt E q u ip m e n t B ru s h le s s

SIZES 3 2 A A - 5 2 / 1

T o u c h le s s

NEARLYM E

Blue

WE SPECIALIZE IN MASTECTOMY PRODUCTS...

W e F e a tu r e

P r o d u c ts

Prosthesis Fitters on Staff M edicare Approved

r * 1

j /f ^ c e s s it ie s T s r n J S i m Y * bra outlet ~ Shop us al w w w . b a r e n e c e s s i t i e s . c o m

Marke|p|ace Mo11 /O Z

3 0 0

C A R

$3

$1.00 Savings Off Regular Price

l$ 0 7 7 ^

W A S H

with this coupon • Expires 3/31/99

i

$«»77l 1 JJP J

00/0

2800 Hwy. 35 • Hazlet (Across from Price/Costco) • 2 6 4 - 4 6 6 0

•_______________________________________________ INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999 1 1

— __________________________________________________

Keyport getting $75,000 for special edtraining Grant money promotes inclusion of disabled students BY MARY DEMPSEY

___

__

Staff Writer

KEYPORT — The school district’s special education program is about to get a financial boost. The district is set to receive a $75,000 grant from the Monmouth-Ocean Educational Services Commission to sup­ port training for special education teachers, child study team members, administrators, parents and students to promote the inclu­ sion of disabled students in regular educa­ tion. The additional training for parents, staff and students is intended to increase the school and outside communities’ under­ standing of the moderate and severely dis­ abled population, according to district Director of Pupil Personnel Karen Frumen.

Fourteen school districts in Monmouth and Ocean counties, including Middletown, are collaborating in the effort to heighten awareness of inclusive educa­ tion for disabled students. School staff is scheduled to be trained at Georgian Court College, Lakewood. It is anticipated the partnership with Georgian Court College will lead to changes in train­ ing for teachers working with the disabled population. Increasing the number of disabled stu­ dents participating in standardized testing, raising the number of regular education teachers participating in inclusion class­ rooms, and increasing planning periods between special education teachers and regular education teachers will be support­ ed by the $75,000 grant, according to Frumen. The goal of the initiative is to develop a regional professional development acade­ my for school administrators, teachers, staff and parents in the two counties. Recent changes to the federal Indi­ viduals with Disabilities Education Act

Youths & Teddy bears to attend nature event The Monmouth County Park System will offer youngsters, ages 5-7, a nature program called “Teddy in the Woods” on Saturday from 1-2:30 p.m. The session will take place at the Holmdel Park Activity Center on Longstreet Road in Holmdel. Youngsters are encouraged to bring their favorite Teddy bears with them to enjoy stories of real bears, make a craft, hike through the woods and enjoy a snack. The cost will be $5 per child. Pre registra­ tion is required. For information or regis­ tration, call (732) 842-4000 or (732) 219­ 9484 for the hearing impaired.

*• •

(IDEA) of 1975 promises to offer children with disabilities more opportunities for an inclusive education with their peers in reg­ ular classes. The new legislation, signed into law June 4, 1997, by President Clinton is in­ tended to strengthen academic expecta­ tions and accountability for disabled chil­ dren, as well as offer increased parental involvement in the educational process of children with disabilities. More children with disabilities will be moved into the regular classroom setting under the new law. By removing financial incentives to districts which separate dis­ abled children from the regular classroom setting, the 1997 IDEA is designed to place children with disabilities with their peers in the regular classroom rather than keep­ ing them separate. Inclusive education requires educating all students with disabilities in their neigh­ borhood schools, in general education classes equivalent to the students’ chrono­ logical ages. In addition, students with disabilities

may not be excluded from a class or school community based on the type or degree of the disability. This is achieved through the use of cooperative learning, peer tutoring and peer support. Inclusion is the education of children with disabilities in a regular classroom set­ ting with additional teaching support with primary placement in the regular class­ room. Although the primary placement is in the regular classroom, the student may also receive instruction in other areas based on the students’ needs. Often referred to as the “regular edu­ cation initiative,” the education of students with disabilities in an inclusive setting means placing the students in a general classroom with a regular teacher and a spe­ cial education teacher. Both teachers share the responsibility of instruction in the class. In addition, the educational programs implemented in the inclusive classroom setting are labeled, rather than labeling the children with the disabilities.

O ld M onm outh Candles H o m e m a d e E a s te r C a n d y C h o c o la te B u n n ie s • D i n o s a u r s • T u r t le s • C h ic k s C o c o n u t & P e a n u t B u tt e r E g g s • J e l l y E g g s

When You Build Your Own Easter Basket a t Old M onmouth Candies in Freehold, You Pick Your Favorite Candies To M ake Your Basket Fit Your Personality. All Chocolates or All Creamers.
Loading...

17 - There are a few of

S p rin g H o m e & G a rd e n It’s time to spruce up your home inside and out S te p rig h t u p Aberdeen step dancer is heading to Ireland to compe...

20MB Sizes 4 Downloads 74 Views

Recommend Documents

17 - There are a few of
Jean Dunnel, Mina Davis, Mona. Franz, Jack Clark; stage managers,. Amory Osborn, Robert Brown and ...... yinnitiK at a p

MlLjLEID I - There are a few of
teacher of commercial geography, shorthand ...... Mrs. Charles F. McDonald of Eng- ...... Sophie Lang," with Gertrude Mi

Sell Now! - There are a few of
Jan 8, 2009 - Cassella agrees with Sarlo's legislative effort. "As far as ...... Alexander Kawalek, Antonella. Saldarria

m - There are a few of
Sep 1, 1988 - 2. Please make sure that all news worthy items to IK published in the Thuis- day, Sept. 8 issue of the. Ne

1971 - There are a few of
lor QUALITY AUTO IMPRTR. Must have thoro knowledge of current .... a fully nualiflfir margin clerk, ahi is.we said previ

russell - There are a few of
Oct 22, 1973 - DeCarlo was pronounced dead by Dr. Joseph Fcraldo, who had been treating him for nietastatic spreading ca

23 - There are a few of
by Daniel S. Welgand, chairman of the Bed Bank draft .... Daniel McDonald, Mrs. Chester. Crabtree, Mrs. ..... Life in 19

10 - There are a few of
Mar 27, 2014 - Store,. Frank Brown's. Insurance.' :be held*rhursdny-March 16. Tonulit projects. 'jKnlibas umeri Board me

9 - There are a few of
I C. O. T. H. A. L. F. S L I P S. REGULARLY *1 .00. (mi prick. Cool, dainty tor hot weath er wear, Idviih nylon em. broi

1 - There are a few of
Sep 17, 1981 - N.J Land Use Law." The future of die township, is too im- portant to be decided "by one judge who is laum