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Environmental queriesslow NavesinkHighlandsproposal Concerns about flooding, steep slopes dominate 7-hr. hearing Properties Inc., Rochester. Following a special sevenCorrespondent hour hearing last week, the nvironmental issues Planning Board decided that have prompted the latest the developer, Ocino Inc., delay in the develop­ Brooklyn, N.Y., must supply further information and it post­ ment of a large senior citizens housing complex on Route 36 poned the hearing indefinitely, near the Atlantic Highlands probably until May at the earli­ border known as Navesink est, according to the board secretary. Highlands. The board determined that The project, part of the Middletown’s affordable hous­ the lawyers and witnesses for ing plan known originally as the Lenape Woods Coalition the Vaccaro proposal, has been and Atlantic Highlands had surrounded by controversy for raised significant concerns the past 10 years. It is strongly regarding public safety and the opposed by Atlantic Highlands, township’s liability. “I was astounded (by the as well as the Lenape Woods Coalition, an alliance of 12 decision),” coalition Co-chair­ neighborhood associations in man Paul Boyd, Atlantic Middletown and Atlantic Highlands, said later. “For 10 years they have not Highlands. The property was acquired gotten into the whole set of about a year ago by Home environment issues,” he said. BY AMY SOKOLOFF________

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“(Last) Wednesday night, they finally got into it.” The proposed Navesink Highlands community, a devel­ opment of 375 units of afford­ able housing for senior citizens and 92 assisted living units, would be built on 25 acres of land in the Lenape Woods, a hilly 250-acre tract primarily in Middletown near the Atlantic Highlands border. The coalition is not against the affordable housing or the senior citizen community but is concerned about environmental problems the proposed com­ munity they refer to as “Sudden City” would cause, Boyd said. The nearly 75 local resi­ dents who attended the meeting disrupted the testimony of Ocino Vice President John English with jeers and shout­ ing. Many thought the proceed­ ing was one-sided and that it leaned in the developer’s favor, they said. The board finally issued a Continued on page 12

J A C K IE P O L L A C K

The Holmdel Hornets defeated Mendham Sunday to become repeat State Group II champions. For the story, see page 55. Here Hornet Jeff Baccash is sandwiched during a win over Asbury Park last week.

New rail trail in the works NJ Transit agrees to preserve Lake Matawan, other trestles of Route 36. One of the trestles traverses the S taff Writer upper end of Lake Matawan. nonprofit group that has Young people use the 425-footbeen promoting a recre­ long, 50-foot-high trestle to cross ational path along an inac­ from Matawan-Aberdeen Regional tive rail line between MatawanHigh and School to Matawan Borough. According to J. Wandres, presi­ Freehold has received news that six wooden trestles along the rail­ dent of the Marlboro-based road right of way will not be Monmouth Heritage Trail Inc. (MHT), Stanley Rosenblum, acting demolished. Also, NJ Transit, which owns executive director of NJ Transit, the right of way, and the has directed his staff not to demol­ Monmouth County freeholders are ish the trestles along the 12-mile working on an agreement to let the rail line. The group learned in January county turn the 12-mile right of J A C K IE P O L L A C K that the agency planned to tear way into a trail which would link Middletown Village School first-graders Michael Gallagher and Jeffrey Chapman examine a starfish during a special up with the 9-mile county-owned down the wooden structures, pur­ Henry Hudson Trail, located north portedly to alleviate the threat of exhibit at the school last week. BY UNDA D eNICOLA

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liability if anyone fell off one of the structures, and went to work immediately to try to halt the plans. As it turned out they were suc­ cessful. In a letter to Rosenblum, the Monmouth County freeholders urged the agency to begin the process of discussing how the abandoned railroad right of way could be conveyed to the county for future public pedestrian and bicycle trail use. “We are in the process of work­ ing out an agreement now,” NJ Transit spokesman Ken Miller said Continued on page 14

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Mid’town police now 99 strong

In d e x :

BY LINDA D eNICOLA Staff W riter

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J A C K IE P O L L A C K

MARCH MADNESS — A Matawan man shovels his walkway Monday morning after the worst winter storm of the season dumped wet snow during the night.

Holmdel boardproposes 5.9-cent school tax hike Rising enrollment, ratables slowdown, state aid decline blamed BY BEVERLY McCEE________________ Correspondent

HOLMDEL — The tentative 1999-2000 school budget includes a 5.9-cent tax in­ crease. Introduced March 3, the $28,706,439 spending plan includes a net increase of $1,081,378, or 3.9 percent, over this year’s budget. If adopted following a March 24 public hearing and approved by voters April 20, the tax rate will be $1,615 per $100 of as­ sessed valuation, which translates into an increase of $118 for a home assessed at $200,000. A public hearing followed by a vote to adopt the proposed 1999-2000-school bud­ get is set for March 24 at 8 p.m. in the cafetorium of Indian Hill School, Holmdel Road. Board officials attribute the proposed increase, the lowest school tax hike in the past three years, to continued enrollment growth, a major decline in state aid, slow ratables growth in the township and the dis­ trict’s already lean spending practices. With enrollment expected to increase by more than 5 percent next year, the already below average cost per pupil, now $7,526 per year, would further decline in 1999­ 2000. In addition, state aid will drop to $1,776,400 next year, an 8.9 percent de­ crease over this year. And while enrollment continues to in­

crease, growth of ratables in the township remains slow at just 1.4 percent this year. As for spending in the district, officials say there are no easy cuts. Of the 20 New Jersey high schools with the highest SAT scores, a list that includes Holmdel High School, only one school spent less per pupil in 1998-99, and just 1.1 percent less. The average cost per pupil of the other 19 high schools on the list is 23.6 percent higher than Holmdel’s. Board officials say the proposed budget focuses on educational goals by adding staff to meet increased enrollment, and enhances bus safety with features that include adding new buses and one additional driver. The budget also advances instruction by adding books and materials to the schools’ libraries, new textbooks and classroom resources, and provides expanded opportu­ nities for students in the fine and perform­ ing arts. The budget also funds building en­ hancements, including new parking lot lights at Satz Intermediate School on Crawfords Comer Road and new ceiling tiles in the gym at Village School on McCampbell Road. The proposed budget also makes progress on the district’s five-year plan to infuse technology in subject area instruction by providing computers, software, library automation, and Internet and distance learn­ ing access at all grade levels, officials say. Three budget presentations are sched­ uled for April 13: 10 a.m. at Indian Hill School, 2:45 p.m. at Holmdel High School, and 7:30 p.m. at Village School. A fourth budget presentation is planned for 9:45 a.m. April 17 to the Jersey Shore Chinese School in the Satz School library.

MIDDLETOWN — With the swear­ ing in of three new police officers on Monday, the township police force is back up to its authorized strength of 99 officers. The three new policemen are replacing officers who have retired. The starting annual salary for new officers who have completed training at the police academy is $30,000. Felipe Benedit, Robert Shannon and Lawrence Seymour follow three new hires who took the oath of office last month, bringing the total up to six new officers. All three are veterans of Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm. Benedit, 31, lives in Monmouth Beach with his wife, Kelly Ann, and their three children. He comes to the township from the Monmouth County Sheriffs Office Law Enforcement Division. Benedit received his original police training from the Monmouth County Police Academy, where he graduated in November 1998. He was born and raised in Georgia, leaving there after his enlistment in the U.S. Army where he served for eight years as an air intercept controller. Benedit, who has completed one year of college toward a business degree, is fluent in Spanish and Portuguese. Shannon, 24, is single. A veteran of Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm and Desert Strike, he was bom in Brooklyn, N.Y., and moved to Middletown with his parents when he was 14 years old. Immediately after graduating from Middletown High School South in 1992, Shannon entered the U.S. Air Force. Prior to his deployment overseas, he was assigned to the Air Force security police. Shannon is scheduled to attend the upcoming 199th basic course for police officers at the N.J. State Police Academy along with probationary officers Andrew Micalizzi and Carl Roth, two of the men appointed last month. Seymour, 29, lives in Eatontown with his wife, Judith, and their son. He comes to Middletown from the East Orange Police Department and is a graduate of the Essex County Police Academy. Seymour is a U.S. Army veteran of the Gulf War, where he served as an infantry­ man. He is presently a staff sergeant in the U.S. National Guard and plans to con­ tinue serving his country as a member of C/Company, 2-113 Infantry. New officers who have not undergone training will attend the N.J. State Police Academy class which starts March 30. Those who have previous police experi­ ence will begin a 3-month field officer training program during which they will ride with another officer, Police Chief John Pollinger explained. “These officers are the cream of the crop,” Pollinger added. “They began the arduous process over one year ago. They rose to the top of the list and then had to pass a large number of background checks and a complete medical and psy­ chological evaluation.”

4

INDEPENPErJt 'MARCH 17. 1999

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Board hires firm to fix H.S. South sink holes BY MARY DEMPSEY S taff Writer

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ON A ROLL — Raritan High School students Stacey Schulte and Jerry Sanfratello, members of the class of 2001, model after-prom wear during a class fund-raiser March 10 at the Hazlet school featuring the latest in prom wear and after-prom wear.

MIDDLETOWN — At a special meet­ ing Monday morning, the school board appointed a contractor to fix the sink hole problem at High School South’s football field and running track. The Board of Education voted unani­ mously to award a contract to Jomac Builders Inc., Belford. Schools were closed because of the Sunday snowstorm, and no members of the public were pre­ sent. Board members Sherry Gevarter and Jeanne Osborne were absent from the 8 a.m. emergency meeting at New Monmouth Elementary School’s all-pur­ pose room. The field repairs are expected to cost at least $52,000. Jomac’s bid of $129,000 as a cost to fix the field was the lowest of

three the board received. The board anticipates the cost of re­ pairing the field to be less than half of Jomac’s bid. School Superintendent Dennis Jackson said at the Monday meet­ ing that some existing projects the district had scheduled would have to be re-evalu­ ated in order to cover the costs of fixing High School South’s field. The sink holes were caused by a bro­ ken drainage pipe 17 feet below the foot­ ball field, according to district officials. The pipes carry a small underground stream that runs down the middle of the football field. A preliminary investigation revealed that a small portion of the underground pipe has collapsed under the football field. The repairs will include excavation above the area where the broken piping was found.

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HAZLET — The Board of Education last week voted to adopt guidelines to deal with verbal harassment and terroris­ tic threats. Broken down into three levels, the guidelines are designed to help the princi­ pal and other school professionals deter­ mine appropriate responses. Level 1 is characterized by threats communicated in a benign, generally nonaggressive manner. Responses include consultations between principal, parents and other professionals if needed. Level 2 includes threats spoken by stu­ dents who are known to be emotional or impulsive, seem to be socially isolated, depressed or self-abusive. The response to such threats will involve conferences with the student and

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INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17.1959 5

Holmdel permits bigger buildings in Rt. 35 zone Environmentalists oppose changes; town hopes to attract ratables BY BEVERLY McGEE

__

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Correspondent

HOLMDEL — The Township Com­ mittee has approved zoning changes that will allow the development of larger, “big box” retail buildings along Route 35. The unanimous vote from the four committee members present at the March 8 meeting followed close to three hours of public comment both for and against the changes. Committeeman Gary Aumiller was absent. According to the changes adopted by the committee, the allowable size of a building in the RO-3 Retail Office Dis­ trict zone will increase from 40,000 to

165,000 square feet. The change also increases permitted building heights by five feet, from 30 to 35 feet. With additional footage permitted for ornamental architecture, the increase totals about nine feet. Committee members took the oppor­ tunity to address what they called misin­ formation being circulated through the township about the ordinance changes. Committee members said that while the ordinance changes will allow the con­ struction of larger buildings, the maxi­ mum amount of square footage that can be developed will not change. The increase in allowable height will add to the aesthetic value of buildings to be constructed, they said. The floor area ratio permitted by the ordinance will remain at 15 percent and impervious coverage allowed will remain at 50 percent, Mayor David Chai said.

“Both have not changed,” he said. Committeeman Terence Wall com­ mented about misinformation that the committee would approve zoning changes permitting the construction of towers of unlimited height. “That issue is in the existing ordi­ nance,” Wall, said “It is not an addition” he said, adding that he believes the com­ mittee should revisit the subject of towers at a later date. Committeewoman Mollie Giamanco also spoke in favor of the changes, saying the township has a responsibility to bring in increased ratables that the changes will promote. “The traffic is already (along Route 35),” she said. “The surrounding towns are getting the ratables and we’re getting the burdens.” While many in the audience agreed, others worried that the area is being de­ veloped too intensively and too quickly. “We recommend not adopting the

ordinance in its present form,” said Sam Shramko, representing the grassroots Citizens for Informed Land Use (CILU) organization, noting that the changes are not consistent with the township’s 1993 master plan. But committee members criticized CILU for circulating a flier about the or­ dinance and proposed changes. “The master plan called for something very limiting,” said Wall. The Environmental Commission, rep­ resented at the meeting by Chairman Larry Fink, also opposed the zoning changes. ' Before adopting the amended ordi­ nance, the committee unanimously ap­ proved a resolution, noting that certain aspects of the ordinance are inconsistent with the township’s 1993 master plan. “I believe it is a reasonable change,” Deputy Mayor loseph Speranza said. “It will also help with our taxes. Route 35 is the place to put this,” he said.

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ABERDEEN — A corrections officer at the Monmouth County jail has been charged with selling crack cocaine to undercover officers from the Bayshore Narcotics Task Force and the township police. According to police, LaShawn Mealing, 27, of Juniper Lane, Jackson, was arrested on March 10 at 10:30 p.m. at the Cliffwood A&P supermarket on Route 35. At the time of her arrest, she was al­

legedly found in possession of crack co­ caine. Charges include possession of cocaine, possession of cocaine with the intent to distribute, distribution of cocaine, and distribution of cocaine within 500 feet of a park. Bail was set at $25,000. Seized at the time of the arrest, was $2,169 in cash and a 1999 Mitsubishi auto­ mobile as well as two pagers and a cellular phone.

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6 - INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17,1999

Track condition worries winning South coach Board looking for way to fund improvements at both tracks BY MARY DEMPSEY Staff Writer

MIDDLETOWN — The surface of High School South’s track is wearing thin and may be causing injuries to stu­ dent athletes, according to the coach of the girls’ track team. “The track is way overdue to be resurfaced,” coach Karl Torchia said at a recent school board meeting. “There’s supposed to be a quarter to half inch of rubberized surface on the track, which is worn down and in some parts of the track, it is just blacktop.” The school that boasts the No. 1 ranked girls’ high school distance med­ ley team in the country also has a track that is eroded down to the asphalt in some spots. On Sunday, High School South run­ ners Cate Guiney, her sister Maggie, • Joanne Bradley and Tara Frohjlich placed first in the distance medley relay race at the National Scholastic Indoor Track and Field Cham pionships in Boston. In addition, Cate Guiney broke the New Jersey high school two-mile run record by more than eight seconds. Guiney’s second-place finish in a time of 10:27.20 for the two-m ile race

M A R Y DEMPSEY

SLACK TRACK — On the surface, the track at Middletown High School South looks in good shape, but a closer look reveals spots where it is worn down to the asphalt.

G ia n t

smashed the 13-year-old record of 10:35.66 set in 1986. “The kids in the last four years have won six state championships. They’ve put a lot into this, blood, sweat and tears, and they don’t ask for anything back,” Torchia stated. Torchia, an exercise physiologist, said the High School South track has the potential to cause injury. “I’m concerned about the kids. A lot of them are getting shin splints; some are turning into stress fractures and this is costing a lot of them their running ca­ reers, and in some cases, it may cost them scholarships,” Torchia told the Board of Education two weeks ago. Board Vice President N. Britt Raynor Continued on next page

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School has a rough, uneven surface with missing cinders. asked Torchia if the track should be Torchia added that the straight-aways closed down for safety reasons, but he are uneven and the track’s width varies said, “No, I’m saying that the tracks from 10 to 20 feet in spots. need to be redone very shortly.” “If you find you have a need for the The track was last refurbished ap­ Thompson track, if this becomes a safe­ proximately 10 years ago, according to ty issue, and the board can’t respond, Torchia. The district is currently looking into certainly let us know what we can do as raising the money for track repairs at an alternative,” Johnson added. Last year, the board approved a rec­ ommendation to refur­ bish the running tracks at both high schools. B u t to avoid g o in g over its budget limit, or state cap, the fund­ ing question was placed on the ballot as a separate question and included repara­ tions to the High School South football field and the High School North football bleachers. The cost of the projects totaled $700,000 and would have added 1.5 cents per $100 of assessed valuation to the tax rate. Voters approved the budget but defeat­ ed the question by fewer than 500 votes. Because the measure was defeated as a sep­ arate question, the dis­ trict could not allocate any funds to repairing the field this year. M A R Y DEMPSEY CINDERLAND — The Thompson Middle School track in The district now faces Middletown has an uneven surface and varies in width emergency “sink hole” throughout the length of the track. repairs at the High School South football both high schools in this year’s budget, field and eroding tracks at both high district Communications Director Karen schools. Kondek said Friday. Throughout the school year, the High Board President John Johnson sug­ School South track team has anywhere gested South’s runners use the cinder from 80 to 180 participants. track at nearby Thompson M iddle Approximately 180 students run in School on Middletown-Lincroft Road the spring, 120 in the winter, and 80 to until a decision is made regarding re­ pairing the high school track. But 90 participate in the fall. Torchia said, “That track is not really “There are more participants in runnable, and we cannot have meets up cross-country, indoor track and outdoor there.” track than any other sport in any other The track at Thompson M iddle school,” Torchia said.

M A R Y DEMPSEY

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Hearing onopen space plan set for March 24 Middletown will use list to determine future land acquisitions BY LINDA DeNICOLA_______ __________ Staff W riter

MIDDLETOWN — The township’s Open Space Preservation Plan is ready for public view. The ad hoc Open Space Committee has scheduled a public hearing on the draft plan for 8 p.m. March 24 at town hall. Copies of the proposed plan are available for review at the Township Clerk’s Office and the Planning Department in the munici­ pal complex and at the library on New Monmouth Road.

Voters approved an open space tax of 1 cent per $100 of assessed valuation in November which will enable the township to raise about $454,000 annually starting this year. The fund, officials have said, will enable the township to bond for up to $7 million to acquire open space. Having a plan in place also helps the township qualify for special funding under the state Green Acres program. The new open space plan contains a list of more than 40 properties identified as having potential value to the township for preservation or recreation purposes. Committeewoman Rosemarie D. Peters, who chairs the special committee, said that this does not mean that the township will be interested in acquiring all of the properties, nor be able to do so with the limited binding

available. “What the plan will do is provide the present and future governing bodies with a new menu of options from which they can select parcels which will serve various needs within the township,” Peters said. Deputy Mayor Joan A. Smith, who also serves on the committee, added that a major factor in determining which parcels are pur­ chased will be their availability and the abil­ ity of the township and the owners to reach agreeable terms. “We are not interested in condemning properties or forcing unwilling owners to sell,” Smith said. The properties included in the plan range from large tracts of hundreds of acres to small parcels of just one acre and are located throughout the 40-square-mile township. A further list of 100 small properties is being

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reviewed by the standing Open Space Preservation Committee for use as pocket parks. These are primarily in the older, more densely populated areas of the town. The plan also includes a rating system which will help the governing body to eval­ uate the environmental and aesthetic charac­ teristics as well as the potential uses of each parcel. Members of the ad hoc committee include representatives of the Township Committee, Planning Board, Environmental Commission, Recreation Advisory Board, ad hoc, Open Space Preservation Committee, Monmouth County Park System and Monmouth Conservation Foundation. The township’s Planning and Parks and Recreation directors have assisted the committee in working on the plan.

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Register children lor kindergarten in Keyport The Keyport Public Schools will hold kindergarten registration on April 21 from 1-3 p.m.; on April 22 from 6:30-7:30 p.m.; and on April 23 from 1-2:30 p.m. Registration will be held in the Central School Cafeteria. In order for parents to reg­ ister their child, they must be 5 years old on or before Oct. 1. The following items will be needed at the time of registration: • child’s birth certificate (with raised seal); • child’s Social Security number; • proof of updated immunizations - four doses of diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus (DPT); three doses of polio - oral polio vaccine (OPV); measles-mumps-rubella (MMR); and a tuberculin test (TB) is requested; • proof of residency must be notarized (deed, mortgage, lease, utility bill, etc.) • in cases of divorce or separation, sub­ mit property settlement agreement or final judgment Children must be enrolled on or before Oct. 1. For information, call (732) 264-0561 or (732) 264-0647.

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WA sponsors breakfast buffet Sunday in Keyport The Bayshore Area Chapter No. 721 of Vietnam Veterans of America (VVA) will sponsor a breakfast buffet from 8 a.m. to noon on Sunday at Keyport Veterans of Foreign Wars Post No. 4247, located at Third and Waverly streets in Keyport. Cost is $4 for adults, $3 for seniors and $2 for children under age 12. For information, call (732) 203-1900. IN C O M E

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Hazlet residents to get free computer training BY RUTH CALIA Correspondent

HAZLET — By the 2001-2002 school year there will be a computer in every classroom in the Hazlet school system, promised Schools Superintendent Timothy Nogueira at last week’s Board of Education meeting. In an effort to promote computer litera­ cy throughout the community, the town­ ship and school board have formed a part­ nership with Comcast Online Internet and a series of Community Computer Nights is planned. Together they are offering the use of 25 computers in the Raritan High School library with free Internet service for stu­ dents’ use during the day and for other res­ idents of the town on designated Thursdays, from 7-9 p.m. Student and adult volunteers will serve as “web guides” for anyone needing assis­ tance. The March 25 Community Computer Night will be designed for senior citizens. April 22 is set aside for parents of K-3 children, while grades 4-5 and middle school parents are invited to attend April 29. Police, fire and first aid personnel will have access on May 13, Raritan High School parents will attend May 27, and an open night for everyone is scheduled for June 3. The board has provided the funds to upgrade the electrical service in the library in order to accommodate this project. In other action last week, the board voted to add one day to the end of the school year to compensate for a snow day used earlier in the year. This will alter scheduled final exams and graduation cerE a t a ll t h e p a n c a k e s y o u c a n a t b r e a k f a s t S a tu rd a y The Matawan United Methodist Church will hold a pancake breakfast on Saturday from 9 a.m. to noon. The meal will include all the pancakes all you can eat, plus servings of sausage, juice, tea and coffee. Cost will be $3 each: children under age 5, free of charge. The event is being sponsored by The United Methodist Men at the church location, 478 Atlantic Ave., Aberdeen. For information, call (732) 566-2996.

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emonies by one day. Because schools were also closed Monday after Sunday’s unexpected snow­ storm, the calendar may have to be changed again. Also, in response to concerns about morning traffic problems on Middle Road at the exit and entrance drives to Raritan High School, including a recent accident, the board discussed possible solutions, including having patrol officers direct morning traffic at the school intersection between 7:15 and 8 a.m. when classes begin.

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Temple Shalom sets ’Tribute to Rabbi' Temple Shalom has scheduled a series of six events paying tribute to Rabbi Henry M. Weiner, who is retiring in June following 32 years of service to the con­ gregation and the Monmouth County community. The events in the “A Tribute to Our Rabbi” series will be held as fol­ lows: • March 19-21: Scholar-in-Residence program with Rabbi Alexander Schindler, past president of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations; • April 24: Lee Gura Concert of Remembrance featuring Debbie Friedman; • May 7: Shabbat evening service with three young rabbis who attended Temple Shalom returning to honor their teacher and mentor; • May 14: Community Shabbat evening service and special Oneg Shabbat in honor of Rabbi Weiner; • May 15: Gala Formal Dinner/Dance at Temple Shalom; and • May 23: Community open house re­ ception and presentation by religious school students. The temple is also creating an ad jour­ nal honoring Rabbi Weiner that will be distributed at the dinner/dance. For advertising information or details, contact (732) 566-2621. Temple Shalom is locat­ ed at Ayrmont Lane and Church Street in Aberdeen.

JACKIE POLLACK

SHARK PUP — Middletown Village School student Steven Burns, 6, pets a dog shark as his first-grade teacher Sandy Douglas points out some of its features. Looking on (l-r) are Jamie Esposito and David Levy.

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a doll from com husks and enjoy a snack. The fee will be $6 per child with adult. Preregistration is required. • On Sunday from 1-3 p.m., parents and their youngsters will make an oldfashioned kite at Longstreet Farm, locat­ ed on Longstreet Road in Holmdel. Using sticks and newspapers, youngsters will create their own kite to take home. Admission and parking are free of charge.

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Keyport getting $75,000 for special edtraining Grant money promotes inclusion of disabled students BY MARY DEMPSEY

___

__

Staff Writer

KEYPORT — The school district’s special education program is about to get a financial boost. The district is set to receive a $75,000 grant from the Monmouth-Ocean Educational Services Commission to sup­ port training for special education teachers, child study team members, administrators, parents and students to promote the inclu­ sion of disabled students in regular educa­ tion. The additional training for parents, staff and students is intended to increase the school and outside communities’ under­ standing of the moderate and severely dis­ abled population, according to district Director of Pupil Personnel Karen Frumen.

Fourteen school districts in Monmouth and Ocean counties, including Middletown, are collaborating in the effort to heighten awareness of inclusive educa­ tion for disabled students. School staff is scheduled to be trained at Georgian Court College, Lakewood. It is anticipated the partnership with Georgian Court College will lead to changes in train­ ing for teachers working with the disabled population. Increasing the number of disabled stu­ dents participating in standardized testing, raising the number of regular education teachers participating in inclusion class­ rooms, and increasing planning periods between special education teachers and regular education teachers will be support­ ed by the $75,000 grant, according to Frumen. The goal of the initiative is to develop a regional professional development acade­ my for school administrators, teachers, staff and parents in the two counties. Recent changes to the federal Indi­ viduals with Disabilities Education Act

Youths & Teddy bears to attend nature event The Monmouth County Park System will offer youngsters, ages 5-7, a nature program called “Teddy in the Woods” on Saturday from 1-2:30 p.m. The session will take place at the Holmdel Park Activity Center on Longstreet Road in Holmdel. Youngsters are encouraged to bring their favorite Teddy bears with them to enjoy stories of real bears, make a craft, hike through the woods and enjoy a snack. The cost will be $5 per child. Pre registra­ tion is required. For information or regis­ tration, call (732) 842-4000 or (732) 219­ 9484 for the hearing impaired.

*• •

(IDEA) of 1975 promises to offer children with disabilities more opportunities for an inclusive education with their peers in reg­ ular classes. The new legislation, signed into law June 4, 1997, by President Clinton is in­ tended to strengthen academic expecta­ tions and accountability for disabled chil­ dren, as well as offer increased parental involvement in the educational process of children with disabilities. More children with disabilities will be moved into the regular classroom setting under the new law. By removing financial incentives to districts which separate dis­ abled children from the regular classroom setting, the 1997 IDEA is designed to place children with disabilities with their peers in the regular classroom rather than keep­ ing them separate. Inclusive education requires educating all students with disabilities in their neigh­ borhood schools, in general education classes equivalent to the students’ chrono­ logical ages. In addition, students with disabilities

may not be excluded from a class or school community based on the type or degree of the disability. This is achieved through the use of cooperative learning, peer tutoring and peer support. Inclusion is the education of children with disabilities in a regular classroom set­ ting with additional teaching support with primary placement in the regular class­ room. Although the primary placement is in the regular classroom, the student may also receive instruction in other areas based on the students’ needs. Often referred to as the “regular edu­ cation initiative,” the education of students with disabilities in an inclusive setting means placing the students in a general classroom with a regular teacher and a spe­ cial education teacher. Both teachers share the responsibility of instruction in the class. In addition, the educational programs implemented in the inclusive classroom setting are labeled, rather than labeling the children with the disabilities.

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C A F R A r u le s t o b e r e p r o p o s e d The state Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) announced it will repropose amendments to the Coastal Area Facility Review Act (CAFRA) rules. In December the DEP proposed CAFRA amendments that included boundaries in towns along the coast where development would be concentrat­ ed in order to preserve outlying areas. Department officials encouraged munici­ palities to examine those boundaries and to suggest revisions as appropriate. Based on comments received to date, the DEP plans to make certain changes re­ garding the regulation of barrier islands

and interim center boundaries that will re­ quire this reproposal. The department is working with municipalities to propose a “center per­ mit” similar to the streamlined approach being tested in Long Branch, where the DEP works with a town to establish a spe­ cial CAFRA permit that allows develop­ ment applications to be processed and approved at the local level. The department will continue to solicit comments on its original proposal until the public comment period closes April 9. These additional comments will be taken into account when the reproposal is being developed.

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E n v ir o n m e n t a l q u e r ie s s lo w N a v e s in k H ig h la n d s p r o p o s a l plans include a wall along the back of the development. The 630-foot-long wall would be built into the slopes and would run along he backs of the six proposed buildings in the development. Water and drainage were another major concern of the environmental ex­ perts that testified on behalf of the coalition and the Atlantic Highlands. Dr. Lahbibi Chibani, also of Sadat

Continued from page 1 warning that if members of the audi­ ence did not control themselves, the remainder of the meeting would be closed to the public. In his testimony to the board, English said, “There is a need for affordable housing. I know how to do it and the township expressed interest in it.” A large percentage of the Lenape Woods area, of which about 20 acres are in Atlantic Highlands, contains steep slopes. According to literature produced by the Lenape Woods Coalition, “the tree mass on these slopes is a source of oxy­ gen and cleanser for the air.” A witness for the coalition, geolo­ gist Suzanne Macaoay of Sadat Associates Inc., a Princeton environ­ mental and engineering science firm, testified that the steep slopes pose the threat of an avalanche of gravel and soil. “(The project) is a serious risk and danger to the public ” she said. Macaoay said the danger comes not only from cutting into the unstable hill­ side, but also from the resulting buildup of water in the slopes, she said. The developer defended the plans and called Macaoay’s assessment “geo­ logically impossible.” As a preventative measure, Ocino’s



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A r c h a e o lo g ic a l p a p e r o n L u y s t e r H o u s e to b e p r e s e n te d S a tu r d a y MIDDLETOWN — Archaeological findings at the historic Holland Road Luyster House will be one of the high­ lights at an archaeological conference Saturday at Monmouth University, West Long Branch. Middletown resident Gerard R Scharfenberger, an archaeologist with Louis Berger and Associates Inc., East Orange, and Monmouth University Professor Richard Veit will present a paper titled “Archaeological Investigations at an 18th-Century Dutch-American Farm: The Johannes Luyster House,” at 2:30 p.m. at the annual Archaeological Society of New Jersey (ASNJ) Conference which is being held from noon to 4 p.m. at the universi­ ty’s Woodrow Wilson Hall auditorium. Scharfenberger, who is a member of the Middletown Landmarks Commission and who has done other local research, said his presentation will last about an hour and invites area residents to attend. The Luyster paper will cover the rea­ sons for the project, the history of the site and an overview of the excavations, fea­ tures and artifacts recovered to date. The artifacts, many of which will be displayed at the conference, span the near­ ly three centuries the Luyster family occu­ pied the house, as well as an Indian settle­ ment that predated European colonization. Scharfenberger’s presentation will include slides of the house, the site and paintings of the house done over the years. He also will show slides of some of the artifacts uncovered during his extensive archaeological dig. The Luyster House was moved in December from its original location on

JERRY W O L K O W IT Z

STYLISH — Raritan High School students (l-r) Jenn Yorks, Rob Brito and Kristen Boyce model prom fashions at a fund-raiser last week at the Hazlet school.

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EGG FARMER — This portrait of Pieter Luyster by Daniel Hendrickson, a neigh­ bor, is currently on display at the Monmouth County Historical Association Museum, Court Street, Freehold. This Luyster was an egg farmer and his head is exaggerated to resemble an egg.

Holland Road just east of Laurel Avenue to Red Hill Road in Middletown Village to make way for the AT&T Laurel Avenue facility. This is the first of series of papers Scharfenberger and Veit plan to present. The investigation is Scharfenberger’s doc­ toral dissertation topic. He is also researching Monmouth County Baptists. ASNJ conferences are held annually at different locations around the state.

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P ro p o se d F re e h o ld -M a ta w a n Trail Railroad right of way

HENRY HUDSON TRAIL - -|

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J E R R Y W O L K O W IT Z

SPANNING THE LAKE — The 425-foot long NJ Transit railroad trestle over Lake Matawan was scheduled for demolition but may now become part of a county pedestrian path.

N e w

r a i l t r a i l in t h e

Continued from page 1

Monday. “NJ Transit would retain ownership of the railroad right of way and the county would lease it and assume responsibility for maintenance and liability,” Miller explained. Wally Tunison, MHT vice president

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to Atlantic Highlands, gets well over 50,000 visitors a year. Rail trails also bring economic benefits to businesses along the trails, he said, including restaurants and convenience stores, local attractions and museums, and bicycle repair shops. Studies show that trail users spend from $5 to $11 per visit, he added. And homeowners with property next to or near a rail trail usually find the value of their property can rise as much as 7 percent.

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' J e w s in S p o r t s ' l e c t u r e Temple Beth Ahm, Aberdeen, will pre­ sent the lecture, “Jews in Sports,” led by guest speaker David Kristol on Sunday at 10 a.m. The free session will include visu­ al presentations. The public is invited to attend the program, which is sponsored by the temple’s Adult Education Committee. A bagel breakfast will accompany the talk. For information, call (732) 583-1700.

h o ld p a n c a k e b r e a k f a s t The Knights of Columbus St. Benedict’s Council No. 11349 in Holmdel will sponsor a pancake breakfast with sausage March 28 from 8:30-11:30 a.m. The event will be held in the St. Benedict School cafeteria, 165 Bethany Road, Holmdel. The cost is $4 for adults, $3 for children or $12 per family. For informa­ tion, call Jack Lietz at (732) 583-4602.

S w in g in to s p r in g w ith E g g s tra v a g a n z a o n 2 7 th The Middletown Township Depart­ ment of Parks and Recreation will hold its annual “Easter Eggstravaganza” on March 27 at 10 a.m. on the Great Lawn at Croydon Hall, located at 900 Leonardville Road in the Leonardo section of Middletown. The event will feature an Easter Egg Hunt and a magic show. Parents are encouraged to bring their own cameras since children will have the opportunity to meet the Easter Bunny. The egg hunt is open to children age 8 and under only, but the entire family is invited to attend the festivities. Children will be separated by age group to search for prizewinning eggs. The rain date is set for March 28 at 2 p.m. The free Easter Egg Hunt is open to Middletown Township residents only. For information, call (732) 615-2260.

H o ly F a m i l y PTA t o s p o n s o r fa s h io n e v e n t The Holy Family PTA will sponsor a Fashion Show/Dinner at 6 p.m. Thursday at the Grand Marquis, Route 9, Old Bridge. Fashions will be provided by The Grove at Shrewsbury. More than 200 gifts will be included in the silent auction and grand raffles. A Super 50/50 cash prize will also be drawn. Tickets are available for $30 each. For information or tickets, call Sheila at (732) 264-7870 or Eileen at (732) 787-1652. Holy Family School is located on Route 36 in Hazlet.

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p r o t e c t io n s t a n d a r d s not adopted them, Pallone added. Pallone, N.J. senators A July 1998 report by the National proposing to bring Resources Defense Council (NRDC) singles out New Jersey for praise as the other states in line only state to have a statewide mandatory beach protection program that includes a BY LINDA D eNICOLA bacteria standard, a testing protocol, and Staff W riter mandatory closure requirements when­ MIDDLETOWN — There is cur­ ever the bacteria standard is exceeded. The program has been in place since rently no national beach protection pro­ gram and no uniform standards for 1986, Pallone said. There were only 18 beach closings beach closings and advisories. Three New Jersey legislators want to and advisories for New Jersey ocean change that. Congressman Frank Pallone beaches in 1997 and 24 closings and (D-6) and Senators Frank Lautenberg advisories at bay beaches. Statewide, and Robert Torricelli (D-NJ.) are seek­ signs are posted on beaches when there ing to bring other states’ beach water is a potential health risk from swim­ testing standards closer to the high level ming. Because the standards employed by mandated in New Jersey. Pallone has introduced H.R. 950, the most other states are far lower, beachBEACH Act (Beaches Environmental goers often receive insufficient warning Assessment, Closure, and Health Act) of potential risk and have no basis for and Lautenberg and Torricelli intro­ comparing the safety of swimming in duced a companion legislation in the those coastal waters. “This is another example of how Senate. According to Pallone, this legisla­ New Jersey can serve as a model for tion, which would amend the Clean what we should do on a nationwide ba­ Water Act, would ensure that states have sis,” Pallone said. “While other states may wish to pre­ in place adequate beach testing pro­ grams and provide protection from serve the status quo, we believe that the health risks, while allowing states flexi­ public good would be much better bility in determining beach closures or served by requiring a higher standard. Our intention is not to micro-manage in implementing stricter standards. Although the U.S. Environmental how each state implements its testing Protection Agency (EPA) has recom­ program, only to ensure that there is a mended standards, most states still have uniform, high standard.”

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Belford man aiming to stay top MS fund-raiser Motivated by wife’s illness, he’s raised more than $175K for MS Society BY LINDA D eNICOLA S taff W riter

MIDDLETOWN — Belford resident Robert Zirlin is dedicated to raising funds for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. His dedication and resourcefulness are moti­ vated by love for his wife, Mary, who was diagnosed with MS 11 years ago when she was 30 years old. He has been a major fund-raiser for a number of years and is about to begin his tristate effort to be the highest fund-raiser nationally for the third straight year. He is collecting donations for the MS Walk, scheduled for April 18.. When his wife was diagnosed with the disease, Zirlin said he felt frustrated. “There was nothing I could do to help her,” he explained. “Then I found that I am a good fund-raiser. So I’m raising money in the hope that a cure will be found in her life­ time.” Last year, Zirlin raised more than $53,000. The year before, more than $38,000, and he was recognized by the National Multiple Sclerosis Society as its top fund-raiser nationally. Zirlin, who works for the American Stock Exchange, raises funds from November to May. “I’ve broken my record every year for the past nine years and plan to do die same this year,” he said. Zirlin’s total the past sev­ eral years is more than $175,000. Zirlin has a list of contributors and has added to it every year. He has more than 450 people on the list, but plans to stop at 500. “It’s very difficult to talk to that many peo­ ple,” he said, since sometimes he has to talk to them more than once.

Zirlin said that since he has been raising money for MS, a number of new drugs have come out to help slow the disease. “I’m happy that they have come out with new medicine, but I’m hoping to buy time to come up with a cure,” he said. According to National Multiple Sclerosis Society literature, MS is the most common chronic neurological condition of young adults in North America and Europe. It usu­ ally hits people at the ages of 20-40. The estimated prevalence of MS in the United States is 250,000-300,000, with nearly 10,000 new cases diagnosed annu­ ally. Women are affected more than men and 95 percent of people with MS are Caucasian, while 5 percent are AfricanAmerican. It is a disease that randomly attacks the nervous system. Symptoms may range from numbness to paralysis and blindness. The disease is unpredictable. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of the disease cannot be foreseen. Anyone interested in sponsoring Zirlin can call him at (732) 706-1348. The National MS Society sponsors the MS Walk, held at 650 sites across the country, including eight in mid-Jersey. “The National MS Society is dedicated to ending the devastating effects of MS; that’s our mission,” Gina Murdoch, direc­ tor of the MS Walk, said. Funds received through the MS Walk support education, advocacy, research and local programs that enhance the quality of life for people with MS and their families. Individuals may register on-line or by phone or fax. For more information, or to register for the MS Walk or coast-to-coast bike tour, call the Multiple Sclerosis Society Mid-Jersey Chapter at (732) 643­ 0010, or visit the chapter’s web site at www.mjcms.org. For more information about MS, con­ tact the National MS Society at (800) FIGHT MS.

Poricy Park offers renewal, wildlife programs The following programs are being of­ fered this weekend by Poricy Park, locat­ ed on Oak Hill Road in Middletown. • On Saturday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. a Feeling Light class will be held at the Nature Center. The session will show how to cleanse the body, relax the mind and restore the spirit. The free session is offered for adults. Advanced registration is required and can be made by calling (732) 842-5966.

• Local wildlife enthusiast John Kinneary will talk about birds and other wild creatures as well as how to create fa­ vorable habitats for wildlife in the back yard. The session will be held from 2­ 3:30 p.m. at the Nature Center. Participants should dress for the weather since the program will end with a walk through the park. Older children and adults are invited to attend. No registra­ tion is required; a donation is requested.

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Young Abepdeen step dancer off to Ireland 11-year-old fell in love with the dance style at local Irish festival BY LINDA D eNICOLA

_______

Staff W riter

ABERDEEN — Siobhan Nolan, 11, of Aberdeen competes in Irish step-dancing competitions in the Northeast, but soon she will be competing in Ireland. The competition in Ennis, County Clair, runs from March 28 to April 4. “We’ve been raising funds for a month now through candy sales” and other activ­ ities, her mother Dawn said. The sixth-grader at the Matawan Avenue Middle School has been attending the Peter Smith School of Irish Dance in South Amboy for four years. For her, the best thing about Irish step dancing is all of the people she has met.

“We go to competitions all over,” Nolan said. “She has competed in Pennsylvania, Connecticut, New York, Delaware and New Jersey. Siobhan gets to meet kids from other schools, other states and now she will meet dancers from all over the world.” Siobhan became interested in the dance form when she was 7 years old when she saw step dancers during an Irish festival at the Garden State Arts Center, now the PNC Bank Arts Center, in Holmdel. She told her mother, “That’s what I want to do.” Last year she was one of the dancers at the PNC Bank Arts Center’s Irish Festival and on March 6 she danced in the Frank Patterson Irish Show at Carnegie Hall in New York City. Patterson is a wellknown Irish tenor, her mother explained. In order to compete at the world cham­ pionships in Ireland, Siobhan had to com­ pete at the Northeastern Regional

Oireachtas (Competition) in Philadelphia, Pa., over the Thanksgiving weekend. She and seven other girls formed what is called an eight-hand ceili group, Nolan said. “To be eligible to go to Ireland, they had to place in the top three. They placed third.” The experience of traveling to compe­ titions has been fun for the whole family, Nolan said. “I can’t step dance, but I love the music,” she noted. There are three basic types of step dances: soft shoe, where the dancers wear ghillies, soft black shoes with criss-cross laces up the front; hard shoe, where they dance in shoes with fiberglass heels and taps on the toes; and figure or team danc­ ing.

The eight-hand reel is a set-figure dance for eight dancers. These soft-shoe dances are the only dances that incorpo­ rate hand and arm movements. Since the popular stage show R iverdance debuted, step dancing has become more popular, Nolan said. Siobhan has an 8-year-old sister, Caitlin, who is also a step dancer. The girls go to class twice a week, and during competi­ tions, they go three times a week. They practice every day at home. “It’s hard,” Nolan said. “Did you ever try dancing while holding your arms straight down? It’s harder than moving your arms. And they can’t look stiff. Beside that, the dances are very compli­ cated.”

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ERIN GO BRAGH — With her hair curled in the traditional style of Irish step dancers, 11-year-old Siobhan Nolan of Aberdeen dons the dress she will wear to dance in Ireland when she competes in an international Irish step-dancing compe­ tition.

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1 8

INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999

JERRY WOLKOWITZ

LOOKIN’ GOOD — Wendy Mehalick of Middletown checks out a sunflower dress at the Spinning Wheel Craft Show Saturday at Middletown High School South.

...................

JERRY WOLKOWITZ

BIRD CAGE — Cathy Westlye of Staten Island, N.Y., is amused by a bird in a cage at the seventh annual Spinning Wheel Craft Show at Middletown High School South.

JERRY WOLKOWITZ

PUPPET LOVE — Kierston Hicks, 1, of Brielle tries to share her pretzel with a marionette on display at Saturday’s fund-raiser at Middletown High School South.

JERRY WOLKOWITZ

GRAND OLD FLAG — Middletown High School South teacher Sue Fream of Red Bank balances a wooden flag on her shoulder as she shops for other purchases at High School South’s Spinning Wheel Craft Show Saturday.

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H o lm d e l c h ie f Five recognized for response to Route 34 school bus accidents BY BEVERLY McGEE______ Correspondent

HOLMDEL — The Police Department has named Sgt. Michael Smith as its Officer of the Year. Smith, along with several colleagues and a number of civil­ ians, was honored at the department’s annual awards ceremony held during the March 8 Township Committee meeting. Police Chief R. Bruce Phillips and Police Commissioner and Committeewoman Mollie Giamanco presented the awards. Smith, a member of the department since 1986, was promoted to sergeant in 1998 and is a leader in the number of ar­ rests made and summonses issued. Smith also received an award earlier this year from the Monmouth County Drunk Driving Task Force for leading the county in arrests of drivers who were under the influence of alcohol or drugs. “He is an example of a leader who can say, ‘Do as I do,’ ” said Phillips. Cpl. James Davis was honored with a Distinguished Service Medal for his work in community policing. In addition to his patrol work, Davis serves as the de­ partment’s blood-borne pathogen officer, and works with township children in such areas as Halloween safety.

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INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999

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Patrolman Shawn Bailey received the department’s Police Medal for having apprehended an armed robber at the PNC Bank in the Holmdel Towne Center shop­ ping mall on Route 35 and Laurel Avenue. Receiving letters of commendation were Sgt. Donald Hughes, Detectives Frank Allocco and Kenneth McGowan, Cpls. James Smythe and Thomas Durdack and Patrolmen Daniel Benbrook, Keith Cannata, Shawn Bailey and Eric Hernando. Two Hazlet officers, Sgt. Jack Mullins and Patrolman John Fitzsimmons, received special awards for their roles in apprehending a subject who was fleeing from Holmdel after having robbed three homes. Several civilians were also honored for roles in two accidents that occurred at the intersection of routes 34 and 520. Linda Spangle, a registered nurse who lives in Manalapan, was honored with a Citizen Service Award for her efforts to help a victim in an accident at the inter­ section involving a dump truck and a pas­ senger vehicle. Spangle stabilized the vic­ tim and assisted when rescue personnel arrived. When a dump truck and school bus collided at the same intersection, resulting in several injuries, civilians Thomas Dougan of Hazlet and Arthur Raskin of Colts Neck, assisted the injured people and helped the less injured off the bus.

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Rebecca Stuart and Ashley Merrigan, both of Colts Neck, two older students on the bus, also assisted while Dr. Sandra Connoly, a Freehold doctor, took immedi­ ate action with the more seriously injured. All were honored by the department with Citizen Service awards. “The Police Department takes great pride in the strictures we have placed upon the receipt of awards,” Chief Phillips told the honorees.

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“They are not just given away. They are earned. That is something you can be proud of.” “Thank you. We’re very proud of you,” added Giamanco, thanking the award recipients and the entire Holmdel police force. Mayor David Chai thanked the hon­ orees on behalf of township residents. “Thank you, officers, and keep up the good work,” Chai said.

ON CAMPUS Army Cadet Brendan D. Masini was placed on the dean’s list at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y. He is the son of David P. and Carol L. Masini of Holmdel. D avid R ossics of Holmdel, a Massachusetts Maritime Academy cadet, recently returned from a six-week training cruise from the MMA campus in Buzzards Bay to Cuba and other tropical ports. Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pa., named the following local students to the dean’s list for the fall semester: Risa Cara Letowsky and Vittorio Antonio Russo, both of Aberdeen; and SheaMarie Roth of Hazlet. Cory Gabel of Holmdel was named to the dean’s list for the fall semester at Susquehanna University in Selinsgrive, Pa.

Lucent Technologies recently an­ nounced the selection of 200 U.S. semifinalists for its Global Science Scholars program, a competition to sup­ port students around the world who are interested in careers in science and tech­ nology. Eighty winners will be provided with one-time $5,000 scholarships and summer internships at Bell Labs loca­ tions around the world. Semifinalists were selected based on their overall aca­ demic achievement including perfor­ mance on standardized tests, grade-point average, class rank, enrollment in advanced placement courses, honors classes, college courses and participation in other competitions related to science, math and technology. Area semifinalists are: Matthew Ellis of Aberdeen; Anjum H ossain and C h ristop h er L ynsk ey, both of Middletown; and Michael Mera of Hazlet. Finalists will be announced April 1. .

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Mansion provides unique view of

Historical Society meticulously maintains circa 1723 house BY RUTH CALIA Correspondent

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The latest addition to the Matawan Historical Society’s Burrowes Mansion Museum is a rare Redware pie plate (at right) the group purchased at auction. The historic building which the borough acquired in the 1970s recent­ ly reopened for the 1999 season. It is open from 2 to 4 p.m. the first and third Sundays of the month.

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Mansion. Sarah Ellison, docent — or tour guide — for the Matawan Historical Society, is waiting to help you meander back through time. The initial description of the house reveals that it really “two” ho joined together, an original Colonial-style section built circa 1723 and Victorian-era sec­ tion that was added in the late 1800s. Over the past quarter century, the Historical Society has acquired fur­ nishings and artwork spanning the life of the home and reflecting its many functions, as well as providing a tactile record of life in Matawan. One of the most prized pos sessions was recently pur­ chased at auction. For $1,400 the society acquired a Redware pie dish believed to have been made in Matawan from the red clay found locally in abun­ dance. Described as a “yellow slip decorated pie plate with bird on a branch, coggled edge,” it is considered unique, since

birds were not usually found on the plates made in New Jersey. The mansion, located at 94 Main St., was the site of a Revolutionary War skirmish when New Jersey Royal

Volunteers pursued Maj. John Burrowes Jr., son of the man­ sion’s owner. As Ellison explains, “Courtney Skinner and his group of Tories, called Skinner’s Greens because of their clothing, stormed through the mansion, firing guns which

left holes in the ceiling and injuring the major’s wife.” The major, meanwhile, escaped by jumping out a win­ dow and swimming across Matawan Creek, at that time a substantial water corridor behind the mansion. Eventually he joined George Washington, who was encamped in the region. In the 1850s, the man­ sion served as the Steamboat Hotel. It next became the home of a dentist, who apparently used the rear yard as a reposi­ tory for pulled teeth, which were uncovered during an arche­ ological dig. During the 1930s it was known as the Colonial Tea Room, owned by the publisher of the Matawan Journal news­ paper, Benjamin F.S. Brown. It remained in the fam­ ily until 1974, when Brown’s youngest daughter sold it to the borough of Matawan for $25,000. Today, members of the Matawan Historical Society furnish and operate the Burrowes Mansion Museum. On the first and third Sundays of each month, from 2

INDEPENDENT; MARCH 17,1999 2 1

Matawan history

A rope bed and other artifacts are displayed in a small upstairs bedroom.

Photos by JERRY WOLKOWITZ to 4 p.m., visitors can discover the treasure-trove of artifacts relating to historic Matawan. A painting depicts a famous 1916 shark attack in Matawan Creek, and tiles from the Matawan Tile Co. and Atlantic Tile Co. can be seen. On display in one of the upstairs bed­ rooms is a spool or rope bed, so named for the ropes which served the same purpose as today’s metal springs. The furniture of J. Mabel Brown, also on display, reveals the splendor of Victoriana. At Christmastime the mansion is deco­ rated to reflect both the Victorian and Colonial periods, and visitors to the annu-

al Matawan Day celebration can travel by trolley to the house, where costume-clad members of the Historical Society guide special tours. With the recent renovation of the man­ sion’s gambrel roof — which required expert craftsmanship to repair and replace the special shingles — the society is now turning its sights to improving the struc­ ture’s electrical system. As a nonprofit organization, the society relies on contri­ butions and membership fees. Anyone interested in learning more about the mansion or the Historical Society can call (732) 566-5605 or write to the Matawan Historical Society, P.O. Box 41, Matawan, NJ 07747.

Matawan Historical Society member Sarah Ellison shows off the oldest piece in the Burrowes Mansion collection, a highboy.

The master bedroom features an ornate headboard and dresser.

Old ceiling beams in the downstajrs living room serve as a reminder of the house’s long and illustrious history. It was the site of a Revolutionary War skirmish in which a group of Tories stormed the house in pursuit of Maj. John Burrowes Jr., who jumped out a rear window and swam across Matawan Creek.

2 2

INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999

Meeting to focus on cleanup at Imperial Oil Environmental group supports DEP’s plan to excavate soil BY BRIAN DONAHUE

__________

Staff W riter

MARLBORO — A local environmen­ tal group is supporting an approach cho­ sen by the state Department of Environ­ mental Protection (DEP) for the on-site cleanup of Imperial Oil, off Tennent Road. Out of several options considered for action on the site, the DEP is seeking to excavate the contaminated soil and sedi­ ment from the property, transporting the “acceptable” soil and sediment to re-use facilities and sending the remaining mate­ rial to disposal facilities. The excavated areas will then be back-filled with clean borrow soil, according to the option. The alternative will be the focus of a meeting tomorrow at 7 p.m. at Town Hall, Wyncrest Road, convened by employees of the DEP’s Site Remediation Program. Members of the Monmouth County Environmental Coalition (MCEC) and Marlboro’s Citizens Advisory Council are expected to attend the meeting. “The MCEC is very, very supportive of what the DEP is proposing,” Marlboro resident Tina Freedman, the group’s pres­ ident, said last week. “What they are rec­ ommending for the cleanup is an excellent choice. It is the complete removal of all of the contaminants from the property.

We’re not talking about any fencing off or any restricting access (which were includ­ ed as other alternatives). We don’t want to leave any contaminants on the property.” Freedman said she hopes that members of the public will participate tomorrow and support a thorough cleanup of the site. Imperial Oil, an oil blending and repackaging business that operates on the 4-acre property, was added in 1983 to the National Priorities List of Superfund sites to be cleaned up with federal funds. A 1985 DEP investigation revealed that both on-site and off-site soils had been contam­ inated by past industrial operations at the facility. The plant has been used by a vari­ ety of industries since the early 1900s. The investigation also concluded that a plume of ground-water contamination was present in the underlying Englishtown aquifer, and a layer of oil product was floating on the water table where the waste filter clay pile was located. Contam­ ination was also found in the sediment of Birch Swamp Brook, which originates near the northeastern border of the site and drains into Lake Lefferts, Matawan. Last year, the federal Environmental Protection Agency cleaned up contami­ nated soil at a residential area on Orchard Place, temporarily relocating some resi­ dents of the small street. However, remedial action on a nonresidential off-site area and the on-site cleanup have not yet taken place. Freed­ man said local officials are concerned about the sequence of the cleanup, prefer­

ring cleanup of the on-site area before the remaining off-site sections. Freedman said she has questions about the DEP’s choice to clean up the on-site area by industrial standards rather than residential standards and whether the pro­ cedure will protect the health of people in surrounding residential areas. Whether Imperial Oil will be permitted to continue to operate during the remedial process is also expected to be discussed. The public is permitted to comment on the DEP’s proposed plan until April 6, ac-

cording to a DEP notice. Comments should be directed to Donald J. Kakas, section chief, Bureau of Community Rela­ tions, New Jersey Department of Envi­ ronmental Protection, P.O. Box 413, Trenton, NJ 08625-0413. Freedman asked that residents also no­ tify the MCEC of their comments by writ­ ing to P.O. Box 1, Morganville, NJ 07751. Questions can be directed to the DEP’s Mindy Mumford, community relations coordinator for the project, at (609) 777­ 1976.

IN BRIEF GSP m eetings to ad d ress A rts Center problem s

Catholic D aughters will spo n so r luncheon Sat.

The first meeting of the Garden State Partnership (GSP) will be held on March 25 at 8 p.m. in Holmdel Town Hall. Area residents are invited to attend including municipal and legislative leaders. The GSP was formed to address the many and varied problems faced at the PNC Bank Arts Center in Holmdel. The problems include: alcohol abuse; environmental damage; noise/quality of life; handicapped accessibility; taxation; and types of con­ certs. The meeting will provide a forum to focus on the areas that are important to Holmdel and the surrounding community. The GSP will seek appropriate changes and offer the area a continuing resource under the auspices of the Holmdel Township Committee. For information, contact Terence Wall at (732) 671-0117.

Court Fulgens Corona No. 1684, Catholic Daughters of the Americas of New Monmouth, will sponsor a luncheon on Saturday at 11:30 a.m. at the Robert B. Meyner Reception Center in Holmdel. Featured will be Mary Eunice of Mary Productions, who will present a mono­ logue, Mary Todd Lincoln, with narration by Florence Cunningham, both are mem­ bers of the Fulgens Corona. Cost will be $25 and reservations may be made by contacting (732) 787-3020 or (732) 671­ 3831. For many years Court Fulgens Corona has supported scholarship pro­ grams, sponsored education contests and made contributions to community and local charities.

s.co m Greater Media Newspapers News Transcript • Independent ♦ Sentinel • Suburban •Examiner •The Hub

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INDEPENDENT. MARCH 17, 1999 2 3

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOA Winning students' a rtw o rk on display The 1999 Monmouth Festival of the Arts’ Fifth Annual Art Contest for Monmouth County High School Junior Art Students was held recently. The win­ ning works will be on display at the festi­ val from March 20-24 at Monmouth Reform Temple, 332 Hance Ave., Tinton Falls. Twelve art teachers from 10 high schools arranged for 38 students to submit 50 original art works for display and judg­ ing. Works included charcoal and pastel drawings, oil and watercolor paintings and sculptures. Certificates of participation and two $100 cash scholarship awards from corporate sponsors, were presented. Winners include: Michael Misurell of Red Bank Regional High School, first place; Elizabeth Barrett of Freehold Borough School, second place; Shan Hua Wang of Matawan Regional High School, honorable mention; Eric McLellan of Howell High School, honorable mention; and Beth VonderBecke of Freehold Township High School, honorable mention. For information about the arts festival or the contest, call (732) 747-8278.

P reteen s, teen s to get model tips and tren d s The Monmouth County Park System will offer “Model Perfect Tips and Trends” for preteens and teens on Wednesday evenings, today through April 7. Preteen classes will be held from 6:30-7:30 p.m., teen classes from 7:30-8:30 p.m. Topics covered will include posture, grooming, walking, speech and make-up tips. Participants should bring a hand towel and small mirror to class. Cost is $30 per person; preregistration is required. For information or registration, call (732) 842-4000 or (732) 219-9484.

Learn job interview ing tips at w orkshop Thurs.

The Monmouth County Park System will sponsor “Get the Job - Interviewing,” a workshop conducted by Rita Freeborough, M. Ed. The session will be held Thursday at the Thompson Park Visitor Center, located on Newman Springs Road in the Lincroft section of Middletown. Participants will learn how to answer questions, dress appropriately and will be given other interview tips. The program fee is $15; preregistration is re­ quired. For information or registration, call the Park System at (732) 842-4000 or (732) 219-9484 for the hearing impaired.

N ew com ers' Club will spo n so r coffee social The Middletown Newcomers’ Club will sponsor a coffee social on Friday at 8 p.m. at a member’s home. Club membership is open to anyone who lives in the Middletown vicinity. Guests are invited to attend the cof­ fee to learn more about the club, which offers a variety of interest groups and special events, as well as children’s activities. For information, call Maria at (732) 345-9525.

NJBCA auxiliary to hold $1-a -B a g Sale M arch 24

The Ladies Auxiliary of the New Jersey Blind Citizens Association Inc. (NJBCA) will hold a $l-a-Bag Sale on March 24 and 27 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The NJBCA is located at 18 Burlington Ave. in the Leonardo section of Middletown. For in­ formation, call (732) 291-0878.

P ro w restlin g event will be held at MHSS

Additional date se t fo r daddy-daughter event

Middletown High School South Gymnasium will be the site of the World Wrestling Association/National Wrestling Association (WWF/NWA) Middletown Mania II. The event will begin at 7:05 p.m. on Saturday and will feature: The Giant Oddity Silva; DoJo Leader; Jim Comette; Doink the Clown; Doug Gilbert; Stevie Richards; Dapper Johnny Falco; and “15-man over the top rope battle royal.” Proceeds will benefit the MHSS and MHSN Post Prom Party. Golden Circle Ringside tickets are sold out. Reserved ringside tickets are available for $16; general admission, $13. Tickets are available at Werners Deli, Main Street in Port Monmouth; Mike’s Deli at Route 35 and Oak Hill Road in Middletown; Don’s Deli on Tindall Road in Middletown; Slaters Deli in Leonardo; Chris’ Deli, West Front Street in Lincroft; P & P Luncheonette in Hazlet; Keansburg Pharmacy; Singer Sew N Vac in Hazlet; Keller’s Deli in Union Beach; Kings Bagels in Keyport; and Kwik Shop in Aberdeen. For information, call (732) 888-3814 or (732) 888-1704.

Due to the favorable response for the Second Annual Daddy-Daughter Dinner Dance, the Middletown Parks and Recreation Department has added a sec­ ond date for the event, Sunday from 2-6 p.m. The event will be held at Buck Smith’s Restaurant, located on Palmer Avenue in Middletown. The afternoon will feature dancing, food and fun. The dinner dance is open to Middletown girls in kindergarten through sixth grade. Girls may be escorted by their fathers, a relative or a family friend over age 21. Dress for the afternoon is “party attire/special occasion.” The cost per daddy/daughter couple is $40, which includes disc jockey, dinner, souvenir photo and a special keepsake of the evening. The cost for each additional daughter is $20. Seating will be limited and registration, which began Jan. 20, is necessary. The program, for Middletown residents only, will be filled on a firstcome, first-served basis. Registration forms are available at the Parks and Recreation Office at Croydon Hall, locat­ ed at 900 Leonardville Road, Leonardo section of Middletown. For information, call (732) 615-2260.

Learn basic bike m aintenance at clinic The Monmouth County Park System will offer a Basic Bike Maintenance Clinic on Sunday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Thompson Park, Newman Springs Road, Lincroft section of Middletown. Participants will have a hands-on opportu­ nity to learn the art of tire changing, tube patching, brake adjustments, chain repairs and general maintenance. Cost will be $28 per person; preregistration is required. Participants will need to bring a bicycle; texts, patch kit and tire levers are includ­ ed. For information or registration, call (732) 842-4000 or (732) 219-9484 for the hearing impaired.

Youngsters to make paper-m ache animal The Monmouth County Park System will offer “Paper-Mache Centerpiece” to youngsters ages 6-9 at the Thompson Park Craft Center, located on Newman Springs Road in the Lincroft section of Middletown on March 24 and 31 from 7­ 8:30 p.m. Students will create a spring baby animal centerpiece from papermache. The cost will be $20; preregistra­ tion is required. For information or regis­ tration, call (732) 842-4000 or (732) 219­ 9484.

SECTIONS

Parents•Kids

Deadline: March 23 Publication: March 31 S P R IN G D IN IN G

indoor Flea M arket h as tables available The Middletown Township Veterans of Foreign Wars Post No. 2179 will hold an Indoor Flea Market on Sunday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The event will feature antiques, new and used items and “attic treasures.” Table cost is $10 each, with dealer setup to begin at 7 a.m. For infor­ mation call Irwin at (732) 787-2126. The post is located off Route 36 east in the Port Monmouth section of Middletown. Proceeds from the event will benefit needy veterans and the post’s community activity programs.

Deadline: March 30 Publication: April 7

Trip to K u ser Farm Mansion se t Sunday The Monmouth County Park System invites area residents to visit the Victorian splendor of Kuser Farm Mansion on Sunday. Participants will leave at 11 a.m. from Thompson Park, 805 Newman Springs Road, Lincroft. The group will re­ turn at approximately 6 p.m. A pay-yourown late lunch stop will be made along the way. The cost of the trip to western Monmouth County will be $24 per person and preregistration is required. For infor­ mation or registration, call (732) 842-4000 or (732) 219-9484 for the hearing im­ paired.

Nontraditional C a ree r Vernal Equinox Night Walk W orkshop se t fo r wom en kicks off this spring The Monmouth County Park System will sponsor a Nontraditional Career Workshop for Women of All Ages on March 25 from 7:30-9:30 p.m. The ses­ sion will be held at the Thompson Park Visitor Center, Newman Springs Road, Lincroft section of Middletown. The workshop will be led by Rita Freeborough, M.Ed., who will explain about high-wage, high-skilled non-traditional careers, concerns and types of train­ ing. The program fee is $15; prereg­ istration is required. For information or registration, call (732) 842-4000 or (732) 219-9484 for the hearing impaired.

S P E C IA L

The American Littoral Society and the National Park Service will host the first of three night walks to celebrate the changes in the seasons. Participants will meet on Sunday at 7 p.m. at Guardian Park in the Fort Hancock section of Sandy Hook. The guided hike will head toward the beach, the tip of the Hook - depending on weath­ er, wildlife and wind. Walkers should bring a flashlight and dress appropriately for the weather. The event is open to the public at no charge. For information, call the American Littoral Society at (732) 291-0055 or Sandy Hook Visitors Center at (732) 872-5970.

Deadline: April 13 Publication: April 21 T o A d In O T

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2 4

INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999

OPINION aUR VI EW

G e t th o s e t r a c k s f ix e d n o w he Middletown Board of Education made a mistake last year when it put fund­ ing for high school athletic repairs in a separate ballot ques­ tion. The board decided to lump money needed to refurbish the running tracks at both high schools and funding for other athletic field improvements together in a request for an extra $700,000. Voters passed the budget but passed on the athletic field money. It’s not clear why the board chose to put that particular fund­ ing outside the budget to avoid going over cap. Now, based on recent com­ ments by Karl Torchia, the Middletown High School South girls’ track coach, South’s track is so worn down it could lead to injuries. That’s an unacceptable situa­ tion, especially given the honors the girls distance medley relay team and other track and field

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athletes have brought home to South. It’s unacceptable regard­ less of the caliber of the athletes who depend on the track to hone track their skills. In urging board members to act quickly to get the tracks back into shape, Torchia reminded them that, “The kids in the last four years have won six state championships. They’ve put a lot into this, blood, sweat and tears, and they don’t ask for anything back.” Students’ safety, both in the classroom and on school grounds, should be a top priority for the board. It was a mistake to put funding for work the board knew had to be done outside the budget and then depend on vot­ ers to be extra generous with their tax dollars. Voters have been very gener­ ous in recent years. Worn down tracks that have the potential for causing injury are unacceptable and should not be funded as a separate measure outside the school budget.

Another farm lost to Holmdel developers his week the migratory birds flew low over my home, returning from locations South. They followed their early spring path to rest and recoup at Ackerson’s farm on Holmdel Road, as they and their ancestors had for so many years past. This year, however, instead of being greeted by cornstalks, they were met by bulldozers. You see, last week celebrated the “Grand Opening of Holmdel Ridge.” I could not help but reminisce walking this farm about one year ago. As I made my way down farm lanes, crossing old wooden bridges over active streams, I noted unique bayberry, large stands of white birch and apple trees and recall sighting a box turtle. It was memo­ rable because it was the only turtle I’ve seen in the wild in the last six years. It was still hibernating underground last month when the bulldozers and graders made their cuts. Once again, humans have changed the face of Holmdel and another bit of the magic is gone. Given the prices of these homes, it is not hard to imagine why our remaining open spaces are at risk. The original contract pur­ chaser, a local developer, made verbal promises and received vari­ ous concessions because he under­ stood the “character” of our town. After approvals he “flipped” the property to an out-of-town builder and walked away. I wonder if the new midwest developer under­ stands or cares about our “charac­ ter.” Yes, Virginia, there is money to be made in Holmdel.

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Don't forget Ab'deen so ccer field needs

Community responds to blood donor call

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n January Bayshore Commu­ nity Hospital, CentraState Medical Center and the Meridian Health System teamed up with Central Jersey Blood Center to raise awareness of the critical need for blood in a unique way. A special campaign was de­ veloped to help reach the goal of collecting 3,000 pints of blood during the month. Each donor filled out a gift tag that was placed on a stuffed teddy bear and 3,000 bears were given to various agen­ cies throughout the area - one bear representing one blood donor. Central Jersey Blood Center is proud to report that we surpassed this goal; our community re­ sponded when called upon. We would like to extend our sincere appreciation to the 3,100 blood and platelet donors who donated in January. Not only did their blood donation make a difference in someone’s life but they enabled a teddy bear to find a home with a child with cancer or other illness, a nursing home resident or some­ one living temporarily in a shelter. The response from the agencies has been heartwarming - such a small token can truly mean so much. We are fortunate to belong to a community that cares. We know that we can depend on these car­ ing individuals to continue assist­ ing us in fulfilling our lifesaving mission each and every month.

of our divisions last fall. If we receive more registrations than we anticipate this year, additional I find it ironic that as this farm children will be denied the is modernized, the builder publish­ he Aberdeen-Matawan opportunity to play. es directions from Garden State Soccer League (AMSL) These facts have been com­ Parkway Exit 114 instead of the recently learned that municated to the township man­ closer 117. This will bring po­ Aberdeen Township is applying ager and council in two separate tential buyers along the “rural and for a state grant of $455,000 to documents, one in July and an­ scenic” routes, away from the traf­ build roller hockey rinks, bleach­ other in October of 1998. usual fic and congestion which, in a few ers and a concession stand. While This state funding grant appli­ months, they will inevitably join we have no problem with, and in cation is especially disturbing in and contribute to. fact fully support, facilities for light of the fact that the AMSL W ES FAGAN the children who play roller has been trying to get something H olm del hockey, we feel that the AMSL much less grand for a long time. and its more than 600 children The township manager and coun­ are no less deserving. cil have met us with ambiva­ The AMSL has been working lence, rejection and interference with different Aberdeen at every turn. Not once during the Township councils for the past four years that we have attempted t this time of the year, I can’t help but think about four years to acquire soccer to get facilities has anyone from a former colleague of fields, and has proposed several the township mentioned any as potential sites. We grant money to help us. In fact, mine who is no longer with locations us. It was three years ago that Kathy have put a lot of effort into work­ money has always been men­ Weinstein was the victim of a ing cooperatively with the coun­ tioned as a limiting factor with carjacking/murder. Kathy was a cils and received firm promises every option discussed. caring teacher and a loving wife that our needs will be addressed. We have to question why, and mother. I often think of her; The councils have initially when the opportunity for a recre­ she will always be a part of the viewed each of these proposals as ation grant was presented to the viable; but after significant township, the decision was made Thome Middle School family. Last week I mentioned to one delays, all have been rejected for to write the application for roller of my classes that it was coming various reasons. The councils hockey facilities and completely up on the third anniversary of have proposed sites over the ignore soccer. In light of the time Mrs. Weinstein’s death. One of years also, but each of these we have spent with the township my students was surprised that I offers was rescinded. in our efforts to obtain soccer Three years ago we were facilities, we find it astonishing would use the word anniversary. This student felt that anniversary offered a soccer field at what we that they were not included in the meant a celebration, and why believe is the same location as grant application. the proposed roller hockey rink. would we be celebrating? When will the Aberdeen I pointed out that anniversary This proposal was retracted due Township manager and council also refers to commemorating to an engineer’s report stating the begin to honestly and sincerely someone’s life. Every year we property was surrounded by wet­ deal with the needs of our 600should commemorate Kathy’s lands and prone to flooding. plus children? We anxiously Our league is growing at a await their reply. life; we should honor her with our memories of who she was and the tremendous rate. We have experi­ DENNIS COSTA enced more than 35 percent legacy that she left behind. on b ehalf of the growth during the past two years. BETTE J . SHREIBER A b erd ee n-M a ta w an te ach er We’re at a point that we can sup­ S o ccer League B oard of T hom e M id d le School port only this year’s anticipated D irectors growth. The AMSL was forced M iddletow n A b erd ee n to establish a waiting list for one

LETTERS

Colleague recalls slain Thorne teacher

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MELISSA McGUIRE P ublic R elations and D eve lop m e nt D irector C entral Jersey B lood C enter S hrew sbury

poo. 7 */,3V/,q3.1."T,/ INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999 £ § 5

L e tte rs

Keyport m ust d rew on uniqueness in strategic feshlon eyport, like many other small about the professionalism of all involved communities across the country, is to anticipate a timely consensus of opin­ facing the prospect of rapid ion on doing what is best for the town and its future. One need look no further than change. Demographics shift, housing prices rise and fall with the economy, Red Bank to witness the transforming international events have an impact on our effect of a coordinated, merchant-backed, population and the new “affluence” of strategic plan for adapting to the realities many Americans make competition for of the marketplace. Keyport is competing for the attention retail “entertainment” strong. However, unlike many other of visitors — shoppers, boaters, sightseers communities, Keyport is willing to and others. Much like other commodities, embrace change and constantly strives to Keyport must “romance its brand” and remain competitive while retaining its draw on its uniqueness in a strategic, most precious commodity — small town coordinated fashion to attract the visitors ambiance and warmth. This is due in no needed to keep our businesses strong and small part to the continuing efforts of the our community engaged. The best way to borough and the enthusiastic volunteers in do this is with the creation of a BID and the Keyport Chamber of Commerce and the commitment of all involved to make it the Keyport Partnership Inc., especially work. If we focus on the outcomes — the recent efforts on behalf of the latter consistently stronger retail traffic, groups to create a Business Improvement involved citizens and a vital image for Keyport — we can continue to affect District (BID) in town. I’ve read with much interest the debate change in our borough, not wait for it to over BID and respect the rights of all in­ affect us. LOUISE HORGAN volved to voice their opinion in open and Keyport honest dialogue. I also know enough

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Frank B eirn e's Irish humor w ill be m issed

Your family has lived in New Jersey at least 3 months prior to application

May the road rise to meet you; is golden, fluid and often May the wind be always be at your back; controversial pen is silent. His fine May the sunshine warm your face, Irish homespun humor will no longer be shared. We have all lost a lovingthe rain fall soft upon your fields. And until we meet again, may God and wonderful husband, father, brother, hold you in the palm of His hand. uncle and friend. KATHLEEN BEIRNE WIGGINTON Frank Beirne’s superb gift of gab, en­ (niece of Frank Beirne of Leonardo joyed by many, disputed by few, will be who die d Feb. 20) remembered by all. A tlantic H igh la nd s So in closing may I share:

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Or write to: Catastrophic Illness in Children Relief Fund Commission, NJ Department of Human Services, PO Box 700, Trenton, NJ 08625-0700

F liers spren d m isinlorm etion in Holmdel It is crucial for residents to remember t a very emotional Holmdel Township Committee meeting two important things when seeking infor­ March 8, the committee expressed mation on township policy. First, no indi­ disappointment at those responsiblevidual for or member of any group is account­ two misleading fliers sent to Holmdel res­ able for their own actions. As experienced at the meeting, they can say whatever they idents. One flier was mailed to residents by a want, confuse the public, have their own group headed by Sam Shramko, Citizens interest at heart and not be accountable. for Informed Land Use. The other flier This is why non-elected officials are not was stuffed in mailboxes and authored by authorized to set township policy. This is an unknown person. Attached to it was a why township policy should not be put to petition implying that the Township Com­ public vote. Second, Holmdel has five elected offi­ mittee was not following required proce­ dures. The author was unaware that proce­ cials who are accountable. It is the five dures are always followed. The truth is - elected officials of Holmdel’s Township no matter what angry or uninformed com­ Committee who are authorized to set town­ ments are made - the present Holmdel ship policy. This allows for efficient gov­ Township Committee has never acted ernment because each committee member contrary to township government policy has the ability and responsibility to consider all relevant and reliable data, inform the procedure. Citizens for Informed Land Use is public, consider public suggestions and believed to be a group of concerned concerns, examine all underlying details, Holmdel residents acting in the best inter­ consider short- and long-term effects on est of the township by keeping citizens Holmdel’s qualify of life and act in the best well-informed about the development of interest of the entire township. HELEN GIANNONE Holmdel properties. This is where the H olm del danger lies.

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LETTERS POLI CY If you have something to say, the Independent wants to hear from you. Whether it be in response to something you read in the Independent or an issue that concerns you, send us a letter for publication. Letters to the editor will be published weekly on the editorial page. All letters should be typed or neatly printed and must include a daytime telephone number, at which the writer may be reached for verification. Letters should be as concise as possible. The Independent reserves the right to edit all letters for grammar, spelling, length and ques­ tionable content. Because this is your newspaper, the Independent urges you to get involved. Keep us informed of your feelings and concerns so we can keep you better informed of the events that affect your life. Letters may be mailed to: Letters to the Editor, Independent, P.O. Box 1080, East Brunswick, NJ 08816; or they may be faxed to (732) 254-0486.

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INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOAn n Liberty Hose schedules Spring Fling Boutique The Liberty Hose Fire Company, Highway 36 in Keyport, will hold Spring Fling Craft/Candy Boutique on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Somethin’ Seasonal will host the event with displays from several vendors. Pictures with the Easter Bunny will be available from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. for $1 each. An Easter bas­ ket will also be raffled off to benefit the fire company.

Keyport Senior Center o ffe rs 5 5 Alive co u rse The Keyport Senior Citizen Center will offer an American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) 55 Alive Defensive Driver Course on March 25 and 26. Upon completion of the two-day course, students will receive a Certificate of Completion, which may entitle them to a 5 percent discount on the major portion of their automobile insurance premium for three years. Also, two points will be deducted from their motor vehicle record if applicable. Membership in AARP is not required to participate but preregistration is necessary. The cost will be $8 for in­ class instruction only; no written tests are given. The senior center is located at 110 Second St., Keyport. For information or registration, call Wendy Tooker at (732) 264-4916. AND THE WINNER IS ... — Elizabeth McKeown, 17, was the big winner in the Middletown Parks and Recreation Department’s combination 26th annual Youth Art Show and 42nd annual Adult Art Show held March 6-7 at the Croydon Hall gymnasium. Elizabeth won first place in acrylics and watercolors, an honorable mention in General Media, and Youth Best in Show.

T H E W

L U C K Y

IN N E R S

A R E *25 h a s b e e n

awarded to each our winners’

Fire auxiliary w ill host E aster Bunny B reak fast The Keyport Fire Patrol Ladies Auxiliary will host a Breakfast with the Easter Bunny on March 27 from 9-11 a.m. at the fire house, located at the comers of First and Waverly streets. Cost will be $5 per adult and $3 per child. For informa­ tion, call (732) 264-3875.

Towns o ffer fre e spring rab ies clm ics

The Matawan Department of Health announced the following free rabies clinics. • Matawan Borough: April 8 from 6-8 p.m. at Hook & Ladder Fire Company, 161 Broad St. • Keyport Borough: April 24 from 10 a.m. to noon at Department of Public Works Garage, Beers and Francis Place • Holmdel Township: May 1 from 8:30­ 11 a.m. at Holmdel Township Department of Public Works Garage, Crawfords Comer Road • Keansburg Borough: May 15 from 9 a.m. to noon at Department of Public Works Garage, Frazee Place

N early New Toy and Bake Sale se t fo r Saturday

The Presbyterian Nursery School will hold its ninth annual Nearly New Toy and Bake Sale on Saturday from 9 a.m. to noon in Fellowship Hall at the school, located at 33 Route 34 in Matawan. Featured will be toys, games, puzzles, books, baby items and more. Homebaked goods will also be sold.

R egister fo r CPR certification co u rse The American Heart Association’s Heart Saver Course, including Adult Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Certification, will be available at the First Presbyterian Church of Matawan on March 24 from 7-9:30 p.m. The course will be taught by a Bayshore Community Hospital employee, reviewing heart disease, risk fac­ tors, signs of a heart attack, actions for sur­ vival and obstructed airway techniques. The certification fee is $30; preregistration is required. For information, call the church office, located at 883 Route 34 in Matawan, at (732) 566-2663. Refreshments will be provided by the Board of Deacons of the church, the sponsor of the event.

GFWC Woman's Chib will H adassah ch apter to hold hold card p arty M arch 26 Chinese auction Thursday The GFWC Woman’s Club will hold a Whist card party on March 26 at the club house, located at 199 Jackson St., Matawan. The public is invited to attend. A $3 donation is requested. The group holds regular meetings on the first and third Mondays of the month at the club­ house. New members are invited to attend. For information, call Kathy at (732) 739-6690.

The Matawan-Aberdeen Chapter of Hadassah will hold a Chinese auction Thursday at Lakeside Manor, Route 36, Hazlet. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m. Admission tickets are $3.50 and are avail­ able in advance or at the door. The event will feature raffles, door prizes and a 50/50 raffle. Free starter tickets, coffee and homebaked cake will be provided. For informa­ tion, call Hilda at (732) 727-6571.

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INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999 2 7

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOA League of Women V oters seek input on land u se The Monmouth County League of Women Voters will hold a roundtable dis­ cussion of “Critical Land Use Challenges in Monmouth County” on April 14 from 7:30-9:30 p.m. at Brookdale Community College in Lincroft. In preparation for the event, the league is surveying municipali­ ties and county agencies to note a range of opinion on certain questions. Although each municipality is unique, the league is looking for patterns of concern so the panelists can effectively address the issues. Responses from the public to the fol­ lowing questions are requested: • what are the major impediments to sound land use planning; • who has the most influence in land use decisions; • do you think the state plan will bene­ fit youf community - if so, how; • is your community concerned about its drinlang water quality; • do you think there is enough commu­ nication between municipalities on plan­ ning issues; • what is your community’s major traf­ fic problem; and • what planning goals and procedures does your community have in place to protect your watersheds, wetlands, wood­ lands and open space. Responses should be addressed to: Monmouth County League of Women Voters, P.O. Box 7649, Shrewsbury, NJ 07702. Indicate the municipality to better correlate the information. Panelists will help citizens understand how zoning can have unintended local and regional consequences for drinking water, traffic, schools, sewers, open space and taxes. The discussion will also exam­ ine how residents can more effectively participate in the decision-making process. Early registration is suggested; seating will be limited. To register, call (732) 224-2880 and register for “Course XGENL003.”

Poison Prevention Week slated fo r next w eek

Assemblyman Michael J. Amone (RMonmouth) reminds Monmouth County residents that March 21-27 is National Poison Prevention Week. Since the obser­ vance began 37 years ago, accidental poi­ sonings have dropped from 450 in 1962 to 29 in 1995. For information on how to poison proof a home, call the New Jersey Poison Information and Education System at I- 8OO-POISON-I.

Middletown Lions Club celeb rates 5 3 y e a rs

A TASTE OF PHYS ED. — A recent Family Fun Night at Middle Road School in Hazlet featured a sampling of activities students enjoy in their physical education classes that ranged from rope climbing to bean bag throwing to jumping rope. Parents were warned that if something appeared too strenuous, they should just watch their child and save themselves for the juggling room.

$ 1.5 M In funds to go to w ard public housing

V eterans to m eet at Fort Monmouth M arch 2 5

Sometime in the spring nearly $1.5 million in new funds will become avail­ able for housing programs administered by the Monmouth County Public Housing Agency. Its Family Unification Program, which reunites abused or neglected children with their parents after counseling and intervention, will fund 75 rent subsidies totaling $663,045. The new Mainstream Program will subsidize rent and social services for 100 disabled people with $730,604. The certified HUD Housing Counseling Program receives $20,000 to support staff costs. This service provides landlord and tenant counseling, mortgage default and rental eviction intervention services, pre­ purchase mortgage counseling and reverse equity mortgage counseling to county residents. The Family Self-Sufficiency Program - offering Section 8 tenants the opportu­ nity to enhance job skills, secure employ­ ment, access services and build an escrow account toward tuition or home owner­ ship - has received $45,000 to support social work staff costs.

The Veterans/Battle of the Bulge (VBOB) will meet at Fort Monmouth’s Lane Hall on March 25 at 11:30 a.m. Lunch will be served and the cost is $9. The chapter seeks associate members, veterans, non-veterans and their relatives. For information, call (732) 264-5447.

The Middletown Lions Club, a community-minded service organization chartered in 1946, is in its 53rd year. New members are invited to join. The club helps hundreds of people in need of eye examinations and provides glasses and eye care for those who require funding. It provides scholarships for area youth in Middletown high schools; spon­ sors candidates to Boys and Girls State yearly; makes annual donations to Camp Happiness in the Leonardo section of Middletown; and contributes to The Rainbow Foundation and New Jersey Eye Bank. Donations are also made to Middletown Helps Its Own and members deliver food baskets to the needy at Thanksgiving and Christmas yearly. The club holds several “Ladies Nites” dinner dance social affairs and holds an annual children’s Christmas Party dinner where each child receives a gift from Santa. Art Wildanger, an active participating member, is the only living charter mem­ ber. The club meets on the first and third Tuesdays of the month at the Lincroft Inn, located at 700 Newman Springs Road, in the Lincroft section of Middletown. For information, call (732) 615-0510. Lions Club International is the largest service organization in the world with 1,408,332 members in 44,198 clubs in 185 countries.

S T . J O S E P H S C H U R C H P A R IS H

Presents L IV E A N D

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T H E SAL R U SSO B A N D • F e a tu rin g B re n t Come join us for a full evening o f dancing, romance and fun. Sal Russo and his band will entertain you before and after the Johnny Maestro & Brooklyn Bridge concert.....Dancing all night long. Watch St. Joseph’s auditorium be transformed into a nightclub & concert hall for the evening.

Municipal Court Automobile Accidents Criminal Law

U N L E S S

R E C O V E R

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Purchase tickets at: Rectory; 376 Maple Place, Keyport Just Hockey: (732) 566-9494

D R E S S T O IM P R E S S L ite F o o d & R e fr e s h m e n ts A v a ila b le

2 8

INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999

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e C hildren’s Art: R eflections on Egypt; Buried T reasure

T h e a te r

works by children in grades one th rough six th ro ug h April 18 admission : $4 lo w e r Gallery M onm outh Museum Brookdale Com m unity College Newman Springs Rd., Lincroft (732) 747-2266

S now W hite, The Musical presented by Marlboro Players March 19 and 20 at 7:30 p.m. March 21 at 2 p.m. Dugan School Topanemus Road, Marlboro tickets: $13; child $11 (732) 972-7217

P e te r an d th e Wolf presented by Paper Moon M arionette Theatre Sat. through May 29 at 2:30 p.m. tickets: $6 First Avenue Playhouse First Ave., Atlantic Highlands (732) 291-7552

42nd s tr e e t presented by Theatre Society & Music Dept, o f Marlboro H.S. Route 79 March 19, 20 at 8 p.m. tickets: $8; $6 seniors & MHS students; $4 under 10 (732)617-8393, ext 8566

P e te r Pan

The P ajam a C am e musical comedy March 18,19,20 at 8 p.m. perform ed by Pegasus Production Company Henderson Theatre Christian Brothers Academy Newman Springs Rd., Lincroft tickets: $12; $11 seniors; $10, students; $9 under 12 (732)758-1118

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The N ightingale musical adaptation o f the Hans Christian Andersen tale March 21 at 1 p.m. tickets: $10, $12 State Theatre Livingston Ave., New Brunswick (732) 246-7469

O rdinary p eo p le presented by South St. Players Fri. and Sat 7:30 p.m. dinner Clarksburg Inn Routes 524 & 571 Millstone tickets: $30 dinner/show (732) 462-4329

B rothers by Dave Williams Thurs., Fri. & Sat. th rough March 27 tickets: $12 or $18 fo r dessert and show dinner package w ith Wild Scallion Restaurant available First Avenue Playhouse First Ave., Atlantic Highlands (732)291-7552

Godspell 1960s musical based on Gospel o f St. Matthew presented by RTG Productions th ro ug h April 4 Fri. & Sat., 8 p.m.. Sun., 3 p.m. Royale Theatre 42 M onm outh St., Red Bank tickets: $18 (732) 219-0081

H edda Gabler Henrik Ibsen drama presented by Two River Theatre Co. March 18-28 Wed. th ro ug h Fri. at 8 p.m. Sat. at 8:30 p.m. Sun. at 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. Algonquin Arts Theatre 171 Main St., Manasquan tickets: $18-$30 (732) 345-1400

Ends two-character drama by New Jersey Repertory Co. Lumia Theater 179 Broadway, Long Branch Fri.-Sun. th ro u g h March 28 Fri. at 8 p.m.; Sat. at 2 & 8 p.m.; Sun. at 2 and 7 p.m. tickets: $20-$36 (732) 229-3166

presented by the Calliope Storybook Theatre Company March 20, 21, 27, 28 at 2 p.m. doors open at 1 p.m. Club Bene Children's Theatre Route 35, South Amboy admission: $6 (732) 727-3000

M u s ic

"Jesus Christ Superstar" will be performed at the Count Basie Theatre on the weekends of March 19 and 26. Awake a n d Sing Clifford Odets classic Fri. and Sat. 7:30 p.m. dessert; 8 p.m. show March 21, 3:30 p.m. show Jewelbox Theatre Seaview Square Mall Ocean tickets:$15; $12 in advance (732) 922-1243

Jesu s Christ S u p e rsta r Andrew Lloyd Weber's rock musical presented by Phoenix Productions March 19, 20, 2 6 & 2 7 at 8 p.m. March 21 and 28 at 3 p.m. Count Basie Theatre Red Bank tickets: $16 - $22 (732) 747-0014

P assion Play presented by th e youth o f St. Agnes parish and th eir friends March 19, 26 and 28 at 8 p.m. St. Agnes Church First Ave., Atlantic Highlands donation: $3; $1 students (732) 291-0272

The s e c r e t G arden presented by Spring Lake Theatre Co. refreshments, g ift auction to benefit Howell H.S.Drama Club March 20 at 6:30 p.m. Spring Lake Com m unity House Third & Madison, Spring Lake tickets: $25 (732) 938-7341 or 938-5583

S p e c ia l E v e n ts G allagher comedian March 19 at 8 p.m. Paramount Theatre Main Street, Asbury Park tickets: $23 fo r all seats valet parking available (732) 775-2100

M onm outh Festival o f Arts a rt exhibit, dem onstrations March 20, gala opening 7:30-10:30 p.m. March 21,12:30-8:30 p.m. March 22-24,9:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m. M onm outh Reform Temple 332 Hance Ave., Tinton Falls tickets: $6; $3 seniors/students gala opening: $35 (732) 747-8278

F o r

Brian Lynch Q u in tet Jazz C oncert March 21 at 2 p.m. Eastern Branch o f M onm outh County Library 1001 Route 35, Shrewsbury Free o f charge (732) 431-7242

An Evening o f Celtic Music perform ed by Navesink Ensemble & Friends, consist­ ing o f five musicians w ho play six sizes o f recorders, the harp, violin, piano and percus­ sion instruments; music fro m medieval tim es to present March 18 at 7:30 p.m. Middletown Township Public Library 55 New M onm outh Road free program (732) 671-3700

M onm outh S ym phony O rchestra in C oncert conducted by Steven A. Gosewisch Concerto in F Major fo r 'Two Horns' by Vivaldi; 'N ight on Bald M ountain' by Mussorgsky; 'Hungarian Dances' by Brahms; and 'Symphony No. 7' in A Major by Beethoven March 21 at 2:30 p.m. Paramount Theater Boardwalk at Sunset Avenue Asbury Park tickets: $18; $14, seniors; free fo r school-age children (732) 918-6676

S en tim en tal Jo u rn ey big band music March 21 at 3 p.m. Howell Public Library Old Tavern Road free concert (732) 363-6084

E x h ib its H olocaust Exhibit exhibit o f works on the Holocaust by contem porary artists th ro ug h March 20 Brookdale Com m unity College's Center fo r Visual Arts Newman Springs Rd., Lincroft (732)224-2618

A rtw ork by T heresa P ezzu tti & D orothy Law rence th rough March 28 Visitor Center Thompson Park Newman Springs Rd„ Lincroft (732) 842-4000

P h o to g ra p h y o f Todd A. R eigert photos display features nature scenes and people th rough th e end o f March M iddletown Township Public Library New M onm outh Rd. (732) 671-3700

P h o to g ra p h s by Rosalie S herm an th rough March 30 Holmdel Branch o f M onm outh County Library 4 Crawfords Corner Road, (732)431-7251

K id s

Aladdin an d th e Magic Lava Lamp - An in teractiv e Rock 'N' Roll Fairy Tale m odern day fairy tale Sat. & Sun. through April 25 at 1 p.m. Jewelbox Theatre Seaview Square Mall Ocean Township tickets: $7; $6 in advance (732)922-1243

"Passion Play" will be presented on March 19,26 and 28 at St. Agnes Church.

INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999 2 9

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Macular degeneration may occur in two forms n recent years, patients have devel­ oped a much greater awareness of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), a retinal disease that has caused visual loss or legal blindness in more than 10 million Americans. The macula is a small area inside the back of the eye in the exact center of the retina. It is from this area that we are able to distinguish the finest details of vision due to the high concentration of cells called cones, that also enable us to see in color. As we grow older, changes may take place in the macula that cause central vision to become blurred or distorted, although peripheral vision remains intact. This condition has become known as agerelated macular degeneration, and may eventually result in central blind spots, loss of color vision, and loss of the abili­ ty to read, distinguish fine details and drive safely. Although the actual cause of ARMD has not been determined, studies have identified a number of risk factors. These include gender (females have a higher rate of ARMD), light iris color, exposure VISION CHECK — A doctor a t Millennium Eye Care, Freehold, tests a to sunlight, smoking, elevated total cho­ p atien t’s eyesight. lesterol, hypertension, and alcohol con­ When looking at the white dot in the cen­ deposited in high concentration in the sumption. There is a tendency for macu­ ter of the grid, lines in the surrounding macular region of the retina. Smoking lar degeneration to run in some families, area may appear broken, missing, wavy, may inhibit the action of antioxidants and although its genetic pattern is not under­ or distorted. Color vision may also be prevent them from reaching the macula. stood. affected. Abnormal blood vessels and Specially-formulated nutritional supple­ Macular degeneration may occur in fluid leakage in the macular area can be ments that contain antioxidants such as two different forms. At present, there is detected with fluorescein angiography, a Vitamins C and E, the carotenoids lutein no way of treating the more common technique in which a fluorescent dye is and zeaxanthin, the minerals selenium atrophic or “dry” form, which causes a injected into the arm and photographs and zinc, which help enzymes in the eye gradual loss of vision due to thinning of are taken of the eye as the dye circulates to neutralize free radicals, are currently the macular tissues. This form usually through the macular blood vessels. being recommended by many eye spe­ does not cause complete loss of central cialists, especially for those whose pre­ Preventing macular degeneration vision. The “wet” type of macular degen­ Patients often ask, “What steps can I ferred diet may not include the fruits and eration, often called exudative macular take to prevent macular degeneration?” or vegetables that contain these substances. degeneration, occurs when abnormal “Can I keep my vision from becoming Studies are under way to determine how blood vessels that have formed in the worse?” Perhaps the single most impor­ much protection is afforded by the rec­ back of the eye leak serum or blood that tant step that people can take is limiting ommended foods and nutritional supple­ causes the layers of the retina to separate. exposure to sunlight by wearing sun­ ments and whether there is any risk of The loss of central vision from this type glasses or a hat to filter blue light and adverse side effects. of macular degeneration may be sudden, reduce the potential damage from free living w ith macular degeneration rapid and severe. In its early stages, “wet” radicals that are induced by light. Some Although medical treatment of macu­ macular degeneration may be controlled researchers and physicians feel that a lar degeneration is limited to patients with laser treatments, which destroy class of chemicals known as antioxidants with early stages of the “wet” form, there abnormal blood vessels and repair weak may help to protect the macula and are many optical devices and support ser­ areas of the macula. Although this treat­ reduce the damaging effects of free radi­ vices available that can help motivated ment will not restore vision that has cals. patients continue many of their daily already been lost, it can slow the rate of Antioxidants occur in nutrients found activities. “Low vision aids” include spe­ degeneration. in dark green leafy vegetables, such as cial glasses, hand and stand magnifiers, Diagnosing macular degeneration spinach, kale and collard greens. These large-print editions of books, magazines, A simple test, viewing a grid-like pat­ compounds, lutein and zeuxanthin, are and newspapers, closed-circuit television, tern, will detect early macular changes. carried through the bloodstream and specially designed lamps and telescopic

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devices. Books on tape are available from local libraries, and the Lighthouse catalog lists watches, clocks, and many household devices that will help patients with macular degeneration maintain a useful lifestyle. Macular degeneration will leave a patient partially sighted, but not blind, and peripheral vision will be unaf­ fected. A look to the future Current research is focusing on ways to both prevent ARMD and to restore vision in those whose sight has already been affected. Photodynamic therapy is a procedure that directs a low intensity laser on a light-sensitive dye in the abnormal macular blood vessels of the macula, triggering a chemical reaction that destroys the abnormal vessels. Other studies are aimed at transplanting retinal cells or using the drug thalidomide, which blocks vessel development, to prevent the growth of abnormal blood vessels in wet ARMD. Macular transloca­ tion, a highly experimental surgical pro­ cedure that allows the eye to transmit images to the brain from the macula by moving it away from the underlying dis­ eased area, has achieved some success in limited trials. Researchers are focusing on new technologies, such as the develop­ ment of new stains and dyes for studying eye tissue, advances in microscopes, and greater insight into the functions and abnormalities of the human eye through immunological and molecular tech­ niques. As advances in medicine extend our life span, more people will develop symptoms of ARMD. At the present time, early implementation of steps to prevent or reduce the risk of macular degenera­ tion, including proper diet, nutritional supplements, protection against sunlight, maintenance of normal blood pressure and cholesterol levels, and avoidance of tobacco products are proactive measures that everyone can adopt. Comprehensive eye examinations in a practice with a reti­ nal subspecialist will identify problems and establish a course of prevention or treatment for patients who are concerned about developing or have already been diagnosed with age-related macular degeneration. This article w as p ro vid ed by Millennium Eye Care, with offices a t 5 0 0 W. Main St, Freehold, Hightstown, Brick a n d Lone Branch. To reach the office, call (732) 462-8707.

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Routine self-exams can detect oral cancer By Dr. Brian Krost ral cancer will be diagnosed in an estimated 30,000 Americans this year and will cause approx­ imately 8,000 deaths. But with detection and timely treatment, deaths from oral cancer can be dramatically reduced. Early detection of oral cancer is often possible. Tissue changes in the mouth that might signal the beginnings of cancer often can be seen and felt easily. Each of us must be aware of the possible signs and symptoms of oral cancer and should report any changes prompdy to our family dentist or oral surgeon. Performing a self-examination regularly will help in early recognition. M onthly routine Oral surgeons suggest that everyone do an oral cancer self-exam monthly. If you are at high risk for oral cancer. — smoker, drinker, user of smokeless tobacco —. you should also schedule an annual exam with your oral surgeon. Warning signs Two changes in ' the mouth that could be warning signs of oral cancer are white patches or reddish patches. Other possible signs or symptoms of oral cancer include a lump or thicken­ ing in the oral soft tissues, soreness or a feeling that something is caught in the throat, difficulty chewing , or swallow­ ing, ear pain, difficulty moving the jaw or tongue, numbness of the tongue or other areas of the mouth, or swelling of the jaw that causes dentures to fit poor­ ly or become uncomfortable. Any of these warning signs that per­ sist for more than two weeks should be evaluated by your oral surgeon. A thor­ ough clinical examination and laborato­ ry test as necessary should be per­ formed. If a biopsy is recom m ended If a sign or symptom is identified your oral surgeon may suggest a biop­ sy. This simple procedure is most fre­ quently done right- in the office. It involves the removal of a small piece of the suspicious tissue. The piece is then sent to a laboratory for microscopic examination in order to make an accu­ rate diagnosis of the problem. The biopsy report not only helps in estab­

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lishing a diagnosis, but also enables the doctor to make a treatment plan specif­ ically designed for the type of cancer diagnosed. Your sim ple self-exam To complete an oral self-examina­ early tion, you will need a bright light and mirror. • Remove any dentures. • Look at and fed the inside of your lips, top and bottom, • tilt your head back to look at and feel the roof of your mouth, • pull your cheek out to see the inside and also to see the back gums, • put out your tongue, looking at all the surfaces including each side and the floor of the mouth, • feel for lumps or enlarged lymph nodes (glands) in both sides of the neck and under the lower jaw Risk factors A number of factors may contribute to the development of oral cancer. These include: tobacco and excessive use of alcohol. Those at a specially high risk of con­ tracting oral cancer are males over 40 years of age who are combination heavy drinkers and smokers, or users of smokeless tobacco. The heat generated by smoking pipe and cigars can also irritate the mouth and lead to lip can­ cer. The sun — Frequent, unprotected exposure to sunlight has been identi­ fied as a risk factor for lip cancer. Aging — Oral cancer is typically a disease of older people usually because of their longer exposure to risk factors. Incidence of oral cancer rises steadily with age, reaching a peak in persons aged 65-74. Each of us should make the oral self-exam a regular feature of our per­ sonal health routine. Many oral lesions are benign and your doctor will use topical treatment and oral rinses to treat these. But don’t ignore any suspicious lumps or sores. Early detection of precancerous and malignant lesions is the key to full recovery. Dr. Brian Krost is a board-certified oral surgeon and partner at the Center for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery with offices in Freehold, Hazlet and Ocean ' Township.

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conceptions and alarming findings from includes a breast exam, but rarely, if ever, sure. Women must “Take Charge!” of their the national survey, last year the does the cardiovascular system get the lives and be aware of their personal risk omen are facing a “silent epi­ American Heart Association launched a same level of attention. Women must factors, and the warning signs and signals demic.” Heart disease and multi-year, national, women’s heart dis­ “Take Charge!” They must be assertive. of heart attack and stroke. With an aging stroke kill more than 500,000 ease and stroke campaign called “Take And being assertive means a woman baby-boomer population it’s more impor­ women in the United States every year to Heart.” Take Wellness to needs to ask her health care provider tant than ever that patients, health care Wellness — more than all forms of cancer, chron­ Heart is designed to improve women’s about her risk for heart disease and providers, health maintenance organiza­ ic lung disease, pneumonia, diabetes, awareness about the true extent of their stroke and what she can do to lower that tions and pharmacies become partners in accidents and AIDS combined. Yet a risk of heart disease and stroke, and to risk. If gynecologists would include the prevention of cardiovascular disease myth persists that women have some increase awareness among health care assessments of heart disease and stroke and in the management of cardiovascular innate protection against heart attacks. professionals and the public about risk as part of their routine examinations, health. This type of collaborative Every year since 1984, more women than women, heart disease and stroke and the it would be an enormous boost to public approach can only help reduce hospital­ men have died from cardiovascular dis­ unique signs and signals for women. izations and improve recovery from ill­ health. eases. Yet a myth persists that heart dis­ For decades cardiovascular research, The magnitude of this “silent epidem­ ness. ease is a man’s problem. diagnosis and prevention focused on ic” in women necessitates a strong Nancy Redeker, Ph.D., R.N., is chair­ According to a 1997 national survey men. Fortunately that is changing. emphasis on awareness, prevention and w om an o f the A m erican H eart of women, commissioned by the Typically in this country, health care for patient adherence to treatment recom­ Association’s New Jersey Take Wellness to American Heart Association, although women has been fragmented, with many mendations. Such recommendations are Heart Coalition, a member o f the board o f nearly twice as many women die from women using their gynecologist as their likely to include an emphasis on low fat, directors o f the A m erican H eart cardiovascular disease than from all primary doctor and others using a gener­ low cholesterol diets, increased physical Association Heritage Affiliate a n d associ­ forms of cancer, including breast cancer, al practitioner. Many women receive rou­ activity, smoking cessation, weight reduc­ ate professor, College o f Nursing, Rutgers only 8 percent of U.S. women consider tine gynecological care, which often tion and treatment of high blood pres­ University. heart disease and stroke as their greatest health threats. That women of all ages and ethnic backgrounds don’t fear heart disease and stroke in the same way that they fear cancer is a major public health H e lp a d d L y m e D is e a s e to th e problem, because it means that they may not be doing everything they can to pre­ lis t o f c o n q u e r e d d is e a s e s . vent cardiovascular disease. The American Heart Association survey also indicated that 91 percent of women P r o te c t y o u r s e lf a n d y o u r fa m ily w ith th e would be comfortable discussing disease prevention and treatment options with their doctors, but only 30 percent L y m e D is e a s e V a c c in e recalled their doctors discussing heart disease and stroke in the past 12 months. It is time for women to “Take Charge!” fro m E M O M e d ic a l C a r e .. of their lives by taking charge of their cardiovascular health. Nearly 16,000 New Y o u r N e ig h b o rh o o d D o c to r Jersey women will die this year from heart disease and stroke. Coronary heart disease is the No. 1 killer of American N o a p p o in tm e n t n e e d e d women. Stroke is the No. 3 killer of American women and the leading cause of serious, long-term disability. “Take Charge!” means that we as women need to learn about risk factors and warning signs of heart disease and stroke, and we need to take action to A N A M E Y OU ’V E T R U S T E D F O R Y EA RS eliminate all controllable or changeable risk factors from our lives. Controllable risk factors include smoking, high blood RT. 35 & KINGS HWY. • MIDDLETOWN • 957-0707 • OPEN 365 Days A Year • OPEN 8 am-10 pm cholesterol, high blood pressure, physi­ cal inactivity, obesity and diabetes mellitus. Now, more than ever, women must take responsibility for their own and their families’ health care. Women need to begin talking with their health care providers about heart disease and stroke and their personal risk factors. In response to the many myths, misO C E A N F I T N E S S C E N T E R

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or the fourth consecutive year, representing minor deviations from Monmouth Medical Center’s com­ MQSA standards. Under MQSA, no mammography prehensive breast center in Long facility may operate unless it is accred­ Brancc has been commended by feder­ al regulators for being in total compli­ ited and certified as meeting federal ance with stringent guidelines that quality standards. The two-day MQSA monitor the performance quality of inspection examines the areas under the auspices of three different profes­ mammography. The Jacqueline M. Wilentz sionals responsible for mammography Comprehensive Breast Center, which — the medical physicist, interpreting opened on the medical center campus physician and quality control technolo­ in January 1994, recently passed the gist. Monmouth’s breast center includes a annual Food and Drug Administration (FDA) inspection without a single vio­ comprehensive mammography service, lation — a success accomplished by certified by the American College of less than 20 percent of the more than Radiology, offering routine screening 2,000 facilities in the country inspected mammography for women without symptoms and diagnostic mammogra­ by the FDA. In order to ensure that tumors are phy for those with symptoms. Six certi­ not missed due to poor mammography fied mammographers are members of film quality, the Mammography Quality the breast center staff and are available Standards Act (MQSA) mandates annu­ at all times to conduct mammograms, al inspection of any facilities perform­ and two fellowship-trained radiologists ing mammograms. Inspections began in read the results at the time of the exam­ ination. The medical physicist is 1995 under the auspices of the FDA. “The federal government thought it responsible for the calibration of the would be prudent to create a system mammography units. The first of its kind in Monmouth with minimum standards for facilities that perform mammography,” says and Ocean counties, the 7,000Thomas Piccoli, medical physicist at square-foot comprehensive breast cen­ Monmouth Medical Center, an affiliate ter, which was named among the top of the Saint Barnabas Health Care 10 breast cancer centers in the country System. “Mammography is such a sensi­ by Self, a national women’s magazine, tive diagnostic procedure, and the FDA joins together in one location preven­ felt that, potentially, a lot of women tive, diagnostic, treatment and rehabili­ were going to be misdiagnosed due to tative services in a comfortable and mammograms not being performed supportive environment. according to uniformly high standards. In New Jersey, an estimated 6,200 And as a result of MQSA, many facilities women were diagnosed with breast simply stopped performing mammogra­ cancer in 1998, and the disease claimed phy because they knew they could not the lives of some 1,500 New Jersey comply with the new standards.” women last year, according to the There are four possible outcomes of American Cancer Society. The U.S. an MQSA inspection. A facility with no Public Health Service believes that observed deviations receives a “no find­ widespread screening of women at the ings” ratings, while a facility cited with appropriate age, followed by prompt deviations receives ratings ranging from treatment when cancerous tumors are Level 1 — reserved for the most serious found, can reduce breast cancer deaths noncompliance issues — to Level 3 — by as much as 30 percent.

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Jail Industry program unveiled FREEHOLD — At a press conference held earlier this month at the Monmouth County Correctional Institution, Sheriff Joseph W. Oxley unveiled the county’s first Jail Industry program. Through a partnership between the New Jersey Department of Corrections and the county correctional institution, the Jail Industry program was created to produce a variety of textiles and hard goods for the state using county inmate labor. To help meet the demand for products, the New Jersey Department of Corrections, through its Bureau of State Use Industries (DEPTCOR), contracted with Monmouth County to manufacture such items as aprons, boxer shorts, laundry bags, highway brushes and toilet brushes. In the inaugural stages of the program, inmates at the county institution will pro­ duce boxer shorts, highway brushes and toi­ let brushes. Through this cooperative effort, the county institution established an in-house production facility, while DEPTCOR pro­ vided all of the necessary training, equip­ ment, supplies, and raw materials, to manu­ facture the products in accordance with state specifications and quality standards. The finished products are inventoried and shipped to DEPTCOR, which, in turn, pays Monmouth County on a monthly basis for each item produced. Corrections Officer Anthony Kowalski has been assigned to serve as the project manager and oversees production. To help ensure the effectiveness and success of the program, Kowalski underwent two weeks of training in production shop management, sewing machine operation, record keeping, shipping, packaging and garment assembly. Presently, there are 13 inmates who meet the proper classification standards and

have demonstrated an aptitude for textile production enrolled in the program. The Jail Industry is the highest-paying job at the county correctional institution. Inmates can work up to five days a week, earning 28 cents an hour. In addition to earning an honest wage, work opportunities such as Jail Industry can foster a sense of self-worth in inmates and provide them with skills that can be used after incarcera­ tion. With minimal start-up costs, the pro­ gram literally pays for itself. Money paid by DEPTCOR for finished goods are used to help defray the costs of the project manager and the inmates. “By sharing services and forming part­ nerships, programs such as the Jail Industry yield a positive impact on virtually every level,” said Gary Hilton, director of the Monmouth County Correctional Institution. “From running a cost-effective program to developing work skills, it is an integral component of the rehabilitation process. Through productive outlets, inmates take a pride in the work they do and perhaps more importantly, in themselves,” Hilton noted. Monmouth is the third county in the state to implement a Jail Industry program. Presently, Sussex and Camden counties are both operating successful and viable Jail Industry programs in conjunction with DEPTCOR. Oxley lauded the program as an invalu­ able asset to the rehabilitative process for the county’s 1,300 inmates. “The industry program is truly a win­ ning proposition for all involved. The state receives a cost-effective work force to help meet the demand for products and the inmates develop work skills and self-esteem that will help them return as productive members of society,” the sheriff explained.

County planning events to mark the millennium he Monmouth County Board of century,” Narozanick said. “We may also Freeholders has created a 15-mem­ have prominent historians give a series of ber committee to come up with lectures and workshops, along with bus tours of Monmouth County.” appropriate and exciting events to observe Concerts may feature music from spe­ the closing of the 20th century this year. Heading the Millennium Celebration cific decades, Narozanick said. “We are looking forward to a year of Committee' is Freeholder Ted Narozanick, a numerous events that will, in some in­ resident of Freehold Borough. From preliminary brainstorming ses­ stances, take us back to our glorious past sions, members of the committee have and, in other instances, cause us to look agreed on some ideas to celebrate the mo­ ahead with great expectations.” Members of the special committee in­ mentous occasion. For example, the com­ mittee decided to hold a contest among clude Sheriff Joseph W. Oxley; Claire county employees to create a slogan for the French, county clerk; Romeo Cascaes, millennium celebration, from which a theme county director of public information; Dr. and a seal will be developed for use Peter Burnham, president of Brookdale Community College, Lincroft; Leo J. throughout the celebration. Banners will be erected on county build­ Carling, county superintendent of buildings ings and a millennium web page will be and grounds; Theodore J. Giannechini, county engineer; Dr. Brian McAndrew, designed for the freeholders’ web site. “The new millennium actually begins on superintendent of the Monmouth County Jan. 1, 2001,” Narozanick said. “Yet we Vocational School District. Also, Michael Maddaluna, county know many people will be celebrating on the first day of the year 2000. We do not superintendent of schools; William want to appear ignorant of the true start of Morrisey, executive director of the the next millennium, yet we do want to give Monmouth County Historical Commission; expression to the desires of the public to Henry R. Nicholson, county director of mark the special arrival of the year 2000, transportation; Louis Paparozzi, director of the county Department of Human Services; which is the last year of the 20th century.” Among the events being considered for Kenneth Sheinbaum, director of the the celebration are a time capsule, dinner Monmouth County Library System; James dances, concerts, essay and poster contests, J. Truncer, director of the Monmouth County Park System; Mark Acker, county music festivals and antique auto shows. “We are also looking at a project in director of finance; and Elaine Valentino, which we’ll take some of our older citizens director of planning and resource develop­ and create an archive of oral histories about ment for the Department of Human what Monmouth County was like when they Services. — Dick Metzgar were growing up in the earlier part of this

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Terence and Judith Cosgrove of Middletown announce the engagement of their daughter, Lisa Marie Cosgrove, to Andrew Gerard Camporini, son of Alfred and Loretta Camporini of the Port Murray section of Mansfield. The future bride is a graduate of Middletown High School South and at­ tended Brookdale Community College in Lincroft and Green Mountain College in Poultney, Vt.. She is employed as an ad­ ministrative assistant at Accutech Environmental Services Inc., Keyport. Her fiance is a graduate of Warren Hills High School in Washington. He earned a bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering from Rutgers University in New Brunswick and a mas­ ter’s degree in engineering management and environmental engineering from Widener University in Chester, Pa. He is employed as plant group leader at Howmet Corp., Castings Division, Dover. A May wedding is planned.

Annette and Neil O’Leary of Old Bridge announce the engagement of their daughter, Kerri Devlin, to Stephen Roberto, son of Angela Acconzo of West Keansburg and Joseph Roberto of Piscataway. The future bride is a graduate of Madison Central High School, Old Bridge, and Kean University, Union, where she earned a bachelor of arts degree in teacher of the handicapped and a certificate in el­ ementary education. She is pursuing a master’s degree in reading specialization at Kean University, Union, and is employed as a special education teacher by the Keansburg Board of Education. Her fiance is a graduate of Raritan High School, Hazlet, and Kean University, Union, where he earned a bachelor of arts degree in political science and a certificate in elementary education. He is pursuing a master’s degree in elementary education at Kean University, Union, and is employed as a sixth-grade teacher by the Howell Board of Education. A July 2000 wedding is planned.

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Mrs. Gloria McArdle of Aberdeen and Mr. Toby Miele of Hazlet announce the engagement of their daughter, Regina Miele, to Chris Mcllmurray, son of Ms. Ann Mcllmurray of Hazlet and Mr. William Mcllmurray of New Jersey. The future bride is a graduate of Matawan High School, Aberdeen. She is employed by Parkway Mort­ gage, Kenilworth. Her fiance is a graduate of Raritan High School in Hazlet. He is employed by the Hazlet Post Office. A September 2000 wedding is planned.

Robinson-Martinez Robert W. and Barbara L. Robinson of Middletown announce the engage­ ment of their daughter, Heather L, Robinson, to John A. Martinez, son of Edward J. and Jeannette Martinez of Middletown. The future bride is a graduale of Middletown High School South and Penn State University, University Park, Pa., where she earned a bachelor of science degree in dental hygiene.

She is employed with Dr. G. Scher, Dr, G. Mills, D.D.S., P.A., Morgan­ ville. Her fia»c€ is a graduate of Red B &nk CatfeOlip High School and La .aSalle University is Philadelphia. Pa., wl /here he earned a bachelor of science degree. He is &e chief executive officer of Century Surgical, Brooklyn, N.Y. An October wedding is planned.

INDEPENDENT. MARCH 17, 1999 3 5

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Lt. Lewis and Maria Hawk

Hawk-Rotondo Maria Rotondo, daughter of Francis and Patricia Rotondo of Middletown, was mar­ ried Dec. 19 to Lt. Lewis Hawk Jr., son of Martha and Lewis Hawk of Matawan. The Rev. David Fulton performed the cerem ony at St. C lem en t’s Church in Matawan, where the bride was given in marriage by her parents. Maid of honor was Loisann Rotondo of Columbia, S.C., sister of the bride. Matron

of honor was Patricia Ross of Middletown, sister of the bride. Bridesmaids were Karen McCann o f Jackson; Stacy Rotondo o f Middletown, sister-in-law of the bride; and Jenifer Layman of Baltimore, Md. Junior bridesm aid was Lisam arie R oss o f Middletown, niece of the bride. Flower girl was Nicole Marie Rotondo of Middletown, niece of the bride. Best man was Dr. Peter Carignan of B ethlehem , Pa. U shers were Bernard K luger o f N ew York C ity; M ichael Firstenberg o f A ndclosia, Pa.; Steven Lichtm an o f H oboken; and R ichard Rotondo o f Middletown, brother o f the bride. Ring bearer was Kenneth Ross Jr. of Middletown, nephew of the bride. A reception was held at Yesterday’s Restaurant in Hazlet. The bride is a graduate of Middletown H igh S ch o o l N orth and B rookdale Community College, Lincroft. The bridegroom is a graduate o f M atawan R egion al H igh S ch o o l. He earned a bachelor’s degree in internation­ al relations from The Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Md., and a mas­ ter’s degree in international economics/­ strategic studies from Paul H. N itze School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, D.C. He is a 2nd lieu­ tenant in the United States Army in the area of Military Intelligence. The couple resides at Fort Huachuca, Ariz.

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Sharon and Darren Locklin of Colts Neck announce the birth of twins on Jan. 3 a son, Griffin Wayne, and a daughter, Holly Darice - at Monmouth Medical Center in Long Branch. Holly weighed 4 pounds, 11 ounces; Griffin, 4 pounds, 10 ounces. Grandparents are Dr. and Mrs. Allen Karbasian of Holmdel and Mrs. Anna Locklin of Millstone. Great-grandparent is Stella Piechocinski of Parlin. Godparents are David and Karen Karbasian o f Medford Lakes and Dawn McDonough of Hamilton.

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IN BRIEF R H S fr e s h m a n c la s s t o s p o n s o r a r t a u c tio n

Raritan High School’s freshman class w ill sponsor the school’s fourth annual freshman art auction. The event will be held Thursday at the high school, located at 419 Middle Road, Hazlet. The art preview hour will start at 7 p.m. and bidding will begin at 8 p.m. Featured will be a variety of artists such as Tarkay, Neiman, Rockwell, Lena Lui, Wyeth and others. Works by RHS stu­ dents will be displayed as well as items cre­ ated by the high school’s Fashion Design class. Musical accompaniment will be pro­ vided by the RHS m usic students. Admission fee will be $5 which includes coffee, cake and a chance at door prizes. Tickets can be purchased in advance or at the door. For information, contact freshman class advisors Nancy Beaty or Mary Sutton at RHS, (732) 254-8411. E d u c a tio n f o u n d a t io n p la n s d in n e r d a n c e t o r S a tu r d a y

The Hazlet Township Foundation for Excellence in Education, a nonprofit orga­ nization providing grants, scholarships and awards programs, w ill sponsor its annual dinner dance on Saturday at the B uttonw ood Manor in M atawan. The evening will begin with an open bar cock­ tail hour, followed by dinner and dancing. The band Devotion will provide the musi­ cal entertainment. Dinner selections will consist of a choice of prime rib of beef or stuffed chicken breast. The cost of tickets

is $45 per person. The evening w ill feature chances on gift baskets and a “Super 50/50.” In addi­ tion, the foundation will be presenting its second Community Service Awards; this year’s recipients are Comcast Online; the Hazlet Township mayor and committee; the H azlet Board o f E ducation; Jake Helfrich of R. Helfrich & Son Corp.; and Frank Luccarelli of Dearborn Farms. The event is the foundation’s major fund-raiser and this year celebrates the foundation’s fifth anniversary. To pur­ chase tickets or to donate cash, gift certifi­ cates or prizes, call Ellen Lamb at (732) 739-2887. In its five-year history, the H azlet Foundation for E x c e lle n c e in Education has raised and awarded in excess o f $30,000 in scholarships, teacher grants and awards.

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INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999

YESTERYEAR 1 0 0 VEARS A C O Capt. W ood o f Keyport, who recently lo st h is v e s s e l, the sch o o n er Mary F reeland, has returned hom e. The Freeland started from Elizabethport on February 1st with a load of 3,000 barrels o f cement, bound for Mobile. The mate was Jon Broander o f Keansburg and the crew consisted of five men. The vessel ran into a hurricane off Cape Hatteras. Storm succeeded storm and the vessel became a wreck. She sprang a leak and the men had to work day and night to keep her from sinking. For four days they had nothing to drink, the water tanks running dry or get­ ting filled with salt water. The vessel was gradually sinking in spite of the efforts of the men. On the thirteenth day after being struck by the gale a vessel came in sight, and though she was signaled she did not see the wreck. The next day another ves­ sel was sighted and this boat answered the signals and the men were taken off. The steamboat Albertina will be put

on the route between Red Bank and New York next Wednesday. For some time past the steamboat company has been dredging the channel, and by next Wednesday it will be in condition for the boat to run. The boat will be commanded by Capt. Lawrence Price and Harvey Little will be the messenger. Excursion tickets to New York and return will be fifty cents, the same as last year. The roads in M onmouth county this spring are the worst they have been for years. From all parts of the county comes the same story o f deep and sticky mud, through which it is impossible for a team to pull a heavy load. Part of this unsatis­ factory state of affairs is due to the weath­ er this spring, but the foundation o f the bad roads lies in the method of road mak­ ing as generally practiced. When clay and gravel are put on the roads in the fall its mixture does not have a chance to becom e worked down and packed before freezing weather sets in, and consequently the worst places in the roads in the spring are those where the most work was done the fall before.

75 YEARS ACO A big m eeting o f the Ku Klux Klan w as held in the B ap tist Church at M iddletown V illage Friday night. The church was filled to overflowing. In ad­ dition to the Klan it is said that a number o f invited guests were present. These invited guests were asked to leave before the meeting ended and it is said after they left a number of candidates for member­ ship were initiated. Some one put a lot of tacks on the state highway near the church and a lot o f automobile tires were punc­ tured. Holmdel township residents who are well acquainted with farming conditions there say that the potato acreage the com­ ing season will not be more than threefourths as large as it was last year. The reason for the big decrease is due to three bad seasons with potatoes. An increase is expected in the acreage o f corn, wheat, asparagus and vineyards. The taxpayers of M onmouth county will pay $845,839.09 more taxes than they did last year. The amount to be raised by taxation is $6,273,723.43. Matawan bor­ ough has the biggest increase, jumping from $39.13 per $1,000 of assessed valua­ tion to $57.20. Matawan also has the high­ est tax rate in the county.

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H o lm d el to w n sh ip r e sid e n ts and interested persons from the Middletown village area met Monday night at Holmdel tow nship hall, C raw ford’s Corner, to protest the proposed establishment o f a barracks to house Puerto R ican farm workers. The Farmers and Gardeners

association, which consists o f members from Holmdel, Hazlet, Matawan and other county municipalities, has purchased nine acres of land from Mrs. H.F. Crawford on which housing facilities are expected to be built. The land is south o f the Jacob B. Rue property on he H a zlet-O g d en ’s Corner R d., H olm del T ow nship. The property is about a mile north o f Annie Ogden’s Comer. The residents are protesting on the grounds that the barracks would reduce the value of their properties and such an establishment would not be desirable in a residential and real estate area. The citi­ zens state that the Puerto Rican workers will be flown in next month and will be housed in the barracks. They w ill be assigned to farmers in the area and paid about 50 cents an hour for their work According to Mr. Rue, there is no zoning ordinance in the township to prevent the erection of the barracks. The Monmouth county Federation of Holy Name societies, which met Sunday night at St. A gn es h a ll, A tlan tic H ighlands, unanim ously selected Red Bank for the annual Holy Name parade and rally to be held Sunday, Oct. 9. The Shrew sbury tow nship election contest for 1949 was formed last week, with township Com m itteem an George Stevens filing a petition for reelection on the R epublican ticket and Sam uel M. Fisher Jr. filing as his democratic oppo­ nent. Mrs. F. Lawton Hindle, president of Red Bank auxiliary of Riverview hospital, reports progress for the large county fair and auction to be held by the group at the Theron M cCam pbell farm at H olm del Saturday and Sunday, May 21 and 22. James S. Parkes, hospital president, will be the auctioneer.

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INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999

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lovely trees and shrubs? Look out your windows or sit on your deck and decide what you want to see: a blooming tree or shrub, a sculpture, or the chain link fence that surrounds your yard? Consider the location of the exits and entrances between the house and the yard. Patios, as well as herb gardens, are most useful when they are located near the kitchen or dining areas. On your graph paper, pencil in large “bubbles” — in the shape of circles, ovals, rectangles, whatever — to define where you want the patio, the garden areas, the paths, the lawn, the shrub and flower bor­ ders. A good way to visualize the basic gar­ den design is to take some photographs of your house, preferably in winter when the leaves are off the trees. Enlarge the pic­ tures on a photocopy machine. Tape the pictures together, if necessary, to get a complete view of your front or back yard. Tape the photocopies to a table and lay tracing paper over them. Pencil in the out­ line of your house, major landscape ele­ ments, trees and shrubs. Estimate where the new garden areas will be and pencil them in. Once you have this basic view, you can add trees and shrubs and flower beds and see what your yard will look like. Keep in mind some basic ideas that landscape designers often use when plan­ ning gardens for new clients: The lawn should have a definite shape, whether a circle, a square, a rectangle or an oval. Flower and shrub beds should never be peppered around a lawn. Locate the lawn, the patio and other major landscape ele­ ments first, then decide where shrubs, trees and flowers should be. Think about creating garden “rooms” defined by hedges or walls. If you want to screen out views, will a fence do the job, or is a solid row of ever­ greens required5 Take note of the sun’s path and mark shady and sunny areas on your graph paper. Write in any significant changes in elevation and areas that are particularly wet or dry. Once you’ve completed this inventory, you can begin selecting plants and refining the shapes of your major yard elements. If you have your heart set on azaleas, lilacs or a southern magnolia, for example, be sure you know the plant’s cultural requirements and its ultimate size. Azaleas need acidic soil and shade. If you put them in full sun, they’re very sus­ ceptible to disease and insect damage. Lilacs need full sun for good blooms and prefer a neutral, well-drained soil. Southern magnolias are stunning trees, but some of them attain a height of 50 feet and a spread of 30 feet or more. Don’t plant them 10 feet away from the house, and remember that they are messy trees. Although they are lovely evergreens and have beautiful, sweet-scented flowers, they drop large leaves throughout the year, have surface roots that suck up mois­ ture from surrounding areas, and produce masses of laige cone-like seed heads that drop to the ground in late fall. This tree belongs at the back or the side of your yard where cleanup will be easy. Once you’ve decided which plants you want, go back to your graph paper and plot in new trees and shrubs at their approximate size. Then pencil in the new look on your tracing paper photograph. Gardens always change with time, but a good basic plan that is well thought out will serve you well over the years and save you many landscaping headaches.

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Correspondent pring is the perfect season to redecorate your home. Light, airy fabrics, plenty o f sunlight, and open, uncluttered spaces bring that carefree, outdoor feeling indoors to enjoy year-round. If you have been considering banishing the dreary winter feel from your living space, interior designer Stephanie Stave, w h o together with husband Bob ow ns and operates Sew & Sew Custom H om e Furnishings in Marlboro, know s exactly what y o u ’re looking for. “There’s a more casual atmosphere inside the hom e today. Rooms are liv­ able and used in w ays other than what they w ere originally intended for,” explains Stephanie Stave. “Traditional dining rooms are n ow multi-purpose for m any hom eow ners, and living rooms are actually lived in, rather than kept formal and untouchable in order to impress com pany.” The talented interior designer has a great eye for color, fabrics, and space. Her practical approach to creating rooms meant to b e both used and admired has brought clients back time after time for updating, suggestions, and brand n ew looks. Clever use o f fab­ rics, as w ell as w in dow treatments that b ecom e a focal point in the room, can com pletely change the feel o f the living space — without fuss and, better still, without breaking the bank. “To many, decorating means expen­ sive fabrics and elaborate plans. It shouldn’t. A decorator has to work with clients in both taste and budget, and should offer a variety o f options to ch o o se from in every price range. Costly fabrics can be used with simple ones and incorporated in a beautiful, yet econom ical design schem e. If a dec- MATCHING COLORS — Sew & Sew Custom Home Furnishings w ill match orator com es into your hom e with only p a in t to the fa b ric o fy o u r choice.

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a few samples that are all basically the same price range — especially an extremely high price range, you ’d better call another decorator — fast,” suggests Stave. The biggest change in decorating today is color. For years, earth tones and muted colors w ere preferred and dominated most hom es, but brilliant, vibrant colors have made a comeback. Bright greens, Day-Glo, and neon are all the rage, and used as splashes of invigorating color to accent an other­ w ise bland room, they can be uplifting and very trendy. Traditional is also very much alive and well, however, with eye-catching cornices, plush drapes, elaborate valances and sedate fabrics that are both beautiful and comfortable. She advises clients to go with designs and fabrics that they feel com ­ fortable with, rather than allowing the decorator to make all the decisions.

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“After all, you have to live with it — not the decorator, w h ose purpose is to offer suggestions and samples, to advise and measure, and w ho has a talent to coor­ dinate the flow o f a room ,” she said. “Never be pressured into selecting pat­ terns, colors, textures, and styles that are trendy if you truly hate the trend. Traditional rooms can be updated with­ out changing the basic feel o f the room — for those w ho are wary o f going with a look that clashes with their con­ servative tastes. N ew fabrics on accent pieces such as pillows, valances and even headboards can liven up a room with little cost — and the room still maintains the traditional feel w hich is pleasing to the client w h o occupies the living space.” In n ew hom es, people are tempted to decorate all the room at once and get it over with. Stave advises those clients to resist the urge. Instead, she suggests doing on e room at a time and living with it for a while. You may decide a different look for another room w ould be more pleasing than having a running them e going throughout the entire house, and many times what is the right look for one room is totally wrong for another. Decorating the house to everyone’s satisfaction d o e sn ’t m ean sitting motionless inside those perfect rooms and gazing at everything with adora­ tion. “No w ay,” says Stave. “It’s all meant to be lived in and used to the fullest. We do things, that, in the past, our mothers w ould have frowned on. We humans tend to track dirt indoors and sneak food and drinks into the living room w hen watching our favorite tele­ vision shows. Our pets, no matter how w ell trained, will probably have an acci­ dent on the rug or the furniture. Life isn’t confined to the kitchen anymore. This is how w e really live.” In response to our all-too-human natures, the Staves have added a new phase to their interior design business — Sew Clean, which is family ow ned and operated. The Staves dry-clean drapes, swags, balloon valances, and cornices, as w ell as pleated and fabric shades, without removing them from the w indow and without shrinking, fad­ ing, sizing, and loss o f flame retardants. Sew Clean also safely dry-cleans diffi­ cult upholstery such as bleeders, Haitian cottons, silks, moires, velvet and antique satin. Even lampshades, oriental carpets, and floor mats can be , cleaned safely by this method. In addi­ tion Sew Clean also offers spray appli­ cations o f soil guards, flame retardants and deodorants — for the m essy human in all o f us. For information on Sew & Sew Custom Hom e Furnishings and Sew Clean’s on-site dry-cleaning services, contact Stephanie Stave at (732) 972­ 8763.

Spring Home & Garden .

PUTTING TOGETHER — Stephanie Stave, who co-owns Sew & Sew Custom Home Furnishings, M arlboro, assembles a valance. Photos byJackie Pollack/Greater Media

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D e co ra tin g a ro o m ta k e s ca re fu l c o n sid e ra tio n By Rita Plush

Correspondent t’s spring — time to liven up the liv­ ing room. Maybe all it needs is a paint job and a few new pillows tossed on the sofa. Maybe not. Decorating for yourself can be exciting — shopping, putting together all the dif­ ferent elements, creating a beautiful room made possible by your efforts. It can be daunting too. Should you first pick out the carpeting then the fabrics, or is it better to select the wall color and then choose the flooring? In a sweat yet? D on’t be. What you need is a plan that will help you organize your ideas and get you started. First c h o o se th e basic style This is the most important decision because it will influence everything that goes into a room. But don’t think that if you’ve chosen the traditional look your room has to look like a museum. Offset the formality with a contemporary piece somewhere in the room, perhaps a black ultra suede ottoman. If casual countiy is your style, dress it up with a Louis XIV style chair covered in a quilted polished cotton. The most successful rooms are mixes of different styles and periods. T h en prepare a flo o r plan A floor plan will allow you to see if the sofa you want is properly scaled for the size of the room, if you’ve selected too many small pieces of furniture or too many large pieces. Art supply stores and home centers make floor planning easy with kits that come with templates and cut-outs you can move around on a grid

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till you get the layout you want. Let th e so fa fabric tell th e co lor sc h e m e story Say you’ve chosen a floral tapestry for the sofa on a blue/gray background with flowers that shade from a soft pink to a mauve and from pale yellow to a golden tone. The leaves are seafoam green. A mauve tone-on-tone stripe or geo­ metric in mostly mauve with a blue accent would do nicely on a pair of chairs in the room. Use raspberry (an eye-catching extension of the mauve in the sofa) as your accent color. C h oose a flo o r coverin g Blue would be my choice for wall to wall carpeting — a darker blue than the tone of the sofa fabric. Contrast, shading and a blending of colors are more inter­ esting than matching one color to anoth­ er. If you like the Old World look of an area rug, consider a subtle pattern in mauve and green on a medium blue background. D o n ’t forget th e w alls an d ceilin g What about color for the walls and ceiling in this mostly blue and mauve, raspberry accented theme? Paint them a nice soft white, right? Wrong. To take this room from pretty to POW you want to color the walls and ceiling. Color warms, color finishes, color is the most effective way of getting a lot for a lit­ tle of your decorating dollar. So paint the walls a light blue/gray, and for the ceiling, a pale mauve that will cast a cheery glow over the whole room.

Rita Plush is an interior designer, writer and lecturer on the decorative arts and resides in Queens, New York.

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ing assortment such as Boyd’s Bears, AnnaLee dolls, Snowbabies, Depart­ ment 56 collectible houses and porce­ lain figurines and trinket gifts. “We have things from as low as $2.99 to a hand painted chest for $2,500,” Arcoleo said. Brock Farms highlights seasons o f the year with great creativity and vari­ ety. For exam ple, their biggest seasons are spring and winter. Brock Farms w elcom es spring and the celebration of Easter with a full stock o f silk and fresh flowers and silk potted plants to name a few. The farm will officially kick off the spring season March 20 and 21. During the winter, staff prepare to give custom ers an astonishing array o f Christmas trees. If you can’t find the Christmas tree o f your dreams at Brock Farms, chances are it doesn’t exist. The farm is ready for the holiday season by Nov. 15. Staff and management prepare six w eeks in advance for every season change and are continually replenish­ ing their stock. Brock Farms has it all for your out­ side and inside hom e decorating needs for any season. Whether you ’re looking for a specific plant, a pretty silk flower arrangement or a gift o f a Boyd’s Bear, you can find it at the farm. Visit with a family w ho has made a living at making your hom e worth liv­ ing in. For information, call (732) 462­ 2700.

Correspondent ne o f the joys o f ow ning a hom e is picking out not only what g oes in it, but what goes around the house as well. The land­ scaping o f a house can be a great w ay for hom eow ners to get creative in the presentation o f their hom es. With spring around the corner, Brock Farms, Freehold, can help p eople decorate both the interior and exterior o f their homes. Brock Farms is in the business o f satisfying customers’ hom e decoration needs. After 50 years in the business, it is quite evident Brock Farms does indeed satisfy their customers. Brock Farms is a fam ily-ow ned business headed by Edward Brock Sr., his wife Jean and their tw o children, Linda Arcoleo, and her husband Robert and Edward Brock Jr. Edward Jr. manages the Colts Neck location w hile Linda works alongside her mother and father at the Freehold store. Linda took a few mom ents to praise longtime store man­ ager Ben Castronova: “He is a big con­ tributing factor to the business. He has wonderful displays and ideas.” At the Freehold location, customers will find an overwhelming variety of plants to pick for their gardening needs located in the 10,000-square-foot green­ house. This enormous greenhouse is hom e to many annuals and vegetable

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ROCK GARDEN — Decorative stones are great accessory pieces f o r any garden o r pond. These and others are available a t Brock Farms, Freehold. Jerry Wolkowitz/Greater Media plants. The nursery has more than one mile o f paved walkways so customers can imagine the w ide variety o f choic­ es. Along with the annuals and veg­ etable plants, there are tropical plants, perennials and other favorites for your gardening pleasure. “Brock Farms has thousands of trees, shrubs and plants to ch oose from,” Arcoleo said.

Brock Farms is also know n for its water gardens w hich consist o f fish ponds in every size, water plants, lin­ ers, sculptures and cem ent fountains. The Freehold location has a large and beautiful gift shop that continues to set Brock Farms apart from their com peti­ tion. Offering a w ide variety o f prices, the gift shop gives customers a decorat­

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A to u c h o f w h im s y fo r y o u r h o m e pring is a season o f change. A time for putting away the winter blues and getting ready for warmer days and longer daylight hours. It’s also a time to look around and create new ideas for your garden or your home. Below are examples of the latest trends in decorating styles and accessories.

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M ichael Graves Design Collec­ tion includes this utensil holder (above) w hich keeps kitchen tools handy and this distinctive coach’s w histle tea kettle (below). (Photo courtesy of Target)

Dress y o u r fu rn itu re (above) f o r the occasion. This Evita sofa can be cov­ ered in any fa b ric. A slipcover gives y o u r fu rn itu re a new look fro m season to season. The frosted-glass top and steelfra m e table (le ft) is complemented byfu lly upholstered chairs w ith option­ a l m ini-skirt slip covers. (Photo courtesy of Thomasville Furniture)

P a rt o f the Tripod Collec­ tion, this bronze patina base and alder wood p ictu re fram e is inspired by an ancient Pompeian a rtifa c t (Photo courtesyof Target) This Thebes Collection clock is in spired by the ancient Egyptians. (Photocourtesyof Target)

Indonesian hardw ood table and chairs w ith umbrella. (Photo courtesy of Target)

\ f .-w<)f ' ■- i -< ‘ * . eJ INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999 4 3

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P ro fe ssio n a l o rg a n iz e r p u ts a n e n d to c lu tte r atawan resident D eena T. Chamofsky is a professional organizer providing organizing service to individuals and businesses. “My company, Find It All Professional Organizers, is based on the premise that many people w ho are disorganized and clutter-laden can’t locate various items from keys to important documents. This generally leads to increased stress and an out-of-control feeling. By providing one on one, confidential assistance to individ­ uals and businesses, stress is alleviated and productivity increased as a result of being able to locate these items quickly,” she says. There are many reasons for not being organized. Here are a few: • procrastination • stress • feeling overwhelmed • frustration • lack of time • build-up of mental clutter which can lead to physical clutter • poor time management H o m e o ffice d esig n s Many people are now working from home, converting the extra bedroom into an office. Planning a customized room tailored to suit the needs of both the busi­ ness and the home is important. Here are a few ideas to consider: • Who will be using the office? • D oes the office double as a guest room? • Place primary equipment such as the computer, printer, fax and scanner near your desk, making sure the lighting surrounding the area is adequate. • Files frequendy used can be placed in a cabinet within the desk or near the desk. • Place the telephone on the desk or within easy reach. E fficient u se o f clo sets and storage sp aces Neat surroundings and effectively uti­ lized cabinets and closets can create greater space. The closet that housed clothing can now accommodate books and office supplies as well. Here are some guidelines to think about: • Create areas to accommodate chil­ dren as w ell as adults. • Place appropriate items within clos­ ets based upon the room location and purpose. D on’t mix kitchen items with things that belong in the garage. • Is the whole closet being used including the area above the clothing? Place bins or shelves to ceiling height to maximize this space. • Create greater closet storage by putting hooks or shelves on the inside of the door. T im e m a n a g em en t tech n iq u es Demands on our time are greater than ever before as a result of increased mobility and blended family responsibili­ ty, for example. Here are som e ways to make good use of available time: • Group small tasks together and do them simultaneously. For example, send a fax, run a print job, make copies and confirm an appointment all at once. (This assumes that the same machine isn’t needed for each of these projects.) • D o the thing you least want to first — adopt a do it now attitude in order- to reduce the mental clutter. • Work backward when planning

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J o d y V a c c a r e lla , In c . LAWN MAINTENANCE and GARDEN SUPPLIES CLUTTER — Deena T. Cham ofsky helps clients organize th e ir offices and homes w ith h e r F ind I t A ll Professional O rganizers business. appointments, estimating how long each task will take. • Anticipate scenarios and plan ahead. Ask yourself, ‘if I do this what will be the result?’ • Break tasks into small pieces and do a little at a time until the task is complet­ ed. File and d esk organizing Technology such as the fax and easy access to marketing lists via the Internet has added a paper and junk mail flow. It’s harder than ever to stay on top of the sit­ uation. Here are ideas to focus on: • Do you use the same files in the office and at home? D o you need to cre­ ate a portable system? • What are the main topics and sub­ categories for your files? • Color code your files based upon these main groupings and sub-groupings. • Use a blotter to define the work­ space directly within arm’s reach. • Keep often used supplies on the desktop and put others in the drawer. • Use a drawer tray with compart­ ments to store other desk supplies that are used infrequendy. Clutter co n trol Mental and physical clutter are the result of living in the past or the future rather than the present. We save memo­ rabilia to excess and worry that w e might need a particular item in the future. We are afraid to throw anything away. Here are some questions to ask yourself: • Do I need this piece of clothing? • When did I use it last? • What condition is it in? • Can the information be easily replaced or retrieved? • Is the item/information outdated? • Keep a garbage pail handy when opening the mail and throw out junk mail after opening. • Sort and categorize the mail using colored file folders to differentiate the cat­ egories.

Deena T. Chamofsky is a member of the National Association of Professional Organizers, the Middlesex Regional Chamber of Commerce and the NewJersey Association of Business Women Owners. She is availablefor speaking engagements at professional organizations and local community groups and continues to coach individuals and businesses in orga­ nizing. For further information, call (7 3 2 )2 9 0 -1 7 1 8 .

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T ile s a c c e n t a n y ro o m in a h o m e B y A nita Stratos

Correspondent ou can have the feeling o f being in a fresh, n ew hom e without the exp en se o f buying a new house — simply update your hom e with the latest trends in tiling. Tiles have com e a long way; they’re not just plain squares anymore. Customized tile pat­ terns can becom e the focal point of your room, with dramatic effects. In order to achieve the best look for your hom e and lifestyle, talk to Vito Mancini, ow ner o f Tiles Unlimited (formerly Ceramics All Over) o f Matawan. “We carry the largest selection o f tiles in the area,” said Mancini. “We have over 5,000 different samples in stock plus catalogs with even more choices.” This is no “same old, same old” tiling store. At Tiles Unlimited you’ll find everything from old world stone look porcelain tiling to high gloss marbles in every shade o f the spectrum. But what sets this place even further apart from others is the in-house creativity. Known for creating designs “ahead o f their time,” Mancini and his staff will always go the extra mile for their clients, giving them a finished product unlike any other. Take a look through the endless possibilities you probably never even knew existed in the world o f custom

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tiling. Mancini will show you pictures o f stunning designs, such as a 6-foot by 6-foot marble mural created for the back wall o f a bathtub. The mural is com posed o f precision-cut inlays o f dif­ ferent shades o f marble, put together to produce the image o f a palm tree set against the ocean, setting sun and beach. Another truly remarkable sam­ ple is o f multicolored mosaic inlays pat­ terned and fitted together to look like an Oriental carpet, com plete with fringe — all done with tiles. These rich eye-catchers have to be seen to be fully appreciated. Mancini created a beautiful fluid look for one client w hen he built a kitchen table from the same tiles as he used to cover the floor. The result was very unique and quite breathtaking. Countertops as w ell as vanities can also b e made using matching or coordinated tiles. Accent pieces for walls and floors can even replace hanging pictures, or just bring a burst o f life to an otherwise dull area. Tumbled marble can be inset with many varieties o f alternately col­ ored images, such as deer, butterflies, birds, or a host o f others. Back splashes for any room can liven up a small area, and inserts of em bossed deco, natural or painted, are wonderful for added interest. One o f the more popular tile selec-

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MATCHING TILES — Tiles U nlim ited employee Pete M antino ( r ) assists Bernadette Bonny and her 7-year-old daughter Samantha, both o f Union Beach. The store is located in Matawan. Augusto F. Menezes/GreaterMedia tions today is distressed porcelain, which is actually stronger than granite. Attractive w hen used on floors or walls, these pieces give the impression o f old world craftsmanship, and can be coor­ dinated with other accent pieces, such as porcelain chair rails. Tiling that cov­ ers the entire floor and sw eeps up the wall to a chair rail, around a fireplace, or surrounding built-in bookcases gives a room a larger appearance. A variety o f earth tone shades such as bone, almond, and neutral appear to be the preferred color choices for today, although Mancini carries all col­ ors, including bolder designer tones which are perfect for certain homes. High gloss marble is also making a comeback. “People really have to go with what they like rather than to just follow the

current trend,” Mancini said. Tile maintenance is minimal; an occasional damp m op is generally all that is necessary because tiles do not absorb dirt, oil, or other stains. Also, tiles create less dust than carpeting, which is beneficial with certain health concerns such as asthma or allergies, as well as not adding dust to furniture. Mancini takes a personal interest in his clients and is present on many o f his jobs, all o f which are done by his ow n staff. The quality o f their work as w ell as their professionalism is w ell docu­ mented by the many letters o f thanks and appreciation he has received from his clients. Tiles Unlim ited is located in Pinecrest Plaza at 1016 Route 34, Matawan. For further information, call (732) 566-3886.

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ou ’ve got mulch! No, the Internet will not deliver mulch like it deliv­ ers e-mail, but it delivers much more in the horticultural field. Novice gardeners and expert horticulturists alike can answer your general questions and your most arcane inquiries with a simple connection to the Internet. Thousands of gardening sites are up and running on the net, and they just keep growing and growing. From your desktop, you can take a virtual tour o f Monet’s garden at Givemy, France (http://www.giverny.org/gardens), order seeds from Burpee (http://www.burpee.com), see the latest plant introductions developed by experts at the National Arboretum in Washington, D.C. (http://www.ars-grin.gov/na), or find out w hat’s ailing your lawn (http://www.yardcare.com). A good place to start is the Garden Gate (http://garden-gate.prairienet.org), a non-commercial site created by Karen Fletcher in 1994. Fletcher describes her­ self as an information junkie with a long­ term interest in gardening w hose goal, she explains, is to “organize information and make it easy for people to find what they’re looking for.” From this one site alone, gardeners can find out where to go to get almost any information they need. Fletcher’s “Teaching Garden” contains a compre­ hensive guide to Internet gardening sites, lists cooperative extension services by state, is linked to scores o f plant-specific databases, and includes useful glossaries o f botanical names and horticultural terms. Visit the Garden Gate “Reading Room” to find on-line magazines, books, and catalogs. The “Sun Room” is probably the most extensive list on the w eb of sites that deal with houseplants. Fletcher also tells you how to join on­ line gardening forums and e-mail groups, provides links to gardening associations and societies, and lists public and private gardens around the world that are worth a visit. Time-Life’s Virtual Garden (http://www.vg.com) is another general site that contains a plant encyclopedia with beautiful photographs that is search­ able by plant name or attribute. The site also has an on-line version o f the popu­ lar book, Gardening By Mail, by Barbara Barton, and under its Gardener’s World index, there’s a link to the very useful Dig the Net feature, a searchable database that rates Internet horticultural sites. Garden Net (http://gardennet.com), is the oldest commercially oriented garden site on the Internet. This is where gar­ deners can find links to seed companies, mail-order nurseries, companies that sell garden tools and accoutrements, and much more. The site was started by Cheryl Trine in February, 1995, to give consumers access to the commercial garden industry as well as horticultural information. Trine says Garden Net is basically “a gateway to other sites.” According to Trine, Garden Net is not really competing with anyone

else. “I think of the Internet as an open table,” she says. “The more sites there are, the better it is for all of us.” At Garden Net, you can order catalogs on-line, find reviews of garden books and informative descriptions o f gardening articles that have appeared in magazines. There’s also a garden question-andanswer section and links to almost any gardening company or subject you may imagine. Other good general gardening sites include the Garden Web (http://www.gardenweb.com) which lists hundreds of on-line discussion groups to join, including forums in Spanish, French, German, Italian and Swedish. Garden.com (http://www.garden.com ) features on-line chats with garden celebrities and experts and a free on-line tool to design your garden. At Gardening at The Mining Co. (http://miningco.com), you can visit the orchid lady, post a ques­ tion on a gardening bulletin board, find out how to build a cold frame, a bog gar­ den, or design a w indow box. For the serious gardener, Ohio State University’s Gardening Fact sheet Database (http://w w w .hcs.O hiostate.edu), listed under its “Webgarden,” contains thousands o f horticultural fact sheets from academic institutions and cooperative extension offices around the country. The site has a searchable data­ base o f more than three thousand plant, disease and insect images. Helsinki University’s Internet Directory for Botany (http://www.helsinki.fi/kmus/botmenu.html) is an excellent resource for botanists and serious garden enthusiasts. It is linked to more than 4,000 other sites, including arboreta, botanical gardens, and international botanical organizations. The directory also contains plant images, resource guides, a database on threatened plants worldwide, scientific journals and on-line discussion groups. As a garden designer and plant enthusiast, I have many of my ow n favorite sites. At the Brooklyn Botanic Garden (http://www.bbg.org), you can take a tour o f the garden, complete with maps and lovely garden photographs, join a project to inventory plant biodi­ versity in the tri-state area of New York, N ew Jersey and Connecticut, find out how to design bird and butterfly gar­ dens, and try to win a prize by identify­ ing the mystery plant. The N ew York Botanical Garden (http://w w w .nybg.org) has monthly planting tips, a plant information service that answers gardening questions via e­ mail, serious botanical monographs available on-line, as w ell as on-line access to the vast catalog in the garden’s library. Harvard University maintains a w eb site on the flora of China (http://w w w .herbaria.harvard.edu/china) with links to other sites on China. Whatever your garden interest, whatever your garden problem, there’s no need to search through garden books that don’t have the information you want. Simply sign on to the Internet and do a little digging around, and you’ll get the kind of garden results you want.

INDEPENDENT, MARCH 18, 1999 4 7

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Author highlights New Jersey gardens hen yo u devote yo u r life to researching beautiful desti­ nations in N ew Jersey, you hear a lo t o f jokes. A rline Zatz, author o f a new b oo k on the gardens o f the Garden State, discovered that some­ times a strong offense is the best defense. “Tell them som ething they d o n ’t k n o w — it stops them dead in th eir tracks,” says Zatz.

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For example, Zatz likes to tell folks about the Pequest B utterfly Garden in Warren County. This little gem o f a gar­ den is planted w ith b utterfly-frien d ly flow ers and plants, and also features a visitors center w ith hands-on exhibits. Adm ission is free; the garden offers am ple o pportunities fo r photographing bloom s and butterflies fro m late spring through late fall. Pequest and more than 100 other gardens are carefully described in Zatz’s n e w book: New

Jersey’s Great Gardens: A Four-Season Guide to 125 Public Gardens, Parks, and Arboretums ($17.00, The Countrym an Press).

W hen asked w h ich is her favorite garden to take fe llo w N ew Jersey resi­ dents to, Zatz cites G rounds For Sculpture in H am ilton. Here, on the fo rm e r grounds o f the N ew Jersey State Fair, 22 acres o f gardens and courtyards are hom e to thousands o f trees, flo w ­ ers, and ornam ental grasses, as w e ll as exquisite o u td o o r sculptures. Y o u ’ll fin d all this plus a m useum featuring a fine collection o f m onum ental sculp­ ture and sm aller installations. For each garden, Zatz offers in fo r­ m ation on its history and plantings, as w e ll as details on h o w to get there, its size, w he n to visit fo r peak b lo o m and seasonal events, and m uch more. Black and w h ite and c o lo r p ho tographs depict the splendor and variety o f the gardens (and perhaps show w h y N ew Jersey is dubbed “The Garden State”); a m ap o f the state shows the location o f each garden to make trip planning a breeze. “One o f the w o n d e rfu l things about N ew Jersey’s gardens is th eir geograph­ ic d istribu tio n,” w rites Zatz. “N o matter w here you are in the state, a great gar­ den is w ith in a 30-m inute drive, and usually m uch closer than that.”

The author o f fo u r books on o ut­ d o o r recreation in N ew Jersey, Zatz is an a uthority o n things to do and places to go in her hom e state. In vitin g places to spend an hour, an afternoon, or an This should prove to be a w elcom e entire day, the p u b lic gardens o f N ew guide fo r garden enthusiasts, as w e ll as Jersey are state treasures. Zatz has cho­ fo r anyone lo o k in g to stretch th eir legs sen each garden in her b o o k fo r its in a n ew place. uniqueness and beauty. For exam ­ ple, W arinanco Park Gardens in Roselle features a dazzling show o f tu lip s in spring; M arquand Park in P rince to n offers m ore than 200 d if­ A Four-Season Guide to 125 Public ferent species o f Gardens, Parks, and Arboretums trees o n its 17 acres.

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The book inclu de s hum ­ m in g b ird and w ild flo w e r gar­ dens, C o lo n ia l herb gardens, A llA m erica Rose Selection gardens, pocket-sized rom ­ antic gardens, and gardens fo r m edi­ ta tio n — p lus places to picn ic, listen to the birds, and aw aken the senses. Most o f the gardens d o n o t charge admission, several o ffe r inter­ p re tive w alks, exhibits, and g u id ­ ed garden tours; and m any are ope n to e njoy year-round.

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Correspondent he temperatures may still be a bit chilly, but now is the time to start preparing for those w arm days and balmy nights that are fast approaching. Getting your home ready for spring and summer outdoor entertaining can be easy w ith a visit to Central Jersey Pools...Patio & More, Freehold. Check out the large selection o f out­ door furniture and accessories that can help make your summer parties a smash­ ing success. This year’s hottest furniture choices include the sling chair in hunter or sage green, as w ell as earth tones such as a rich classic copper. The sling’s popu­ larity is enhanced by its comfort along w ith ease o f maintenance — a quick rins­ ing is all that is needed to keep these chairs looking good. Vinyl strap chair designs have come a long w ay over the past years, and are also now in demand, along w ith all weather wicker. Cast aluminum is one o f the most durable furniture sets, and its heavy, durable nature makes it a natural choice for high-wind areas w hile it adds charac­ ter to its surroundings. O f course, tradi­ tional cushion chairs are always a safe bet, know n w ell as being the ultimate in com­ fort. But don’t overlook the extras that w ill make your backyard stand out. Furniture that is functional but still adds a little more fun to the time you spend outdoors can

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and adults as well. O r bring the comforts o f the indoors outside by adding an attrac­ tive outdoor lamp w ith attached table next to a more remotely placed chair. Bar height dining tables w ith high din­ ing sling bar stools are a winning alterna­ tive to traditional dining tables. A “must” for that lazy weekend is the stand alone hammock w ith a umbrella for added com­ fort from summer heat. O r how about a cushioned swing for daydreaming the hours away? If a pool is what you’ve always yearned to see in your backyard, now is the time to consider putting one in. Central Jersey offers a good selection o f freeform custom pools, waterfall spas, wading pools, and above-ground pools. “The big news in pools is that they have become very high tech,” said Steven Metz, vice president o f Central Jersey Pools. “Almost anything that needs to be done can be controlled remotely from inside the house. Water temperature, light­ ing, filter, spa, there are even advanced automatic pool cleaners.” Central Jersey offers pools w ith vinyl liners that have the look o f tiles, and the

wide selection o f liner patterns covers every taste and style. A wonderful addition to any built-in pool is the buddy seat, an in-pool lounge center complete w ith shade umbrella for daytime comfort and lights for nighttime enjoyment. If an above-ground pool is more for you, Central Jersey carries many selections including one w ith a 52-inch high wall, which has become very popular. In some towns, pools w ith a 52-inch wall do not require additional safety fencing for the pool area, but Metz strongly urges cus­ tomers to check w ith their particular towns fo r the final ruling. For rainy day indoor enjoyment, Central Jersey stocks pool tables and accessories, poker tables, and much more. Central Jersey Pools has been family owned and operated for more than 40 years. The store is open year round, mak­ ing the staff accessible even in the middle o f winter. Whether you’re in the market for dining accessories, outdoor lighting, or a complete outdoor entertainment system, pay a visit to Central Jersey at 4235 Route 9 north in Freehold. For further informa­ tion, call (732) 462-5005.

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C A S E L L A ' P A IN T IN G B E A U T IF U L P E R E N N IA L — S c a e v o la a r e b e s t s u i t e d f o r g r o u n d c o v e r o r a r o c k g a r d e n . T h e m a u v e - c o lo r e d f l o w e r s c a n g r o w in h a n g in g b a s k e ts .

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F in e p o in ts o f fin a n c in g a h o m e e x p la in e d any Americans are so busy w ith the demands o f their careers and families that they are not able to keep up w ith financial trends, tax law changes and other factors that affect their ability to buy o r sell a home, accord­ ing to Gerry Scala, manger o f Prudential New Jersey Realty’s M iddletown office. Many buyers d on ’t realize that they already have the financial means to either buy their first home or trade up to the home they really want. And many sellers don’t appreciate the federal regulations that enable them to assist buyers or relieve their tax burdens. “One o f the many advantages o f w orking w ith a licensed real estate pro­ fessional is their knowledge o f these important financial considerations,” he explains. “A t Prudential N ew Jersey Realty, w e take pride in keeping our clients inform ed on these trends.” First-time buyers often don’t realize that there are many special programs available to help them finance their first purchase. “First-time buyers can be any fam ily w ho have not ow ned a home fo r three years, according to most o f these programs,” Scala points out. “This can also include a divorced person w ho recently ow ned a home w ith a former spouse. There are also programs avail­ able o nly to buyers w ho have an income below a certain level, w hich is particular­ ly helpful to divorced and single buyers.” Another factor that many people don’t appreciate is the num ber o f programs that allow 100 percent financing o f a new home. “The conventional w isdom a gen­ eration ago about a m inim um dow n pay­ ment o f 20 percent dow n is very conser­ vative b y today’s standards,” Scala says. “Prudential N ew Jersey Realty agents sell homes every w eek to people w ith much low er dow n payments or no dow n pay­ ments at all.” Finding the assets to finance a home purchase is another service that Prudential N ew Jersey Realty provides. “We have sold a num ber o f homes to

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people w ho used funds from their 401(k) plans w ith no penalties involved,” Scala explains. “In many cases, know ing about this possibility has helped us put con­ tracts together that otherwise w o u ld not have happened. We w o rk closely w ith our clients to find the best options to meet their o w n situations. Many people don’t kn o w that sellers can actually assist a purchaser in buying their home. Rather than dropping the price o f the home, it may make financial sense fo r the seller to pay some points on the buyer’s m ort­ gage, or, the seller may have an assum­ able mortgage w ith an extremely good rate and not realize it. O ur real estate pro­ fessionals can help home owners explore these options w hen they are selling their home. “A fter people have lived in a home fo r aw hile, they begin to th in k about having a larger kitchen, another bath­ room or some other im provem ents,” Scala says. “Some peo ple m ay be unnecessarily staying in a hom e that doesn’t suit th eir needs because they d o n ’t realize they already have the means to move. In some cases, it’s bet­ ter to sell a hom e and b u y a larger one, rather than to over-im prove the one they have.” He continues, “Real estate is usually a fa m ily’s largest single asset, so it makes sense to w o rk w ith a profession­ al w h o is w ell-versed on all factors w h ich can affect the value o f the assets. Prudential N ew Jersey Realty’s real estate professionals have a higher level o f education and participate in more co ntinuing education programs than ever before, and w ith good reason. The regulatory demands on us are greater and m ore exciting than ever. W hen w e can hand the keys o f a house to a new owner, or w he n w e successfully sell the hom e fo r someone w h o needs to m ove, it’s a terrific feeling.” For a free brochure about financing a new home, call Prudential N ew Jersey Realty at (732) 671-3500.

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‘Fourth of July’ ad d s sparkle to gard en s he w o rld ’s newest clim bing rose, Fourth o f July has been called the “rose o f the decade” by gardeners all over the country w h o have tested the plant fo r the last three years. In every cli­ mate, Fourth o f July has proven to be outstanding. The flowers are velvety red-striped w ith bright w hite, creating an explosion o f eye-popping color fo r the landscape. And every bloom is different — some more vibrant red and others w ith broad w hite stripes. The flo w e r sprays are huge and fragrant, and last fo r a long time on the plant. Fourth o f July is always in flower, and it blooms and re­ bloom s readily the very first season. The plant has sparkling dark green foliage and is vigorous, w ith canes that grow from 10 feet to 14 feet. It is an excellent choice fo r training horizontally along a fence, or vertically to clim b over the top o f an arbor or trellis. W hen grow n w itho ut support, the canes w ill arch gracefully to provide a w onderful cascading display. H ardy in even the coldest climates, Fourth o f July is also very disease-resis­ tant. W ith just a handful o f fertilizer n ow and then, and plenty o f sun and water, this rose w ill reward its grow er w ith lots o f garden color all season long. Fourth o f July is an All-America Rose Selection fo r 1999- In fact, it’s the first clim ber to w in this award in 23 years. Fourth o f July is new from Weeks Roses and is available n o w at your favorite nursery o r garden center.

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W H A T T O C H O O S E — C u s to m e r s v is it in g T ile s U n lim it e d a r e s u r e to f i n d t h e r i g h t t i le f o r a n y r o o m . T h e s t o r e is lo c a t e d in P in e c r e s t P l a z a , R o u t e 3 4 , in M a t a w a n . Augusto F. M enezes/G reater M edia

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o, you’ve decided you w ant to get in on the hottest furniture trend — leather, but something is holding you back. Perhaps you think that leather furniture is impractical, too hard to clean or too fragile for your active household. Besides, nobody can really afford it, right? Wrong. These are all popular myths about leather. The facts may surprise you. “There are a lot o f misconceptions about leather as an upholstery material,” explains Margi Daniels, ASID, design con­ sultant for La-Z-Boy Inc. “The truth is, it is one o f the most practical and beautiful o f all upholstery materials. It is also one o f the hottest trends for the home.” According to Daniels, there are five main myths about leather. They are listed below w ith inform ation that w ill help you separate the facts from the fables.

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Myth No. Is leather is m o re delicate th an fabric Leather is twice as strong and lasts three to five times longer than upholstery fabric. Because genuine top-grain leather is the strongest and longest lasting o f all upholstery materials, it’s great fo r areas o f the home that are used a lot. It also w ill not crack or tear and has the ability to stretch w hile retaining its shape to assure a long-lasting luxurious appearance.

Myth N o. 2s leather is im p o ssib le to clean Leather is easy to clean and needs lit­ tle care during normal use. In most cases, splashes and spills can be blotted away w ith a cloth. If you’re still concerned, buy leathers treated w ith a protective top coat, - _ .which a re sotnelimes J£fcrtgd_tp_as treat­

le a t h e r

ed or finished leathers. The protective strength o f these treated leathers makes them particularly beneficial for families w ith small children and pets.

Myth N o. 3: leather furniture is to o e x p e n siv e W hile it is true that leather is, in most cases, more expensive than fabric, leather’s longer life span makes it a w orth­ w hile investment. Budget-minded shop­ pers may w ant to consider an application know n as leather-finesse or leather match. W ith this application, top-grain leather is used on all visible areas w hile matching vinyl is used on areas less subject to body and eye contact, such as the sides, back and underneath the cushions.

Myth No. 4s leather d o e sn ’t age w e ll Leather, unlike synthetics, has a “pati­ na,” a coat that becomes richer w ith use and age. Oils retained in the hide w ork over the yeais to heal scrapes and scratch­ es, blending them naturally into the leather surface. Furthermore, the natural markings on the hide, such as barbed wire nicks, brands, neck wrinkles, or scratches give each individual hide its ow n personality and actually add value to the furnishings.

M yth No. 5s leath er is u n com fort­ able Many people have the misconception that leather is hot and sticky in the sum­ mer and cold in the winter. Exacdy the opposite is true. As a natural material, much like skin, leather has a porous sur­ face w hich “breathes” to quickly adjust to both body temperature and varying hum idity. Ifs comfortable year-round.

INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999 5 1

SPRI NG A GREATER

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M R . BATH R O O M ...................................................

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Beautiful gardens await visitors B y T h e A sso c ia te d P ress pring brings not just blossoms but gardening things to see and do: “Green Geometry: The Fernleigh Topiary Collection” is on view at the New York Botanical Garden through A pril 4. This “gallery garden” features 200 topi­ aries formed in more than a dozen shapes. Some are 12 feet tall, standing as ranks and files o f green; others are in containers, w ith a touch o f pale blue and white viola blossoms. Located in the Bronx, N .Y , the NYBG is open Tuesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For information, call (718) 817-8700. More than 250 stately homes, gardens and historic landmarks are on display April 17-24 fo r “Historic Garden Week in Virginia.” Three dozen separate tours are sched­ uled during the week across the state, ranging from the Atlantic shoreline to the highlands. Properties include tow n houses w ith walled gardens, country and subur­ ban estates, restored farm houses in rural areas, seashore villas and houses w ith interesting histories tied to the American Revolution, the Civil War and the Victorian era. New to Garden Week this year is one o f Virginia’s oldest established areas, Essex County, in the eastern Middle Peninsula area. Sponsored by the Garden Club o f Virginia, the tours benefit restoration o f historic grounds and gardens throughout the state. Prices range from $10 to $20 per event, and single admissions are $3 to $5. For a brochure w ith tour dates and venues, call (804) 644-7776. A more com­ prehensive 200-page guidebook can be mailed fo r a $5 donation payable to Historic Garden Week, 12 E. Franklin St., Richmond, Va. 23219The Demonstration Gardens at the Arboretum o f Los Angeles County recent­ ly reopened, redesigned by Sunset Magazine in typical suburban backyard style. The 1.5-acre site has been reconstruct­

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ed to reflect Southern California’s aware­ ness o f recycling, water conservation and native plant life. Eight sections range from an entertainment garden w ith a built-in barbecue, refrigerator and sink to a stone garden that has man-made boulders and a lily pond. There’s a section devoted to flora and fauna native only to California. Visitors are allowed to touch, explore or just stroll. The Arboretum o f Los Angeles County is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. “From Botany to Bouquets: Flowers in Northern Art,” through May 31 at the National Gallery o f Art in Washington, D.C., explores the beauty o f exotic flowers and discoveries in science and botany. Featured are 16th- and 17th-century Dutch and Flemish still-life paintings, watercolors, manuscripts and botanical books. Sixty-one o f them are by some o f the great still-life artists o f the era: Ambrosius Bosschaert the Elder (1573­ 1621), Roelandt Savery (1576-1639), Jan Brueghel the Elder (1568-1625), Jan Davidsz de Heem (1606-1683-4), and Jan van Huysum (1682-1749). For information, call (202) 737-4215. Thirty m illion blossoms are promised fo r the Epcot International Flower & Garden Festival, April 16-May 30 at Walt Disney World in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. There w ill be workshops, hands-on demonstrations and music from the era o f the “Flower Children.” For information, call (407) 824-4321. The new 40-acre Callaway Brothers Azalea Bowl, w ith more than 4,000 hybrid and native azaleas, debuts this spring at Callaway Gardens in Pine Mountain, Ga. Most o f the hybrid azaleas are propa­ gated from cuttings from the original Overlook Azalea Garden and are arranged in a progression o f colors. Thirteen species o f native azaleas are featured in the north portion o f the garden. Callaway Gardens, owned and operat­ ed by the nonprofit Ida Cason Callaway Foundation, is on U.S. 27, 60 minutes by car southwest o f Atlanta. For information, call 1 (800) CALLAWAY.

T ree, p lan t c a r e e s s e n t ia l for b e a u tifu l l a n d s c a p e s By Eileen Xoutnik

Special Sections Editor ~ W 7 ~ e e p in g trees a n d p la n ts h e a lth y is essential fo r landscapes. Experts J L S k . a t G u a rd ia n T ree & T u r f In c., F re e h o ld , k n o w h o w to he lp . T w o years ago D re w M a d zin an d Scott C o llin s d e c id e d to p o o l th e ir c o lle c ­ tiv e e x p e rtis e an d g o in to business. M a d zin b rin g s m o re th a n 20 years o f e xp e rie n c e to th e business after o w n in g , a n d o p e ra tin g a p la n t care firm . C o llin s ’ k n o w le d g e o f the business sterns fro m his e xp e rie n c e w o rk in g w ith landscape firm s. In a d d itio n , Paul B le w ja s is in v o lv e d w ith th e research a n d d e v e lo p m e n t o f G u a rd ia n p ro g ra m s as w e ll as d a ily o p e r­ ations. H e is o n e o f th e fe w state c e rtifie d tree e xp e rts in th e cen tra l Jersey area. .

lal p la n t care a n d lias d e v e lo p e d p ro ­

gram s su ita b le fo r any situa tion , fro m m an a g in g an insect p ro b le m o n a k e y p la n t to im p le m e n tin g an Integ rated Pest M anagem ent p ro g ra m fo r reside ntial o r co m m e rc ia l sites. A c c o rd in g to G u a rd ia n , p la n t d is o r­ ders can be c o n fu s in g a n d d iffic u lt to m anage. T h e re are m o re th a n 130 pests tha t fe e d o n o rn a m e n ta l p la n ts in N ew Jersey, n o t to m e n tio n th e diseases. C o n tro lin g a n d m in im iz in g p la n t Ja m age re q u ire s th o ro u g h k n o w le d g e o f th e ir life cycle s a n d h a b its an d the a b il­ ity to p ro v id e tim e ly tre a tm e n ts th a t are ba sed o n clo se m o n ito rin g , site h is to ry , v a rie ty o f p la n t species ancl e n v iro n ­ m e n ta l c o n d itio n s T ra d itio n a l spray ■ o fte n cause s itu a tio n s su ch as pest resis­ tance, pest re su rge nce a n d secondary’ pe st o u tb re a ks. For m o re in fo r m a tio n , c o n ta c t G u a rd ia n a t (7 3 2 ) 863-6970.

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ou can take advantage of this window of opportunity to learn the art of selecting window treat­

ments. • Consider this advice from experts at Hunter Douglas: • Space: First, look at the window space itself, then the area surrounding it and, finally, the entire room. To visually expand a window or room, choose soft, light or cool colors. Another hint: Coordinate the window treatments with the wall color because low contrasts keep the eye moving around the room. • lin e : Vertical lines add height and

dignity to a room, creating a formal atmosphere and drawing the eye upward. Vertical lines can also add height and importance to patio doors and other types of windows. Vertical blinds in one of the many fashionable choices available from Hunter Douglas or Luminette Privacy Sheers — a treatment that com­ bines a sheer face fabric and adjustable fabric vanes — are good options here. Horizontal lines are usually consid­ ered less formal. However, certain hori­ zontally oriented treatments such as Country Woods w ood blinds and Silhouette window shadings, a unique

combination blind and shade with a sheer look, as well as pleated or Duette honeycomb shades in silk-like fabrics can be quite formal and elegant. Also, using valances and other decorative over treat­ ments can add height and formality to any horizontal window covering. Curved lines on windows have a soft­ ening effect. Treatments with curves include swags, tapered valances, and bal­ loon shades. • Form: Window fashions may also be used to alter and improve existing window shapes. For example, consider­ ing rectangles are generally more attrac­

tive than squares, a treatment can be installed outside the window opening and above any molding to lengthen the look. • Color: This is the most important element when it comes to setting a mood. It is also what drives many decorating decisions. A good rule of thumb when combining colors in a room is to let the primary color be featured in up to 75 per­ cent of the room, your secondary color about 15 to 20 percent, and your third color about 10 percent . The primary color is usually in the floor and/or wall cover­ ings since they take up the most area.

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M I D D L E T O W N - 1 3 2 0 H I G H W A Y 3 5 ...........7 3 2 - 6 7 1 - 2 5 7 5 7331

INDEPENDENT. MARCH 17, 1999 5 3

P o lic e B e a t All items in Police Beat are taken from police department records. All suspects are presumed innocent until found guilty in court.

ABERDEEN On M arch 12 at 2:36 a.m. someone broke the glass front door of Jerry’s Valet Cleaners on Route 34 and entered the store. The cash register drawer was found open but nothing was missing. Damage to the door is estimated at $600. P olice arrested Antonio Fortuna, 18, of 590 Lloyd Road, and charged him with possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. The arrest occurred following a motor vehicle stop on March 8 at 11:59 p.m. on Route 35 and Riverdale Avenue.

Way on March 7 at 2:36 a.m., according to reports. P olice charged Karalyce Rusignuolo, 27, 210 Campbell St., Union Beach, with d riv in g w h ile in to x ic a te d a fte r being stopped in the parking lot of the Hazlet Swim Club at 12:34 a.m. on March 7, ac­ cording to reports. P o lic e c h a rg e d John Praizner, 25, 117 Raritan Ave., Keansburg, the man­ a g e r of D om ino P izza, R oute 35, on March 1 with theft of moveable property and giving false information to the police fo r a lle g e d ly ste a lin g $1,248 in night d ep osits from the restaurant. He told police that at 1:13 a.m. March 1 he was accosted by two men who wrestled him to the ground and stole the deposits, police said. Police said an investigation and

HOLMDEL An attem pted car th e ft was reported between 9 a. m. and 5 p.m. March 22 in the parking lot of Prudential, 23 Main St. On March 12, Michael Whalen Jr., 20, 6 Spruce Lane, Florence, and Jessica Pawlikowski, 22, 37 North Vale Ave., Little Silver, were arrested at the Holmdel Motor Inn, Route 35, and charged with posses­ sion of m arijuana under 50 grams and possession of drug paraphernalia. Whalen was also charged with disorderly conduct and possession of alcohol under age. The arrests occurred at 8:26 a.m. E g gs w ere re p o rte d ly throw n at a Line Road residence at about 10:22 p.m. March 14.

MATAWAN P olice charged R aym ond J. Behar, 40, 878 Pioneer Drive, Brick, with driving while intoxicated after a routine m otor vehicle stop on Main Street at 11:31 p.m. March 10, according to reports.

MIDDLETOWN Police arrested James A. Walling, 60, of 42 Brainard Avenue, Port Monmouth, for driving while intoxicated on March 11 at 10:10 p.m. The arrest occurred on New

Monmouth and Cherry Tree roads. Police arrested George W. Vansise, 33, of 39 Long Oak Road on March 11 at 8:49 p.m. for driving while intoxicated. The arrest occurred on Kenwood and New Monmouth roads. Police charged Paul A. Rykowski, 40, of 13 Tanglewood Road with driving while intoxicated on March 12 at 2:14 a.m. The arrest occurred on Harmony Avenue. Police arrested James A. Gaul, 37, of 174 Bray Ave. for driving while intoxicated on March 10 at 12:40 a.m. The arrest occurred on Bray Avenue. Police arrested Barrett Andrew Mills, 35, of 4246 Lakewood Boulevard, Naples, Fla., for driving while intoxicated on March 8 at 10:10 p.m . The a rre s t occurred on Hubbard Avenue.

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HAZLET Police charged Mary Jelencsics, 37, 99 Green Grove Ave., Keyport, with driv­ ing while intoxicated after a routine motor vehicle stop on Route 36 and Fieldcrest

inconsistencies in the manager’s account led to his arrest. He was released on his own recognizance.

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Rates and APR (Annual Percentage Rate) as of 3/12/99 are fo r one- to four-fam ily owner-occupied homes and are subject to change w ith o u t notice. Borrow up to $240,000 w ith as little as 5% dow n; a 20% dow n paym ent is required on loans to $500,000; for loans over $500,000, a 25% dow n paym ent is required. M axim um loan am ount, $1.000.000. D ow n payments of less than 20% w ill be accepted w ith private mortgage insurance on loans to a m axim um o f $240,000. P&l represents principal and interest payments on the loan.

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INDEPENDENT. MAROH 17,1999

OBITUARIES Greater Media Newspapers prints obituaries as a free community service, at no charge to the families of the deceased or to the funeral homes that provide the information. JOHN BADRICK, 73, of Middletown died March 8 at King James Care Center, Middletown. Born in London, England, he came to the United States in 1963, settling in New York City and living in Long Island, N.Y., before moving to Middletown 28 years ago. Mr. Badrick was a member of the Surfrider Beach Club in Sea Bright, the Bamm Hollow Country Club in M iddletown and the Telecommunication Professionals of New Jersey. He had served with the British Army during World War II as a staff sergeant. Surviving are his wife of 35 years, Pamela Johnston Badrick; four sons, David of Shorham By Sea in Sussex, England, Gary of the Leonardo section of Middletown, Craig of Jackson and Steve of Middletown; and four grandchildren. Services were under the direction of John F. Pfleger Funeral Home, Middletown. Cremation was private. IDA BANKS NAMIAS, 92, of Red Bank died March 10. Bom in Poland, she came to the United States as a child, settling in New York; she lived in Teaneck and retired to St. Petersburg, Fla., mov­ ing to Middletown in 1979. She was predeceased by her husband, Arthur in 1980. Surviving are two daughters, Jeanette Harrison of Red Bank and Lorraine Darcy of Lapine, Ore.; a son-in-law, Ray Harrison of Middletown; five grandchildren; and 11 great-grandchildren. Services were under the direction of John F. P fleger Funeral Home, Middletown. Interment was at Bayview Cemetery, Middletown. V IR G IN IA R. PARKE C ER W IN , 58, of M iddletow n died March 11 at Jersey Shore Medical Center, Neptune. Born in Elizabeth, she was a homemaker. Mrs. Cerwin attended the Westminster Presbyterian Church, Middletown. She was predeceased by her father, Richard E. Parke, and a sister, Jean Miscavage. Surviving are her husband, Arthur F. Cerwin; a daughter, Heather Ricci of San Diego, Calif.; her mother, Margaret Parke of Louisville, Ky.; and a brother, Robert W. Maggs of Louisville. Services were under the direction of John E. Day Funeral Home, Red Bank. Interm ent was at St. C atherine’s Mausoleum in Sea Girt. Memorial donations may be made to the American Diabetes Association, New Jersey Affiliate Inc., Vantage Court North, 200 Cottontail Lane, Somerset, NJ 08873.

JOHN T. BYRNES, 78, of Middletown died March 10 at Meridian Nursing & Rehabilitation Center, Red Bank. Born in Jersey City, he lived in Bloomfield and Belleville before moving to Middletown in 1957. He worked for AT&T in New York City for 40 years as a patent licensing engineer, retiring in 1982. He was a U.S. veter­ an of World War II, serving as a glider pilot in the South Pacific. Mr. Byrnes was a communi­ cant of St. Mary’s Roman Catholic Church, New Monmouth section of Middletown. A 1956 grad­ uate of Rutgers University in New Brunswick, he earned a bachelor of science degree. He was a member of the Telephone Pioneers of America. Surviving are his wife of 51 years, Ruth A. Gentile Byrnes; three sons, John T. of W ashington, D.C., Richard R. of Leonia and David A. of Spring Lake; a daughter, Ruth B. Butler of Chatham; two sisters, Helen Greeves of St. Augustine, Fla., and Ann Granstrand of W estfield; and nine grandchildren. Services were under the direction of the John F. Pfleger Funeral Home, Middletown, with a religious ser­ vice at St. M ary's Roman C atholic Church. In te rm e n t w as at M ount O live t C em etery, Middletown. RO B ER T R U SSELL G O O D W IN , 89, of M iddletown died March 12 at Arnold W alter Nursing Home, Holmdel. Born in Boston, Mass., he lived in Nova Scotia, Canada; Brooklyn, N.Y., and River Edge before moving to Middletown four years ago. He was an exempt member of the River Edge Fire Department for 50 years and a Tomasso Plaza Tennant Association member. Mr. Goodwin worked for Wrights Aeronautical for 15 years, then for the U.S. Postal Service in River Edge for 30 years, retiring in 1975. He was predeceased by a son, Jam es G oodwin, in 1984. Surviving are his wife of 63 years, Lillian Edith G oodw in; tw o sons, G eorge of W est Milford and Robert of Lambertville; three daugh­ ters, Barbara Conlon of Walnut Creek, Calif., Shelia of Huett of Boca Raton, Fla. and Patricia G age of M onm outh B each; a s is te r, M ary Goodwin McKenna of Brooklyn; 14 grandchil­ dren; and seven great-grandchildren. Services were under the direction of John F. Pfleger Funeral Home Inc., Middletown, with a religious service at St. Mary’s Roman Catholic Church, M id d le to w n . In te rm e n t was at M onm outh Memorial Park in Tinton Falls. Memorial dona­ tions may be made to: Visiting Nurse Assoc, of Central New Jersey (VNA), 141 Bodman Place, Red Bank, NJ 07701.

ROGER D. TUCCILLO, 61, of Little Silver died March 7 at JFK Medical Center, Edison. Born in The Bronx, N.Y., he lived in Monroe, N.Y., before moving to Matawan and then to Little Silver in 1967. Mr. Tuccillo was principal of St. Benedict’s School, Holmdel. He was a graduate of Seton Hall University in South Orange, where he received a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree. He was a retired principal of the Matawan-Aberdeen School District, where he was employed from 1963-95. For several years he was an adjunct pro­ fesso r at M onm outh U n ive rsity’s Education Department, West Long Branch. Mr. Tuccillo was a communicant of the Church of the Nativity, Fair Haven, and was a U.S. Army veteran, serving in the Korean Conflict. He was a former member of the New Jersey Secondary Principals Association, the Shore Athletic Club and the New York Road Runners Club. He was a m em ber of the Recreational Fishing Alliance and the National Catholic Education Association. He was prede­ ceased by his mother, Mathilda Stabile Tuccillo, and a brother, Richard. Surviving are his wife, Brenda M. Maresca Tuccillo; a son, David A. of Aberdeen; a daughter, Andrea M. of Little Silver; his father, Richard of Middletown; and three sis­ ters, Deanna Giattino of Goshen, N.Y., Doreen Leclerc of Middletown and Daria O’Brien of Port Jefferson Station, N.Y. Services were under the direction of John E. Day Funeral Home, Red Bank, with a Mass scheduled today at 10 a.m. at St. Benedict's Church, Holmdel. Interment was to be at Mount Olivet Cemetery, Middletown. FRANCIS W. MEOLA, 77, of Keyport died March 13 in Cliffwood Beach. Born in New York City, she lived in Newark before moving to Keyport four years ago. Mrs. Meola had worked as an expediter at Kearfott, Newark, for 15 years and as adm inistrative assistant at Vornado Bros, in Garfield for 10 years. She was a communicant of Holy Family Church, Union Beach. Mrs. Meola was predeceased by her husband, Daniel, in 1993. Surviving are two daughters, Paulette Mayers and Barbara Bamford, both of Cliffwood Beach; a son, Daniel T. Meola of Nutley; 10 grand­ children; three great-grandchildren; and a close friend, Vincent Gaynor of Keyport. Sen/ices were under the direction of Day Funeral Home, Keyport, with a Mass at St. Lawrence Roman Catholic Church, Laurence Harbor. Interm ent was at Glendale Cemetery, Bloomfield. Memorial dona­ tions may be made to Visiting Nurse Association of Central New Jersey, 141 Bodman Place, Red Bank, NJ 07701.

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ROBERT B. LOCKE, 65, of Gaines, Pa., died March 8 in Union Beach. Born in Norwalk, Conn., he had lived in Middletown for 64 years before moving to Gaines, Pa. He was a communicant of St. C a th e rin e ’s Roman C a th olic Church, Middletown. Surviving are his wife of 46 years, Marilyn; a son, Robert N. of the Port Monmouth section of Middletown; two daughters, Christine M. Morse of Jackson and Patricia I. Steidle of Union Beach; his mother, Margaret Palmer of M ilford, Conn.; a sister, Jea ne tte Locke of Salsbury, Md.; three grandsons; five grand­ daughters; a daughter-in-law, Cathleen Locke; and a son-in-law, Mark Steidle. Services were under the direction of John F. Pfleger Funeral Home, Middletown. VITO W. VALENZANO, 59, of Keyport died March 11 at Memorial Medical Center at South Amboy. He was born in New York City, Mr. Valenzano was a service technician with Copier Warehouse in Avon. He was a communicant of Jesus the Lord Roman Catholic Church, Keyport, and was a member of the Knights of Columbus, Keyport. Surviving are his wife, Helen Pagnano Valenzano; three sons, Stephen of Hazlet, and Scott W. and Christopher H., both of Keyport; a daughter-in-law, Christine Valenzano of Hazlet; and a grandson. Services were under the direc­ tion of Bedle Funeral Home, Keyport, with a reli­ gious service at Jesus the Lord Roman Catholic Church. Interment was at St. Joseph’s Cemetery, Keyport. Memorial donations may be made to: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memorial & Honor Program, P.O. Box 3704, Memphis, Tenn. 38173-0704. FRANCIS R. MONAHAN, 75, of the Leonardo section of Middletown died March 12 at Riverview Medical Center, Red Bank. Bom in New York City, he moved to Leonardo 36 years ago. He was a com m unicant of St. Agnes Roman Catholic Church, Atlantic Highlands. Mr. Monahan was a member of the American Legion Post No. 338 in Leonardo; DAV in New York; and Local AFL-CIO District No. 37 in New York City. He was a U.S. Army veteran of World War II, receiving a Purple Heart, Asiatic Pacific Campaign Medal and ribbon with two Bronze Stars; a private first class, he served with the 27th Infantry and 102nd Medical Battalion. Surviving are his wife of 50 years, Dorothy; a son, Francis R. of Jersey City; two daughters, Dorothy M. Stewart and Maureen J. Adams, both of Leonardo; a brother, Robert V. Monahan of New York City; a daughter-in-law, Dee Monahan of Jersey City; a son-in-law, James Adams of Leonardo; and five grandchildren. Services were under the direction of John F. Pfleger Funeral Home, Middletown, with a reli­ gious services at St. Agnes Roman Catholic Church. Interment was at Bay View Cemetery, Leonardo. MARY M. SM ITH, 93, of Matawan died March 8 at Bayshore C om m unity H ospital, H olm del. Born in Jerse y C ity, she lived in Ridgefield Park most of her life before moving to Matawan 10 years ago. She had worked as a personal credit investigator at Summit Bank in Hackensack for 15 years, retiring 30 years ago. She was a parishioner of St. Clement’s Church . in Matawan and a member of its Altar Rosary Society. She was a former parishioner of St. Francis Church in Ridgefield Park and had been a member its Altar Rosary Society. Mrs. Smith w as a m em ber of the Ladies K n ig h ts of Columbus of Ridgefield Park and a member of the Holy Name Hospital Auxiliary in Teaneck. She was predeceased by her husband, Philip, in 1978 and a son, Gerard J., in 1987. Surviving are a son, Richard J. of Spring Lake; a daughter, Ruth Ann Tighe of Matawan; three sisters, Ruth Mulligan of Union, Gertrude Carroll of Union City and Rita Desmond of Freehold; seven grandchil­ dren and three great-grandchildren. Services were under the direction of Waitt Funeral Home, M org an ville, w ith a M ass at St. C le m e n t’s Church. Interment was at George Washington Memorial Park, Paramus. MARYANNE W IERZBICKI, 37, of Hazlet died Feb. 28 at Christ Hospital, Jersey City. Born in Jersey City, she moved to Hazlet 10 years ago. Mrs. Wierzbicki was employed as a special education teacher for the Board of Education in Jersey City for the past 16 years, working at Snyder High School. She was a communicant of Holy Family Roman Catholic Church, Union Beach. Surviving are her husband, Anthony; a d a u g h te r, K irstin of H a zlet; he r m othe r, RoseMarie Wierzbicki of Jersey City; four sisters, Joane Meyers of West Orange, Karen Kaerns of Union Beach, Gwenn Wierzbicki of Bayonne and C ynthia M cG innis of Jersey City; and three bro th ers, Ray of HoH oK us, Joseph of Las Vegas, Nev., and Gerard o f Pompton Lakes. Services were under the direction of Day F1ineral Home, Keyport, with a Mass at Holy Family Rom an C a th o lic C h urch , U nion Beach. Cremation was private. Donations will be ac­ cepted for an “ Educational Fund for Kirstin Natale” at Amboy National Bank, 3590 U.S. Highway 9, Old Bridge, NJ 08857. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I R I lf t lf lM f

INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999 5 5

SPO RTS H o r n e t s r e p e a t a s S t a t e G r o u p II c h a m p i o n s Klatsky is game’s MVP after 27-point effort

Holmdel is now 22-7 on the season, but more importantly, 21-3 after their 1-4 start in December.

BY TIM MORRIS________

“Our only losses since then have been to St. P atrick ’s, St. A n th o n y ’s and Christian Brothers Academy,” said Stead. “At one time they were the number two, three and four teams in the state.

Staff Writer

hen Tom Stead looked over H o lm d e l’s sch ed u le, w hich included the Nike Prep Classic in California and games against state pow­ ers St. A n th o n y ’s, St. P a trick ’s and Snyder, he knew his Hornets were going to be tested.

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“I think our loss to Red Bank Catholic early in the season made us focus on our first g o a l, the C South D iv is io n ,” he added. “That loss taught us that you can’t overlo o k ed an yon e, and it kept us focused.”

“I knew it was going to be one long, grueling adventure,” he pointed out. “We wanted to take things one day at a time.

A w ay from the Shore C onference, Stead pointed to two games that helped make the Holmdel season.

“We broke things down in stages. First, we wanted to win our division and play well in the Shore Conference Tournament. Then would come the state tournament, where we wanted to play our best,” he said.

“When we went to St. Anthony’s and played w ell there, w e used that as our measuring stick,” he pointed out. “When we held our own there, it proved we can play with anybody. Our big win against Snyder at our house was important. It avenged a loss to them last year and it put us above .500 at the time and that got us going.”

The goal was to return to Atlantic City, site o f the N ew Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association over­ all Group II championships to defend their title. There were bumps on the road to the title due to that demanding schedule, but Sunday night, Stead’s Hornets were back defending it against the team they beat in ’98, North Jersey, Section I champion Mendham. It was there the Hornets put all they had learned to good use as they held up under the pressure o f a second-half rally by the Minutemen to repeat as Group II champions, 55-51.

The last four years have been great for the Hornets: four division titles, two state sectional and two state Group II titles. In that span they have captured the hearts of Holmdel residents and the community has really supported the team. “The tow n has rallied behind u s,” noted Stead. “They’ve given us incredible support everywhere w e ’ve gone. A lot made it through the snow to support us in Atlantic City.

“We learned how to handle pressure down the stretch,” said Stead. “Having been there before, we know what it takes to get through it.” W hat it takes m ost is m aking foul shots, and no one is better under the gun than senior point guard D ave Klatsky. When the Hornets needed the big play or the crucial free throw, Klatsky made it. The game’s Most Valuable Player poured in a game-high 27 points, including a per­ fect 10-10 from the foul line in the fourth quarter. H is free throw shooting kept Mendham at bay and enabled the Hornets to hold on to their championship. “This was an unbelievable feat,” said Stead. “There’s a lot o f pressure to repeat and people get spoiled a little bit by your success. It was harder the second time around.” Knowing the value o f free throw shoot­ ing in big games, the Hornets spend extra time after practice on it. “Our foul shooting has gotten us here,” Stead pointed out. “The kids play a game with coach (Tom) Pushie in which they have to make 15 in a row before they can leave. It’s a great way o f improving your concentration and that is what free throw shooting is. Especially at the end of the game.” And, no one on Holmdel’s team does it better than Klatsky. “D ave has basically carried us,” ex­ plained Stead. “We have a lot of role play­ ers and he’s the one who puts us on a dif­

“The team got a great deal of satisfac­ tion winning this one for all the people who have supported us,” he added,

JACKIE POLLACK

SHOT SPOT — Holmdel High School’s Adam Fleischner looks fo r a shot.

ferent level. H e’s averaged 21 points, seven rebounds and seven assists a game in the tournament. That’s a lot from a 5-10 guard.” H olm d el began Sunday’s Group II final like a team on a m issio n , stunning Mendham with a 20­ 6 first-quarter lead. “M endham is a very good team and we knew they were go in g to be very h u n gry,” noted Stead. “It was im portant that we come out of the gate fast and get a lead.

that Mendham, though, would fight back.” John Donovan led the Hornets’ early surge with seven o f his nine points.

Mendham (25-4), wasn’t going to quit, though, and an 11-9 edge in the second quarter kept them in the game. They only 'T h e t e a m g o t a g r e a t trailed 29-17 at the d e a l o f s a t is fa c tio n h a lf and a 19-12 w in n in g t h is o n e f o r third- quarter advan­ tage made it a game.

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Early in the fourth quarter, the T o m S te a d Minutemen got with­ in one point, 41-40, H o lm d e l H ig h S c h o o l before Klatsky was b o y s b a s k e tb a ll t e a m fo u led on a threepoint shot and made all three free throws. “We stressed that after our Sterling game in the semi-finals It would be that way the rest of the period when we fell behind by 11 in the first with Klatsky’s pressure shooting holding half,” added Stead. “We got out to that big off Mendham’s charge. Klatsky scored 12 lead early and we didn’t let up. I knew of the Hornets’ 14 fourth-period points.

Holmdel will begin play in the NJSIAA Tournament o f Champions Thursday night at the Dunn Sports C enter in Elizabeth. The Hornets were seeded fourth and will play the No. 5 seed, Group III champion Parsippany, at 6 p.m. The w inner w ill play at R utgers University on Sunday in the TOC semi-fi­ nals against No. 1 seed Seton Hall Prep. “When you look at this year’s field, the traditional pow ers aren’t there,” said Stead. “In the past, that created mismatch­ es. I don’t see that this year. “I know that Parsippany is a very good team,” added the Hornets coach. “W e’re going after this game believing we can win it.” It was K latsky w ho sparked the Hornets to its second straight Central Jersey Group II crown earlier in the week when he pumped in 25 points in the 63-48 win over Asbury Park. Klatsky, who had four treys, hit for six points in the first quarter when Holmdel stung the Bishops in the first quarter, jumping out to a 17-7 lead. Donovan and Adam Fleischner each netted nine for the Hornets, who made it to the title game from the N o. 4 seed. Maybe that bodes well for Holmdel this week in the TOC.

5 6

INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999

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WAY TO GO — The St. John Vianney Lancers anticipate v ic to ry near the end of S a tu rd a y 's gam e a g a in s t th e Im m a c u la te H eart B lu e A n g e ls o f W a s h in g to n Township.

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hey’re back. Again. The St. John Vianney High School girls basket­ ball team is returning to the state Tournament of Champions (TOC) for the third straight year and the ninth time in 10 seasons. -

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Expectations are always high at the tra­ dition-filled Holmdel school. Prior to the start o f the cam paign, coach Brad Hagensen said, “Our goal every year is to get back to the TOC.” And the Lancers, 26-2, appear to be on top o f their game. Vianney earned its TOC berth (and No. 1 tournament seed) by beating Immaculate Heart Academy (IH A ) o f W estw ood in the N JSIA A Parochial A championship game Saturday at the Dunn Center in Elizabeth. With that victory, Vianney chalked up its third successive Parochial A title. The Lady Lancers also won the crown five tim es from 1990-94, and captured the Parochial B championship in 1995. “Our defense has been the key for us right from the start o f the season, and the girls seem to be able to turn it up higher when they need to,” Hagensen said. “This team has a great work eth ic, th e y ’re always working to improve, and it’s been paying off. As a result, they’ve formed their own identity as a team that will come right after you.” The determined Lancers took control from the start. After the opening tap it went score, press, steal; score press, steal and score some more. Within three min­ u tes, V ian n ey had created seven

turnovers, built a 10-0 lead, held their opponent without a shot and, in the pro­ cess, shattered Immaculate Heart’s con­ fidence. When the Blue Eagles from Bergen County finally did get shots, they missed nine straight before finally tickling the twine. By the end of the first quarter the score was 27-5, Lancers. Despite the big lead, Vianney showed no sign o f lettin g the W ashington Township squad off the ropes. At the half, the Lancers were up 53-21, and on their way to a 78-38 win. Senior co-captains Regan A po and Sandi Haefner, the heart and soul of the team, paced the attack. Apo led the way with 15 points, including seven from the charity stripe, w hile Haefner added 13 points. Apo was named the game’s Most Valuable Player. “I ’m very proud o f the way Regan (Apo) and Sandi (Haefner) have stepped up and taken on the responsibility as the leaders o f this team ,” H agensen said. “They’ve done the job on the floor and in the locker room.” Junior guard Vanessa Putnoky came up big as w e ll, hitting for 15 points. Guards Nina V ecchio and Tami Coyle, who scored four and five points, respec­ tively, were outstanding on the press, cre­ ating several turnovers and forcing bad passes. V ec ch io w as a k ey p layer in the L an cers’ 5 9 -3 8 w in over G lou cester C atholic in the N JSIA A South Jersey Parochial A title game on March 9. The junior point guard scored 16 points, in­ cluding a pair of three-pointers, to lead the way. Apo contributed 13 points and Tami Coyle canned two important three-point­ ers.

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INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999 5 7

Brookdale softball team beglos seasoo as No. 1 BY T IM MORRIS Staff Writer

he Brookdale Community College softball team will begin the 1999 season at the very top. Coach Bo Scannapieco’s Jersey Blues have turned into a national force in recent years and Brookdale will begin the 1999 season as the No. 1-ranked D ivision III junior college softball team in the country. Fortunately, the Jersey B lu es have experienced the pressure o f being No. 1 before. Last season the squad made Brookdale history when they became the first athletic team to be ranked No. 1 in the country. The 1998 season saw the Jersey Blues go 42-5 and finish second at the Junior College Division III World Series. Along the way they won a school record 28 con­ secutive games, shared the Garden State Athletic Conference championship and won the Region XIX tournament. Scannapieco, who has taken Brookdale to the World Series in each of the last three seasons, knows that it’s not where you be­ gin the season, but where you finish that counts. “It’s a building process,” he said. “You don’t start the season where you ended it. You have to work to get there. I think the kids realize that and they’re looking for­ ward to getting started.” There is good reason for BCC’s lofty ranking — the Jersey Blues have seven returning starters, including first team AllAmerican pitcher Lauren Larson, a Raritan High School graduate. Larson was the Most Valuable Player in the R egion X IX Tournament that sent Brookdale to the Junior C ollege World Series. She went 18-2 with a 1.46 ERA. She tossed four shutouts and authored a no­ hitter against Bergen. In addition to her 18 wins, she had two saves. Also returning to the rotation is Carol Hilton, who went 10-3 with a 3.98 ERA. Brookdale must find a pitcher to replace Sandi Davis in the rotation and that won’t be easy. She was 12-0 with a 2.95 ERA and three shutouts last spring. In freshm an Janine L eone o f Old Bridge, Scannapieco thinks he may have found his third starter. Scannapieco is a strong believer in pitching depth and that depth is a big rea­ son why the Jersey Blues had made it to the World Series for three straight years and finished third in ’97 and second last year. Scannapieco doesn’t bum pitchers out by relying on one ace to carry the team. He spreads the starting assignments around. Larson started 24 games last year, Davis, 21 and Hilton, 18. Scannapieco does not designate an ace of the staff. “My feeling is that the pitcher who is going that day is No. 1,” he said. Larson isn ’t the only first team AllAmerican returning to the Lincroft campus. Shortstop Maryanne Soares is back and with her comes one of the country’s most productive offensive players. Soares made the All-Tournament Team at the World Series. As for her overall season, she was nothing short of brilliant. She batted .559 (third best in the country) and led the na­ tion in runs scored (72), hits (90), triples (17), home runs (12) and RBI (73). Kelly Fairclough, a St. John Vianney High School graduate, is back at second base and with her comes her .354 average. She made the W orld S eries A ll­ Tournament Team which speaks for her

T

ability to play under pressure. A lso returning are catcher K elly Honecker, Stephanie Leonard and Krysti Tice. Honecker, who made the All-Region XIX Team, batted .308 and drove in 32 runs. Leonard, who provides speed at the top of the lineup, scored 47 runs and stole 28 bases while batting .287. Tice batted .325, hit three home runs and drove in 30 runs. Tice won a game in relief last year and can come on to pitch in an emergency situation. Howell’s Andrea Heil and Marlboro’s Rebekah Dillon were cornerstones of the Jersey Blues in 1997 and ’98. Both have gone on to play Division I softball and will be hard to replace. Heil batted .443 with 38 RBI and 56 runs scored, while Dillon hit .447, drove in 48 runs and scored 53 times. Vicki Trowbridge and her .457 average and 46 RBI also graduated. Newcomers who will replacing those veterans include a pair of Central Regional stars, Toni Penniman and Becky Barrett; H ow ell’s Angela Colfer; W all’s Christy Szeigis and Red Bank’s Marianne Reevy. Penniman, a third baseman, hit .450 for the Golden Eagles. Barrett batted .421, but may be more valuable as a centerfielder. Scannapieco said that Barrett is as good defensively as any centerfielder Brookdale has had. C olfer hit .403 for the R ebels with power. Her versatility (she can play catcher or outfield) as well as her production will get her into the lineup. Szeigis is a candidate for designated hit­ ter — she hit .344 at Wall — and Reevy, who is another speedster, hit .328 at Red Bank. She plays first base. “We have a lot to replace with the loss of Vicky, Andrea and Rebekah,” explained Scannapieco. “This year’s team should be more athletic. W e’re a little quicker and I expect that if we have to manufacture runs w e’ll have the ability to do that.” Brookdale embarks on a very ambitious 55-gam e schedule that w ill b egin in Maryland on Friday with a doubleheader against C atonsville. On Saturday and Sunday the Jersey Blues will participate in the Del-Tech Tournament. “Our first five games are very difficult,” Scannapieco said. “We are playing very good teams and could drop some games there. The No. 1 ranking isn’t important. These games will be tough, but it will show us where w e’re at.” Brookdale will open its home season on March 25, hosting Mercer at 3:30 p.m. in a doubleheader. The regular season w ill continue through May 6. On April 10-11, Brookdale will host its own softball tournament. The Region XIX Tournament will start on May 8-9 with first round games at the home o f the higher seed. If the Jersey Blues are to get to the nationals for a fourth straight year, they may have an edge in the Region finals because Brookdale will be hosting the tournament finals on May 13 and May 15. The nationals will be at Anne Arundel Community College in Arnold, Md., May

20- 22. With the season just two days away, Scannapieco likes his team’s prospects. “I expect us to be better at manufactur­ ing runs this year,” he said. “We may not have the power we had, but we have fences now and that may help. Defensively, I like our team. I think we can win games with our defense this year. I think our pitching can be where it was last year.”

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"M e e t in g P la c e TORESPONDTOANAD, CALL1 -9 0 0 -7 7 3 -6 6 0 2 $1.99 PERM INUTE.You M USTBE18 OROLDER. W omen Seeking Men Call 1-900-773-6602 $1.99 per min. YOUNG AT HEART 5 ’3 ” S ingle w id o w ed fem ale w ith long auburn hair a nd big brown e yes. E njoys good con­ v e rsa tio n , co o kin g , boa ting , jo gg in g and exercising. S eek­ ing a m ale 39-44, o ver 6 ’0 ” w h o is a non-sm oker, has a fu ll head o f h air and is rom an­ tic. BO X 36680 E N TIR E LY YO U R S S in gle black fem ale, 20, se ek­ ing a sin gle male, 21 to 24, tali, w h o like s p arks, d ining o ut and sp en ding tim e together. B O X 13383 M ID D LE S E X CO U N TY D ivorced w h ite fem ale, slim , rom antic lady, 4 0 0 s , dow n to e a rth a nd c a rin g . E njoys m usic, m ovies and dining out. Seeking a g entlem an, 46 to 56, fo r a lifetim e of happiness. BO X 32721_________________ E A S Y G O IN G S in g le , w h ite fe m a le , mid 4 0 0 s , fu ll figured, d ark hair and g re y e yes seeking a sin ­ cere, rom antic, w hite m ale fo r a long term relationship. BOX 37497______________________ LO N G T E R M R E LATIO N D ivorced, w hite petite fem ale, 56 yr old, 5 ’, brow n h air and e yes is se eking an honest, sin cere m ale, fo r a Iona term relationship. BO X 10638 IT A L IA N LA D Y 5 2 y r o ld , Italian fem ale, e njo ys m ovies, m usic, outdoor a ctivities a nd m ore. Seeking a kind, decent, w h ite m ale, 52 to 60, non-sm oker, fo r dating and possib le long term re la tion ­ ship. B O X 12422____________ L IFE IS B E A U T IF U L D o w n to e a rth , b lu e eyed b runette, affectionate, warm , loving, Je w ish w id o w desires h o n e st, co m p a ssio n a te , yo un g a t heart Jew ish male (M ensch), 64 to 69, a n on ­ sm oker, to share tom orrow O s love, laughter, and happiness. (M o n m o u th /M id d le s e x are a) B O X 32716_________________ A R E YOU TH E O N E ? D ivorced fem ale, 60, blonde hair, blue eyes, tall and slim . E njoys a va rie ty o f interest. S eeking so m e on e old fa sh ­ ioned, sincere, kind and h on ­ est, w ith s im ila r interest. BOX 37314______________________ L E T O S MEET.... _ W h ite fe m a le , e a rly 5 0 0 s , 5 ’5 ” , 128 lb s, red dish hair, b ro w n e yes. E n jo ys tra ve l, d in in g , m o v ie s a n d m ore. S ee kin g a w h ite m ale, tall, n on-sm oker, w ith sim ila r inter­ ests, fo r a relationship. BOX 40699______________________ FR IE N D A N D LO V E R 32 y r old, 5’6", 118 lb, single, w hite fem ale w ith a dau gh ter is se e kin g an a ttra ctive , secure, happy, non-sm oking, single male, 31 to 37, 5 ’7” or taller, w h o w a nts to g et the m o st o u t o f life. L oves a ntiq ue s, hiking, snow m obiling, g ardening, traveling, o ut­ doors, and life. B O X 3 2 /0 9 IN T H IS M A ILB O X 5’8” , 140 lb, sin gle fem ale, seeking a single male, 40 to 65, fo r frie n dsh ip and more. BO X 37392_________________ TO U C H O F C L A S S M onm outh County, attractive, 63 yr, n on -sm o ke r, w idow, u n e n cu m b e re d , a nd retired. A n open, optim istic, flexible, a d v e n tu re s o m e w o m a n. S eeking 6 0-69 yr old m an fo r long term relationship. BO X 32705

L IF E IS B E S T S H A R E D P e tite , a ttra c tiv e , fe m in in e , affectionate, w h ite, w id o w ed fem ale is in search o f a white, widow ed male, 6 0 or older, w ith tra d itio n a l va lu e s, fo r com patibility. E njoys dancing, tra vel, arts, etc. Tell m e so m e ­ th in g a b o u t y o u rs e lf. BO X 32701_______________________ TA LL AND HANDSOME 40 yr old, 5 ’6” , m edium build, p ro fe s s io n a l, sin g le , w h ite fem ale w ith one child, blonde hair, and blue e yes is seeking a professional, honest, n on ­ d rinking, single, w hite m ale fo r friendship and a possible rela­ tio nsh ip . B O X 376 22 _________ IS IT ME Y O U A R E ... ...Looking For? I am an a ttra c­ tive, passionate, e asy going, ca rin g a nd a ctive la dy and seek a m an w h o is 5 0-60, non­ smoker, w ho also has a sense o f hum or, is brig ht and has la ugh lines around his eyes. B O X 32645_________________ R E A D Y FOR R O M A N C E 21 ye a r o ld sin g le b la ck fem ale w ith long black hair a nd b ro w n e yes. E njoys, m ovies, dining o u t and more. S eeking a m a le w h o is very ro m a ntic a nd h a s s im ila r in ter­ ests. B O X 13394____________ NO F A LS E HY P E Ju st a ve ry p re tty red head, E uropean charm , sm art, J e w ­ ish p ro fe ssio n a l. S ee ks the sam e in a han dso m e m an of success, integrity, hum or, vital, 55 to 65, fo r cuddling, caring, a nd com m itm ent. W ido w e r a plus. BO X 32631____________ DO W N TO E A R TH 5 ’4 ” , 140 lb, sin gle m o the r of one likes th e beach, dining, ca m ping and fishing. Seeking a dow n to earth, honest, hard w o rke r fo r a long term rela tion ­ ship. B O X 37009____________ VER Y P R O M ISIN G 35 y r old fem ale, 5 ’10”, 130 lbs, s in c e re a nd hon est. E n jo ys m o vie s, d in in g out, m u s ic a nd m o re . S e e kin g so m e on e w ith s im ila r in te r­ ests, w ho is em o tion ally and fin an cia lly secure. B O X 12496 S IN C E R E A N D H O N E S T Fem ale, 5’3 ”, 140 lbs, brown h air and eyes. E njoys m ovies, fle a m a rke ts, q u ie t tim e s. Seeking a w hite m ale, 50 to 6 3, sin cere a nd honest. BO X 37581_______________________ LETO S TALK D ivorced w h ite fem ale, 30 y r old, 5’ , 95 lbs, b londe hair, h azel eyes. E njoys m ovies, dining, and more. Seeking a p rofessional male, 2 0 to 30, w ith sim ila r in terests, fo r a frie n dsh ip and possib le rela­ tionship. BO X 39635_________ DE S IR E & A F FE C TIO N W hat else could you w a nt for? S ingle w h ite fem ale, m id 40s, independent, sincere and hon­ est. E njoys dining, dancing, m u s ic and m o re . S e e kin g w hite m ale, 40s-55, w ith sim i­ la r in terests. S o ca ll! B O X 2 4 1 4 6 _________________ C E N T R A L N J. D JF 45 y r o ld , slim , a ttra ctive , b ru ne tte , in d e p en d en t, n o n ­ sm oker, professional, honest, ca rin g a nd a ffe ctio n a te , divorced Jew ish fem ale, with grow n children. E njoys nature, m useum s, art, m usic, theater, m ovies, fine d ining and travel. In se a rch o f s in ce re , n o n ­ sm oking, sin gle Je w ish male, 4 5-52, fo r long term relation­ ship. BO X 32489____________ P R IC IL L A S E E K S ELVIS Fun loving, 54 ye ar old, green eyes, long d a rk hair, lo ves m u sic, a n d w a n ts to m e e t E lvis lo ok alike fo r com p an io n ­ ship. BO X 32659

Men Seeking W omen Call 1-900-773-6602 $1.99 per min. S T IL L S EA R C H IN G W h ite , w id o w e d , C a th o lic m ale, yo un g 61, 5’9” , slim , e x­ e xecutive, non sm oker, o cca ­ s io n a l d rin ke r, e n jo y s c o n ­ certs, h istorical places, dining, s p o rts, w e e ke n d tra vel, a ntiques, seafood, th e a te r and m o st cultural activities. Look­ ing fo r a slim , rom antic, fe m i­ nine, non sm oking, easygoing gal. B O X 15481_____________ A TTE N TIO N : B A R B A R A You replied to m y box number, it w a s # 32626, yo u r voice m essage did not record on m y vo ice m e ssa g e se rvice . P lease call again fo r Steve. BO X 32724_________________ C O M P U TE R PAR TNER 55 y r old, 160 lb, 5 ’9” d ivorced, w hite, Je w ish m ale seeks e ­ m ail co nn ectio n w ith playful, single, w h ite fem ale. L etO s fin d o ut m ore a bo ut each o th e r o ver th e Internet. B ea u ty is not required, n iceness is n eces­ sary. E a s t W ind sor. B O X 32725______________________ L E TO S C O N N E C T S ingle, w hite male, 6 ’, 210 lbs in g o o d sh a p e w ith va rie d in te re sts. S e e kin g a slim , attra ctive fem ale, 42 to 52, fo r a possible long-term relation­ ship. BO X 36175____________

H E A R T O F G O LD D ivo rce d w h ite m a le , 44, 5’ 11” , 175 lbs, honest, sincere and ro m a n tic. S ee kin g divorced w hite fem ale, 37-46, w ith a slim fig ure a nd has morals. BO X 32715 SEE W H AT HAPPENS S ingle m ale is se eking a w hite o r P uerto Rican, bi fem ale, to g e t to kn ow each o th e r and hang out. BO X 37678________ IO M S O P ER FEC T Yeah right!!! 64 y r o ld single w hite male, 5’7” , 170 lbs, fit, crabby, no se nse o f hum or and u gly a s sin! E njoys noth­ in g. W ould like to m e e t a slim , a ttra c tiv e , ch e e rfu l, sin gle w h ite fem ale, u nd er 60, fo r w hate ver m ay develop. BOX 32601 S E E K IN G A FR IE N D S in g le , w h ite , p ro fe ssio n a l, m ale, 54, 5 ’10” , 165 lbs, sin­ ce re , se n sitive , hon est, ro m a n tic, w ith a se n se o f hum or. Seeking a sin gle w h ite fe m a le , n o n -sm o ke r, 45-55, e asy going, good hearted, ca r­ ing and old fash io n values. BO X 32624 C IR C L E T H IS A D 60 yr old, 5 ’8” , cross dresser, subm issive, seeking a fem ale w h o like to have a good tim e. B O X 12194

DA Y TIM E R O M A N C E Italian m a le , 6 ’, w ith b la ck c u rly h a ir a n d m o u sta ch e. E njoys long w a lks on beach, h olding hands, m ovies, quiet even in gs and more. S eeking a fem ale 25 to 4 5 w ith sim ilar interests. R ace not im portant. BO X 36689_________________

IO L L T R E A T U R IG HT Italian m ale w ith a sense of humor. E njoys w alks on the b each, hold in g han ds, cu d ­ d lin g and more. Seeking a sin­ gle fem ale, 25 to 4 5, w h o is w arm , affectionate, and want to be pam per and treated like a lady. BO X 13118_______

L O N E LY W ITH O U T YOU 3 2 y r old, d ivorced fa th e r of one, m edium m uscu lar build, hazel eyes. E njoys co m e dy clu bs and music. S eeking a p h y s ic a lly fit, sin g le or d ivorced fem ale, w ith a sense o f hum or. BO X 13339________

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C O U N T R Y G IR L TY P E 31 yr old, 6 ’1” , average build, single m a le w h o like s music, dinn e r, s h o o tin g p o o l and more. Seeking a single, co un ­ try girl type , w ith sim ila r inter­ ests. BO X 13355____________ NICE JE W IS H G UY 2 9 yr old, 5 ’9” , single h and­ so m e Je w ish male, brow n hair a nd eyes. E njoys dating and ro m a nce . S ee ks J e w is h o r non-Jew ish fem ales, 21 to 35, w ho are fit with sim ila r inter­ e sts fo r possib le long term relationship. M onm outh co un ­ ty. B O X 32719 ______________ LETO S HA V E S O M E FUN 31 yr old single, m ale security guard se eking a single fem ale w ho likes to go out and have fun . B O X 36934_____________ IN TH IS M A ILB O X S ingle m ale seeking a tru st­ in g , s in c e re a nd h o n e st fem ale. C hildren okay. BOX 37407 ______________________ LO V E A N D H A P P IN E S S 23 y r old, 6’2 ” , 190 lb single, w hite m ale se eking som eone w h o enjoys lo ve, rom ance and happiness. BO X 12072

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Coltsfall to SetonHall Prep 3-0 inseason-endinghockeyplayoff B Y S E A N S IM M O N S

Staff Writer

MORRIS — Brady Crooks scored two goals to lead top-seeded Seton Hall Prep’s ice h ock ey team past fou rth -seed ed Christian Brothers Academy o f Lincroft in the NJSIAA Parochial School semifinals at the William G. Mennen Sports Arena Friday. The Colts finished the season with a record of 13-10-1. Seton Hall Prep jumped out to a 1-0 lead on a goal by Crooks 1:25 into the second period. Scott Eberenz then broke away and put the puck past C B A ’s Ed Fernandez for a 2-0 lead at 5:39 o f the third period. The Pirates then went up 3-0 on Crooks’ second goal with 18 seconds remaining in the game. The Pirates outshot the Colts 29-24 and goalkeeper Jeff Skowronski notched his seventh shutout of the season. Fernandez turned back 26 shots for the Colts. “The second period was mixed,” CBA coach Mike Reynolds said. “They have some good hockey players and they got loose from us. They are a well-disciplined and well-coached team.” One game earlier, in a March 10 quar­ terfinal contest, CBA’s Fred Brown put in the game-winning goal o ff a feed from Ryan Clune to lift the Colts past fifthseeded St. Joseph’s (Metuchen) by the score of 4-3 at the American Hockey and Ice Skating Center, Wall Township. “Ryan Clune and I had been moving the puck back and forth all game,” Brown said. “They were giving us lanes all night. Ryan gave the puck to me and I skated in. “I knew I had a good defender on me and I didn’t think I could get past him, so I wanted to put a shot on goal, thinking maybe w e could get a rebound,” said B row n. “I thought I cou ld use their defender as a screen and I was very sur­

prised the shot went in.” Brown got things going for the Colts early, scoring 42 seconds into the second period off a pass from Brian Bauman to give them a 1-0 lead. Clune then found Matt Clemente for a breakaway goal with 5:54 left in the second stanza to give the Colts a 2-0 lead. St. Joseph’s stormed back w ith a power play goal by John Fedele off of a double assist by Anthony Invemo and John Feltz with 3:17 left in the second period. With 12:03 remaining in the third pe­ riod, Tom Howard converted on a pass from Fedele to tie the game at 2-2. Then, St. Joseph’s took a 3-2 lead when Craig Black found Invemo for a slap shot from the left wing with 7:28 remaining in the game. Alex Soloway scored on a double assist from Brown and Adam Lepore six­ teen seconds later to tie the game at 3-3. “It was just a rebound o ff one o f their skates,” Soloway said. “I just put it back and it’s a great feeling.” Finally, Brown fired a slap shot past St. Joseph’s goalkeeper Dave Brain with 2:04 left in the game to seal the victory for the Colts. St. Joseph’s goalkeeper went to the bench with 1:10 remaining to give the team an extra attacker. The Falcons at­ tacked CBA goalkeeper Mike Bruce with shots, but the Colts’ defense rose to the occasion, stopping one shot then swarm­ ing after the puck as the final seconds ticked away. The Falcons outshot the Colts 24-21 and Brian stopped 17 shots. Bruce made 21 saves for the Colts. “This was a great game from a fan’s standpoint,” Reynolds said. “In the first period I thought there were three or four shots we should have follow ed up, but Mike Bruce did what he had to do to help us win the game.”

SPORT SHORTS The Battle of Monmouth Jaguars, an under-12 girls soccer team, is looking for a couple of girls to complete their roster for the spring Monmouth-Ocean Soccer Association season. Girls must be born between 8/1/87 and 7/31/87 to be eligible. Tryouts will be held at the Marlin Estates F ield in Marlboro on Saturdays. Call Bruce for the time of the tryouts at (732) 536-6528. There is no residency require­ ment. The Battle o f M onmouth Lightning, a 1982/83 girls soccer team, is looking for an experienced player to add to its roster. The Lightning play in the MonmouthOcean Soccer Association. The team prac­ tices in Marlboro. Players must be bom after 7/31/82 to be eligib le. Interested players should call Sue at (732) 303-0929 for more information. The Jersey Shore M accabi Club of the Jewish Community Center of Greater Monmouth County will start holding try­ outs for you th s ages 13-16 from Monmouth and Ocean counties the week o f M arch 15 for the JCCA M accabi Games to be held in Rochester, N .Y ., Aug. 15-20. Tryouts will be held in the follow ing sports: baseball, basketball, golf, gymnastics, in-line hockey, racquetball, soccer, swimming, track and field and volleyball. Anyone interested should ca ll (7 3 2 ) 5 3 1 -9 1 0 0 and ask for the Maccabi Club and leave your name, age, sport and telephone number.

GoodSports USA in Wall Township is now accepting registrations for M en’s O pen S o ccer, O ver 30 S o ccer, Flag Football, Youth Soccer Tournament, Girls and Boys High School Soccer Leagues, Women’s Soccer and Women’s Lacrosse. For more inform ation, call (732) 681 8898. T he fo llo w in g b a se b a ll team s are holding tryouts for players ages 13-19: the Flemington Orioles, call Jeff Smedley at (9 0 8 ) 9 0 3 -0 2 9 7 ; the South Jersey Cardinals, call Jim McDermott at (732) 723-9204; the Jersey Shore Indians, call D on B iela k at (7 3 2 ) 9 0 5 -1 3 8 4 ; the Amarillo Dillas, call Art Levine at (973) 208-7453; and the Central Jersey Reds, call Chris Rogusso at (908) 421-4300. All these teams play Sunday double-headers against A competition. In addition, the teams offer college scholarship network­ ing and the chance to be seen by college coaches and scouts. The Central Jersey Firebirds 14-andunder Girls Fastpitch C lass A team is looking for two infielders and two out­ fielders for the spring and fall season. Call Vince at (732) 780-6710 to arrange a try­ out. The Central Jersey Firebirds 16-andunder Girls Fastpitch C lass A team is looking for a pitcher and a catcher for the spring and fall seasons. C all V ince at (732) 780-6719 to arrange a tryout.

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ome buyers now have a to o l available to measure and evaluate hom e inspectors. The Standard o f Care f o r the Home Inspection Profession has ju s t been published b y the H om e Inspection Institute o f A m erica Inc. In development since 1996, it spells out the ethics required o f an inspector. A section dealing w ith pre-inspection agreements tells what should be in the w ritten contract the inspector uses. Consumers should o n ly use inspectors w ho provide such an agreement. Consumers should check and understand the contents o f the contract before they agree to the terms. There are also sections on evaluating com ­ ponents, the report and handling deficiencies fou nd during the inspection. Another 20 pages gives advice on what the inspector should inspect. I t also details w hat the inspector should be lo o kin g fo r during the inspection o f each o f the components. A rm ed w ith this document, the homebuyer can ask several inspectors detailed, k n o w l­ edgeable questions. I t is best to evaluate sev­ eral inspectors before selecting one fo r the job. A ll too often, the consumer o n ly asks price, w h ich is probably the last question that should be asked i f the customer wants a qu ality inspection. The Standard o f Care f o r the Home Inspection Profession is available fro m the Hom e Inspection Institute o f A m erica Inc. They can be contacted at 314 M a in St., P.O. B o x 4174, Yalesville, C N , 06492, o r call (203) 284-2311.

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INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999 6 1

THE M A R K E T PL A C E

IREAL ESTATE UPDATE

#

• Real Estate • Business • Auto • Classified •

CURIOSITY SEEKERS

AUTOS I n te r n e t d r iv e r 's lic e n s e ta k e s

b u y e r s

fo r

a

r u le

To get around this pesky legality, some o r m otorists w ith a bad d rivin g record, companies w ill “ register” the license in a fo r­ the lure o f an international driver’s eign country using a foreign address fo r the license that cannot be revoked is very user’s home address. W hat potential buyers tem ptin g, regardless o f the p rice tag. should consider is the inevitable tra ffic stop A ccord in g to A A A , web sites on the Internet offerin g such licenses ask as m uch as $300when fo r a police office r asks to see their license and vehicle registration. the $10 item. The addresses fo r the license and the vehi­ “ A A A is one o f on ly tw o organizations cle registration w ill vary drastically, and ly in g authorized b y the U.S. Departm ent o f State to to a la w enforcement office r about your resi­ issue and sell International D riv in g Permits dency is a crime. (ID Ps) and Inter-A m erican D riv in g Permits In order to issue a v a lid ID P o r IA D P , the (lA D P s ) in the U n ite d States,” said B ill issuer m ust see a va lid U.S. state o r te rrito r­ Hughes, m anager o f A A A A u to Travel ia l d riv e r’s license. However, the Internet Operations. varieties ra re ly ask fo r d riv e r’s license in fo r­ The purpose o f an ID P o r an IA D P is to m atio n o r fo r a copy o f the license. allow those traveling abroad to drive legally, O ther things yo u should kn o w about the and avoid potential problem s arising fro m lan­ ID P o r IA D P are: guage barriers. • I t costs $10 and is v a lid fo r up to one A n ID P includes the in fo rm atio n on a U.S. year fro m the date o f issue. driver’s license in 11 languages and is accept­ • I t is a w id e ly recognized fo rm o f photo ed in m ore than 200 countries outside the U.S. id e n tific a tio n and is available at m ost A A A A n IA D P translates that same in fo rm atio n in to office s to a ll holders o f a U.S. d rive r’s fo u r languages and is accepted in Central and license. South Am erican countries. • You m ust be at least 18 and have a v a lid “ In accordance w ith international law, U.S. d riv e r’s license to purchase one. these permits are not recognized in the coun­ • You need tw o passport-size photos fo r try in w h ich they are issued,” said Hughes. purchasing the perm its (these photos are also “ There are m any offers fo r purchasing interna­ available at m ost A A A offices). tional driver’s licenses through the Internet, • I t m ust be accom panied at a ll tim es by but none o f them are recognized in the U.S. as a U.S. d riv e r’s license. legal d rivin g perm its fo r U.S. citizens residing in this country.”

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m m

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LINCROFT COLONIAL Exquisite remodeled and expanded 4 BR, 2/ bath colonial. 28 ft. gourmet white kitchen, corian counters and 2 fpls. great room, hdwd firs, ing. pool and so much more. (025-008522) C a ll (7 3 2 ) 6 7 1-8 000

J im C a m ille r i

QUE ST I ° N : VSOiy sh °u ld I use the

services o f a REALTOR when I can buy all the real estate forms I need at the stationary store and just fill them in myself? IT’S WHAT GOES INTO p r in t e d f o r m s th a t g i v e s v a lu e a n d p ro te c tio n .

AN SW ER : These printed form s are only a starting point. There are dozens o f varieties o f deeds, leases, and mortgage forms. W hich ones are to be chosen to best protect yourself is a good question fo r openers. Then, it ’s what goes into the blanks, what is crossed out, and what is added that gives you the value, security and protection that you pay the experts for. Believe me, some o f the largest financial losses and legal entangle­ ments have resulted from printed forms being incorrectly used.

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WELL MAINTAINED! This ranch on an oversized lot offers vinyl siding, “L” shapedliving/dining room, EIK, 3bedrooms, 2full baths & two large sheds for extra storage. (056008264) C a ll (73 2) 583-5 400

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TWO FOR THE PRICE OF ONE! Beautiful ranch home in great condition. 3 bedrooms, 2full baths. Updated oak kitchen. Newer carpeting over hdwd. flors. Full fin. basew/fam. rm. w/wet bar, DR, kit. &full bath. Bonus 3 room cottage w/porch, LR, BR, kit. & bath. Call now! (025-008472) C a ll (73 2) 6 7 1-8 000

Monthly payments are for 30-year conventional fixed rate mortgages as detailed below. Please ask about: Lower Down payments*Lower Monthly Payments*Other Options For purchase prices up to $283,925, monthly mortgage payments (principal+interest) quoted in our ads are to qualified buyers, based upon a 20%down payment and aconventional 30-year fixed rate loan at 6.25%with 3 points, A.P.R. 6.591%. As an example, a$100,000 loan would mean 360 monthly payments of $615.72. For purchase prices from $283,926 to $625,000, the monthly payments are to qualified buyers based upon a 20% down payment and calculated at 6.50%with 3 points on a "Jumbo" 30-year fixed rate mortgage with an A.P.R. of 6.806%. An example of a$500,000 loan would mean 360 monthly payments of $3,160.34. Figures herein are approximate and do not include property taxes, hazard insurance, or homeowners association dues for acondominium purchase. Interest rates quoted areas of Oct. 1, 1998, and subject to change. Not responsiblefor typographical errors; while information is believed accurate, we request that the payment bevalidated with a mortgage provider prior to purchase.

h t t p : / / w e i c h e r t .c o m

For M ortgage info call 732-224-0110 For Insurance info call 973-605-1555

MIDDLETOWN

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3 BEDROOM COLONIAL Well maintained side hall colonial. Updated baths, hdwd. firs, move-in cond. Also great for profesional office. (025-008546) C a ll (73 2) 6 7 1-8 000

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Realtors

6 2

INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999

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C E N T R A L JE R SE Y M O R TG A G E RATES L en d ers P h o n e # American Suburban Fund. 800-887-4554 Choice Mortgage Services

3 0 - y r F ix .

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6.875% 6.625%

RATE

PTS. 0.00

3.00

5.125%

0.00

RATE

PTS.

5.875%

7.250%

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7.125%

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E R A

732-951-3911 Freehold Savings & Loan 732-462-6700 Hamilton National Mtg. 609-273-1234 Hometown Mortgage 888-854-8100 J.S. Financial Mortgage 800-346-8002 Kentwood Financial Svcs. 800-353-6896 Loan Search

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7.375%

0.00

6.750%

0.00

5.625%

0.00

N/Q

N/Q

6.875%

■ .. 2.00

6.625%

2.00

N/A

N/A

7.125%

0.50

7.000%

0.00

6.750%

0.00

5.750%

0.00

7.250%

0.00

6.375%

3.00

6.125%

3.00

-

6.625%

3.00

7.125%

0.00

6.750%

0.00

N/A

N/A

7.375%

0.00

6.750%

0.00

6.375%

0.00

N/Q

N/Q

7.250%

0.00

*4.990%

0.00

N/Q%

3.00

5.000%

0.00

7.000%

0.00

5.750%

250

6.875%

2.50

6.000%

6.500% li! L OS’ S',

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6.500%

N/Q

7.125% 7.000%

No Income Jumbo, 20% Down, 7.125%, 1.25 pts. FREE Rate Watch Prog. Serving all of New Jersey. “Your #1 Mortgage Lender" Call li>r reduced closing cost special We offer First Time Homebuyers with 3%down payment. (PMI required on less than 20%down) Low rate special. Consistantly the lowest rates. Rock bottom jumbo rates. *Eff. rate based on 30-yr loan paid off in 21.5 yrs. No Application fee. www.htmortgage.com No income verification loan Available. Good/Bad credit or bankruptcy is okay.

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---------7.000%

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6.750%

0.00

4.250%

3.00

7.250%

NJ’s Lowest Rates! Available Weekends call for service. 15-yr. OK to

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7.000% 0.00 6.500% 0.00 5.625% 0.00. 7.125% 0.00 1 million. 732-591-1735 Information provided by The National Financial News Services. Rates are valid as of March 12, 1999 and are subject to change without notice. Contact lenders directly for additional fees and services, and APR’s. Check rates on the Internet - www.nfns.com.

L e n d e r s w i s h i n g t o p a r t i c i p a t e c a ll ( 8 0 0 ) 9 3 9 - N F N S .

J ayne Camlin 1998 Coldwell Banker Presidents Club 1999 San Diego International Business Conference Guest 1998 NJAR Bronze Million Dollar Club

Fran Barone J udas 1998 Coldwell Banker Presidents Circle 1999 San Diego International Business Conference Guest 1998 NJAR Silver Million Dollar Club

K aren McCreadie 1998 Coldwell Banker Presidents Circle 1999 San Diego International Business Conference Guest 1998 NJAR Silver Million Dollar Club

Mary J. McHale 1998 Coldwell Banker Presidents Club 1999 San Diego International Business Conference Guest 1998 NJAR Silver Million Dollar Club

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u p d a t e s

-

732-591-5908 Columbia Savings Bank 800-962-4989 Corinthian Capital Group 732-745-8870 Crystal Mortgage 800-378-5010 First Bank of Central Jersey

REAL ESTATE

3 0 -y r J u m .

1 -y r A R M

B a n k e r B R O K E R A G E

www.nymetro.coldwellbanker.com

C O N G R A T U L A T IO N S TO O U R N J A R “1 9 9 8 ” M IL L IO N D O L L A R C LU B W IN N E R S . H o w a r d Lo g a n

p r o g r a m

R

ic h a rd M a z o r, the N o . 1 sales asso­ c ia te at th e B u r g d o r ff E R A M id d le to w n o ffic e , is a c tiv e ly p ro ­ m o tin g the u p d a te d v e rs io n o f E R A ’s u n iq u e and p o p u la r p ro g ra m , the S ellers S e cu rity P la n (SSP). T h e SSP assures c o n ­ sumers th a t th e ir E R A b ro k e r w i l l se ll th e ir ho m e o r E R A w i l l purchase it. T h e new and im p ro v e d v e rs io n p ro vid e s h o m e ­ ow ners a guaranteed o ffe r o f 90 pe rce n t o f the ho use’s appraised value, based on tw o in d e p e n d e n t ap pra isals, w h ile a llo w in g sellers to accept h ig h e r o ffe rs d u rin g the lis tin g p e rio d . T h e S elle rs S e c u rity P la n is a to o l th a t assists h o m eo w ne rs w h o need to purchase another ho m e q u ic k ly , b u t cannot because th e ir cu rre n t ho m e is n o t sold. A n assured sale to E R A frees e q u ity and p ro vid e s greater n e g o tia tin g p o w e r f o r p u rch a sin g th a t ne w hom e. “ E R A is the o n ly n a tio n a l re a l estate bro kera ge fra n ch ise system tha t o ffe rs its c u sto m e rs a g u a ra n te e d sale o n th e ir hom e,” says M a z o r, w h o lo o k s fo rw a rd to another ye a r in the to p 1 pe rce n t o f 2 7 ,000 E R A agents w o rld w id e . “ I f y o u ’re re lo c a t­ in g to an othe r to w n , lo o k in g to do w n size, o r even b u y in g up, the S ellers S e c u rity P la n gives ho m eo w ne rs re a l n e g o tia tin g pow er. W ith the SSP, y o u are q u ic k ly on y o u r w a y to purchase th a t n e w hom e.” F o r fu rth e r in fo rm a tio n and e lig ib ilit y re q u ire m e n ts, co n ta ct R ic h M a z o r and his tea m a t (7 3 2 ) 7 0 6-1 016 .

Moira Barrett Congratulations 1998 NJARMillion Dollar Bronze Level

Mary Ann Brown Congratulations 1998 NfAR Million Dollar Bronze Level

Broker-Manager

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Welcome To Coldwell Banker

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Linda Kwolek

W

Linda Mikhail

Iya Sidorova

Corinne Smith

MIDDLETOWN OFFICE 9 5 0 HIGHWAY 3 5 ™

7 3 2 -6 7 1 -1 0 0 0

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Susan B. Goldberg Congratulations 1998 NJAR Million Dollar Bronze Level

INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999 6 3

M ARKETPLACE D o n n a

BUSINESS

B e n e fit fo r the E as t B ru n s w ic k A s s o c ia tio n

o f B r a in

8

B a n k er

A n n a F it z p a t r ic k

Come Browse Our Weh Site! www.nymetro.coldweUhanker.cam

he 16th an n ual B u ffe t B re a k fa s t

C h ild re n w il l b e h e ld fro m

C o ld w e ll

R E SI I) E NT1 AL B RO KE R A G E

B enefit to help kids w ith brain injuries T

B ru n o

In ju re d

C h u c k M a u e r

O ld B r id g e

Call Donna at 732-583-5000

r

T i n t o n F a lls * 2 1 4 , 9 0 0 C o lo n ia l o ffe rin g 4 b e d ro o m s, 2.5 b a th s, d in . r m ./ liv in g ro o m co m b o , EIK , n e w c a rp e tin g . H o m e re n o v a te d a n d fre s h ly p a in te d . B eing s o ld "as is." (M A T 5 289)

M a ta w a n

* 1 7 9 ,9 0 0

j

Desirable Edgemere Heights offers this all brick Ranch w/large liv. rm ., fireplace, fo r­ m al din. rm ., hardwood floors, large lot, new h ot water heater and 2 car garage. 5 m inute to NYC trains. (MAT 5328)

p .m . on Sunday, M a r c h 2 8 at th e H ilto n B ru n s w ic k . O rg a n ize rs ex p e ct to raise

B is o g n i

Custom C olonial features in clude FP in FR & MBRM, soaring 10 f t ceilings, Corian ctps, upgraded appliances, 3 fu ll gorgeous bths, hw firs, custom m olding, 2 zone heat, C/A, circular drive, much more. (MAT 5411)

a.m . to 1

E as t B ru n s w ic k and T o w ers, in E ast

Y v o n n e

* 3 8 2 ,5 0 0

P a u la F o x

m o re th an $ 10,000 fo r the association

M a ta w a n

Call Anna at 732-583-5000

* 1 2 8 ,9 0 0

Secluded Ranch in n ice c o n d itio n . V in y l sid in g , n ew e r ro o f, w o o d b u rin g stove, f u ll a p p lia n ce package, fre sh ly p a in te d & n ew e r c a rp e tin g th r u o u t. (M A T 5260)

L in d a W a llm a n

Call Yvonne at 732-583-5000

Call Chuck at 732-583-5000

a t th e event. The

H ilt o n

E a s t B r u n s w ic k

and

S h a r o n D o lli “1

G lo r ia "Sam" B r o o k s b a n k

T o w ers w il l donate s ta ff and fa c ilitie s to th e o rg a n iza tio n fo r the g ala b re a k ­ fast b u ffe t. C a p t. R a lp h L a m o , p res id e n t o f the E a s t B r u n s w ic k L o c a l 9 , N J . State L a w E n fo rc e m e n t O ffic e rs A s s o c ia tio n , has

M a r lb o r o

Call Paula at 732-583-5000

b een in s tru m e n ta l in co o rd in a tin g the y e a r ly b re a k fa s t b u ffe t since its b e g in ­ n ings. “E a c h year, o v e r 9 0 vo lun teers and th e h o te l s ta ff w o r k to g e th e r to orga­

Y u lia P e s s in a

is d o n ate d —

fr o m

the

h o te l’s fa c ilitie s to the fo o d — so a ll m o n e y raised b y th e b re a k fa s t goes d ire c tly to the k id s. A n d ,

an y le fto v e r

fo o d is d on ated to th e lo c a l C a th o lic C h a ritie s . N o th in g goes to w aste. M o s t years, w e ’ve ra is ed m o re th an $ 10,000 f o r th e

association fr o m

this

single

O ld B r id g e

M a ta w a n

* 3 0 9 ,0 0 0

* 1 7 9 ,9 0 0

H a z le t

L o v e ly c o n te m p o ra ry C o l. w it h la rge p ro p e rty . 4 b e d ro o m s, 2.5 baths, 2 car garage, fu ll base m e nt, fa m . rm . w /fire p la c e & sliders. G re a t fa m ily n e ig h b o rh o o d a n d close t o a ll N Y C tra n s. (M A T 5 404)

S pacious 4 b e d ro o m Cape w it h f i n ­ is h e d basem ent w /b a r. U p d a te d k itc h e n . E n tire h o m e fre s h ly p a in te d . I n g ro u n d p o o l f o r s u m m e r fu n . Close t o co n v e n ie n c e s . (M A T 5 40 9)

Call Gloria at 732-583-5000

Call Sharon at 732-583-5000

* 2 4 9 ,9 0 0

P o ss ib ilitie s !! D a ycare o r h o m e o ffic e ! T w o large r o o m a d d itio n w/separate h e a t, a /c a n d e n tra n c e . Backs u p to G re e n Acres, 5 b e d ro o m s , 3 b a th s a n d FR w /fire p la c e is a m u s t see!! (M A T 5326)

Call Linda at 732-583-5000

J e f f D is p e n z a

s

n iz e th e b re a k fa s t b u ffe t,” said L a m o . “ E v e ry th in g

rr

* 2 4 4 ,9 0 0

L o v e ly secluded C o n te m p o ra ry h o m e o n tw o p ictu resq u e w o od e d acres. 3 b e d ro o m s, 2.5 b th s ., b ase m e nt a n d 2 ca r garage. C e ra m ic tile e n try , fo y e r a n d k itc h e n (M A T 5 339)

O ld B r id g e

* 3 0 9 ,0 0 0

C o l. w / 2 s t o r y liv . r m . & fo y e r, k it c h e n w / c e n t e r is la n d , s t e p d o w n fa m . rm . w / f ir e p la c e , f in is h e d b s m t. & tr e e d b a c k y a r d . (M A T 5372)

Call Yulia at 732-583-5000

Aberdeen Clubber- 5 brms., 3 full bths., custom kit., 2 car garage. $229,000 Mat 5308 Old Bridge Great for 1st time buyers. Mostly cosmetic repairs. . $65,900 Mat 5350 Aberdeen Move into this 4 brm., 2 bth. Col. Oversized deck $119,900 Mat 5403 South Amboy Charming 3 brm. Col. Close to trains and bus. $125,900 Mat 5401 Howell Col., 3 brms., 1.5 bths., fam. rm. w/f.p. deck, fenced yard & garage. $164,900 Mat 5447 H a z le t

CO LD U JeU . IDS Matawan/Aberdeen Office 1082 Hwy 34, Matawan B A N K e R □ I REALTOR' m (73 2 ) 583-5000

* 1 7 9 ,9 0 0

Private lo catio n ! Fam. o rie n te d W oo dla n d Park. Large room s & w a lk in p a n try in k itch en . H a rdw ood flo ors u nd er carpet­ ing. 3 bedroom s, 1.5 baths, deck Sc fenced in yard. (M A T 5386)

Call Jeff at 732-583-5000

RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE'

E ach O ffice is In d e pe nd e ntly O w n ed and O pe ra ted

event.” T h e E as t B r u n s w ic k A s s o c ia tio n fo r B r a in

In ju re d

C h ild re n

assists lo c a l

c h ild re n and adults w h o s u ffe r n eu ro ­ lo g ic a l

and

d e v e lo p m e n ta l

im p a ir ­

J e a n n e

m ents. Proceeds fr o m the an n u a l b re a k ­

F asano H

C o ld w e ll

Come Browse Our Web Sitef www.nymetro.coIdwelIhanker.com

P ro g ra m fo r c h ild re n and adults, fro m

I

ages 3 to 9 0 .

n m l

e q u ip m e n t, d ay trip s and sp ec ialize d co m p u ters and s o ftw are fo r p ro g ra m p articip an ts. “ T h e D a is y R e c re a tio n P ro g ra m , is so n a m e d because alth o u g h b e a u tifu l,

H a z le t

p re s id e n t

of

th e

East

K a r e n M c C r e a d ie

Call Jeanne at 732-671-1000

K w o le k

B r u n s w ic k

W o n d e rfu l o p p o r t u n it y t o liv e in a 5 b e d ro o m , 3 b a th h o m e t h a t h as m u c h t o o ffe r. U p d a te d k itc h e n , c e ra m ic tile b a th s, f a m ily ro o m w it h fire p la c e a n d clo sets g alo re . S im p ly u n p a c k a n d e n jo y . ( M ID 7 22 8)

A A berdeen

* 1 3 9 ,9 0 0

M id d le to w n

* 1 9 8 ,0 0 0

R e n o v a te d 3 b e d ro o m C o lo n ia l. V in y l s id in g , new er w in d o w s , k it c n e n & b a th , garage, b a s e m e n t clo se t o t r a in , b us, s h o p p in g . ( M ID 7165)

C o m e e n jo y t h is im m a c u la te h o m e o n a d ee p p ro p e rty . H o t t u b o n p a tio , s p rin k le rs , h a r d w o o d flo o r s & b a y w in d o w are s o m e o f t h e fea tu re s. H o m e h a s b e e n t r u ly c a re d f o r b y o r ig in a l o w n e r. ( M ID 7 2 2 7 )

Call Karen at 732-671-1000

Call Mary at 732-671-1000

A s s o c ia tio n . “ I t ’s a p e rfe c t m e ta p h o r fo r th e p o p u la tio n

we

serve,

to

us

J a m e s O 'B r ie n

th e y ’re a ll b e a u tifu l.”

M a r y J . M c H a le

Call Teresa at 732-671-1000

E le a n o r W o o lle y

* M

! f , il

'

d M

I*

M id d le to w n * 1 9 9 , 0 0 0

M i d d l e t o w n * 2 0 2 ,0 0 0

C le a n & n e a t u p d a te d s p lit o n cu l-d e sac. V in y l s id in g , A n d e rs o n w in d o w s , n e w k it. w /c e ra m ic t ile flo o r, u p d a te d b ath s, recessed lig h tin g , h d w d firs , 1 ca r gar, a ll a p p lia n ce s. W a lk to tra ns. & s h o p p in g . (M ID 7211)

Y o u th fu l C o lo n ia l w it h 4 b e d ro o m s, 2/2 b a th s , e at in k itc h e n , large g re at ro o m w it h s to n e fire p la c e liv in g ro o m , d in in g ro o m , d e n , h a rd w o o d flo o rs , c e ra m ic t ile . T o o m a n y a m e n i­ tie s t o m e n tio n . ( M ID 7 22 9)

Call Linda at 732-671-1000

ROOM FOR THE EXTENDED FAMILY 5 bdrms., 4 full baths in Lincroft! Den, FR, for­ mal DR & EIK, 3 car garage & great deck for entertaining. Playroom and office on lower level. Fabulous Lincroft location.

$3 4 9 , 9 0 0 G lo ria N ilso n Realtors

* 1 9 7 ,5 0 0

H a z le t

Great starter h om e! P rofessionally la n d ­ scaped w ith p icke t fence charm . C o nven­ ie n t to N Y C tra n sp o rta tio n & GSP 117. Now's the tim e to make yo u r m ove and become a h om eow ner! (M ID 7212)

L in d a

M a r y J . M c H a le

1 3 9 ,9 0 0

in d iv id u a l daisies alw ay s h ave a s lig h t im p e rfe c tio n , even i f n o t o bvio u s to the casu al observer,” says R o n W is n e s k i,

T e r e sa G r a n d e

RES I DE NT I AL BROKERAGE

fast b u ffe t support the D a is y R e c re a tio n

T h e don atio ns also h elp fu n d cam p

B a n k er

MIDDLETOWN OFFICE Call for details

7 4 7 -5 6 0 0

“ANYSIZEHOUSE & GARDENUNDERTHESUN”

K a y S h ie ld s

Atlantic Highlands * 2 4 9 , 9 0 0

R u m so n

R e s id e n tia l o r p ro fe s s io n a l z o n in g . B ric k , stu c c o sh ore C o lo n ia l. Large ro o m s , m a n y a m e n itie s a n d u p grades. M u s t see e x tra p a rk in g . ( M ID 7 215)

5 bedroom spraw ling Ranch, fireplace, basement, 3 zone gas heat. Oversized 2'A car garage. Rumson schools. Picturesque setting, 1 acre & in g ro u n d poo l. (M ID 7008)

Call James at 732-671-1000

Call Mary at 732-671-1000

M ID D L E T O W N O ld B rid g e

9 5 0

* 8 2 ,9 0 0

C onve n ie nt lo ca tio n and affordable. Come see th is com fortable 2 bedroom hom e fea turin g a fu ll basement and 1 car garage. (M ID 7221)

Call Kay at 732-671-1000

* 4 4 9 ,9 0 0

Ire n e

C a le y

O F F IC E

H IG H W A Y

3 5

M id d le to w n

* 8 9 ,9 0 0

C le a n a n d n e a t c o n d o a lte rn a tiv e . Possible 2 b e d ro o m c o tta g e w it h h e a te d e n clo se d p o r c h . Large p ro p e rty I w it h ro o m t o e x p a n d . W a lk t o b u s a n d s h o p p in g . ( M ID 7 22 3)

7 3 2 -6 7 1 -1 0 0 0 □

Call Eleanor at 732-671-1000

Call Irene at 732-671-1000 © 1 9 9 8 C o ld w e ll B an ke r R esid en tia l B ro kerag e C orp oratio n . Each O ffice Ind e p e n d e n tly O w n ed a nd O perated

OPPORTUNITY

64

INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999

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P ER M IN U T E .

R E A D Y FO R R O M A N C E

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2 1 y e a r o ld sin gle b la ck fem ale

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C a ll 1 - 9 0 0 - 7 7 3 - 6 6 0 2 $ 1 .9 9 p e r m in . YOU NG AT H E A R T 5 ’3 ” S in gle w id o w e d fe m a le w ith long a ub urn h air a nd big brown eyes. E njoys g oo d co nve rsa tion , c o o k in g , b o a tin g , jo g g in g and e xercisin g. S ee kin g a m a le 39-44, o v e r 6 ’0” w h o is a non-sm oker, h as a fu ll head o f h air a nd is rom antic. B O X 3 66 80 E N TIR E LY Y O U R S S in gle b la ck fem ale, 20, se e kin g a sin gle m ale, 21 to 24, tall, w ho like s parks, d in in g o u t a nd sp en d ­ ing tim e together. B O X 13383 M ID D L E S E X C O U N T Y D iv o rc e d w h ite fe m a le , slim , ro m a n tic la dy, 4 0 0 s , d o w n to e a rth a n d ca rin g. E njoys m usic, m o vie s a nd d ining o ut. S ee kin g a g e n tlem an , 4 6 to 56, fo r a lifetim e o f h ap piness. B O X 32721________ E A S Y G O IN G S ingle, w h ite fem ale, m id 4 0 0 s , fu ll figured, d ark h air a nd g re y e ye s se ekin g a sin cere, rom antic, w h ite m ale fo r a long term re la ­ tio nsh ip . B O X 3 74 97 ____________ L O N G T E R M R E L A TIO N D ivorced, w h ite petite fem ale, 56 y r o ld , 5 ’ , bro w n h a ir a n d e y e s is se ekin g an hon est, sin cere male, fo r a long te rm relationship. BO X 10638__________________________ IT A L IA N L A D Y 52 y r old, Italian fem ale, e njo ys m ovies, m u sic, o u td o o r activities a nd m ore. S ee kin g a kind, decent, w h ite m a le , 5 2 to 6 0, non-sm oker, fo r d atin g a nd p ossib le lo hg term rela tion sh ip. B O X 12422_________ L IF E IS B E A U T IF U L D o w n to e arth , blue e ye d b ru ne tte , a ffe ction a te , w arm , loving, Jew ish w id o w d esire s honest, co m p a s­ sionate, yo u n g a t h ea rt Je w ish m a le (M en sch), 64 to 69, a n on ­ sm o ke r, to s h a re to m o rro w O s lo ve , la u g h te r, a n d h a p p in e s s . (M o n m o u th /M id d le se x a re a ) B O X 3 27 16 ___________ A R E Y O U TH E O N E ? D ivo rce d fem ale, 60, blonde hair, b lue e yes, ta ll a nd slim . E njoys a va rie ty o f interest. S eeking so m e ­ one o ld fa sh io ne d , sincere, kind and hon est, w ith s im ila r interest. B O X 37314 _____________________ L E T O S M E E T..... W h ite fem ale, e a rly 5 0 0 s , 5 ’5 ”, 1 28 lb s, red dish hair, b ro w n eyes. E njoys tra vel, dining , m o vie s and m ore. S eeking a w h ite male, tall, non-sm oker, w ith sim ila r interests, fo r a relationship. B O X 4 06 99 FR IE N D A N D LO V E R 32 y r old, 5 ’6 ” , 118 lb, single, w hite fe m a le w ith a d a u g h te r is se ekin g an a ttra ctive , se cure, happy, n on ­ sm o kin g, sin gle male, 31 to 37, 5 ' T o r taller, w h o w a n ts to g e t the m o st o u t o f life. L o ve s antiques, hiking, sn ow m ob iling , g ardening, tra veling , outdoors, a nd life. BO X 3 27 09 __________________________ IN T H IS M A IL B O X 5 ’8” , 140 lb, sin gle fem ale, s e e k­ in g a sin gle m ale, 4 0 to 65, fo r frie n d sh ip a nd m ore. B O X 3 73 92 TO UCH O F C LASS M o n m ou th County, attra ctive , 63 yr, n on-sm oker, w idow, u ne ncu m ­ bered, and retired. An open, o p ti­ m istic, fle x ib le , a d v e n tu re s o m e w om an. S ee kin g 6 0-69 y r o ld m an fo r long te rm relationship. BO X 327 05 __________________________ L IF E IS B E S T S H A R E D P etite, attractive, fem in ine , affe c­ tio na te, w h ite, w id o w ed fe m a le is in se arch o f a w hite, w id o w ed m ale, 6 0 o r older, w ith tra d itio n a l values, fo r com p atib ility. E njoys dancing, tra vel, arts, etc. Tell me s o m e th in g a bo ut yourself. BO X 32701___________________________ TA LL AN D HANDSOME 4 0 y r old, 5 ’6 ” , m e d ium build, pro­ fe s s io n a l, s in g le , w h ite fe m a le w ith o n e child, b lo n d e hair, and b lu e e ye s is se eking a p ro fe ssio n ­ al, hon est, n o n -d rin kin g, single, w h ite m ale fo r frie n d sh ip and a possib le relationship. B O X 376 22 IS IT ME Y O U A R E ... ...L o okin g For? I a m an attractive, p a ssio n a te , e a s y g o in g , ca rin g a nd a ctive la dy a n d se ek a m an w h o is 50-60, non-sm oker, w ho a lso has a se nse o f hum or, is b rig h t a nd has la ugh lines aro un d h is eyes. B O X 32645

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w ith long b la ck h air a nd brown eyes. E n joys, m ovies, d ining o ut and m ore. S ee kin g a m a le w h o is v e ry ro m a n tic a nd h a s s im ila r in terests. B O X 13394 NO FALSE HYPE Ju st a ve ry p re tty red head, E uro­ pean ch arm , sm art, Je w ish pro­ fession al. S ee ks th e sa m e in a handsom e m a n o f su cc e s s , integrity, hum or, vital, 55 to 65, fo r cudd lin g , ca rin g, and com m itm en t. W id o w e r a plus. BO X 32631 D O W N T O E A R TH 5 ’4 ” , 140 lb, sin gle m o the r o f o ne like s th e bea ch, dining , cam ping and fish in g . S e e kin g a d ow n to earth, hon est, hard w o rk e r fo r a long term relationship. B O X 3 70 09 V E R Y P R O M IS IN G 3 5 yr o ld female, 5 ’10”, 130 lbs, s in c e re and h o n e s t. E n jo ys m o vie s, d in in g o ut, m u s ic a nd m ore. S ee kin g so m e on e w ith sim ­ ila r in terests, w h o is e m o tion ally a nd fin a n c ia lly se cu re . BOX 12496__________________________ S IN C E R E A N D H O N E S T Fem ale, 5 ’3” , 140 lbs, b ro w n hair a nd eyes. E n jo ys m o vie s, fle a m arkets, q u ie t tim e s. S eeking a w h ite m a le , 5 0 to 63, sin cere and hon est. B O X 37581______________ LETO S TA LK D ivo rce d w h ite fem ale, 30 y r old, 5 ’ , 95 lbs, b lon d e hair, hazel eyes. E njoys m ovies, dining , a nd more. S ee kin g a p ro fe ssio na l m ale, 2 0 to 30, w ith sim ila r interests, fo r a frie n d sh ip a nd p ossib le re la tion ­ ship. B O X 3 96 35 ________________ D E S IR E & A F F E C T IO N W h a t e lse co uld y o u w a n t for? S in g le w h ite fe m a le , m id 4 0s, inde p en d en t, sin cere a nd honest. E njoys dining , d ancing, m u sic and m ore. S e e kin g w h ite m ale, 4 0s55, w ith sim ila r in terests. S o call! B O X 2 41 46 _____________________ C E N T R A L N J. D JF 4 5 y ro ld , slim , attra ctive , brunette, in de p en d en t, n on-sm oker, pro fe s­ sional, honest, caring a n d a ffe c ­ tio na te, d ivo rce d Je w ish fem ale, w ith g ro w n c h ild re n . E n jo y s natu re , m u se um s, art, m usic, th e ­ ater, m ovies, fin e d ining a nd tra v ­ el. In se arch o f sin cere, n on -sm o k­ in g, sin gle Je w ish m ale, 4 5-52, fo r long term relationship. B O X 3 24 89

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L O N E L Y W ITH O U T Y OU 32 y r old, d ivorced fa th e r o f one, m e d iu m m u s c u la r b u ild , h aze l e yes. E njoys co m e d y clu b s and m usic. S ee kin g a p h ysica lly fit, sin gle o r d ivorced fem ale, w ith a se nse o f hum or. B O X 13339 C O U N T R Y G IR L T Y P E 31 y r old, 6 ’1” , a verag e build, sin­ g le m ale w h o like s m usic, dinner, sh o o tin g pool a nd m ore. S eeking a sin gle, co un try g irl type , with sim ila r interests. B O X 13355 N IC E JE W IS H G U Y 2 9 y r old, 5’9 ” , sin gle h an dso m e Je w ish male, b ro w n h air a nd eyes. E n jo y s d a tin g a n d ro m a n ce . S e e ks J e w is h o r n o n -J e w is h fe m a le s , 2 1 to 3 5, w h o a re fit w ith s im ila r inter­ e sts fo r possible lo n g te rm re la ­ tio n s h ip . M on­ m o u th coun ty. B O X 3 27 19 L E T O S HA V E S O M E FUN 31 y r o ld single, m a le s e c u rity g ua rd se ekin g a s in g le fe m a le w h o like s to go o u t a nd h a ve fun. B O X 369 34 IN TH IS M A IL B O X S in g le m a le s e e k in g a tru s t­ ing, sin cere and honest fe m a le . C h ild re n okay. B O X 3 74 07

LOVE AND H A P P IN E S S 2 3 y r o ld , 6 ’2 ” , hours a day, days a week 190 lb sin g le , Designed fo r both Touchtone and Rotary Phones w h ite m a le seekmg so m e on e who e n jo y s lo ve, ro m a n c e a n d h a p p in e s s . B O X A T T E N T IO N : B A R B A R A 12072 __________________________ Y ou replied to m y b o x num ber, it A N Y V E G G IE S A R O U N D w a s # 3 26 26 , y o u r voice m essage d id n o t re cord o n m y voice m e s­ In se a rc h o f s in g le d iv o rc e d sa ge service. P lease call aga in fo r fem ale, 2 7 to 44, e a sy going, non­ S teve. B O X 3 27 24 __________ _ _ sm oker. I am a sin gle w h ite m ale 37, 6 ’0, 170 lbs, w h o enjo ys the C O M P U T E R PAR TNE R outd oo rs, m usic, a nd anim als. No 55 y r old, 160 lb, 5 ’9 ” divorced, kids. B O X 32718 _ w hite, Je w ish m ale se e ks e-m ail

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** S E E K IN G G R E A T G U Y ** S in gle w h ite p ro fe ssio na l fem ale, 33, 5 ’7” , 135 lbs, pretty, fit, n on ­ sm o ke r, e n jo y s tra v e l, m u sic, d an cin g, th e a tre a nd m useum s. S ee ks sin gle w h ite profe ssio na l male, n on-sm oker, 3 0 to 4 3, w ho is edu cate d, hon est, sincere, with gre at se nse o f h um or fo r long term relationship. B O X 3 26 32 _________ Y O U A R E M Y S U N S H IN E 4 7 y r old w h ite d ivorced fem ale, blue e yes, b ro w n hair, w arm , co m ­ p a s s io n a te , h u m o ro u s. E n jo ys d an cin g, co m e d y show s, cudd lin g and laug h in g. S ee kin g to fin d a d ivo rce d w h ite male, 45 to 55, w h ose lo oking fo r both frie n dsh ip a nd hugs. B O X 13023

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RE A DY , SET, C A L L 32 y r old, 5 ’4 ” , 115 lb, G erm an and Ita lia n , v e ry a ttra c tiv e , sin g le , white, p ro fe ssio na l fem ale, n on ­ sm o ke r, n e v e r m a rried . E n jo ys m ovies, the a tre, m useum , sh o p ­ ping, fin e d ining and m ore. Loo k­ ing fo r a single, w h ite, attractive, pro fe ssio na l m ale, neve r m arried a nd no kids. B O X 13565_________

K IS S M E ,Y O U F O O L! Funny, w a rm , app ea ling , co m p a s­ sionate, pro fe ssio na l, Je w ish lady e njo ys th e arts, antiq uing , dining, so m e sp orts, tra ve l, etc. W ishin g to m e e t g o o d -n a tu re d , fle xible, edu cate d, Je w ish gentlem an, 52 to 62, 5 ’ 10” o r taller, fo r possible relationship. S ha ll w e sh are co m ­ radeship, g igg le s a nd p ossib ly the fu tu re ? B O X 3 27 04 ______________

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SW EET, L O Y A L, HONEST P retty, p e tite , d iv o rc e d , w h ite fem ale w ith blonde h a ir and g re e n e yes. In se arch o f a fit, attra ctive , e m o ­ tio n a lly a n d fin a n ­ cia lly se cure, go o d natu re d m an, 4 4 to 52, fo r lo n g te rm re la tio n s h ip . B O X 325 78 _____________

LETO S CHAT 5 ’2 ” , 1 20 lb , n o n -s m o k in g , brunette, petite, H isp a nic Italian, d ivo rce d fem ale, in late 4 0 0 s , is se eking a han dso m e , .n o n -sm o k­ in g m a le , in la te 4 0 0 s , w ith a se nse o f hum or, fo r a possib le relationship. E njoys nature, o u t­ doors, a nd m ore. B O X 37660

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** A T T R A C T IV E & H O N E S T ** 32 y r old, 107 lb sin g le , w h ite fe m a le , p e tite , fit, long d a rk hair, e m o ­ tio n a lly se cu re , dow n to e a rth . S e e kin g sin g le , w h ite m ale, 3 2 to 42, w h o is e m o tion ­ a lly secure, honest, fun , alive fo r la ug h ­ ter, frie n d sh ip and p o s s ib le a lo ng te rm re la tio n s h ip . B O X 326 50

S O M U C H T O O FFE R D ivorced w h ite fem ale, 47, 5 ’8 ”, b ro w n h air a nd b lue eyes. S eeking a sin gle o r d ivo rce d m ale, 35 to 55. B O X 374 87 _________________

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co n n e c tio n w ith .p la y fu l, single, w h ite fem ale. L etO s fin d o u t m ore a b o u t each o th e r o v e r th e Internet. B ea u ty is n ot required, n icen e ss is n ece ssary. E a st W in d so r. B O X 3 27 25 __________________________

H E A R T O F G O LD D ivo rce d w h ite m ale, 44, 5 ’ 11” , 175 lb s, h o n e st, s in c e re and rom antic. S ee kin g d ivorced w hite fem ale, 37-46, w ith a slim figure a nd h a s m orals. B O X 32715

LETO S CONNECT S ingle, w h ite m ale, 6 ’, 210 lbs in g oo d sh ap e w ith va rie d interests. S eeking a slim , a ttra ctive fem ale, 4 2 to 52, fo r a possib le long-term rela tion sh ip. B O X 3 61 75 _________

S EE W H A T H A P P E N S S in gle m a le is se e kin g a w h ite or P uerto Rican, bi fem ale, to g e t to kn o w each o th e r and hang out. B O X 37678___________ .__________

D A Y TIM E R O M A N C E Italian m ale, 6', w ith black cu rly h a ir a nd m ousta ch e. E njoys long w a lks on bea ch, hold in g hands, m ovies, q u ie t e ven in gs a nd more. S eeking a fem ale 2 5 to 4 5 with s im ila r in terests. R a ce n ot im por­ tan t. B O X 36689

IO M S O P E R F E C T Yeah right!!! 64 y r o ld sin gle w hite m ale, 5 T \ 170 lb s, fit, crabby, no se nse o f h um or a nd u gly a s sin! E njoys nothing. W o u ld like to m eet a slim , attra ctive , chee rfu l, single w h ite fem ale, u nd er 60, fo r w h at­ e v e r m a y d eve lo p. B O X 32601

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S P IR IT U A L B O N D Single w h ite C h ristia n fem ale, a co un try girl, 3 7 y r old, se ekin g sin ­ g le w h ite C h ristia n male, 35-45, fo r long te rm relationship. E njoys dogs, ca m p ing , cookin g , reading, th e a te r a nd va rio us interests. BO X 10768

IO L L T R E A T U R IG H T Ita lia n m a le w ith a s e n s e o f hum or. E n jo y s w a lk s o n th e b each, h old in g h ands, cu dd lin g a n d m o re . S e e kin g a sin g le fem ale, 25 to 45, w h o is w arm , . affection a te , a nd w a nt to b e p a m ­ p e r and tre ate d like a lady. BO X 1 31 18 __________________________ N E V E R B E E N M A R R IE D

6’1 1 / 2 ”, 170 lbs, n e v e r b ee n m a r­ ried, pro fe ssio na l, like s th e o ut­ d o o rs, C a th o lic , v e ry a c tiv e in sports, religion, re a din g a nd band m usic. L oo kin g to m eet a person th a t h a s n e v e r b ee n m a rried , C a tho lic, a ttra ctive and 23. BO X 3 40 67 __________________________ O P P O R T U N IT Y K N O C K S 58 y r o ld w id o w e d , o u tg o in g fe m a le like s m ovies, d an cin g and m ore. S ee kin g a sin gle m ale. BO X 3 74 10 __________________________ L O O K IN G FO R LO V E S in gle male, 37, sincere, honest, fin a n c ia lly a n d e m o tion ally secure, w ith a m e d ium build a nd a positive a ttitu de on life. Likes co n ve rsa ­ tio ns, m ovies, d ining out, w orking o ut, m usic and m ore. L oo kin g fo r ca rin g, honest, ro m a ntic w om an, fo r la s tin g frie n d s h ip , p o s s ib le rela tion sh ip. B O X 361 59 _________ JU S T D O IT Ha nd so m e , fit, outg oin g , rom antic, m u lti-lin g u a l, fin a n c ia lly se cure, s in g le b la ck, m a le , 4 2, 6 ’2 ” . E njoys sports, m ovies, d an cin g, tra vel, a nd fin e cuisin e. S eeking tall, a ttra ctive , intellige n t, d ow n to e arth , sin gle w hite, fem ale, fo r p o s sib le lo n g te rm rela tion sh ip. B O X 32551______________________ G O OD H EARTED GUY S in gle w h ite m ale, 32, 5 ’ 10” , 170 lb s, e n jo y s m ovie s, sp orts, d ining o u t a nd b e in g rom antic. S ee ks a sin gle w h ite fem ale, 2 6 to 3 4, non sm o kin g, w h o is fit, fun , a ffe ctio n ­ a te a n d fa m ily o rie nta ted w ith sim ­ ila r in terests. B O X 3 26 27 ________ S E E K A T T R A C T IV E L A D Y S in gle Je w ish dad, n ot religious, 46, a thletic, 5’ 10", 165 lbs. S ee ks a thletic, petite w o m a n u nd er 45. E njoys travel, rom ance, outdoors, o ldies, fle a m arkets, N e w York City, co o kin g a nd n ew adve ntu re s. A ll rep lie s answ e re d . B O X 3 27 10 MONM OUTH COUNTY 3 7 y r old, handsom e, divorced, w h ite m ale w ith o ne ch ild is se ek­ ing a pretty, honest, loyal, w hite fem ale, 30 to 38, fo r a possible re la tio n sh ip . E njoys th e norm al th in g s in life. B O X 3 27 08 ________ G IV E ME A C A L L ... 3 3 y r o ld , 5 ’ 10” , h o n e st, n on ­ sm o kin g, single, w h ite m ale w ho o w n s h is ow n h om e is se ekin g an honest, sincere, m arriage m ind ed fem ale, fo r a possib le relationship. B O X 37661_____________________ W A N T E D S P E C IA L L A D Y S in gle w h ite m ale, 4 7, 5 ’10” , 175 lbs, nonsm oker, han dso m e , sin­ c e re , enjo ys d ining out, d ancing, m ovies, q u ie t tim es. In se a rc h of one ve ry specia l lady, 3 0 plus, fo r datin g, frie n dsh ip , possib le se ri­ ous long term rela tion sh ip, m a r­ riage. No dru gs, no sm o ke rs. C h il­ d ren w elcom e. B O X 325 44 ______

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S W E E T & P E TITE 18 y r o ld single, bi-fem ale, pretty, petite, sw e e t and o pen m inded. S eeking a bi-fem ale, 18 to 23, a ttra c tiv e a n d petite. To enjo y d ancing, N e w York city, partying and m ore. B O X 12842___________ HO NESTY & TRUST 4 9 yr old, 5 ’ 11” , 175 lb, attractive, fit, stra ig h t acting, g a y w h ite male, s e e k s a n o th e r m a le , w h o is stra ig h t a cting a nd w h o believe s in hon esty a nd tru st. B O X 10418 M A L E TO M A L E S ingle, 5 7 y r old, w h ite, p ro fe s­ sional, retired male. Loo kin g fo r a m ale, 6 0 plus, w h o is rom antic, manly, non-sm o kin g , retired, fo r a ca su a l re la tion sh ip and possib ly m ore. B O X 11088 L O O K IN G FO R A FR IE N D 35 y r old, 5’6” , 140 lb, w h ite, gay m ale, b lon d e hair, b lue eyes, e m o ­ tio n a lly and p h ysica lly fit. E njoys co okin g , g ym w o rk outs, th e o u t­ doo rs, eating, plays, show s, and ju s t staying hom e. H o ping to m eet n ew frie n d s a nd p ossib ly m ore.. B O X 15630

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C a ll 1 - 9 0 0 - 7 7 3 - 6 6 0 2 $ 1 .9 9 p e r m in . S T R A IG H T F R IE N D S H IP S Single, w h ite, stra ig ht fem ale, 35, enjo ys ca m p ing , shop ping , b o w l­ in g , m o vie s, b a rs o ccasio n ally, w a lk in g and ta lk in g . S e e ks stra ig ht frie n d w ith s im ila r in ter­ e sts. B O X 32616 ** L E T O S H A V E S O M E FU N ** 34 y r old, single, stra ig ht, w hite fem ale. Loo kin g fo r a straight, s in ­ gle, w h ite fem ale, 30 to 38, to go o u t and have a g oo d tim e . E njoys d ancing, hiking, w orking out, th e ­ ater, m ovies, m usic, a nd crafts. B O X 35833 L E T O S H A V E FUN S traigh t w h ite widow, 57, seeks a no the r stra ig h t fe m a le fo r frie n d ­ ship, m ovies, d an cin g, tra ve l. B O X 10582 LUCY & ETHEL W h a tO s life w ith o u t frie n ds? Fun, stra ig ht, sin gle w h ite fem ale, 35. S eeking o th e r stra ig ht fem ale fo r w acky a d v e n tu re s . In te re s ts in c lu d e c lu b s , m u s e u m s , N e w York, w o rkin g o u t a nd th e o u t­ d oo rs. B O X 3 26 07

GUIDELINES The Publisher assumes no liability for the contents of, or replies to any per­ sonal advertisements; and such liabili­ ty rest exclusively with the advertiser of, or respondent to, such advertise­ ments. The Publisher may, in its sole discretion, change, reject or delete any personal advertisements which it deems inappropriate. A ll advertisers must record a voice greeting to accom­ pany their ad. Ads without voice greet­ ings may not appear in The Meeting Place. When you respond to a Meeting Place ad, your phone b ill w ill reflect a charge o f $ 1.99 per minute. An aver­ age 3 minute call costs $5.97. The Meeting Place is provided by Greater Media and Advanced Telecom Ser­ vices, Wayne, PA 19087.. Copyright 1999 ATS 3/12/99

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C IR C L E T H IS A D 60 y r old, 5 ’8 ”, cro ss dresser, su b ­ m issive, se ekin g a fe m a le w h o like to h a ve a good tim e . B O X 12194

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S E E K IN G A FR IE N D S ingle, w h ite, pro fe ssio na l, male, 54, 5 ’ 10” , 165 lb s, sincere, se n si­ tiv e , h o n e s t, ro m a n tic , w ith a se nse o f hum or. S ee kin g a sin gle w h ite fem ale, non-sm oker, 45-55, e a sy g oin g , g oo d hearted, caring a n d o ld fa s h io n v a lu e s . B O X 326 24 __________________________

C O U L D T H IS B E M A G IC ? _ S in gle , w h ite m ale, e a rly 5 0 0 s , attra ctive , fin a n cia lly se cure, n o n ­ sm oker, 5 ’ 10” , 170 lbs., brow n hair and e yes. Likes th e b each, travel, m usic, re a din g a nd d ining out. In se a rch o f v e ry attra ctive , single, w hite, fem ale, 37 to 47, non sm o k­ er, fo r possib le fo r long term rela­ tio nsh ip . B O X 32577

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F R IE N D S H IP O NLY 68 y r old, 5’4 ", 129 lb, single, w hite fem ale is se ekin g single, w h ite male, 55 to 65, o ld fash io ne d , fo r frie n dsh ip . B O X 12218__________

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A CO M PLETE PAC KAG E S in g le , J e w is h , p ro fe s s io n a l fem ale, pretty, fit, spontaneous, p o s itiv e a ttitu d e , h u m o ro u s, rom antic, classy. E njoys holding hands, w a lkin g o n the b each, New York City, tra vel, m usic, d ancing. S ee kin g sin gle, Je w ish , p ro fe s­ sio na l m ale, 4 8 to 56, intelligent, a ttra c tiv e , fit, c a r­ in g, g e n u in e , to sh a re w o n d e rfu l m o m e nts w ith. BO X 32605_____________

J U M P S TAR T A ttractive , w h ite , fem ale, 5 0 0 s , w ildlife artist. E njoys cu ltu ra l a ctiv­ ities. S ee kin g a pro fe ssio na l, in tel­ lig e nt, w h ite, m ale p re fe ra bly in th e m e d ical o r m ental health field. N o n -d rin ke r a nd non-sm oker, 45 to 55, to d iscuss life a nd each other. B O X 3 27 06 _______________

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A P R E F E R R E D O PTIO N W itty, w a rm a nd a pp ea ling pro fe s­ sio na l Je w ish la ss enjo ys W all S treet, th e arts, antiq uing , dining , va rio us sp orts and travel. D esiring tall, Je w ish co u n terpa rt, 54 to 62, with h om e to build su pp ortive, lov­ in g re la tio n s h ip , w ith m u tu a l a pp re cia tion a nd m uch laughter. L etO s talk. B O X 32661__________

P R IC IL L A S E E K S ELVIS F un loving, 54 ye a r o ld , green e yes, lo ng d ark hair, lo ves m usic, a nd w a n ts to m e e t E lvis lo ok alike fo r co m p an io nsh ip . B O X 3 26 59

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Reaching Over 160,000 Homes DEADLINES assifiedDisplay Fridayprior - 4:00pm inMiddlesex&Monmouth Counties Cl ClassifiedLineAdsMonday 12:00Noon • News Transcript • Sentinel • Suburban

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S Buy, Sell, Trade

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® Announcements

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Services

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020 Buildings Garages

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4 Lines • 4 Weeks $28°° (e a c h a d d itio n a l lin e $ 7 .0 0 )

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1-800-660-4ADS OR 732-254-7979 D IS C R IM IN A T IO N N O T IC E “ A ll r e a l e s t a t e a d v e r t is e d h e re in is s u b je c t to th e F e d e ra l F a ir H o u s in g A c t a n d th e N e w J e rs e y L a w a g a in s t D is c r im i­ n a tio n , w h ic h m a k e it ille g a l to a d v e rtis e a n y p re fe re n c e , lim i­ ta tio n o r d is c rim in a tio n b a s e d o n ra ce , c o lo r, re lig io n , s e x , a ffe c tio n a l o r s e x u a l o rie n ta tio n , m a rita l s ta tu s , h a n d ic a p , fa m il­ ial s ta tu s , a n c e s try , o r n a tio n a l o rig in , o r in te n tio n to m a k e a n y s u c h p re fe re n c e , lim ita tio n o r d i s c r im in a t io n . W e w il l n o t k n o w in g ly a c c e p t a n y a d v e rtis ­ in g fo r re a l e s ta te w h ic h is in v io la tio n o f th e la w . F o r in fo r­ m a tio n c o n ta c t th e N e w J e rs e y D iv is io n o n C iv i l R ig h t s , 31 C lin to n S t., N e w a rk , N e w J e r­ se y, 0 7 1 0 1 7 2 0 1 -6 4 8 -2 7 0 0 ”

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WINDING WOOD 1 & 2 BEDROOM GARDEN A d s w ith item s p rice d $150°°o r

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• U s e d it e m s f r o m p r iv a t e p a r tie s o n ly . T o ta l p r ic e m u s t n o t e x c e e d *150°°. N o li v i n g it e m s (p e ts , p la n ts , e tc .) N o s p o r ts c a rd s , B e a n ie B a b ie s , e tc . • A d m u s t b e d e liv e r e d , fa x e d , e - m a ile d o r m a ile d t o G r e a te r M e d ia N e w s p a p e rs . » F re e b ie s w i l l n o t b e a c c e p te d b y te le p h o n e . • 1 it e m p e r a d , 1 a d p e r w e e k , p e r f a m ily . • F re e b ie s w i l l n o t b e a c c e p te d w it h o u t th e t o t a l p r ic e o f th e it e m .

MERCHANDISE CLASSIFICATION #042-051

flS E K S ™

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1 WEEK

FREEHOLD OFFICES AVAILABLE

O L D B R ID G E S t u d io a p a r t m e n t , p r i v a t e h o m e , u t i lit ie s in c lu d e d . $ 6 5 0 ./m o . C a ll 7 3 2 -6 0 7 -1 4 3 6

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„ M E R C H A N D IS E C L A S S IF IE D J jV ________ (private party only)

4 LINES

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A P A R T M E N T S FR O M $625. & UP. BRAND NEW A V A IL A B L E . O p e n d a ily 1 0 a m -6 p m 7 3 2 -2 3 8 -3 9 1 9

015 Summer/Winter Rentals

FLORIDAVILLA 3 b e d ro o m , 2 b a th v illa w /p riv a te p o o l. Q u ie t re s id e n tia l lo c a tio n . 8 m ile s to D IS N E Y & o th e r a ttra c tio n s . W e e k ly /M o n th ly R a te s A v a il.

ADDRESS _ CITY. Z IP .

L O G C A B IN , P A . $ 8 0 0 ./P E R W E E K C A L L 7 3 2 -2 5 4 -1 3 3 1 , E V E S . O C E A N C IT Y M D . -1 0 0 fe e t to th e b e a c h , 2 b e d rm s ., sle e p s 6 , c o m p le te kit., c a b le T V , A C , W h irlp o o l b a th . $ 6 5 0 . to $ 7 5 0 . w e e k ly . C a ll 7 3 2 -5 2 1 -2 4 4 4

NAME.

. STATE. PHONE PLEASE INCLUDE ALL SPACES AND PUNCTUATION. ONE CHARACTER PER BOX.

017 Office & Floor Space ★ B E L F O R D /M ID D L E T O W N * O ffic e / S h o p S p a c e . 1 1 0 0 s q . fe e t. 7 3 2 -7 8 7 -7 3 9 7

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SERVICE TECHNICIAN T e c h n ic ia n w ith a n e x p e rtis e fo r h i-lin e p ro d u c ts n e e d e d im ­ m e d ia te ly to jo in ra p id ly e x p a n d in g s e rv ic e s ta ff. E x p e rie n c e p re fe rre d , b u t w ill tra m th e rig h t a p p lic a n t. F u ll b e n e fits p a c k a g e a n d p le a s a n t w o r k in g a t m o s p h e r e , m a k e th is a u n iq u e o p p o rtu n ity . C a ll P J, S e rv ic e D ire c to r T o d a y !

DAVID MICHAEL FREEHOLDHOWELL MB/HONDA/VW

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025 Business O pportunities 2 5 W O R D S + 13 M IL L IO N H O M E S = G re a t R e s u lts . Y o u ca n m a rk e t y o u r p ro d u c t to 13 m illio n h o u s e h o ld s th ro u g h o u t N o rth A m e ric a b y p la c in g y o u r c la s s ifie d a d in m o re th a n 8 0 0 s u b u r b a n n e w s p a p e r s , lik e t h is o n e f o r o n ly $ 8 9 5 . O n e p h o n e c a ll, o n e in v o ic e , o n e lo w p a y m e n t is a ll it ta k e s . C a ll th e S u b u rb a n C la s s ifie d A d ­ v e r tis in g N e tw o r k fa x - o n d e m a n d s e r v ic e a t 8 0 0 - 3 5 6 ­ 2 061 o r 3 1 2 -6 4 4 -6 6 1 0 x4 7 3 1 to s p e a k w ith a s a le s c o o rd in a to r. H E L P W A N T E D ! 3 5 p e o p le w a n te d to lo se w e ig h t & e a rn m o n e y $ $$ . C a ll 7 3 2 -3 9 0 -1 0 6 3 H O M E B A S E D D IS TR IB U TO R S N E E D E D IM M E D IA T E L Y ! C o m p a n y p a id ca r. N e w G a te w a y c o m p u te r s u p p lie d . F re e tra in in g . G U A R A N T E E D b u s in e s s fin a n c in g . $ 1 7 ,6 8 0 m o n th ly , fo r o v e rv ie w ca ll (8 0 0 )6 0 7 -6 0 0 6 b o x # 6 8 0 6 _______ (S C A N e tw o rk )________ M O M S - S ta rt a h o m e b a s e d b u s in e s s . M a k e y o u r o w n hrs. N e w , u n iq u e , p e rs o n a liz e d g ift c o m p an y. N o rin e 7 3 2 -7 2 7 -5 i4 7 P A Y P H O N E S , P re m iu m L o c a tio n s , a v a ila b le in y o u r A re a . S ta rt y o u r O w n B u sin e ss. 100 /k y e a r p o te n tia l. $ 1 0 k to 15 k in v e s tm e n t re q u ire d . 1 -8 0 0 -8 2 9 -2 2 3 0 /2 4 hrs. ________(S C A N e tw o rk )________ THE PAM PERED CHEF ® L ik e p e o p le , c o o k in g , re c o g n i­ tio n , fle x ib ility , e x c e lle n t e a rn ­ in g s ? N o d e liv e rie s /in v e n to ry . T o n i S tra z z a , In d e p e n d e n t D i­ rector T o ll fre e : 1-877-8 72 -8 66 4

028 C ontracting Equipment C O N T R A C T O R S E Q U IP M E N T B u ild in g M a te r ia l C lo s e - o u t! 2 4 ’ A lu m , s c a ff. s tg . p la tfo rm , k e ro s e n e h tr. (M a s te r B -1 2 5 ) P ro p a n e h e a te r, p re s s , reg. & ta n k , s c a ffo ld in g -p u m p la d d e r ru n g ja c k s , 2 0 ’ s te e l A fra m e G in p o le . S id in g , trim , h a rd w a re a n d m o re ! C a ll a ft e r 5 p m 7 3 2 -7 2 1 -3 9 8 4

030a Income Tax E X P . C P A P re p a re s T a x R e tu rn s . Y e a r R o u n d S e rv ic e . $ 6 5 . & u p . 7 3 2 -6 7 9 -6 1 2 0 Q U IC K T A X R E T U R N S d o n e b y C P A . B u s in e s s & P e rs o n a l. C a ll 7 3 2 -9 7 2 -6 9 8 4

031 Money to Loan $ $ O V E R D U E B IL L S !! C R E D IT P R O B L E M S ? C o n s o lid a t e D e b ts !! S a m e D a y A p p ro v a l. C u t m o n th ly p a y m e n t s to 5 0 % !! B e c o m e D e b t F re e . N O A P P L IC A T IO N F E E S '! 1 -8 0 0 ­ 8 6 3 -9 0 0 6 E xt. 9 0 0 ww w. h e Ip p a v -b ills .c o m (S C A N e tw o rk ) V IS A /M A S T E R C A R D -U p to $ 6 ,0 0 0 , N o d e p o s it, N o cre d it/b a d c re d it O K ! C a ll to d a y fo r g u a ra n te e d fa s t a p p ro v a l o r in fo rm a tio n . C a ll 1 ­ 8 0 0 -2 4 7 -7 0 1 2 (S C A N e tw o rk )

035 Help Wanted Full Time C L A S S IF IE D W O R K S ! F A X Y O U R A D 7 3 2 -4 32 -0 0 16

FACTORY WORKER P la s tic M a n u fa c tu rin g C o m p a n y h a s im m e d ia t e Denings fo r a M a c h in e p e r a t o r / M a t e r ia l H a n d le r . G o o d w a g e s p lu s fu ll b e n e fit “ a c k a g e . 5 m in u t e s w e s t o f re e h o ld . C a ll 7 3 2 -7 9 2 -1 9 8 9 H A IR S T Y L IS T F t/P t fo r fa s t p a c e d s a lo n . H ig h p ro file c lie n te le . P a id v a c a tio n . B e n e fits a v a ila b le . C a ll 7 3 2 -8 4 2 -1 1 8 8 H H A ’ S & C N A ’S 3 p m to 11 p m , O p e n in g a t E n g lis n to w n A s s is t e d L iv in g R e s id e n c e . F re e m e d ic a tio n c o u rs e o ffe re d if h ire d b y 3 /2 0 /9 9 . A ls o 7 a m to 3 p m a n d 3 p m to 1 1pm W e e k -e n d s o n ly . W ith w e e k ­ e n d d iffe re n tia ls . A p p ly in e rs o n : L ib e r t y M a n o r a S a tta & M o u n t V e r m o n R o a d s , E n lig h t e n M o n d a y th r u F r id a y . 9 a m to 5 p m D a ily . E O E ___________________

JOB FAIR O f fic e R e c e p tio n is ts • S e c re ta rie s •A d m in s . “A /P -A /R •C u s to m e r S e rv ic e W a re h o u s e •P ic k e r P a c k e r • P a lle t J a c k • F o rk lift

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CAREER CHANGE ? W e h a v e a p ro v e n tra n s itio n tra c t re c o rd fo r fo lk s c h a n g in g c a re e rs . D is c o v e r h o w e a s y it is to re p o s itio n y o u rs e lf. G e t y o u r R E A L E S T A T E L IC E N S E a n d b e g in to e a rn a so lid in c o m e . C a ll P e a rl C o o k , M a n a g e r O ld B r id g e O ffic e 7 3 2 -5 2 5 -1 5 5 0 W E IC H E R T R E A L T O R S C E R T IF IE D H O M E H E A L T H A ID E S C O M P A N IO N S /L IV E -IN S W ANTED C o m e G r o w W ith U s ! W o rk n e a r h o m e . Im m e d i­ a te o p e n in g s t h r o u g h o u t M o n m o u t h & M i d d le s e x C o u n tie s . F le x. h rs. O w n tr a n s p . n e c e s s a r y . C o m p e te tiv e s a la ry . C a ll a b o u t o u r S ig n -o n b o n u s . C A R O U S E L OF HOME CARE 7 3 2 -3 0 3 -0 2 4 5

C L E R IC A L - P a y r o ll C o . in S o u th R ive r. F T /P T $ 9 ./h o u r. C o m p u te r w o rk , filin g , p h o n e s . C a ll 7 3 2 -2 5 4 -2 2 4 0

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LAW N & TR E E S PR AY T E C H N IC IA N - M u s t h a v e 2 y e a r s e x p e r ie n c e & a v a lid d riv e r’s lic e n s e . F u ll m e d ic a l & d e n t a l p la n , p a id h o lid a y s & v a c a tio n . C a ll 7 3 2 -5 3 6 -2 2 2 1 o r m a il to P .O . B o x 50, M a rlb o ro , N J 0 7 7 4 6

LAWN PERSON E x p e r ie n c e d , r e s p o n s ib le & re lia b le . O ld B rid g e a re a . M u s t h a v e c a r C a ll 7 3 2 -6 7 9 -8 2 4 8

LAWN SPRINKLER INSTALLER F u ll-T im e N o e x p e rie n c e n e c e s s a ry . O w n tra n s p o rta tio n . M a rlb o ro a re a . C a ll 7 3 2 -9 7 0 -0 5 0 0

LAWN SPRINKLER TECHNICIAN E n jo y w o rk in g w ith y o u r h a n d s ? E x p e rie n c e p re fe rre d b u t w illin g to tra in . B e n e fits a v a ila b le . C a ll 7 3 2 -6 7 9 -7 4 7 4

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CONTESTANTS

N o w a c c e p tin g a p p lic a tio n s fo r th e 1 99 9 M s. N J A m e ric a n T e e n , P re T e e n , S w e e th e a rt a n d P rin c e s s S c h o la rs h ip P a g e a n ts . O v e r $ 7 5 0 ,0 0 0 . in p riz e s g iv e n a n n u a lly . (O p e n to g irls a g e s 3 -2 0 ). N o e xp . n e c e s s a ry . F o r fre e in fo ., ca ll 7 3 2 - 2 8 8 - 1 3 3 1 .

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COOK-FT E x p e rie n c e n e c e s s a ry . A p p ly C re a m R id g e G o lf C lu b 1 -8 0 0 -3 4 5 -4 9 5 7

COPY EDITOR F u ll tim e p o s itio n w ith irre g u la r h o u rs fo r c h a in o f w e e k ly n e w s p a p e rs b a s e d in E a s t B ru n s w ic k . C a n d id a te m u s t p o s s e s s u ­ p e r io r la n g u a g e s k ills , a t­ te n tio n to d e ta il a n d a p t i­ tu d e f o r d e s k to p p u b lis h ­ in g , K n o w lw d g e o f M a c in ­ to s h /Q u a rk E x p re s s a p lu s. S e n d re s u m e s to: A d e le Y o u n g

732-583-8098

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A c o s m e tic s d is trib u to r lo c a te d in S a y r e v il le h a s a t e m p to p o s s ib le h ire o p e n in g fo r a p e r s o n e x p e r ie n c e d in n o n f a c tu r e d c a s h a p p lic a t io n , c h a rg e b a c k s a n d d e m o n s tra ­ tio n / c o m m is s io n s a la r ie s . G o o d k e y b o a rd s k ills a n d a c c u r a c y is a m u s t . K n o w l­ e d g e o f A S 4 0 0 a p lu s. S a la ry s ta rtin g a t $ 2 4 ,0 0 0 . P le a s e fa x r e s u m e t o 7 3 2 -7 2 7 -5 5 5 5 A T T E N T IO N : A R C H -H K

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MCDONALD’S O f M illsto n e H ir in g f o r a ll s h if t s F u ll- t im e & P a r t- tim e U p t o $ 8 .0 0 a n h o u r to s ta r t. S ta rt n o w & b e c o m e e lig ib le f o r B o n u s P a y P ro g r a m . A p p ly in p e r s o n . M C D O N A L D ’S R o u te 5 3 7 M o n m o u th R o ad C re a m R id g e , NJ

DAYCAMP A F A B U LO U S SU M M ER H irin g : • S u p e r v is o r s • S p o r t s C o a c h e s • L if e g u a r d s • C o u n s e lo r s • P a in t in g P e rfe c t fo r c o lle g e s tu d e n ts / te a c h e rs . C a ll 7 3 2 -4 4 6 -5 3 7 7

DENTAL ASSISTANT F o r O rth o d o n tic p r a c tic e . N o e x p e r ie n c e n e c e s s a r y - w ill t r a in . $ 6 . / h o u r to s t a r t & fu ll b e n e fit p a cka g e . 7 3 2 -5 3 6 -4 4 2 2 D R IV IN G IN S T R U C T O R S W A N T E D ! W ill T ra in . R e tire e s w e lc o m e . C a ll 7 3 2 -5 8 3 -1 5 2 0

M E R C H A N D I S IN G - N a tio n a l C o m p a n y h a s im m e d ia te n e e d f o r r e t a il m e rc h a n d is e r s a n d fix tu re in s ta lle rs . E x p e rie n c e in r e s e ts , d is p la y s , a n d p la n o ­ g ra m s h e lp fu l. C a ll 8 0 0 - 8 3 2 ­ 6 7 5 5 E xt. 5 3 4 (S C A N e tw o rk )

MERCHANDISING/ STOCK R e c e iv in g & s h ip p in g M a n g e r fo r c lo th in g s to re in M a n a la p a n . O p e n c a rto n s , p ric e , h a n g & d is p la y m e rc h a n d is e . C a ll 7 3 2 -9 7 2 -2 3 2 2

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035 Help Wanted Full Time M A N IC U R IS T P o s itio n a v a ila b le fo r b u s y D a y S pa . F T D a y s & E v e n in g s . C a ll 7 3 2 -2 5 7 -8 1 1 8 f o r in t e r v ie w . NURSES C E R T IF IE D HOME H E A L T H A ID E S L IV E -IN S / C O M P A N IO N S R N 'S • L P N ’ S A v a ila b le I m m e d ia te ly ! • S h if t W o r k • S ta f f R e lie f I n t e r v ie w s - 7 D a y s PREFERRED H EALTH M ATE

7 3 2 -8 4 0 -5 5 6 6 O F F IC E A S S IS T A N T L o o k in g fo r m o tiv a te d p e rs o n , fle x ib le h o u rs , d e ta il o rie n te d . D iv e r s ifie d d u tie s . E x c e lle n t c o m m u n ic a tio n s k iffs . H a z fe f a re a . C a ll K ris 7 3 2 -3 0 3 -0 2 4 5 O F F IC E H E L P - P ro c e s s in g B rid a l A c c e s s o ry M a il O rd e rs . R e s p o n s ib ilitie s in c lu d e p re p a rin g s m a ll lig h t p a c k a g e s fo r s h ip m e n t & ta k in g p h o n e o rd e rs . P le a s a n t s m o k e fre e office. M a rlb o ro area. R e s p o n s ib le in d iv id u a ls c a ll 7 3 2 -7 6 1 -2 5 5 6 O F F IC E A d m in is tra tiv e A s s is ta n t • C le ric a l • S e c re ta ria l • R e c e p tio n is t Im m e d ia te D a ta E n try /C le ric a l o p p o rtu n itie s fo r lo n g -te rm te m p a s s ig n m e n ts in s u rro u n d ­ in g F re e h o ld a re a . M a n y o th e r u n iq u e T e m p o ra ry & P e rm a n e n t o p p o rtu n itie s . 4 0 1 K , M e d ic a l & B o n u s e s .

HORIZON STAFFING RESOURCES T e l: 7 3 2 -8 1 7 -0 5 0 0 F a x : 7 3 2 -8 1 7 -0 5 5 5 P A C K A G IN G F re e h o ld b a s e d c o m p u te r s u p p ly c o m p a n y lo o k in g f o r p e rs o n to p a c k a g e p ro d u c ts & w o rk in q u a lity c o n tro l a re a . M u s t b e n e a t & o rg a n iz e d . C a ll L a s e r S a v e 7 3 2 -4 3 1 -3 3 3 9 P A IN T E R / H O M E R E P A IR p e r s o n s n e e d e d . B e n e fits a v a il a b le . T r a n s p o r t a t i o n a m u s t. C a ll 7 3 2 -8 1 7 -0 1 9 1

PARK AIDE E a s t B r u n s w ic k T o w n s h ip A p ril-S e p te m b e r M o n d a y -F rid a y 8 :0 0 a m -4 :0 0 p m $ 6 .5 0 -$ 9 .0 0 /h r. p ly a t E a s t B ru n s w ic k AppIMtun icip al B u ild in g D iv is io n o f H u m a n R e s o u rc e s EEO

PATIENT SERVICES REPRESENTATIVE H ig h e n e rg y p e o p le a n d c o m p u te r f r ie n d ly p e r s o n n e e d e d f o r p u b lic r e la t io n s , s e c re ta ria l a n d c lin ic a l a s s is ­ ta n c e in b u s y a lte rn a tiv e h e a lth c a re fa c ility . W ill tra in . B e n e fits a v a ila b le , re tu rn e e s w e lc o m e . C o n tin u in g e d u c a tio n p ro v id e d . F o r in te rvie w call: 7 3 2 -2 5 4 -6 0 3 6

PEST CONTROL TECHNICIAN N o e x p e rie n c e c n e c e s s a ry , w ill tra in . C a ll 7 3 2 -7 2 1 -5 0 5 9 R e c e p tio n is t/D a ta E n tr y Y o u n g , e m e r g in g c o n s u lt in g s e rv ic e s p ro v id e r s e e k s s o m e ­ o n e to b e o u r re c e p tio n is t/a d m . a s s is ta n t. Y o u m u s t be p r o fic ie n t in W in d o w s 9 5 /9 8 a n d M S W o rd a n d d e m o n ­ s tra te a o o d w ritte n a n d ve rb a f s k ills . C o m p e te tiv e s a la ry a nd b e n e fits . S e n d re s u m e to: K e y R e s o u rc e S o lu tio n s , Inc. 2 6 9 8 R o u te 5 1 6 , S u ite H O ld B rid g e , NJ 0 8 8 5 7 o r F a x 73 2 -6 0 7 -9 0 5 9 E-m ail: G p e te [email protected] ke yre sin c.co m

R ETAIL SALES MANAGER IN-STORE BRANCH FULL-TIME P ro v id e n t S a v in g s B a n k, a tw o b illio n d o lla r N e w J e rs e y B a n k h a s a n o p e n in g fo r a R e ta il S a le s M a n a g e r o u r in - s t o r e s u p e rm a rk e t b ra n c h lo c a te d in M id d le s e x C o u n ty . C a n d id a te s h o u ld h a v e g o o d s a le s m a n a g e m e n t e x p e rie n c e w ith th e a b ility to fo s te r t e a m w o r k a m o n g t h e S a le s A s s o c ia te s ta ff a n a e n jo y d e v e lo p in g c u s to m e r re la tio n ­ s h ip s t h r o u g h p e r s o n a l c o m ­ m u n ic a tio n s w ith p ro s p e c tiv e c u s to m e rs . T h e a b ility to c re a tiv e ly d e v e lo p u n it m a rk e t­ in g p la n s a n d s t r a te g ie s is a p lu s. E x c e lle n t b a s e s a la r y a n d c o m p le te in c e n tiv e a n d b o n u s p r o g r a m . E x c e lle n t b e n e f it s p a c k a g e in c lu d in g : H e a lth , D e n t a l, P e n s io n a n d P r o f i t S h a rin g .

035 Help Wanted Full Time R E C E P T IO N IS T - F /T - P /T M e d ic a l o f f ic e . E x p e r ie n c e re q u ire d . C a ll 7 3 2 -6 1 7 -8 8 0 0 R E C E P T IO N IS T : H e a lth C lu b F /T - P /T - T in to n F a lls & E a st B r u n s w ic k lo c a t io n s . G o o d c o m m u n ic a tio n skills. C a ll 7 3 2 -3 9 0 -7 3 9 0 S A L E S - L o o k in g fo r e xtra in c o m e . T u p p e rw a re h a s P /T & F /T a v a ila b le . G re a t & h a v e fu n . C a ll 7 3 2 -6 1 3 -2 8 8 8

SALES / RETAIL E x p e r ie n c e d s a le s p e rs o n n e e de d fo r K id s -P re -T e e n - J r . S to r e P a r t T im e / F u ll T im e S a tu r d a y a n d o r S u n d a y a m u s t.

Call 732-972-2322 SALES

SALES MANAGEMENT IM M E D I A T E O P E N I N G - A r e o u re a d y to e a rn b e tw e e n >30,000. -$ 5 0 ,0 0 0 . y o u r fir s t y e a r & $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 . -$ 8 0 ,0 0 0 . y o u r s e c o n d y e a r & $ 7 5 ,0 0 0 . $ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 . y o u r th ir d y e a r . T h e n w e ’d lik e to s p e a k to yo u . T h e le a d in g N A T IO N A L R E A L E S T A T E o ffic e in N J is lo o k in g fo r 2 C A R E E R m in d e d p e o p le fo r r e s id e n tia l, n e w h o m e s a le s , c o m m e rc ia l in v e s tm e n t s a le s & le a s in g in C e n tra l J e r­ s e y a re a . M a n a g e m e n t o p p o r­ tu n it y e x is ts . W E W IL L G E T Y O U L IC E N S E D A T N O G O S T $ZERO DO LLAR S - AND T R A IN Y O U . F o r c o n fid e n tia l in te rv ie w : C a ll T o m P o k lik u h a at C e n tu ry 2 1 , W o rd e n & G re e n 7 3 2 -2 3 8 -2 1 0 0 S E C U R IT Y O P P O R T U N IT IE S

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS IN CENTRAL NJ Full Time & Part Time $7.50-$9.00 Hour to Start $200. Sign-On-Bonus A re n b rig h t S e c u rity , o n e o f th e n a tio n ’s la rg e s t s e c u rity c o m >anies, is s e e k in g c a n d id a te s o r s e c u rity o ffic e r p o s itio n s . Q u a lifie d c a n d id a te s m o s t )O sse ss a v a lid d riv e r’s ic e n s e , c le a n re c o rd , H S d ip lo m a / G E D , f le x ib le a v a il­ a b ility , a n d b e a b le to p a s s a d ru g te s t & p h y s ic a l. W e o ffe r: C h o ic e o f M e d ic a l P la ns: T ra d itio n a l In d e m n ity o r R e g io n a l H M O C h o ic e o f D e n ta l P la n s a s w e ll a s L ife In s u ra n c e P a id V a c a tio n s /T ra in in g In te re s te d c a n d id a te s s h o u ld c a ll 8 0 0 -2 2 3 --0 5 4 6 e x t 1 1 8 to s c h e d u le a n a p p o in t m e n t.

035 Help Wanted w ant Full Time S T O R E M A N A G E R - K no w b u ild in g s u p p lie s , h a rd w a re , p lu m b in g , e tc. H e lp c u s to m e rs w ith th e ir p u rc h a s e s . C a ll 7 3 2 -2 5 7 -8 0 6 3 S U P E R V IS O R S /D e m o n stra to rs W o rk fro m h o m e . E xc. $. G ifts & C h r is tm a s A r o u n d T h e W o rld . C a ll R u th 7 3 2 -4 6 0 -0 0 7 2 T E A C H E R S /A S S IS T A N T S T u rn w o rk in to p la y a t K id d ie A c a d e m y . C a ll n o w fo r te a ch in g p osition. 6 0 9 -6 5 5 -7 7 8 0 T E L E P H O N E IN T E R V IE W E R S FO R C O N S U M E R RESEARCH COMPANY M a n a la p a n b a s e d firm s e e k s e n t h u s ia s t ic in d iv id u a ls w ith g o o d in t e r p e r s o n a l s k ill s to c o m p le t e p h o n e s u r v e y s . E v e n in g a n d w e e k e n d s h ifts . F le x ib le h o u rs . W ill tra in . A d v a n c e m e n t o p p o rtu n itie s ! • 2 0 -4 0 h o u rs • S ta rtin g S a la ry $ 7 .-$ 8 ./h o u r + B onus • N o S a le s C a ll C h r is t in a a t 7 3 2 -3 0 8 -0 5 0 0 E x t. 2281

8 30 B e rg e n A v e n u e J e r s e y C ity , N J 0 7 3 0 6 E O E M /F /D /F

036 Help Wanted Part Time

OUR ADS GET RESULTS!

O P T IC A L A S S IS T A N T P T O ld B rid g e . C a ll 7 3 2 -6 7 9 -2 1 6 7

M ID D L E T O W N /P O R T M O N M O U T H - C h ild c a re in m y h o m e . C a ll 7 3 2 -4 9 5 -7 5 5 5

R E C E P T IO N IS T - D r’s. O ffice , H o w e ll. M a tu r e , re s p o n s ib le p e r s o n , p h o n e s k ills , t y p in g a n d f le x ib le h o u r s . I n c lu d e s P M & S a tu rd a y h o u rs . S o m e c o m p u te r. 7 3 2 -3 6 7 -2 0 4 0

O L D B R I D G E - 2 M o m s w ill c a re fo r y o u r c h ild , F /T o r P /T , M o n d a y -F rid a y . 7 3 2 -3 9 0 -8 9 4 5

CALL CLASSIFIED 1 -8 0 0 -6 6 0 -4 2 3 7

LIFEGUARD F o r P re -S c h o o l s u m m e r c a m p . M o n d a y , W e d n e s d a y & F rid a y o n ly. C a ll 7 3 2 -4 4 6 -3 7 3 7

036 Help Wanted Part Time

CARRIERS E a r ly A M , P /T . E a rn $ 6 0 0 .0 0 $ 8 0 0 .0 0 / m o n th + in c e n t iv e s ! M u s t h a v e re lia b le c a r & va lid N J D riv e r’s lic e n s e . S o m e co llectio n n e c e s sa r y . C a ll 8 8 8 -4 5 3 -3 4 3 7

CHILDCARE WORKERS N e e d e d fo r s e rv ic e s & e v e n ts a t M o n m o u th W o rs h ip C e n te r. $ 7 .5 0 p e r h o u r . 7 3 2 -3 3 2 -9 6 0 0

T E L L E R S /S A L E S ASSOCIATES IN-STORE BRANCH FULL-TIME

C H IR O P R A C T IC A S S IS T A N T R e s p o n s ib le p e rs o n fo r b u s y o ffic e in E a s t B ru n s w ic k . A fte r­ n o o n & e v e n in g h o u rs & o n e m o rn in g . M o n d a y -T h u r s d a y , w ill tra in . C a ll 7 3 2 -2 3 8 -1 2 2 4

P ro v id e n t S a v in g s B a n k , a tw o b illio n d o lla r N e w J e rs e y B a n k h a s o p e n in g s fo r T E L L E R S / S A L E S A S S O C IA T E S to w o rk in o u r in - s t o r e s u p e r m a r k e t b r a n c h e s lo c a te d in M id d le s e x C o u n ty .

C O A C H - L o c a l S w im C lu b s e e k s s u m m e r s w im t e a m c o a c h f o r y o u n g te a m . L if e ­ g u a rd c e rtific a tio n n e c e s s a ry , c o a c h in g e x p e rie n c e p re fe rre d . 18 o r o v e r. C a ll 7 3 2 -7 8 0 -9 6 2 8

C a n d id a te s w ill b e re s p o n s ib le f o r c u lt iv a t in g n e w c u s to m e r re la tio n s th ro u g h in -a is le s e ll­ in g o f o u r b a n k p ro d u c ts in o u r in -s to re s u p e rm a rk e t u n its. R e ta il s a le s e x p e r ie n c e is a p lu s . C a n d id a t e s s h o u ld enjo y w o rk in g w ith p e o p le in a te a m e n v iro n m e n t. E x c e lle n t b a s e s a la r y a n d c o m p le te in c e n tiv e a n d b o n u s p ro g ra m . E x c e lle n t b e n e fits p a c k a g e in c lu d in g : H e a lth , D e n t a l, P e n s io n a n d P r o f i t S h a rin g . S e n d r e s u m e a n d s a la r y h is t o r y o r f a x re s u m e to : 2 0 1 -9 1 5 -5 4 3 2

THE PROVIDENT SAVINGS BA N K 8 30 B e rg e n A v e n u e J e r s e y C it y , N J 0 7 3 0 6 E O E /M /F /D /V

WAITER/WAITRESS F T /P T E x p e rie n c e n e c e s s a ry . A p p ly C re a m R id g e G o lf C lu b . C a ll 1 -8 0 0 -3 4 5 -4 9 5 7

YARD HELP B la c k s to n e L u m b e r, R te . 9 O ld B rid a e , n e e d s e n e rg e tic , d e ­ p e n d a b le a n d frie n d ly p e rs o n to a s s is t c u s to m e rs a n d h a n d le v a rie d ta s k s . L e a rn a n d g ro w w ith u s. F u ll b e n e fits p a c k a g e . A p p ly in p e rs o n . C a ll f o r a p p o in t m e n t: 7 3 2 -7 2 1 -7 3 0 0

SENIOR ACCOUNTANT F u ll T im e p o s it io n a v a ila b le i m m e d ia t e ly a s th e S e n i o r A c c o u n t a n t f o r N e w s p a p e r a n d P r in t in g c o m p a n y . T h is p o s itio n is re s p o n s ib le fo r th e p re p a ra tio n o f fin a n c ia l s ta te m e n ts , e x te n s iv e a c c o u n t a n a ly s is , m o n th e n d clo s in g a n d G /L a n d fix e d a s s e t m a in te n a n c e . A d e g re e in a c c o u n tin g is a m u s t. P ro fic ie n c y in E x c e l & L o tu s. E x p e rie n c e in G re a t P la in s is a p lu s. W e offer a co m p e te tive s a la r y a n d c o m p r e h e n s iv e b en e fits p a c k a g e . M a il o r F a x re s u m e to:

GREATER MEDIA NEWSPAPERS Human Resource Manager P.O. Box 1080 East Brunswick, N.J. 08816 Fax# 732-254-0256

COOK-PT F o r c h ild c a re c e n te r. A p o s i­ tio n p e rfe c tly s u ite d fo r p a re n ts w h o w a n t to s e e th ie r c h ild re n o ff to s c h o o l & b e th e re w h e n t h e y r e t u r n . D u t ie s in c lu d e . C o o k i n g & k e e p in g a n e a t k itc h e n , if y o u c a n m a k e s p a ­ g h e tti o r c o o k h o t d o g s , th is jo b m ig h t b e f o r y o u ! H o u s e h o ld e x p e r ie n c e is p e r fe c t. H o u rs a re fro m 1 0 -2 . P e rk s to o ! C a ll V iv ia n a t 7 3 2 -2 5 1 -3 2 2 1 CUSTO M ER REPRESENTATIVE $ 1 2 . t o s t a r t. F le x ib le s c h e d u le . C a ll fr o m 2 :3 0 p m t o 6 :3 0 p m M id d le s e x - 7 3 2 -2 5 4 -1 4 1 1 M o n m o u t h - 7 3 2 -5 4 2 -4 8 4 8

RECRUITM ENT ACCOUNT MANAGER OUTSIDE SALES W e a re lo o k in g fo r a d y n a m ic , p ro -a c tiv e , s e lf-m o tiv a to r. Y ou w ill b e re s p o n s ib le fo r d e v e lo p in g p o w e rfu l re la tio n s h ip s w ith N a tio n a l R e c ru itm e n t A d v e rtis in g A g e n c ie s , E m p lo y m e n t S e rv ic e s c o m p a n ie s , a n d lo c a l d ire c t a c c o u n ts . Y o u w ill be tra v e lin g to N e w Y o rk C ity , W a s h in g to n D .C ., a n d P h ila d e l­ p h ia o n o c c a s io n . S a le s e x p e rie n c e is p re fe rr e d b u t n o t m a n d a t o r y . W e w ill t r a in t h e r ig h t p e r s o n . If y o u a re a p o s itiv e -m in d e d , e n e rg e tic , g o a l-o rie n te d in d iv id u a l w e w a n t to ta lk to y o u im m e d ia te ly . B a s e S a la ry + c o m m is s io n + b e n e fits + in c e n tiv e s . C a re e r g ro w th o p p o rtu n itie s w ith in o u r m u lti-m e d ia c o rp o ra tio n are a lw a y s e n c o u ra g e d . E -m a il, fa x o r s n a il m a il y o u r re s u m e to:

C o m p u te r lite ra te , o rd e r e n try & p ro o fs , c le ric a l d u tie s , 1 :0 0 -5 :3 0 M -F . C a ll A d e tte 7 3 2 -9 7 2 -1 4 4 0 DEM O NSTRATO RS N e e d e d in y o u r l o c a l s u p e rm a rk e ts . 6 0 9 -5 9 7 -0 5 0 0 D E N T A L A S S IS T A N T C D A /R D A W a n te d fo r p ro f­ e s s io n a l m o d e rn o ffic e . C a ll 7 3 2 -9 7 2 -3 8 6 6 fo r d e ta ils . D R IV IN G IN S T R U C T O R S E x p e rie n c e p re fe rre d , b u t w ill train.E . B ru nsw ick.7 3 2-72 1-5555

EXERCISE INSTRUCTOR F O R a c tiv e & fit s e n io r c itiz e n s . M u s t b e c e rtifie d & e x p e r ie n c e d . M o n d a y A M c la s s e s . C a ll M a rlb o ro R e c re a tio n 7 3 2 -6 1 7 -0 1 0 0 L A N D S C A P IN G L a w n c u ttin g , s h ru b s , p la n ts . W o rk w .o w n e r. C a ll & le a v e m e s s a g e 7 3 2 -5 8 3 -8 1 6 6

MAILROOM B u s y m a ilr o o m is lo o k in g f o r d e p e n d a b le p e o p le to fill p a rt tim e p o s tio n s tw o to th re e n ig h ts a w e e k . If yo u lik e to w o rk in a fa s t p a c e d a tm o s p h e re , c o m e in a n d fill o u t an a p p lic a tio n at:

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R E C E P T IO N IS T /F R O N T D E S K - M u s t b e o r g a n iz e d , c o m p a s s io n a t e . H e a v y p h o n e s , m a k in g a p p o in tm e n ts , e tc. M o n d a y th ru F rid a y, 1pm to 5 p m . C a ll 7 3 2 -7 3 9 -0 8 8 8 S A L E S - A T T E N T IO N W O R K F R O M H O M E . E a rn a n e xtra P / T $ 5 0 0 . - $ 1 ,5 0 0 . F /T $ 2 ,0 0 0 . to $ 4 ,5 0 0 m o n th ly . 1 -8 8 8 -6 6 7 -7 6 4 9 S A L E S -H a v e a lo v e fo r D e c o r & fa b ric ? W e n e e d a s ty le c o n ­ s c io u s s a le s p e rs o n fo r w in d o w d e c o r s e rv ic e . F le x h o u rs , w ill tra in . C a ll 7 3 2 -6 0 7 -0 0 8 4 SALESPERSO N L o o k i n g f o r p e r s o n w it h a s to n g k n o w le d g e in fa s h io n to w o r k P T in c o u t u r e la d i e s s h o p . C a ll 7 3 2 -6 8 3 -1 8 8 3

SEAMSTRESS E x p e r ie n c e w ith fin e fa b r ic s n e e d e d fo r b u s y d re s s s h o p in M a n a l a p a n . P T /F T . F le x ib le h o u rs. C a ll 7 3 2 -9 7 2 -2 3 2 2 .

SECURITY

W e n e e d a fe w G o o d M e n a nd W o m e n - R a c e w a y P ark. C a ll 7 3 2 -4 4 6 -6 3 2 7

STAFF NEEDED

M E D IC A L F R O N T D E S K P M & S a tu rd a y A M F a m ily p ra c tic e in M id d le to w n , e x p e rie n c e p re fe rre d . C a ll 7 3 2 -6 7 1 -0 8 6 0 o r fa x r e s u m e 7 3 2 -6 7 1 -6 4 6 7

M EDICAL OFFICE ASSISTANT P le a s a n t w o rk in g c o n d itio n s in b u s y P o d ia tris t O ffic e s . C o m p u t e r s k i l l s a n d b a s ic k n o w le d g e o f H M O ’s/ re fe r ra ls n e c e s s a ry . M o n d a y , T u e s d a y & T h u rs d a y e ve n in g s . P lu s a d d itio n a l h o u rs a v a ila b le . F a x re s u m e to : 7 3 2 -7 3 9 -4 6 5 6 o r c a ll 7 3 2 -7 3 9 -3 2 3 0

O F F IC E C L E R K - M u s t h a v e e x c e lle n t c o m m u n ic a tio n skills, k n o w le d g e o f w o rd p e r fe c t & th e a b iliity to ty p e . Q u a lifie d in d iv id u a ls C a ll 7 3 2 -4 4 6 -1 1 2 9 R E C E P T IO N IS T G o o d p h o n e & c le ric a l s k ills . 9 a m to 5 p m . 3 to 4 d a y s p e r w e e k C a ll 7 3 2 -6 1 7 -1 0 0 0

037 Babysitting Child Care

SHREW SBURY BOROUGH C h ild c a re m y h o m e . e x p . M o m cert. C P R . F T /P T 7 3 2 -5 3 0 -8 9 0 6

037a Child Care Wanted

T E LEM AR KETER S $ 7. p e r h o u r + $ 1 0 0 . w e e k ly b o n u s . 6 -9 p m . M o n d a y -T h u rs d a y . M a ta w a n . 1 -8 0 0 -2 3 5 -0 6 4 4

W A T E R H E A T E R -E le c tric . 5 0 G a llo n C a p . $ 7 5 . o r b e s t o f f e r . F U R N A C E - H a llm a r k W a r m A ir O il F ir e d - $ 1 5 0 . o r b e s t o ffe r. “ C o n v e rte d to g a s ” 7 3 2 -6 0 5 -0 2 4 0 A s k fo r W ill.

M IL L S T O N E T W P .-C h ild c a re n e e d e d fo r 3 g irls a g e s 1, 5 & 8 in o u r h o m e . 1 1/2 to 2 d a y s /­ w e e k . T ra n s p . & e x c . re fs. req. C a ll 7 3 2 -8 4 5 -1 3 9 3 O L D B R I D G E - S e e k in g P T c h ild c a r e h e lp , s o m e a f t e r s c h o o l, e v e n in g & w e e k e n d fo r 2 b o y s . F le x ib le h o u rs , y o u r h o m e o r m in e . R e f e r e n c e s re q u ire d . C a ll 7 3 2 -6 7 9 -0 1 9 4

038 Cleaning Help Wanted H O U S E K E E P E R -E x p e rie n c e d . 9 a m -1 p m . 5 d a y s p e r w e e k . L o c a te d in C o lts N e ck. C a ll 7 3 2 -4 6 2 -3 4 2 4

039 Health Care

040 Situations Wanted C A R E G IV E R : H o n e s t w o m a n w /e x p . & e x c . re fe r e n c e s w ill L iv e - In & c a re f o r th e s ic k & e ld e rly . B e a tic e 9 7 3 -4 9 7 -1 1 5 4 H O U S E W O R K -F le x ib le h o u rs P M . C a r, re fe re n c e s , m a tu re . 718-4 72 -6 2 80 o r 7 32-617-03491

041 Resumes Office Services

T O A D V E R T IS E H E R E C A L L C L A S S IF IE D 1 -8 0 0 -6 6 0 -4 2 3 7

★AFFO RDABLE R ES U M E S * G u a ra n te e d in te rv ie w s . O p e n 9 a m to 9 p m , 7 d a y s a w e e k . C a ll 7 3 2 -4 3 2 -4 0 0 0 .

TRAVEL AGENTS

WORD PROCESSING

G R E A T O P P O R T U N IT Y -T o se ll W a lt D is n e y W o rld & c ru is e v a c a tio n p a c k a g e s ! O u ts id e sa le s . C o m m is s io n o n ly. 7 3 2 -6 1 3 -8 4 4 4

T e rm P a p e rs • C o v e r L e tte rs R e s u m e s • B u s in e s s R e p o rts

V ID E O P R O D U C T IO N A S S IS T A N T - F o r w e e k e n d c re w s . W ill tr a in . M u s t h a v e ca r. C a ll 7 3 2 - 5 9 1 - 8 8 9 1 ________

WArTERS/WAITRESSES B a n q u e t se rv ic e . F le x ib le h o u rs . N o e x p e rie n c e n e e d e d . A p p ly in p e r s o n : G a rd e n M a n o r 5 0 R o u te 3 5 N o r th , A b e rd e e n

036a Em ploym ent Services COM PUTER USERS NEEDED W o rk o w n hrs. $ 2 5 ,0 0 0 .-$ 8 0 ,0 0 0 .w k ./y r. 1 -8 0 0 -4 7 6 -8 6 5 3 x 1081____

037 Babysitting Child Care CHILDREN’S CHOICE 4 6 W . F e rris S t., E. B ru n s w ic k A g e s 3 m o n th s - 5 y e a r s K in d e rg a rte n . S ta te C e rtifie d O p e n 6 :3 0 a m -7 p m , 12 m o n th s a y e a r. C a ll 7 3 2 -6 1 3 -4 4 8 8

¥¥ DO YOU NEED A NANNY? L IV E IN / L IV E O U T . • C h ild C a re . • H o u s e k e e p e r. * C o m p a n io n . 7 3 2 -5 2 5 -1 5 5 9 F R E E H O L D - E x p e r ie n c e d m o m w illin g to b a b y s it in m y h om e. T L C , ft/p t. 7 3 2 -8 6 3 -1 5 3 8 H O L M D E L /H A Z L E T - C e rt, te a c h e r/m o m w ill c a re fo r y o u r c h ild 7 a m - 4 p m . G r e a t fo r t e a c h e r s . S tim u la tin g , lo v in g , s a fe environ m e nt. R e fe re n c e s , C a ll 7 3 2 -2 6 4 -4 9 3 6 J A M E S B U R G /M O N R O E C a r in g m o m w ill c a re fo r y o u r child in m y h om e. Fun/a ctivitie s. R e fe re n c e s . C a ll 7 3 2 -6 56 -1 0 99

KIDS COUNT

A g e s 2 m o s. to 8 y rs . F u ll d a y K in d e rg a rte n . O p e n 7 a m -6 :3 0 p m . S ta te c e rtifie d . O ld B rid g e . C a li 7 3 2 -7 2 3 -9 4 1 6

W A S H E R & D R Y E R - Speed Q u e e n . V e r y g o o d c o n d itio n , $ 1 5 0 .0 0 ta k e s th e s e t. P le a se c a ll 7 3 2 -4 4 6 -8 6 7 1 .

w w w w w w w w

L IV E -IN C A R E G IV E R M o n Fri. F o r th e e ld e rly-H o m e ln ste a d S e n io r ca re . C all 7 3 2 - 5 4 2 -9 0 0 4

T E L E M A R K E T E R -$ 1 0 . / h r. b o n u s . M /F d a y s . 2 0 -2 5 hrs. /w k . M a rlb o ro 7 3 2 -3 3 2 -0 2 5 1

R E F R IG E R A T O R S - $ 7 5 . & u p , g u a ra n te e d . S to v e s : $ 1 0 0 . & u p. M C /V is a . 7 3 2 -5 6 6 -3 2 3 3

W A S H E R - W H IR L P O O L S u p e r c a p ., 2 S P D ., 7 C Y C L E . E x c e l l e n t c o n d it io n , $ 1 2 5 . P le a s e ca ll 7 3 2 -3 3 5 -0 8 6 6 .

N u rs e In s tru c to rs fo r : A rc h e ry R o p e s & C h a lle n g e c o u rs e

P A R T T I M E / F U L L T IM E P E R M A N E N T P O S IT IO N IM M E D IA T E O P E N IN G S N u rs e ry S c h o o l. C a ll b e tw e e n 9 am to 5 p m . 7 3 2 -2 5 4 -3 5 0 5

R E F R IG E R A T O R - C A R R IE R . 6 F T . G o o d c o n d itio n , $ 1 0 0 .0 0 , o r b e s t o ffe r . 7 3 2 - 2 6 4 - 6 5 8 3 , c a ll a fte r 6 p m ._________________

M A N A L A P A N - M o m ’s h e lp e r/ It. h o u s e w o r k . 1 0 & 1 4 y r . b o y s , 3 d a y s 4 -8 p m . C a r, re fs. M a tu re m in d e d . 7 3 2 -4 4 6 -1 1 9 1

H O M E C A R E - F o r e ld e r l y , d is a b le d . L iv e -in /o u t. P o lin te r A g e n c y 9 0 8 -9 2 5 -0 4 9 4

TEACHER AIDES TEACHERS

R E F R IG E R A T O R - 1 .7 c u .ft. W h ite , 2 y rs . K e n m o re . E x c e l­ le n t c o n d . Y o u h a u l, $ 1 4 0 . , b e s t o ffe r. 7 3 2 -3 8 9 -2 4 2 0 , e ve s

W A S H E R - H o t P o in t . E x tr a la r g e . G a s D r y e r : H o tP o in t. B otn 2 y rs . E x c e lle n t, $ 3 0 0 ., b o th . 7 3 2 -9 3 6 -9 2 2 6 , a fte r 4 p m

L IF E G U A R D S Iv y L e a g u e D a y c a m p

Call 732-446-7035

043 Appliances

H O LM D E L - N anny needed. N o n -s m o k in g & re fe re n c e s , fo r 2 c h ild re n , 3 d a y s p e r w k. O w n tra n s p o rta tio n . 7 3 2 -2 7 5 -1 4 5 5

HOLIDAY SWIM CLUB

MARKET RESEARCH

M E D IC A L R E C E P T IO N IS T Pediatrician, H o lm d e l. C o m p u t­ e r e x p e rie n c e a p lu s. F le xib le h o u rs. C a ll 7 3 2 -2 6 4 -1 6 9 9

A ttn .: R e c ru itm e n t A c c o u n t M a n a g e r P O B o x 1 08 0 E. B ru n s w ic k , N .J. 0 8 8 1 6 E -m a il: g m c la s s ifie d @ g m n e w s .c o m 7 3 2 - 4 3 2 - 0 0 1 6 (tax)

R E C E P T IO N IS T /A S S IS T A N T C h iro p ra c tic o ffice . E n t h u s ia s t ic , h a r d w o r k in g . C o m p u te r s k ills . M o n d a y th ru T h u r s d a y , 1 p m to 6 :1 5 p m . K e n d a ll P a rk . 7 3 2 -2 9 7 -1 2 2 2

CUSTOMER SERVICE

G e t P a id t o C o lle c t O p in io n s !! $ 6 .-$ 1 0 .p e r h o u r . P /T -F /T . I n te r v ie w e r s . A ls o n e e d P /T S u p e r v is o r s fo r B r u n s w ic k S q u a re M a ll. 7 3 2 -9 4 6 -0 1 0 5

S e n d r e s u m e a n d s a la r y h is t o r y f o r fa x r e s u m e t o : 2 0 1 -9 1 5 -5 4 3 1

THE PROVIDENT SAVINGS BANK

035A Help Wanted Seasonal

INDEPENDENT , MARCH 17, 1999 6 7

732-583-9452

042 Antiques Collectibles

ANTIQUES T o p p ric e s p a id fo r: A n tiq u e fu rn itu re , o rie n ta l ru g s p a in tin g s , je w e lry & s ilv e r. W e p u rc h a s e e n tire c o n te n ts o f e s ta te s . W ill c o m e to y o u r h o m e . C a ll 9 0 8 -8 6 2 -0 2 0 0 A N T IQ U E S W A N T E D F u rn itu re • E s ta te »1 p ie c e N J G a lle r ie s 7 3 2 -4 4 6 -9 4 9 0

BARBER CHAIR A N T IQ U E , $ 7 5 .0 0 . P le a se c a ll 7 3 2 -2 9 7 -6 2 0 2

FREEHOLD ANTIQUE GALLERY D IS T IN C T IV E A N T IQ U E F u r n it u r e & A c c e s s o r ie s R e p re s e n tin g 1 0 0 Q u a lity A n tiq u e D e a le rs 1 0 -5 M o n d a y th ru S a tu rd a y 1 2 -5 S u n d a y 21 W e s t M a in S tr e e t F re e h o ld , N J 0 7 7 2 8 7 3 2 -4 6 2 -7 9 0 0 E s ta te s P u rc h a s e d E n tire o r P a rtia l M A T C H B O X C A R S - 7 0 s. N o b o x e s . G o o d condition, 4 0 p ie c e s , $ 1 5 0 . f o r a ll, o r w ill s p lit. P le a se ca ll 7 3 2 -2 5 7 -1 2 9 3 .

043 Appliances D IS H W A S H E R - P O R T A B L E W h irlp o o l, 2 y e a rs o ld . E x c e l­ le n t c o n d it io n , $ 1 2 5 . P le a s e c a ll 7 3 2 -6 5 1 -7 3 5 7 . _______ D R Y E R - E L E C T R IC W h irlp o o l. A lm o n d . V e ry g o o d c o n d itio n , $ 7 5 .0 0 . P le a s e c a ll 7 3 2 -5 3 0 -7 3 1 9 .________________

MICROWAVE - LARGE S h a rp C a ro s e l II, $ 60 . P le a s e c a ll 7 3 2 -9 4 2 -8 5 8 9 .

044 Com puters A COMPUTER TUTOR A ff o r d a b le , P e r s o n a liz e d a t h o m e PC tra in ing .73 2 -7 86 -0 49 3 C A L L T H E P C M D - F o r a ll y o u r c o m p u te r n e e d s . A t h o m e s e rv ic e o f IB M & c o m p a tib le s ru n n in q W IN D O W S ’9 5 /’9 8 C a ll R o b e r t 7 3 2 -2 3 8 -6 7 7 9 C O M P U T E R T A B L E /B o o kca se , $ 3 5 . M A C c o m p u t e r/m o n ./p r in te r (c o m p , n e e d s re p a ir $ 1 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -5 8 3 -5 8 4 4 HARDW AR E OR SOFTW ARE R e p a irs • U p g ra d e s • In s ta lls T ro u b le s h o o tin g 'T u t o r in g C a ll 7 3 2 -2 9 0 -7 4 7 7

NEW PC OWNERS! N e e d y o u r n e w P C s e t up o r in h o m e tra in in g ? C a ll 7 32 -2 27 -0 4 96

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www.gmnews.com 045 C lothing

047 Furniture C L A S S IF IE D W O R K S ! FA X Y O U R A D 7 3 2 -4 32 -0 0 16 B E D R O O M S E T - 6 P C ., $ 4 5 0 . L a m p s e t (3 p c.), $ 6 0 . D e s k & c h a ir , $ 1 2 0 . C o lo r T V , 1 3 ", $ 9 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -5 2 1 -1 7 0 5 . B E D R O O M S E T -O A K p la tfo rm b e d w /n ig h t s ta n d s , d r e s s e r w /m ir r o r , & a rm o ire , $ 1 ,0 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -2 9 0 -9 0 7 7 . B E D S -T W IN SET B ra s s h e a d b o a rd . Q u e e n S et: h e a d b o a rd - 2 v a la n c e s , B lu e. G o o d c o n d itio n . 7 3 2 -9 7 2 -7 8 2 7 B U F F E T & H U TC H - D ark w o o d . C o n te m p o ra ry , $ 3 7 5 . K it c h e n s e t : O a k , s e a t s 4 , $ 1 5 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -6 7 9 -8 7 4 2 B U N K B E D S - C H IL D R E N S . " R o o m P lu s " . F o rm ic a , 5 d ra w d re s s e r, 3 d ra w d e s k , 4 t ie r s h e lf . A ll in 1, E x c e lle n t co n d ., $ 6 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -8 6 6 -1 7 1 0 C H A IR - Q U E E N A N N E R o s e c o lo r . E x c e lle n t c o n d i­ tio n , $ 1 2 5 . o r b e s t o ffe r. C a ll 7 3 2 -2 9 4 -9 1 6 3 , a fte r 6 p m . C H A N D E L IE R - C o n te m p ., fo y e r. B e a u tifu l, ic ic le d e sig n . V a lu e d @ $ 1 ,7 0 0 . W ill se ll $ 5 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -6 8 3 -2 4 5 4 C H E S S /C H E C K E R P L A Y IN G T a b le . W o o d , w ith 4 c h a ir s . B e a u tifu l & p e r fe c t c o n d itio n . C a ll 8 :3 0 -5 p m - 7 3 2 -3 0 3 -0 2 0 8 . C H IF F E R O B E - D R E S S E R In N a tu ra l. R e v e rs ib le to w h ite . N e v e r u s e d . O N L Y $ 7 5 .0 0 . P le a s e ca ll 7 3 2 -9 4 6 -1 2 0 1 . CO FFEE TA BLE S o lid m a r b le . M u s t s e ll. M o v in g . B e a u t i f u l, $ 1 5 0 . P le a s e c a ll 7 3 2 -2 5 4 -0 2 5 9 . CO FFE E T A B L E - A LL W O O D L a rg e O c ta g o n s h a p e d , g o o d c o n d it io n . O r ig in a lly $ 1 ,0 0 0 . A skin g $ 40 0. C a ll 7 3 2 -2 51 -8 7 39

COFFEE TABLE E x c e lle n t c o n d itio n , $ 50 . P le a s e ca ll 7 3 2 -7 2 7 -5 7 0 6 CO M PUTER TA B LE L ig h t w o o d c o lo r, 41 1 /2 " X 2 3 1 /2 " , o n e s h e lf, $ 3 5 . P le a s e c a ll 7 3 2 -4 6 2 -0 1 0 2 .

COUCH & CHAISE R a tta n . E x c e lle n t c o n d itio n . P le a s e c a ll 7 3 2 -7 8 0 -3 2 9 9 . C O U C H - C u s to m w h it e c r u s h e d v e lv e t , $ 1 4 9 . 0 0 , o r s t o f f e r . P le a s e c a ll 7 3 2 -5 3 6 -6 3 0 2 . D E N F U R N IT U R E - 6 y rs . C o n te m p . 8 p c . s e c t. s o fa , g la s s e ta g e re , ( 2 ) w h ite fo r m i­ c a ta b le s . C a ll 7 3 2 -5 3 6 -2 4 7 4 D IN E T T E S E T - 5 P ie ce , g la s s to p , b la c k fa n b a c k c h a ir s . E x c e lle n t c o n d it io n . $ 2 7 5 .0 0 C a ll 7 3 2 -7 3 0 -9 6 1 0

DINING Buffet Hutch O a k , b y B ro y h ill, $ 1 5 0 . P le a s e c a ll 7 3 2 -8 4 2 -2 7 8 6 .

G IR L S / B O Y S - T o p b r a n d s . L a y e tte . U p to siz e 4 . S p rin g / S u m m e r , $ 6 0 . o r $ 2 . to $ 5 . P le a s e ca ll 7 3 2 -5 7 7 -0 0 6 9 .

047 Furniture ARMCHAIR - LOVELY L ike T a p e s try , $ 1 2 5 .0 0 . P le a s e c a ll 7 3 2 -2 9 0 -2 6 5 5 .

BAR STOOLS (5): Free D a rk w o o d , s w iv e l. G o o d c o n d itio n . C a ll 7 3 2 -7 4 7 -2 4 4 4

BAR WITH 2 STOOLS 4 2 in c h . W a ln u t/F o rm ic a , $ 1 5 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -4 4 6 -4 7 7 5 B E D - R o o m P lu s . F o rm ic a t w i n l o f t , w /6 d r a w e r s & 4 s h e lv e s , g u a r d r a il & la d d e r . C o lo rs b e ig e w /te a l d ra w e r s , m a tc h in g c o m fo r te r s e t & s h e e ts . W ic k e r ta b fe , w /4 s t o o ls & m a t c h i n g h u t c h & t r u n k . P r ic e n e g o t ia b le A ll g re a t fo r s m . apt. 7 3 2 -3 0 8 -2 3 2 6 B E D R O O M (B E L L IN I) W H IT E C h ild re n ’s C rib p lu s 3 p ie c e s : 5 d ra w e r, 3 d ra w e r w / h u tc h , 3 d ra w e r w /a rm o ire .M IN T ! M IN T ! $ 1 1 0 0 .0 0 • P L A T F O R M B E D (IK E A ) F U L L S IZ E w ith 2 n ig h t tables. $ 35 0.0 0 • 7 32 -9 72 -7 9 55 B E D R O O M S E T - 6 pc. F re n ch P r o v i n c i a l , a n t i q u e . S o l id w o o d . E x c e l le n t c o n d it io n . P le a s e ca ll 7 3 2 -7 8 6 -0 9 5 5 . B E D R O O M S E T - 6 p c., $ 4 0 0 . S o lid w o o d , p r ic e d f o r q u ic k s a le . E x c e lle n t c o n d it io n . P le a s e ca ll 7 3 2 -5 8 3 -4 6 3 8 . B E D R O O M S E T - G IR L ’S. C o u n t r y P in e , 2 e n d t a b le s , d r e s s e r , d e s k , c h a ir , m irro r, $ 6 5 0 . H E A D B O A R D : B ra s s & w h ite m e ta l, F U L L size , $ 2 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -5 3 6 -0 5 4 0 . B E D R O O M S E T - G re y fo rm ic a . Q u e e n fla tfo rm b e d ., s to ra g e h e a d b o a rd , p ie r c a b s, w /lig h t b rid g e . T rip le d re s s e r, 6 d re w e r c h e s t, B e s t o ffe rC a ll 7 3 2 -6 1 3 -8 7 3 2 B E D R O O M S E T - M IC A W H IT E - 3 p ie c e s . B e d , 3 d ra w e r d re s s e r & 3 d ra w e r w ra p a ro u n d . $ 6 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -9 7 2 -5 6 2 1 B E D R O O M S E T - T r ip le D r e s s e r w it h a r m o ir e , h e a d ­ b o a rd w ith m irro r, lig h ts & s to ra g e & 2 s id e u nits. $ 1 ,0 0 0 C a ll 7 3 2 -5 8 3 -2 2 5 4 B ED R O O M S E T -Y O U T H . D re s s e r, c h e s t, d e s k , n ig h t ta b le , W o o d & fo rm ic a , $ 1 5 0 . P le a s e c a ll 7 3 2 -5 7 7 -1 1 5 6

D IN IN G R O O M - C o n te m p . L IK E N E W . G la s s t a b le , 4 2 x 7 2 , w /6 u p h o l. c h a irs . S a c ­ r ific e $ 5 7 5 . C a ll 7 3 2 -9 7 2 -8 5 7 7 D IN IN G R O O M S E T - B la c k la c q u a r, o v a l tb l., w / 4 c h a irs. $ 200 . o r b e s t o ffe r. C a ll 7 3 2 -7 2 3 -9 0 5 5 D IN IN G R O O M S e t G o rg e o u s O rie n ta l. G re a t b u y ! C o m p le te f o r m a l s e t w / lig h t e d C h in a . $ 2 ,3 0 0 . A r le n e -7 3 2 -5 3 6 - 5 8 4 5 D IN IN G R O O M S E T ­ A S o lid c h e r r y w o o d 11 p c . 9 6 ” d o u b le p e d e s ta l ta b le w /2 le a v e s , 8 h a n d - c a r v e d b a ll & c la w C h ip p e n d a le c h a ir s & m a t c h in g 6 0 ” lig h t e d h u tc h b u ffe t. N e v e r o p e n e d , s t ill b o x e d . C o s t $ 1 1 , 0 0 0 . S e ll $ 2 ,9 0 0 . (a d d t’l s e rv e r a v a il.) C a ll 7 3 2 -3 6 0 -4 6 8 4 D IN IN G R O O M S E T : C o n te m ­ p o ra ry. B e ig e la c q u e r, 6 c h a irs, le a f & b u ffe t. B ra n d n e w , n e v e r u s e d , $ 8 5 0 . C a ff 7 3 2 - 8 1 7 - 9 8 4 0 D IN IN G R O O M T A B L E W / L E A F . 6 c h a ir s & c h in a c lo s e t. P e c a n w o o d . $ 4 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -7 2 7 -3 9 7 9 E N T E R T A IN M E N T U N IT B o n e la c q u e r & g la s s . F its 2 7 ” T V & s te re o e q u ip . L IK E N E W ! $ 3 9 5 . C a ll 7 3 2 -5 3 6 -6 4 0 3 K IT C H E N S E T W o o d g ra in ta b le , 5 4 x 4 2 , w /4 u p h o ls te re d m e ta l c h a irs & le af. $ 3 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -2 5 1 -0 1 2 7

KITCHEN TABLE 36x52 T a n /B ro w n F o rm ic a to p . L ike n e w , ,$5 5 . C a ll 7 3 2 -2 5 4 -1 3 2 9 L A - Z -B O Y L E A T H E R S e c tio n a l. M a u v e w / s le e p e r & re c lin e r. B e s t o ffe r. C a ll 7 3 2 -5 3 6 -7 0 8 7 L IV IN G R O O M & D E N + S e c tio n a l, C o u c h , E n d T a b le s , W a ll U n it, e tc . F o u r m irro re d w a rd ro b e s , te n fe e t o f e xtra c lo s e t s p a c e . 7 3 2 -5 6 6 -6 7 0 5 L IV IN G R O O M S E T - C o u c h / S le e p e r, w a ll u n it, g la s s co ffe e t a b le , m ir r o r e d p e d e s ta ls , & la m p s, $ 8 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -6 1 7 -1 6 7 8 L IV IN G R O O M - M a u ve c o n te m p o ra ry s o fa w / sle e p e r, lo v e s e a t, re c lin e r & tw o ta b le s . $ 3 7 5 .0 0 C a ll 7 3 2 -7 2 7 -7 6 5 2

MATTRESS V e ry g o o d c o n d itio n . Firm S e rta , $ 1 2 5 . C a ll 7 3 2 -2 5 7 -6 9 8 5 M O V IN G - D re x e l H e rita g e 9 pc. p e c a n d in in g ro o m + so fa , c h a irs , ta b le s , la m p s , e tc. A ll p e rfe c t c o n d . 7 3 2 -4 3 1 -1 5 8 6 M O V IN G - G ir l’s w h ite B d rm . F re n c h P ro v. tw in b e d s . E a rly A m e r. h i-ris e r. E th a n A lle n C h i­ na ca b in e t, m o re ! 732 -5 66 -2 7 71

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M O V IN G S A L E - C o n d o c o n te n ts . D illo n 4 p c. e n t. ctr. $ 1 ,6 0 0 . C a rs o n 4 p c . c u rv e d b a c k s e c t. $ 1 ,1 0 0 . B e d ro o m s e t : C a p t a in s 4 p c s . $ 3 7 5 . T iffa n y fix tu re $ 7 5 . F lo o r la m p $ 1 0 0 .L o ts m o re . 7 3 2 -8 7 0 -8 0 7 9 M O V IN G S A L E -1 9 5 2 7 S O F A & L O V E S E A T - C o u n try style , w ith w o o d trim , 2 e n d ta b le s , & 2 b r a s s la m p s . E x c e lle n t c o n d itio n .m 7 3 2 -9 5 1 -9 6 5 7 M O W E R -L T S N A P P E R R ID E O N , 3 3 in ch d e c k w ith w a g o n . G re a t c o n d itio n $ 6 0 0 .0 0 . C a ll R a lp h 7 3 2 -7 8 0 -8 3 1 5 , e v e n in g s

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2 1/2 ro o m s o f fu rn is h in g s .

A n tiq u e s . O d d s & e n d s . S ilv e r $ co ins. Etc. C a ll 7 3 2 -5 3 6 -1 6 6 6

RECLINER E x c e lle n t c o n d itio n . P ric e d to se ll, $ 9 5 . C a ll 7 3 2 -5 2 1 -1 9 9 6

SOFA & LOVESEAT T a b le s : C o ffe e , s o fa , & e n d , b o n e & g la s s . W a ll U n it: W ic k ­ e r w / lig n t b r id g e . S o f a B e d : w /Q N . m a ttre s s . 7 3 2 -9 7 2 -8 3 8 6 SO F A - Q UEEN S LEEPER , W ith C h a ir a n d O tto m a n . G o o d c o n d itio n , $ 4 5 0 . P le a s e c a ll 7 3 2 -3 2 9 -9 0 0 4 . S O F A , L O V E S E A T , C H A IR , END TA BLE S & COFFEE T A B L E . T r a d it io n a l. E x c . c o n d . C a ll 7 3 2 -6 7 9 -2 4 5 1 S O F A / LOVE S EA T O ff w h ite , w ith b lu e , ro se a nd s e a fo a m . E x c e lle n t c o n d itio n , $ 6 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -6 0 7 -2 6 3 1 . T A B L E S : C o n te m p . g la s s o va l c o c k ta il, a s k in g $ 4 0 0 . 2 e n d tb ls ., a s k in g $ 1 0 0 . e a c h . G la s s 0 0 . - 7 3 2 -5 2 1 -0 2 6 5

T h e R o a rin g

R E C L I N E R - H a n d ic a p p e d . H y d ra u lic , 3 p o s itio n , a u to -lift. J a d e . L ik e n e w , $ 6 0 0 . P le a s e ca ll 7 3 2 -5 2 1 -0 5 1 4 .

REFINISHING G e rm a n T ra in e d P e r fe c tio n is t R e fin is h in g * R e s to rin g • H a nd S trip p in g 'B a n n is t e r s • K itch e n C a b in e ts • P ia n o s • D o ors. F re e E s tim a te s • 7 3 2 -5 7 1 -2 9 1 5

ROCKING CHAIRS (2) M a tc h in g , a ll w o o d , $ 1 0 0 . fo r th e p a ir. C a ll 7 3 2 -5 2 1 -6 1 3 5 S E C T IO N A L - L IV IN G R O O M 4 p c. P e n ta g o n sh a p e d , C o n te m p o ra ry , o ff w h ite / s e a fo a m /a m e th y s t, $ 8 0 0 . 3 p c. d a rk P e a c h F o rm ic a W a ll U n it, $ 3 5 0 . B e s t o ffe r on a ll. C a ll 7 3 2 -4 6 2 -1 9 9 0 . S E C T IO N A L C O U C H - 8 PC . L o v e ly u n it. P lu sh M a u v e c o lo r w ith o tto m a n s , $ 1 ,000 . o r b e s t o ffe r. A ls o a s s s o rte d m irro re d ta b le s . C a ll 7 3 2 -5 3 6 -2 0 7 1

SLEEPER SOFA Q u e e n . T a n , g o o d c o n d itio n , $ 1 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -3 4 5 -8 0 2 0 S O F A & L O V E S E A T -T a p e s try w /b u rg u n d y w in g c h a ir & o tto ­ m a n . 3 y rs . y o u n g $ 6 5 0 . S o n y sta c k s te re o s y s te m $ 3 0 0 . (2 ) A n tin q u e c h a irs (m a tc h in g ) $ 3 0 0 .,& a n t iq u e r o u n d t a b le $ 1 5 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -4 5 0 -9 3 6 6

2 0 ’S MERCHANDISE CLASSIFIED (P riv a te P a rty O n ly )

m 4 Lines • 4 weeks- $20. (e a ch a d d itio n a l lin e $ 5 .) s o m e re s tric tio n s a p p ly

1-800-660-4ADS Local 732-254-7979 TIFFANY LAMPS (2) C e ilin g c h a in e d ., $ 1 0 0 . C a ll 1 -8 0 0 -7 0 0 -2 2 0 0 c o d e 32

VANITY - 30" O a k , w ith s in k b a s e , $ 5 0 . P le a s e c a ll 7 3 2 -9 4 2 -8 5 8 9 . W A L L U N I T ( 3 p c . ) B la c k , $ 3 0 0 . C o ffe e t a b le s : 3 f o r $ 1 2 5 . C o m p u te r d e s k s : 1 fo r $ 5 0 ., 1 fo r $ 6 5 ., a n d m o re . A ll g o o d c o n d itio n . M U S T S E E ! C a ll 7 3 2 -7 8 7 -2 9 0 8 . W A L L U N IT - 5 P C . O a k , 2 to w e rs C e n te r T V /S te re o c a b i­ n e t, lig h t b a r, m irro r, g la s s & b ra s s . E x c e lle n t c o n d ., $ 5 0 0 . P rig . $ 1 ,1 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -2 5 7 -8 8 9 0

W A L L U N IT - 3 P C . M e d iu m w o o d . G la s s & b ra s s trim . Like n e w . A s k in g $ 7 0 0 . P le a s e ca ll 7 3 2 -4 4 6 -5 3 4 4 .

WALL UNIT

2 p c. A lm o n d . 6 4 x 1 6 x 7 7 . L ike n e w . $ 3 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -2 5 1 -4 2 1 7

048 General Merchandise 1 8 " D IR E C T V S a t e llit e S y s te m s . S in g le $ 6 9 .0 0 . T w o B o x S y s te m s $ 1 9 9 .0 0 . 3 M o n th s F r e e P r o g r a m m in g . F re e In s ta ll K it w ith P u rc h a s e . A u t h o r iz e d D e a le r . O p e n 7 days (S C /A N e tw o rk )

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C L A S S IF IE D W O R K S !

S e a rs , lik e n e w . 5 0 x 3 9 x 21 d. B e ig e , $ 5 5 . C a ll 7 3 2 -8 2 1 -9 1 4 9

F A X Y O U R A D 7 3 2 -4 32 -0 0 16

CERAMICS-MOLDS g re e n w a re , kiln , 2 5 0 p ie c e s , $ 1 5 0 . fo r all. C a ll 7 3 2 -2 5 4 -9 1 9 8

w ith s h o w e r d o o rs , sin k , to ile t. A ll p in k , $ 1 0 0 . 7 3 2 -2 6 4 -1 9 1 5 B E D R O O M S E T - T W IN M ic a W h ite /g re e n a c c e n ts , b u ilt- in s to ra g e , d e s k , 6 d ra w e r d re s s e r. G o o d c o n d itio n , $ 2 5 0 . C H E S T F R E E Z E R : 9 c u .ft. E x c e lle n t c o n d itio n , $ 2 0 0 ., & lo ts m o re ! C a ll 7 3 2 -2 1 9 -0 9 0 7 . B IC Y C L E S - N e w F u ll S u s ­ p e n s io n , M t. B ik e s w /s h o c k s . F r e e s ty le w /r o to r & p e g s . H O N D A C B R 9 0 0 m o to rc y c le p a rts. D ra ftin g ta b le & ca b in e ts . A u t o O T C S c a n T o o l . C a ll 7 3 2 -2 5 1 -3 7 9 8 . B O O T S - M o t o c r o s s C y c le , s iz e 10 1 /2 . E x c e lle n t c o n d i­ tio n , G a e rn e b ra n d , $ 1 0 0 . P le a s e c a ll 7 3 2 -2 5 4 -4 4 9 0 . C A N A R Y F L IG H T C A G E W IT H S T A N D . 2 8 ” lo no /20 ”w id e / 3 6 ” h ig h . A s k in g $ 2 5 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -2 9 0 -2 2 4 7

CANNING JA R S -100 S o m e to p s . F R E E - P le a s e c a ll 7 3 2 -2 5 1 -2 8 9 8 .

CARPET

JU S T C O M PLETED LAR GE D E V E L O P M E N T . O VE R 1200 Y D S . L E F T . C lo s e o u t $ 3 .9 5 . C A L L E D D IE 7 3 2 -5 9 1 -0 8 6 9 O R 1 -8 0 0 -2 4 6 -0 8 6 9

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HO T TUB

6 S e a te r w ith c o v e r & s te p s . $ 3 ,0 0 0 . n e g o tia b le . C a ll 7 3 2 -5 2 5 -0 2 3 9 a ft e r

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K IT C H E N C A B IN E T S 21 F e e t o f c o u n te r .,12 u n its, P o rc e la in s in k & fa u c e t. G o o d cond. $775.00 • 732-957-8686

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LADDER 2 4 ft. a lu m in u m e x te n s io n , $ 5 0 . P le a s e c a ll 7 3 2 -3 0 8 -4 6 3 6 L O S E W E IG H T N O W ! I’ L L T E L L Y O U H O W ! C a ll 7 3 2 -4 7 1 -1 6 0 1 M A R B L E T IL E S - R o s a b o rd a . 2 1 8 s q .ft. Im p o rte d 1 st Q u a lity . L is t p ric e $ 1 0 .5 0 p e r tile , a s k ­ ing $ 4 .0 0 E A C H . 7 3 2 -2 9 7 -9 6 2 2

LO O K FOR YOR F R E E B IE C O U P O N IN C L A S S I F I E D ! M A IL • F A X • E -M A IL

COPIER/FAX MACHINE H P . E x c e lle n t c o n d itio n , $ 1 5 0 . P le a se c a ll 7 3 2 -8 8 8 -9 6 8 4 .

D IA M O N D S 2 .1 6 C T . E V S 2, $ 1 1 ,5 0 0 ., o r b e s t o ffe r. 1 .2 9 C T . M A R Q U IS I C o lo r S 1 1, $ 3 ,5 0 0 . B E E P J o h n a t 7 3 2 -2 1 9 -3 0 4 7 o r C A L L 7 3 2 -8 1 7 -0 8 0 6 . D IN IN G R O O M -W h ite ,m o d e rn w /6 c h a irs & b u ffe t, $ 4 5 0 . E n c y c lo p e d ia B r itta n ic a 1 9 8 6 w /u p d a te s $ 3 0 0 . 7 3 2 -2 6 4 -1 9 1 5 D IN N E R W A R E - M IK A S A "B a s k e t o f W ild flo w e rs ". S e r v ic e f o r 1 2 , $ 5 0 . P le a s e c a ll 7 3 2 -7 2 7 -3 9 7 9 . E N T E R T A IN M E N T C E N T E R . R e frig e ra to r. C o u c h . D re s s e rs ( 2 ), a n d v a rio u s o th e r h o u s e ­ h o ld ite m s. C a ll 7 3 2 -7 2 7 -9 3 6 7

M A R L B O R O - M O V IN G S A L E B e d ro o m s e t: 4 p c s . S le e p e r s o fa . H a n d p a in te d c h ild r e n ’ s f u r n . B e l l i n i r o c k in g c h a ir . L a m p . ( 2 ) 1 0 s p e e d b ik e s . S e c tio n a l c o u c h . 7 3 2 -4 6 2 -5 2 0 1 M O T O R IZ E D S C O O T E R - fo r d is a b le d p e r s o n . B R A N D N E W . E a s y to o p e ra te & fo ld s fo r tra v e l. $ 1 ,8 0 0 . firm . C a ll 7 3 2 -6 7 9 -4 2 3 0

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2 4 ’ R o u n d , 4 fe e t d e e p , filte r, la d d e r, v a c u u m , e v e r y th in g in c lu d e d . M U S T S E L L !! $ 5 0 0 .0 0 o r b e s t o ffe r. C a ll 7 3 2 -7 8 0 -2 4 4 8 , e v e n in g s . P O O L S A N D F IL T E R - F o r a b o v e - g r o u n d p o o l. U s e d 3 w e e k s . A lm o s t n e w .$ 4 0 0 . neg. C a ll 7 3 2 -2 9 0 -1 4 5 2 P O O L T A B L E - 7 1 /2 ­ 4 ft ., 3 /4 in . s la te . S a c r ific e , $ 1 5 0 . C a ll M ik e 9 7 3 -3 2 4 -0 2 9 9 o r V in a t 7 3 2 -7 2 7 -8 4 1 7 .

PROJECTION TV - 45" N e e d s w o rk , $ 1 0 0 .0 0 P le a s e ca ll 7 3 2 -8 8 8 -3 9 0 5 R A D IO C O N T R O L L E D C A R G o o d a s n e w b u g g y , w ith 2 b o d ie s . R e a d y to ru n , $ 9 0 . P le a s e c a ll 7 3 2 -8 4 2 -5 7 0 9 R E L O C A T IN G - M U S T D O W N S IZ E ! L e a v in g H o w e ll. F u rn itu re a n d h o u s e h o ld ite m s. B e s t o ffe rs. C a ll 7 3 2 -3 6 3 -1 6 7 7 . S A L O N S T Y L IN G C H A IR S ( 8) B la c k . E xc. c o n d itio n $ 10 0 . e a c h o r b e s t o ffe r. C a ll 6 0 9 -2 0 8 -1 3 5 7

Satellite Descrambler a n d 2 R e c e iv e rs , $ 1 5 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -2 5 1 -9 1 1 0 , S p o tsw o o d .

S U M P P U M P - N ew basem ent to ile t s y s te m . N e v e r u se d . R e ta il $ 9 0 0 . A s k in g $ 5 5 0 C a ll 7 3 2 -6 8 3 -2 4 5 4

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S TR O LLE R - DOUBLE P e r e g o . H u n te r G re e n d o t. R a r e ly u s e . A s k in g $ 2 0 0 . H o lm d e l a re a . 7 3 2 -6 7 1 -4 7 1 3

TRAMPOLINE

STROLLER - DOUBLE

O u ts id e . L a rg e , 14 fe e t ro u n d , $ 1 5 0 . P le a se ca ll 7 3 2 -4 4 6 -1 5 4 5

P e re g o . G e o m e tric , lik e n e w , $ 1 5 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -7 8 0 -1 7 4 7

VENDING - Counter

STROLLER - GRACO E x c e lle n t c o n d itio n , h a rd ly u s e d , $ 3 5 . C a ll 7 3 2 -7 9 2 -8 2 7 7

M a c h in e s h o p q u a lity , 5 ” ja w s , $ 1 2 5 . C a ll 7 3 2 -5 3 0 -5 8 6 5

049 Merchandise Wanted

W A L L U N IT . M ic ro w a v e c a rt w ith s h e lv e s & d o o rs . R e frig e ­ ra to r. B a b y fu r n itu r e , to y s 732-727-752 3 2 -7 2 7 -7 5 2 6 sw in g set, M O R E ! 7

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WATER WELL POINT

5 fe e t 6 in ch e s, 2 in ch d ia m e te r, $ 7 5 .0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -6 7 9 -0 7 7 5

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M O V IN G - H o u s e h o ld ite m s , Q N . b e d ro o m s e t, Q N . s o fa b e d /lo v e s e a t, c a r s e a ts , s tro ll­ e rs, & m o re . C a ll 7 3 2 -9 7 2 -8 4 4 8

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T O O L S - C ra fts m a n 6 H P , 6 0 ja l. u p rig h t C o m p re s s o r, $ 2 7 0 . J la c k & D e c k e r B a n d S a w w ith ta b le , $ 1 2 5 . C a ll 7 3 2 -2 9 7 -4 2 6 9

VISE - MORGAN

P IA N O - K im b a ll U p r ig h t w ith b e n c h , lik e n e w , $ 1 ,1 5 0 . B e d r o o m s e t: w /Q N . b e d , g o o d c o n d ., $ 3 0 0 . K it c h e n s e t: w ith 6 c h a irs o n ro lle rs , Ig. re c ta n g u la r ta b le , $ 3 7 5 . O th e r ite m s a v a ila b le . 7 3 2 -4 4 6 -3 6 6 8

N e e d

048b Infants Juvenile Items

T o p S n a c k M a c h in e , $ 7 5 . P le a s e c a ll 7 3 2 -6 1 3 -1 8 1 9 .

P IA N O K IM B A L L 4 2 ” U P R IG H T E x c e lle n t c o n d itio n . $ 1 ,0 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -9 7 2 -1 1 7 3

o r c a ll 8 0 0 -7 3 3 -0 3 6 3

w w w.hom etown.aol. com /m ovinday

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A M O V IN G S A L E * H o n d a s e lf - p r o p e lle d la w n m o w e r. W a s h e r & D rye r. P a tio s e t, 5 p c . N o r d ic T r a c k P ro . W o o d k itc h e n ta b le w /2 c h a irs , 2 D re s s e rs . C a ll 7 3 2 -7 2 3 -0 9 9 2

S A T E L L IT E D IS H - W ith a ll e q u ip m e n t, 68 ". F o r H o m e o r C o m m e r c ia l u s e , $ 1 ,2 0 0 . • 7 3 2 -7 6 5 -1 1 0 1 , D A Y S o r 7 3 2 -5 6 6 -1 7 1 2 , E V E N IN G S .

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YOUR A D CAN BE HERE! 1 -8 0 0 -6 6 0 -4 A D S

M O V IN G S E L L IN G A L L H O U S E

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K IT C H E N C A B IN E T S - W h ite O a k . $ 3 0 0 . S T O V E - C a lo ric G a s , $ 2 0 0 . G o o d c o n d it io n . C a ll 7 3 2 -2 3 8 -1 5 4 2 _______

CLASSIFIED (p riv a te p a rty o n ly )

E x c e lle n t c o n d itio n , $ 80 . P le a s e ca ll 7 3 2 -2 5 4 -0 8 0 4 .

BATHROOM-TUB

F R E E 6 D A Y S /5 N IG H T S IN B A R B A D O S . 4 S t a r H o t e l. O n ly $ 2 4 .9 5 G u a r a n te e d !! S e n d $ 2 4 . 9 5 to H O T S P O T G E T A W A Y S , 2 5 6 5 B ro a d w a y , S u ite 1 0 3 , N e w Y o r k , N Y 1 0 0 2 5 . (S C A N e tw o rk )________

C A S E M E N T W IN D O W b y A n d e r s e n . A ll h a r d w a r e & s c re e n . 8 ’7 ” w id e x 4 ’5 ” h ig h . T e rra to n e c o lo r .B R A N D N E W . A skin g $ 7 0 0 .C a ll 732 -8 28 -2 3 81

AIR HOCKEY: 4ft. x 2ft. A R T S T U D IO C O N T E N T S : 3 5 Ig . fr a m e s , s t r e tc h e r s , p rin ts /p a in tin g s , ta b le , c h e s ts , d o ll h o u se s. C a ll 7 3 2 -8 4 2 -3 5 4 0

F E N C IN G - F R E E g iv e a w a y . 1000 ’s o f ft., p re s s u re tre a te d w o o d , 1 " x 8 , m u s t re m o v e u n d e r s u p e r v is i o n . C a ll 6 0 9 -2 5 9 -9 1 1 9 .

C A S E M E N T W IN D O W P E L L A , 3 0 "w . x 6 0 " h . , $ 1 5 0 . o r tra d e fo r g a rd e n w in d o w . P le a e c a ll 7 3 2 -6 5 1 -0 4 4 2

048 General Merchandise

048 General Merchandise

048 General Merchandise

048 General Merchandise

047 Furniture

047 Furniture

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(2 ) S T E E L W A G O N W H E E L S W A N T E D fo r 8 lu g C h e v y V a n 1 6.5 x 6 .5 . C a ll 7 3 2 -2 5 7 -3 9 3 5 , le a v e m e s s a g e _______________

W H E E L C H A IR - G o o d c o n d it io n . E a s y f o ld in g , f o o t re s ts a n d b ra k e s , $ 8 5 . c a ll 7 3 2 -9 3 3 -4 9 3 9 .

A BUYER O F SLO T C ARS, T R A IN S & O T H E R T O Y S . C a ll B ig M a rty at 7 3 2 -4 6 2 -0 7 4 0 .

WINDOWS (2) A lu m in u m , & P a n e , 3 2 x 4 2. Like n ew $ 60 . ea. 7 3 2 -2 64 -7 0 67

A A A A N T H O N Y ’ S A N T IQ U E S P A Y S TO P $$ FO R A N Y A N T IQ U E -1 P ie c e o r c o n te n ts • E s ta te s * H o u s e s a le s • E tc . J O -J O A u c t io n s h e ld 3 rd T u e s . e v e r y m o n th , E s t. 1 9 7 9 C a ll U n c le J o e 7 3 2 -2 6 4 -3 1 3 0

048b Infants Juvenile Items

SAVE THIS AD !

B A B Y S W IN G - B ra n d n e w . G ra c o , 3 s p e e d , o p e n to p . N e w , $ 9 0 . A s k in g $ 6 5 . 0 0 P le a s e ca ll 6 0 9 -2 5 9 -0 7 8 3 .

ALL LIONEL TRAINS O r F lye r. T o p c a s h a p p ra is a l. P ric e no o b je c t. 7 3 2 -9 4 6 -2 8 9 3

C A R S E A T - C H IL D ’S. C e n tu ry 2 0 0 0 . B ra n d n e w s e a t c o v e r , $ 2 5 . 0 0 . P le a s e c a ll 7 3 2 -2 6 4 -9 4 5 3 .

B EFO R E YOU H AVE YOUR SALE! WE BUY AND SELL! 2 4 B ro a d S tre e t, K e y p o rt L il 7 3 2 -2 6 4 -0 7 7 7 o r 2 6 4 -8 6 1 5

C R IB & 5 D R A W E R C H E S T C h ild c ra ft. O a k, c o n te m p o ra ry . E x c e l le n t c o n d i t i o n , $ 3 0 0 . P le a s e ca ll 7 3 2 -2 1 9 -5 8 1 7 . C R IB E V E N F L O W h ite /b ra s s . C a rria g e , P la y p e n , S tro lle r, C a r S e a t, C a r B o o s te r S ea t. C a ll V a le rie 7 3 2 -6 7 9 -9 5 1 3

B U Y IN G - B o o k s , re c o rd s , m o v ie s , g la s s w a re , to y s , m ilita ry , h o u s e c o n te n ts , etc. C a ll 7 3 2 -8 4 2 -5 8 7 1

BUYING CAMERAS

C R IB W /C A N O P Y , C h a n g in g ta b le & d r e s s e r , C h ild c ra ft $ 7 5 0 . C ra d le , h ig h c h a ir, p la y ­ p e n , s w in g , b o u n c e r, c lo th e s & to y s . C a ll 7 3 2 -4 2 2 -2 3 7 4 C R IB , D R E S S E R & C h a n g in g t a b le . C h ild C r a f t , n a tu r a l. G re a t c o n d itio n , $ 1 5 0 . P le a se c a ll 7 3 2 -8 8 8 -3 2 3 5 . IN F A N T C A R R IE R /C a r S e a t/ S tro lle r c o m b o . V e ry g o o d c o n ­ d i t i o n , $ 4 5 . 0 0 . P le a s e c a ll 7 3 2 -7 9 2 -7 6 9 6 .

A n d P h o to E q u ip m e n t. 1 p c . o r w h o le s tu d io . N o P o la ro id o r m o v ie . C a ll 7 3 2 -9 2 8 -7 8 1 1

CASH FOR BOOKS Call 732-536-0850

CLUTTERED? CONSIGN T u rn y o u r g e n tly w o rn c lo th in g , fu rn is h in g s , k n ic k -k n a c k s , n e w s a le s m a n ’s s a m p le s in to D E J A V U * 7 3 2 -4 3 1 -2 0 0 1

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049 Merchandise Wanted

CONSIGN

Y o u r W o m e n ’s & C h ild re n ’s Q u a lity C lo th in g & A c c e s s o rie s

CALL 2ND TURN AROUND 7 3 2 -4 3 1 -7 6 6 7 DOLLS in your ATTIC? WE BUY 1 OR 100 PICK-UP AVAILABLE 7 3 2 -3 4 1 -7 6 1 1 * 7 3 2 -3 4 9 -3 3 1 1 G U N S • S W O R D S • M IL IT A R Y IT E M S . L ic e n s e N J /F e d e ra l D e a le r. B e rt 7 3 2 -8 2 1 -4 9 4 9

050 Musical Instrum ents P IA N O - B R I G G S - B o s t o n u p rig h t. B e a u tifu l w o o d . G re a t s o u n g /c o n d itio n . $ 4 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -4 4 6 -1 4 5 7 P IA N O S p in e tt. W a ln u t w ith b e n c h . G o o d c o n d itio n $ 5 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -3 6 3 -3 0 3 9

PIANOS-ORGANS L O T S O F T R A D E IN S FR O M $450. A ll F lo o r M o d e ls O n S a le 1 -8 0 0 -4 5 3 -1 0 0 1

051 Sporting Equipment EXERCISE BIKE $ 7 5 .0 0 P L E A S E C A L L 7 3 2 -2 6 4 -3 0 4 1

EXERCIZER C lo u d W a lk e r. U s e d 5 tim e s , $ 75 . o r b e st offer. 7 3 2 -8 4 2 -8 0 7 9 HO M E GYM - SEARS P ro -F o rm , w ith F le x F o rc e A c tio n S te p p e r , $ 5 0 . P le a s e c a ll 7 3 2 -3 2 9 -2 8 6 4 .

PO O L TAB LE 7 ’ K a s s o n . S la te ta b le , re d fe lt. 2 y rs . y o u n g . E x c . c o n d . $ 5 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -4 0 9 -3 3 0 7 S E A R S L I F E S T Y L E R C a rd io fit. E x c e lle n t c o n d ., $ 7 5 . o r w ill tra d e fo r re c u m b e n t s ta ­ tio n a ry b ike . C a ll 7 3 2 -3 7 0 -4 0 5 9 S O L O F L E X - C o m p le te w ith le g e x te n s io n s , b u tte rfly . E x c e lle n t c o n d itio n , $ 7 0 0 . P le a s e ca ll 7 3 2 -5 8 3 -4 6 3 8 . S O L O F L E X - C o m p le te H o m e G y m . L e a e x te n s io n s & b u tte r­ f ly in c lu d e d . E x c e lle n t c o n d i­ tio n , $ 6 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -3 6 0 -4 8 3 5 .

TR EAD M ILL N o rd ic T ra c k W a lk F it. Like n e w , $ 4 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -3 2 9 -9 0 0 4 T R E A D M IL L P R O F O R M C ro s s W a lk S p a c e S a v e r. L ik e n e w . $ 4 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -7 8 0 -7 3 1 5

WEIGHT SET-WEIDER

063 Instruction

065 Pets & Animals

A R T C L A S S E S f o r C h ild r e n In m y F re e h o ld h o m e b y e x p ., ce rt.te ach e r. C a ll 7 3 2 -8 6 6 -1 7 2 3 P IA N O I N S T R U C T IO N S IN Y O U R H O M E - B e g in n e rs to a d v a n c e d le vels. 7 3 2 -7 9 2 -7 3 9 8 P IA N O /K E Y B O A R D - B e rk le e ra d . Y o u r h o m e o r m in e . 12-291 -19 7 0 *G re g s p ia n o @ a o l

S T U D IO

63

T h e re is a D iffe re n c e

M U S IC P ro fe s s io n a l In s tru c tio n 6 3 M illto w n R d ., E . B ru n s w ic k 7 3 2 -2 5 7 -8 6 3 7

VIOLIN AND PIANO

CAT - FREE to m a tu re p e rs o n . P e rs ia n . W h ite & C re m e . 7 3 2 -7 8 0 -3 2 9 9

063b Tutoring

G O L D E N R E T R IE V E R - 9 m o n th s o ld . A ll s h o ts , A K C re g is te re d . G o o d fa m ily pet. $ 3 0 0 .0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -7 2 7 -4 6 1 7 H a n d s o m e L a b ra d o r/S h e p h e rd m ix . N e e d s g o o d h o m e . H o u s e b r o k e n , s h o t s u p to d a te . G e n t le . N e e d s fe n c e d y a rd . C A L L 7 3 2 -6 9 8 -9 4 9 5

IN M Y M A R L B O R O H O M E C a ll 7 3 2 -9 7 2 -9 0 5 6 A L G E B R A I & II S A T ’S G e o m e try & B a s ic S k ills . N e e d H e lp ? F e e lin g fru s tra te d ? E x p e rie n c e d T e a c h e r & T u to r. C a ll 7 3 2 -6 1 3 -9 2 2 5

8

BIO, CHEM, MATH C e rtifie d , g u a ra n te e d re s u lts . Y o u r h o m e . C a ll 7 3 2 -7 8 0 -4 4 2 8

CHEM/BIO/AP BIO

065A Pet Supplies and Services C A N IN E S O L U T IO N S O b e d ie n c e tra in in g & e le c tric fe n c in g . F o r p u p p ie s & d o g s. S p rin g d isc. C a ll 7 3 2 -6 1 3 -3 7 0 0 P E T C A R E U N L IM IT E D In c P ro f. P e t S ittin g In Y o u r H o m e B o a rd in g A v a il. In s ./B o n d e d 7 3 2 -4 4 6 -2 5 0 3

In y o u r h o m e . E xp . te a c h e r. C a ll 7 3 2 -2 3 8 -0 6 5 2

□ E A S T B R U N S W IC K M O V IN G S A L E . 2 5 4 R o o n e y C t. (F o x M e a d o w - o ff C ra n b u ry & R u e s L n .) S at. 3 /2 0 , 9 a m to 3 p m . F u rn ., a n tiq u e s , h o u s e h o ld & m u c h m o re . □ E A S T B R U N S W IC K - 5 9 W e llin g to n Rd. (o ff U n iv e rs ity R d .) S a t. & S u n ., 3 /2 0 & 3 /2 1 , 9 -2 . M O V IN G - L o ts o f S tu ff!!

069 Entertainm ent

H IG H S C H O O L S u p e rv is o r o ffe rs M a th /S A T tu to rin g . F re e ­ h o ld a re a . 7 3 2 -4 3 1 -8 3 3 3 M a th - C o lle g e te a c h e r, q u a lity le s s o n s ; b ks. p u b lis h e d : S A T A lg /trig /ca lc. C a ll 7 3 2 -2 3 8 -3 0 4 2 M A T H , S A T P R E P (M & V ) C e rt. M a th T u to rin g G ra d e s 5 -8 , A lg e b ra 1 & 2, G e o m e try D ia n e 7 3 2 -2 9 4 -1 7 0 7 M A T H /R E A D IN G - K T H R U 8 T e a c h e r w /1 0 y e a rs e xpe rie n ce. R e a so n a b le rates 7 3 2 -3 0 8 -9 4 9 0

A D O P T IO N L o v in g c o u p le lo n g to a d o p t. E x p e n s e s p a id . C a ll a n y tim e t o l l f r e e 1 -8 7 7 -7 9 8 -6 0 1 0 A M A Z IN G W E IG H T L O S S P R O G R A M - F a s t, e a s y , g u a r a n te e d . N o th in g to lo s e b u t th e w e ig h t! F R E E s a m p le s . C a ll W illy 7 3 2 -9 0 5 -0 1 1 9 E -m a il W a itB G o n e @ a o l.c o m

A S T O R Y T IM E C h ild p a rtic ip a tio n w /p u p p e ts , s o n g s & c ra fts . 7 3 2 -2 5 4 -9 3 8 9

A-D.J. GOOD TIMES W e d d in g s , 16’s. 7 3 2 -2 1 3 -0 0 9 0

ALLCHARACTERS

• • • W IT H • • •

ERIC THE GREAT A n y O c c a s io n . 7 3 2 -5 3 6 -6 9 3 6 B A R N IE O R A L IO N K IN G P A R T Y C a ll 7 3 2 -6 5 1 -3 2 5 6

BUBBLES THE CLOWN M a g ic, b a llo o n s * 7 3 2 -4 4 6 -3 1 3 1

FIND YOUR SPECIAL SOMEONE NOW!

$ 2 .9 9 p e r m in . M u s t b e 1 8 yrs+ 1 -9 0 0 -3 2 8 -2 1 1 1 , e x t. 2 8 1 8 S erv-U , A rizo n a - 6 1 9 -6 4 5 -8 4 3 4

S P A N IS H / F R E N C H - L D T C R a is e g r a d e s n o w ! 10 y r s .o f s u c c e s s w /k id s . 7 3 2 -6 1 7 -1 1 9 2

064 Lost & Found D O G F O U N D - FE M A LE lo o k s lik e s m . d e e r) G o rd o n s C o rn e r R d ., M o rg a n v ille , on 3 /3 . B e e p : 1 -8 0 0 -5 2 0 -4 2 0 3 F O U N D - S e t o f ke y s , c o rn e r T h ird S t. & O tte rs o n R o a d . F o u n d la st w e e k o f F e b rua ry. C a ll 7 3 2 -4 6 2 -6 1 9 3

CELEBRATION E N T E R T A IN M E N T - D J/V ID E O Taping. Pkg Avail. 7 32 -7 21 -0 8 92

CHILDREN’S PARTIES C lo w n o r C o m e d y M a g ic P ro fe s s io n a l e n te rta in e r. R efs. • B a llo o n s • F a c e P a in tin g M a g ic & A L iv e B u n n y J IM B O 7 3 2 -2 9 7 -1 3 6 9

066a Novenas

S A T /P S A T P riv a te s e s s io n s in y o u r h o m e . E x p e rie n c e d s ta ff d ire c te d b y th e C o lle g e B o a r d ’ s S A T S o ftw a re a u th o r. W e use o n ly re a l te s ts . T o p s c o re g a in s fo r 15 y e a rs . S c o r e A t t h e T o p ! 1 -8 8 8 -G E T -1 6 0 0

DANCE M AN DJ ST. JU D E N O VEN A

May the sacred heart of Jesus be adored, glori­ fied, loved and preserved throughout the world now and forever. Sacred heart of Jesus pray for us. St. Jude, worker of miracles, pray for us. St. Jude, hope of tne hopeless, pray for us. Say this prayer nine times a day. By the eighth day your prayer will be answered. Say it for nine days. It has never been known to fail. Publication must be promised.Thank you St. Jude.

M.O.

G O O D D A N C E M U S IC M A K E S T H E A F F A IR A ffo rd a b le . C a ll 7 3 2 -2 9 7 -4 2 5 4

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□ S A Y R E V IL L E -1 3 2 B o e h m h u rs t A v e . T h u rs ., F ri., S at., 3 /1 8 , 19 & 2 0 , a ll d a y . S o m e ­ th in g fo r e v e ry o n e !____________

C O M PLETE CO NTENTS OF H O M E to b e s o ld F rid a y T h ru S u n d a y , 3 /1 9 to 3 /2 1 , f a m to 5 p m . I n c lu d in g a p p lia n c e s , to y s , c o lo n ia l D in in g & B e d rm s e t. D e a c o n ’s b e n c h , h o u s e ­ h o ld g o o d s , s o d a , r e c lin e r , 1,000 o f o th e r ite m s . 3 L u c c a r e lli D r iv e , H o lm d e ll, N J

b y B r u c e B ra y M a g ic ia n s • C h a ra c te rs (R u g B ra ts « R -T h u r* L -M o ,e tc .) M o o n W a lk s • R id e s C o tto n C a n d y • B irth d a y S p e c ia lis ts . 1 > 8 0 0 -4 9 1 -2 7 2 9 P L A Y E R S C A S IN O P A R T IE S Birthday/Anniversary/Picnic/Corp. P ro f. S ta ff. 7 3 2 -5 6 0 -9 0 6 7

PONIES & PETTING ZOO BY HAPPY TRAILS 7 3 2 -2 5 1 -4 2 4 0 H o rs e d ra w n w a g o n rid e thru y o u r n e ig h b o rh o o d . A p e ttin g Z O O to o ! C a ll 7 3 2 -9 2 8 -3 5 9 7 D e c o ra te d & F rie n d ly . C a ll 7 3 2 -4 4 6 -6 4 7 4

SINGING TELEGRAMS C u s to m R o a s ts -F u n n y /S w e e t A ll o c c a s io n s . 7 3 2 -9 7 2 -3 3 6 6

TE A

P A R T IE S

F O R C H IL D R E N F o r b irth d a v p a rtie s o r a n y o c c a s io n . C a ll 7 3 2 -2 6 4 -0 4 2 1

*T H E PUPPET L A D Y * S p e c ia liz in g in P R E -S C H O O L P A R T IE S s in c e 1 97 7. C a ll 7 3 2 -2 6 4 -5 1 7 0

069a Party Planning

D e d ic a te d to m a k in g y o u r p a rty a s u c c e s s . B a rte n d e rs a ls o a v a ila b le . 7 3 2 -4 4 6 -5 7 9 8

070a Appliance Repair DAVE’S APPLIANCE 2 0 Y e a rs S e r v in g C e n tr a l N J R e frig e ra to rs & M a jo r a p p l. R e p a ir/In s ta lls . 7 3 2 -7 8 6 -0 8 1 0

USE YOUR V IS A , M A S T E R C A R D O R D IS C O V E R C A R D TO PAY FO R Y O U R AD.

A LL TYPES OF IM P R O V E M E N T S - F re e E st. A N I C O N S T . 7 3 2 -5 2 1 -2 4 4 4

CUSTOM CARPENTRY H o m e Im p ro v e m e n ts . Q u a lity c ra fts m a n s h ip a t a d o w n to e a rth p ric e !N o J o b T o o S m a ll! 15 y e a r s e x p . F re e E s tim a te s . C a ll M a rk a t 7 3 2 -3 6 3 -8 2 6 8 D E C K S , A d d itio n s , K itc h e n s & B a th ro o m s . S & R H o m e Im p ro v e m e n ts . 7 3 2 -6 7 9 -2 2 9 1

073 Carpet Cleaning

S a fe , lo w m o is tu re fo a m e x tra c tio n . F a s t d ry in g . N o jo b to o s m a ll. F u lly in s u re d . C a ll fo r F R E E e st. 7 3 2 -3 6 7 -1 9 8 7

074 Carpet Install Repair/Sale A .J . C A R P E T - S a le s /R e p a irs R e s te tc h e s /R e la y s In s ta lla tio n s . Q u a lity fo r le ss.

7 3 2 -5 3 6 -4 7 0 3

CARPET REPAIRS • In s ta lla tio n • R e -S tre tc h in g • R e la y U se d C a rp e t • S A M E D A Y S E R V IC E

732-679-603f C AR PE T REPAIRS • R E -S T R E T C H E S • R E -L A Y S R e as, ra tes. C a ll 7 3 2 -4 3 1 -1 5 9 3 F L O O R C O V E R IN G U n lim ite d C a rp e t • L in o le u m • V in y l T ile L a m in a te d F lo o rs p lu s c a r p e t C le a n e rs & P o w e r W a s h in g . F o r p r o m p t , r e lia b le s e r v ic e C a ll M ic h a e l a t 7 3 2 -7 9 2 -8 3 0 7 J IM ’ S C A R P E T IN S T A L L A T IO N S a le s, c le a n in g , re -la y s , re -s tre tc h e s a n d re p a irs . C a ll 7 3 2 -4 9 5 -9 4 8 3

076 Cleaning Domestic C L A S S IF IE D W O R K S ! F A X Y O U R A D 732 -4 32 -0 0 16 H O U S E C L E A N IN G , H o n e s t

C A LL CLASSIFIED re lia b le , re a s o n a b le ra tes. H o m e s & o ffice s. 7 32 -2 22 -2 9 66 1-800-660-4ADS P-U-R-R-F-E-C-T-L-Y o r 732-254-7979 CLEAN AFFORDABLE H O M E C L E A N IN G A T IT S

C e ra m ic tile -ln s ta ll $ 2 .7 5 & up sq . ft. F re e e s t. 7 3 2 -8 4 5 -3 7 8 4

PONIES 4-FUN PARTIES CARPET KLEAN, INC.

C E R A M IC T IL E & M A R B L E IN S T A L L A T IO N N o jo b t o o b ig o r s m a ll. F re e e s tim a te s . 7 3 2 -9 2 0 -0 2 8 5 C U S T O M C E R A M IC T IL IN G N e w in s ta lla tio n , re p a irs, re m o d e lin g . F re e e s tim a te s . J o h n C h e r r y 7 3 2 -2 9 0 -9 0 8 6

JOHN’S CERAMIC TILE R E M O D E L IN G & R E P A IR S B a th ro o m s • F o y e rs • K itc h e n s O v e r 2 5 y e a rs e x p e rie n c e F R E E E S T IM A T E S C a ll 7 3 2 -3 2 4 -7 9 8 3

N A R IS I T IL E E X P E R T IN S T A L L A T IO N •C e ra m ic T ile ‘ G ra n ite » M arble F re e E st. J o e 7 3 2 -6 1 7 -0 3 2 5

076 Cleaning Domestic A B C C L E A N IN G E xp . P o lis h L a d y p ro v id in g th e b e s t s e rv ic e w ith g re a t ra te s . R e fs, u p o n re q u e s t. F re e e st. C a ll A lic e 7 3 2 -6 7 9 -6 6 9 9

ABSOLUTELY SPOTLESS M o v e -in /O u L C a rp e ts ,W in d o w s W e e k ly • B iw e e k ly • M o n th ly In s u r e d & B o n d e d . F re e E s t. 7 3 2 -4 3 1 -9 0 9 9 • 7 3 2 -9 4 6 -3 4 3 4 B O N N IE S C L E A N IN G S V C . E xp . & R e fs. V e ry s p o tle s s cle a n in g. C a ll 7 3 2 -3 1 6 -1 3 2 0 C L E A N IN G D O N E b y A N N A H o u s e s /a p a rtm e n ts . E xp . w ith re fe re n c e s . C a ll 7 3 2 -2 5 4 -2 5 6 1

CLEANSW EEP R E S ID E N T IA L /C O M M E R C IA L D a y s , E v e n in g s , W e e k e n d s F R E E e st. R e a s. In s. R efs. 7 3 2 -3 1 4 -2 3 8 6 • 7 3 2 -5 2 5 -3 5 7 2 E N E D IA C L E A N IN G H o m e s • O ffic e s • A p a rtm e n ts G o o d re fs., e xp . 7 3 2 -2 5 7 -2 4 7 6 H A V E Y O U R H O M E C le a n e d b y s o m e o n e w h o c a re s . M a n y refs. N o rush jo bs.7 3 2 -5 2 8 -0 9 3 9 H O U S E C L E A N IN G - If y o u n e e d s o m e o n e to c le a n y o u r h o u s e , C A L L M E ! R e lia b le , re fe re n c e s . C a ll 7 3 2 -5 5 3 -1 6 7 2

V E R Y B E S T . 7 3 2 -2 5 7 -8 4 6 3 P O L IS H C L E A N IN G S E R V IC E 10 y e a rs e x p e rie n c e . E xce lle m re fe re n c e s . L o w p ric e s . C a ll Iv a n a 7 3 2 -6 7 9 -6 6 9 9 P O L IS H R E L IA B L E -W o m a n c a n c le a n y o u r h o u s e & a p a rt­ m e n t p e rfe c tly . “ R e fe re n c e s ” C a ll 7 3 2 -5 2 5 -2 4 2 7 P O L IS H W O M A N w ill c le a r y o u r h o m e .E x p e rie n c e d .R e a s ­ o n a b le ra te s .C a ll 732 -5 25 -2 9 24 R O S A S C L E A N IN G S E R V IC E O ffic e s , H o m e s , C o n d o s . O u r o w n c le a n in g s u p p lie s a nd e q u ip m e n t. C a ll fo r fre e e st. 7 3 2 -4 3 2 -5 9 2 2 S P O T L E S S H o u s e & O ffic c c le a n in g . H o n e s t & r e lia b le . C a ll 9 7 3 -4 6 5 -0 1 1 6

TOO

B U S Y to k e e p

u p w ith h o u s e h o ld c h o re s ? Le m e h e lp . C a ll 7 3 2 -5 4 2 -6 3 4 5

O R IG IN A L S b y D A H L IA P r o fe s s io n a lly d e s ig n e d w in d o w tre a tm e n ts & a c c e s s o rie s D e s ig n e r fa b ric s a v a ila b le . F o r a p p t. C a ll 7 3 2 -6 0 7 -0 0 8 4

077 Dry wall Sheetrock A L L A IR E C O N T R A C T IN G P ro f. ta p in g & s p a c k lin g sinc« 1 9 8 4 F re e e s t. 6 0 9 -2 5 9 -2 0 8 C

SHEETROCK & TAPING S p e c ia liz in g in s m a ll jo b s F ree E stim ates. 1-800-640-3965

078 Electrical 3 R E L E C T R IC R easonable»R eputable«R eliabk E le c tric • P h o n e • C a b le • DakF re e e s t., In s u re d . L ie # 1 3 4 5 5

7 3 2 -4 9 5 -2 2 7 1

TH E LU C K Y W IN N E R S A R E . j.

R & R M U S IC 7 3 2 -7 2 7 -1 2 0 5 D J ’ s T H E U L T IM A T E W e d ­ d in g P r o fe s s io n a ls . K a r o a k e A v a il. C a ll 7 3 2 -6 8 1 -8 6 2 2

K E Y B O A R D IS T Ed th e O N E M A N B A N D 6 0 9 -2 7 5 -6 8 8 1 • 7 3 2 -7 4 5 -5 4 6 4

M AG IC

F a m ily e n te rta in m e n t w ith a s e n s e of hum or. M ic h a e l G u tm a n 7 3 2 -7 9 2 -1 7 6 0

Prayer to St. Jude Oh Holy St. Jude, Apostle and Martyr, great in virtue and rich in Christ, faithful intercessor ot all who ' >ke your special patronage in of need, to you I have recourse from the depth of my heart and humbly beg to whom God has given such great power to come to my " Stance. Help me in my p '

f.r

a ^ d e d to each of our winners* L o r e t t a Sm it h of South River A n n a O ’S h e a o f Freehold H arvey Freem an J r . of Old Bridge

P r e - p a y m e n t r e q u ir e d . M a s te r c a r d .V IS A o r D is c o v e r a c c e p te d

C o r e y J e n o r ik i of Monmouth Junction

Name________________________________ Address. Phone _ MC/VISA/DISCOVER # ____

. Initials at end of prayer..

. EXP. _

C h e c k O n e P ra y e r: □ P ra y e r t o S t . J u d e □ P ra y e r t o t h e B le s s e d V ir g in □ P ra y e r t o t h e H o ly S p ir it

P IA N O & V O IC E T e a c h e r & A u th o r - N .Y . & N .J. P ro d ig y - J u illia rd . E x p e rt - A ll L e v e ls . C a ll 7 3 2 -6 7 9 -0 9 3 3

P A R T Y P IZ A Z Z

DJ ANY OCCASION

1 -8 0 0 -6 6 0 -4 A D S

□ S t.J u d e N o v e n a

063 Instruction

D IS A P P E A R IN G A T T IC S ta ir s S e r v in g A re a S in c e 1 97 2 C a ll P a t 7 3 2 -3 4 1 -8 0 6 3

K E Y B O A R D V O C A L IS T D a nce • C o cktail • S in g-A -L o ng s • W e d d in g s • A n n iv e rs a rie s B irth d a y s » J u d y 7 3 2 -4 3 1 -1 2 8 6

Q u a lity fro m $ 3 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -2 3 8 -4 3 0 6

Your prayer will be published in our newspaper in your community.

061E Estate Sales

OUR ADS GET RESULTS CALL CLASSIFIED 1-800-660-4ADS

075 Ceramic Tile Repair/Install

D IS C J A K E Y

S O U T H R IV E R

M O V IN G S A L E

070b Attic Stairs

P A R T Y M U S IC

HOW TO PUBLISH A N0VENA

□ P A R L IN - M O V IN G S A L E 1 9 0 4 B a y h e a d D r. (H a rb o u r C lu b ). S a t., 3 /2 0 ,1 0 - 3 . F o u to n , w a ll u n it & m a n y m is c . ite m s.

1 8 H o lm e s (M a in to J a c k s o n to H o lm e s ). S a t., & S u n ., 3 /2 0 & 2 1 , 9 -3 . F u rn ., c lo th e s , h o u s e ­ w a re s , to y s , b o o k s & M O R E !

rja ONE WAY DJ’s

SERVERS

* * YOU CAN

S . A . T . V E R B A L , R e a d in g S p e c ia lis t, S p e c ia l Ed S p e c ia l­ ist, E n g lis h a ll le v e ls , M a th . C o lle g e E s s a y s 7 3 2 -2 5 7 -2 7 7 7

C a ll 1 -8 0 0 -2 9 5 -4 6 2 6

PONIES 4 PARTIES

AMAZING MAGIC

□ M A R L B O R O - 9 J e n n ife r C t. (O ff W y n c re s t R d .) S a t.,& S u n . 3 /2 0 & 3 /2 1 , 9 a m -4 p m . T o y s , g ift ite m s, c lo th in g , h o u s e h o ld s , S o m e t h in g f o r e v e r y o n e



O R 7 3 2 -2 5 4 -7 9 7 9 L IV E P S Y C H IC T A L K L iv e o n e -o n -o n e N O W !!! 1 -9 0 0 -8 3 5 -0 0 2 6 E xt. 4 0 4 2 $ 3 .9 9 p e r m in . M u s t b e 18 yrs. S e rv -U 6 1 9 -6 4 5 -8 4 3 4 P h o e n ix , A X

E x p e rie n c e d c e rtifie d te a c h e rs G ra d e s 2 -8 C a ll 7 3 2 -7 2 7 -5 6 9 0

S e t a n d d u m b -b e ll, $ 2 0 . P le a s e c a ll 7 3 2 -4 4 6 -2 5 4 8

060 Garage Sales

1 -8 0 0 -6 6 0 -4 A D S

BALLOO N SHO W & GAM ES F A C E A R T , M A G IC & M O R E

B e n c h , w e ig h ts , le g lifts , e tc., $ 1 2 0 . P le a e c a ll 7 3 2 -9 4 6 -4 8 4 6

WEIGHTS (1 )-1 1 5 LB.

ADVERTISE IN OUR BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY

732-723-0179

B a r & B a t M itz v a h P re p K e lli R ic h m a n 7 3 2 -5 3 6 -2 9 1 4

DJ’S WITH PIZZAZZ

PARTY D O LL ROOM A B irth d a y M a g ic a l M a k e o v e r Nails, Hair,Pizza, 7 32 -6 71 -9 1 11

EXCEL TUTORING HEBREW TUTOR

069 Entertainm ent

J M U S IC F O R A L L O C C A S IO N S . 7 3 2 -2 6 4 -0 4 2 1

P ro f. tra in e d , 6 y e a rs old. N e e d s g o o d h o m e . S e rio u s in ­ q u irie s o n ly. C a ll 7 3 2 -8 2 1 -5 7 5 1

SMALL DOG BOARDING

A L L S U B J E C T S A re a s K E xp. te a c h e r in y o u r h o m e . C a ll N a n c y 7 3 2 -9 3 6 -9 6 9 3

DON’T WAIT FOR THE PHONE TO RING!

* DALMATIAN m

P IT B U L L P U P P IE S C h o c o la te & R e d. A D B A . R e d n o s e d . P a r e n ts o n p re m is e s . C a ll 7 3 2 -2 6 2 -8 5 9 7 .

M a n a la p a n 7 3 2 -6 1 7 -2 1 0 8

067 Psychics

INDEPENDENT , MARCH 17, 1999 6 9

□ A d d it i o n a l N o v e n a s a v a ila b le p le a s e c a ll

Please return form with check or money order for $31.00 payable to Greater Media Newspapers.

CLASSIFIED DEPARTMENT G re a te r M e d ia N e w s p a p e rs P.O. B o x 10 80 East B ru n s w ic k , N J . 0 8 8 1 6

H a v e A H a p p y S t. P a t r i c k ' s D a y ! f r o m G r e a te r M e d ia N e w s p a p e r s Thank you to our loyal readers for the 100’s o f entries to our classified Find the Shamrock Contest!

7 0

INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17,1999 Greater Media Newspapers’ Classified Section is NOW Online! www.gmnews.com

Business &Service Directory ■. .

.

_

m

C A L L 1-800-660-4-ADS

r

D e a d lin e F r id a y 1 :0 0 P M

A S P H A L T /C O N C R E T E

STANLEY A SPH ALT PAVING Home Driveways Parking Lots

•• A a ir/H ir/i—e a t • A la rm s • A p p lia n c e R e p a ir • A s p h a lt/C o n c re te P aving • A u to D e ta ilin g • B rid a l S e rv ic e s • B u ild in g /R e m o d e lin g

732-251-2667 O pen Sat.

B&C Masonry

• Masonry & E xte rior Design

Reserve Now hr '99 season 5%off at Booking exp. 4/ 15/99

1-800 -867-7749 Insured

B y R a y G u id a N o j o b t o o s m a ll A G o o d C ra fts m a n f o r a ll y o u r C a rp e n try N e e d s B u ild in g & R e m o d e lin g S h e e tro c k /T rim D o o rs & A c o u s tic C e ilin g s S to rm D o ors Insured - 27 Years Experience

732-536-3397

j

T I L E

732-679-9500

R e s id e n tia l/ C o m m e r c ia l • D r iv e w a y s • C o n c r e t e • R R T ie s • B e lg i a n B l o c k • P a r k in g L o ts • L in e S t r ip in g A p p lie d

Hand lO +

withBrush

years experience

732-888*0803

B U IL D IN G /R E M O D E L IN G

CARPENTRY

/r j

A & S

* FREE ESTIM A TES*

Serving Monmouth County

■ /is in i V l li u

Free Estimates

French Drains Additions & Renovations Steps • Patios • Concrete Fireplaces • Chimneys Bisiiess: 732-566-0008 Home Phone: 732-566-6708

SIM 0S BROTHERS HO M EREM ODELING Family Run Since 1955 S id in g • R o o f in g W in d o w s • D o o r s F a s c ia • S o f f it s C u s t o m /D e c o r a tiv e T r im G u t t e r s • R e p a ir s

732-462-9221 Fully Insured Free Estimates

K IN G 'S TILE - Professional Installers o f Tile 6f M arble. "We T re a t Y o u r H o m e L ik e It 's O u rs !" Serving the com m unity fo r close to 2 0 years. From the sim plest regrouting & recaulking o f bathroom s to the com plete installation o f ceram ic and m arble tiling for your kitchens, floors, bathroom s, or any room in th e house. M arble polishing, pool tile repairs, backsplashes and counter tops are some o f the many jo b s we do. Select any tile from any tile store and we w ill save you 10-40% off the regular store price. For a FREE estim ate call STEVE-732-679-9500. K in g 's tile has been advertising in G re a te r M edia N ew spapers fo r o ve r 15 years and alw ays g e ts g re a t re s u lts !

BU ILD IN G & REMODELING • Additions • Custom Carpentry • Window Replacements • Kitchens • Bathrooms • Basements • Doors • Skylights • Tile • Decks

732-364-9182 Fully Insured

D AN E CUSTOM CARPENTRY INC. • • • • •

D ecks A d d it io n s B a s e m e n ts P a t io D o o r s W in d o w s

FREE ESTIMATES

SM ALL JO B SPECIALTIES Professional Q uality • Repairs • Renovations • Carpentry • Additions • Kitchens • Baths M . SANDBERG

752-786-0260 R e fe re n ce s • R e lia b le N e w J e r s e y S t a t e L ic e n s e

^ IsT O R “P r o f e s s i o n a l B u il d in g & R e m o d e l in g C o m p a n y "

7 3 2 -4 4 6 -5 9 2 1 F u l l y In s u re d

commercial/residential

BURSTING AT THE SEAMS?

HOME

Polish M A S O N

-NOVIELLO CONTRACTING CO. C home im provements

• Steps • Chimneys • Fireplaces • Brick Patios Walkways • All Concrete Work • Interlocking Pavers

• A D D IT IO N S • A D D A L E V E L • D O R M E R S • BATHRO O M S, ETC. 2 7 3 M a in S t., M a ta w a n (C o rn e r o f R t. 3 4 )

732-566-2828 CustomDecks b p i B l h n | f i' Additions -is M J l> Roofing/siding J ^ Windows/doors C O N T R A C T IN G

Basements Skylights Alterations Kitchens/Baths

ALL PHASES OF CONSTRUCTION

732-905-9025 or 1-800-404-5817 100% Financing Available To Approved Customers 24 Hour Pre Approval

n

6 0 9 -7 5 8 -4 8 0 0 1 -8 0 0 -7 S 8 -0 0 S 8 H A N D Y

ROCKWELL WALLSH Specializingin Taping,

The GRAND HANDYMAN, Inc. Residential & Commercial • Professional, Conscientious & Dependable Service • Repairs, Installations & Improvements

CALL FO R FR EE ESTIMATE

* FREE ESTIMATES *

732-389-9688

732-928-2880

Free Estimates

LB,IM PROVEM ENTS

H ELN IK S

Charlie Croce Construction

COUNTERTOP WORM?

All Phases of Home Improvements

You Don’t Need a New Kitchen... Buy Direct from Countertop Manufacturer. Custom Designed & Installation Included.______

S p e c ia liz in g in A ll T y p e s o f R e n o v a tio n s fr o m

7 3 2 -2 0 5 -0 0 8 6 7 3 2 -5 2 5 -8 1 1 8

REMODELING

Fully Insured

t Glass-LikeFinishing' c« ° £ g § IlH Fret Estimates

^

Fully Insured,

7 3 2 -9 72-5868

WINDOWS/DOORS/DECKS

Since 1970

C o n c e p t t o C o m p le tio n

• ROOFING • GUTTERS • SIDING • REPLACEMI WINDOWS • CONCRETE • DECKS Fully Insured

• A d d it io n s • S h e e tr o c k • S p a c k le Over 1 7 __ years experience

732-367-1793

732-79^-0749

Free Estimates

E R IC K S O N 'S C A R P E N T R Y Quality Craftmanship • A d d it io n s • R e s t o r a t io n s • B a th r o o m s • F in is h e d B a s e m e n ts • D e c k s • G a ra g e s

Excavation & MasonrY 150 New Homes Built - Over 18 yrs. experience

• W in d o w & D o o r R e p la c e m e n t • W a ll R e p a ir s ( C a ll o u r R e fe re n c e s )

C a ll T o d d f o r y o u r FREE E s tim a te

L e t O u r A r c h it e c t s D e s ig n Y o u r P r o j e c t w it h 3 - D D r a w in g s

7 3 2 -5 3 0 -9 7 3 3 A ll C alls A re R e tu rn e d W it h in 2 4 H o u rs

“ E u r o p e a n C r a f t s m a n s h ip / M e t ic u lo u s C le a n U p ” A D D IT IO N S • B A S E M E N T S D E C K S • P A IN T IN G R O O F IN G • S ID IN G • W IN D O W S 100% Financing Available • Commercial/Residential Satisfaction Guaranteed • References Upon Request Free Estimates

7 32 -7 8 0 -3 34 8

I

1

J

L

LET SOMEONE ELSE DO THE WORK!

9 2 Years o f P ro ven Q u a lity

NewIndependent Distmbutors

c o fflc m e .® G EN ERALH O M EREPAIR ‘ADDITIONSANDRENOVATIONS* ‘CUSTOMCARPENTRY* *D00RSANDWINDOWS* *KITCHEN/BATHREMOLDING* *PAINTING(INTERIOR/EXTERIOR)* •POWERWASHING*

W E90ITAU

BATHROOMS

*2 ,595“ upto5x8 DISCOUNT KITCHENS Tub areas retiled Small repair work OK Fully Insured - References

CARLO CONST. FreeEst. 35yrs. exp. CustomWork-A Specialty

7 3 2 -5 7 7 -6 8 1 5

732-721-2894

KI C A B IN E T S

SIGMUNDS REFINISHING

S T R IP P E D &

L IK E N E W CO UNTERTO P R EPLAC EM ENT

K IT C H E N C A B IN E T S S T R IP P E D

& R E F IN IS H E D

732-495-3484 Free Estimates • Fully Insured

KINGS TILE In s ta lle rs of T IL E & M A R B L E W e Also Do Regrouting, R ecaulking & A ll R ep air W ork

732-679-9500 FULLER BRUSH PRODUCTS

P E R S O N S

7 3 2 -3 1 6 -9 1 6 6

10-40% O F F

Fully Insured

To Advertise Your Business Here

732-866-4468

A n y T ile o f your choice in area stores F ree E stim ate

FAX 7 3 2 -3 0 8 -4 6 1 0

1-800-660-4-ADS

Just A sk!

S A T IS F A C T IO N G U A R A N T E E D S e r v in g R e d B a n k / M id d le t o w n a re a

7 3 2 -8 1 5 - 1 5 6 0

C a ll

No Job Too Big Or SmallI All WorkGuaranteed! FreeEstimatesAndFullyInsured

Fully Insured, Neat & Reliable Workmanship

sub-contractor pricing for heavy equipment, masonry & site work

re m m a n C o n s tru c tio n Co.

A n y t h in g & E veryth ing.....

Contempra Designs, Inc.

References • Insured • Free Estimates

u t Additions & New Homes,

IMPROVEMENT CORP.

• B a t h E n c lo s u r e s • T a b le T o p s • S to r m W in d o w s • S to r m D o o r s • V e n t ila t e d S h e lv in g

•ADDITIONS •ALTERATIONS •FINISHED BASEMENTS •DECKS • ROOFING & SIDING •REPLACEMENT WINDOWS

O ve r 2 0 yrs. o f A m erican European Experience

M IR R O R S

GLASS AND MIRROR

•ADDITIONS *BATH/KITCHENS •BASEMENTS *ALLTILEWORK •DECKS *W00D FLOORING •SIDING *D00RS •ROOFING ‘WINDOWS •ELECTRIC/PLUMBINGREPAIR •SHEETROCKREPAIR * FULLY INSURED'

GUARANTEED C O N S T R U C T IO N , IN C .

TOTAL

&

Fully Insured

Kitchens • Baths Additions, etc.

7 3 2 -5 6 6 -3 2 3 8

G L A S S

PERFECT REFLECTION, INC.

B U IL D IN G /R E M O D E L IN G

B U IL D IN G /R E M O D E L IN G

J O H N J. SENOPOLE

• PIi im hinn/Hfiatinn

• In te rlo c k in g Pavers

Waterproofing Specialists

Fully Insured • FreeEstimates • References

• fila c c A Mi rrnrs

INTERPAVERS Specializingin:

PAVING& SEALCOATING

General Contracting

• nooLPm D eck P ow/oerr W W achinn a sh in g E lectrical E x te rm in a to rs F e ncing F ire p la ce s F loors G a ra g e D o o rs

P A V IN G

New& Resurfaced Driveways & Weather Sealing

Serving Middlesex & M onm outh Co. over 31 years.

•■DniiHinn B u ild in g Ci S uinniinc p p lie s • C a rp e t C are • C a ta g lo g P ro d u cts & S e rv ic e s • C h im n e y S e rv ic e • C le a n in g • C lo s e ts • D e co ra tin g

DISCOUNT KITCHENS 1 5 Y e a rs E x p e r ie n c e • C a b in e t s & C o u n t e r t o p s R e p la c e d 1 0 0 ’s to c h o o s e f r o m • R e p a ir s & A d d - O n s • R e p la c e o r R e fa c e V e r y R e a s o n a b le Free Estimates • Fully Insured

"Pete 't ’TZxtcAeua 732 -972-2309

TRANSCRIPT, BAYSHORE'MIDDLETOWN INDEPENDENT, EXAMINER

Greater Media Newspapers’ Classified Section is NOW Online! www.gmnews.com L A W N

O A R E /L A N D S C A R IN G

L ANDSCAPING (Greener Grass Our Way) • Granular Fertilization Programs • Insect Weed & Disease Control • Seeding & Sod

T . W

H I T A K E R

e a it y

R E A C H O V E R 1 6 0 ,0 0 0 HOMES IN M O N M O U T H & M ID D L E S E X C O U N T IE S C a ll C la s s ifie d 1 -8 0 0 -6 6 0 -4 2 3 7

E X P E R T W A L L P R E PA R A TIO N

A L L -B O R O E L E C T R IC A L R e s id e n tia l/C o m m e rc ia l F R E E e s tim a te s . Lie. # 1 4 1 1 2 C a ll 7 3 2 -8 8 8 -3 6 3 0 A M P E L E C T R IC A L - A ll E le c tric a l re p a irs / In s ta lla tio n s B u rg la r a la rm s . Lie # 8 9 7 7 C F re e E s tim a te s . 7 3 2 -7 3 9 -8 7 9 7

“ W h e re , T h e , C u s t o m e r

Interior/E xterior I^IAUPAPER • POWERWASHING| ' -; (BookNowFor Spring/Summer >. Exterior Painting) | 1 Upto 5YearsExterior Guarantee 7 3 2 -2 5 1 -9 6 3 5 ,

• Reliable • Quality Workmanship with a commitment to satisfaction • Sheetrock & Spackling free Estimates • Fully Insured

Free EstTReferences/Insured:

I

C a ll L e o n a r d

1 22 Years Experience

Over 30 Years Experience in Interior Design & Paperhanging including Faux Finishes

F R A N K ’S E L E C T R IC S M A L L J O B S & R E P A IR S Lie. # 8 7 7 8 . 7 3 2 -4 7 1 -9 5 0 8 G AR DEN STATE E L E C T R IC A L C O N T R A C T O R S W h e re th e b ill Is n e v e r A S h o c k • R e s id e n tia l • I n d u s tr ia l • C o m m e r c ia l Lie. # 1 2 2 2 9 A C all 7 32 -8 66 -0 6 00 P a g e r # 7 3 2 -4 8 7 -3 5 6 2

JB ELECTRICAL S e e u s in th e Y e llo w P a g e s

732-566-7192

732-792-2274

R e fe r e n c e s A v a i la b le P L U M B IN G /H E A T IN G

abso lutely i S S g s r F t f *1 • P re p a s te d *

& P a s te d P a p e rs • P ap er R em oval • R e a s o n a b le R ates

AFFORDABLE ’PAINTING Exterior/Interior

rt <-ji f t r —

7M-741-5W0

PLUMBING & HEATING

HERB PLUM BING A ll Phases o f P lu m b in g

•POWER WASHING References Free Estimates Fully Insured

( .1 . PAINTING # W a llp a p e r in g

N o

•WALLPAPERING

J o b S m

b y L o u G u id a

■ No jo b too small ■ Alterations & Remodeling■ Sheet Rock & Tile Repaired w ith all jobs ■

T o o

a ll

732-651-6318

7 3 2 -9 7 2 -7 7 7 9

F r e e E s t. C a ll I a n

Lie. # 9 8 4 4

UC # 58 16

R e s id e n tia l/C o m m e rc ia l 1 5 % o f f S e r v ic e U p g r a d e 1 5 % S e n io r D is c o u n t B o n d e d & In s u re d • L ic .# 1 2 8 2 3 F R E E E s t. • R a d io D is p a tc h e d

1-800-317-7530 J B S E L E C T R IC - A /C lin e s & p o o ls . C e ilin g & a t t ic f a n s . R e a s o n a b le . Lie. # 1 1 3 6 3 . 7 3 2 -8 8 8 -8 2 9 8

JRM ELECTRIC F re e E s tim a te s . Lie. # 9 9 4 4 B o n d e d & In su re d R e s id e n tia l & C o m m e rc ia l 7 3 2 -5 2 5 -9 7 7 0

7 3 2 -2 5 1 -2 3 4 3

RICHARDK.MOORE f ib r e

P ro fe s s io n a l__ Pain tin g & W allpapering

*

M u r a ls REFS. • FREE EST.

Ivan 732-545-0516

• E x p e r t W a ll

¥ S

N e e d to c o o l o ff?

e a l Inc.

C a ll o u r a d v e r tis e rs th e y c a n h e lp .

Specializing In S w im m in g Pool Resurfacing

P r e p a r a tio n Owner Operated Satisfaction Guaranteed Fully Insured Free Estimates

732-577-1166 732-671-7768

Free Estimates

F u lly Insured

732-247-6670

N • • • • •

eigh bor & S on

Prof. Wallpapering Ini. & Ext. Painting Faux Painting Marblizing • Ceramic Tile Repair Home Improvements “ D ecorating S p e c ia lis t” C a ll G re g

7 3 2 -7 4 7 -3 8 4 5 THE W ALL A DOCTOR • • • •

Paper Hanging Wallpaper Removal Painting Wall Repairs

E X T E R IO R



IN T E R IO R

Professionally Done Free Estimates • Insured

A L L P H A S E R e m o d e lin g , Inc.

GARAGE DOORS & OPENERS

W

W

m

Call me for a tree Market Analysis of your home. f c

7 3 2 -5 3 6 -3 2 6 8

Prudential

732-615-2301

O D D J O B S - Can do m ost a n y th in g ,. N o J o b T o o S m a ll. C a ll J o h n 7 3 2 -2 5 1 -0 8 9 3

0 8 0 G u tte rs

080b Hom e

n mmxi tmL WALLPAPERING FAUX FINISHES • INTERIOR PAINTING

ROOSpecializing FING&SID ING in All phases of Roofing & Siding Beats Most Competitors Prices Senior Citizen Discounts

Fully Insured

7 3 2 - 9 2 8 - 0 4 8 0 C in d y

P a g e r # 8 2 7 -9 2 4 1

Call Dennis S P E C IA L

7 3 2 -5 8 3 -7 9 7 4 7 3 2 -2 9 4 -9 0 0 1 “W h e re Quality, Reliability & C le a n lin e ss C o u n t ” A ll W o r k G u a r a n te e d Free Estimates • Fully Insured References I

Q

732-390-5390

SHARP CUT M ECH. CORP. Q u a lity H o m e Im p ro v e m e n ts H e a tin c j/K itc h e n s /B a th s /A d d it. F re e E st. • A ffo rd a b le P rice s. 7 3 2 -7 2 3 -0 4 8 2 o r 7 3 2 -4 4 6 -6 5 8 5

Im provem ents G U T T E R C le a n in g & R e p a ir s F R E E E S T IM A T E S C a ll J o h n 7 3 2 -2 5 1 -0 8 9 3

A D D IT IO N S • B A S E M E N T B A T H • K IT C H E N S • F re e est. A N I C o nstructio n 7 3 2 -5 2 1 -2 4 4 4 A L L J O B S - S m a ll & B IG . C o n c re te , c a rp e n try , ro o fin g & m u c h m o re . F R E E e s tim a te s . C a ll G e o rg e 7 3 2 -2 3 8 -2 2 5 7

080a H andy P e rso n s

ALL WINDOWS

A -Z H A N D Y M A N S E R V IC E S S p e c ia liz in g In P a in t in g P ro fe s s io n a l/V e ry R e a s o n a b le F re e E s tim a te s • In s u re d C a ll 7 3 2 -3 0 3 -8 7 7 0

L o w e s t p ric e s • F re e e s tim a te s C a ll B o b 7 3 2 -8 4 5 -3 0 7 6

CLOSETS PLUS S to r a g e s o lu t io n s f o r e v e r y ro o m . R e d e s ig n c lo s e ts , etc. Q u a lity s h e lv in g . C o m m ./R e s . F re e e s tim a te s . 7 3 2 -6 7 1 -8 8 7 3

EMPIRE HOME IMPROVEMENT ADVERTISE IN OUR BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY

1-800-660-4A D S OR 732-254-7979

A L L H O M E R E P A IR N E E D S K itc h e n s /B a th s * T ile • W in d o w s D o o rs • B a s e m e n ts . S u p e r lo w p ric e s o n c u s to m m a d e c o u n te rto p s . Q u a lity in s ta lla ­ tio n . F re e e s t. 7 3 2 -8 8 8 -7 9 0 2 E S S E N T IA L H O M E R E P A IR S F re e e s tim a te s . N O J O B T O O S M A L L ! C a ll 7 3 2 -4 6 2 -1 5 3 1

HOME MAINTENANCE A ll c a rp e n try n e e d s , d e c k s / w a lk w a y re p a irs , tre e /y a rd w o rk , e tc . C a ll 7 3 2 -2 5 1 -9 3 4 2

TO TAL HOME IM P R O V E M E N T S C a ll 7 3 2 -5 6 6 -2 8 2 8

081 L a w n C a re L a n d s c a p in g

A BETTER CUT C o m p le te la w n c a re . F re e e st. F u lly in s. S e rv in g g re a te r Red B a n k A re a . C a ll 7 3 2 -7 4 1 -5 3 8 9

A BRANCH INSPECTION SPRING CLEANUPS • N e w L a n d s c a p in g • L a n d s c a p e Im p ro v e m e n ts • T re e /S tu m p R e m o v a l • S o d /S to n e /M u lc h /S o il • D riv e w a y S e a lc o a tin c j • M o w in g /L a w n C h e m ic a ls • G u tte r C le a n in g /R e p a irs F R E E e s t., In s. 7 3 2 -8 6 6 -1 8 8 2 B e e p e r # 7 3 2 -7 9 2 -9 0 5 9 A BS O LU TELY , A LW AYS AFFO RDABLE

SPRING CLEAN-UPS P ru n in g & T rim m in g , T re e R e m o v a l & S tu m p G rin d in g , D ra in a g e S y te m s , S o d /M u lc h / S to n e , T h a t c h in g & S e e d in g . R a ilr o a d T ie C o n s t r u c t io n , L a n d s c a p e D e s ig n & In s ta lla ­ tio n . F u lly in s u re d & F re e e st. C R E IG H T O N L A N D S C A P E 7 3 2 -9 0 1 -7 4 3 3

. .. B y giving you the c o u r te o u s , p e r s o n a l s e r v i c e you d e s e r v e . . . . B y g iving you o v e r 3 0 y e a r s of

New Jersey Realty

E-ZPAINTING,INC. Residential & Commcm • Interior & Exterior Painting • Power Washing • Water & Fire Damage^| Restoration " • Free Estimates • Fully Insured Serving CentralJersey Since 1985

732-225-7566

JUNK CARS BOUGHT

C a ll O u r

expertise.

B u s in e s s ^ S

e r v ic e

A d v e r t is e r s W E LE A SE E V E R Y M AK E A N D M O D EL

S E R V IC E S

C H IIN 'S

O F F

• Auto Alarms • Remote Starters

LET SOMEONE ELSE DO THE WORK!

L E A S E

S P E C I A L

R E T U R N S

A V A IL A B L E

1996 TOYOTA C A M R Y LE

IN S T A L L E D Experienced. Very reasonable rates!

4 dr., 4 cyl., auto., p/s, p/b, p/disc brakes, a/c, am/fm st/cass. lab int., moon roof, buckets, console, r/def, p/w, p/d/l, p/mir, bd/side md, tint, cruise, sec sys, pin strip, intermit wipers, mats, p/ant, tilt, keyless entry, rad., alum wheels, ext.: white int: beige, wood dash, gold package. VIN #733226, 42,750 miles. Down pymt.: $1000, Bank fee: $495. Sec. dep. $200. Mileage 12,000 per year. Excess miles at 150 per mile. 1st month payment $139.00. Total due at lease inception $1834.00. Total of Payments $3753.00. Total Cost $5248.00. Purchase Option F.M.V.

M ARLBO RO A U TO W RECKERS

732-591*1400

L E A S E

O T H E R

CALL1-888-842-3479

* 1 3 9

f o r m o re in fo r m a tio n .

Lease For

W IN D O W S

Exp. - Estb. 1987 * * O w ner O perated. Neat Emergency Service Available Brush-Roller S pray In te rio r - E xte rior Popcorn Ceilings. S taining W allpaper Removal Pow er W ashing Fully Insured - Free Estimates CompMre- Our WorhtULKskify Call Our References

M O N A H A N C O N S T R U C T IO N A ffo rd a b le p ric e s , q u a lity w o rk. B a th ro o m s , k itch e n s, a d d itio n s, d e c k s , w in d o w s , a ll c a rp e n try . F re e e s tim a te s .* F u lly in s u re d . C a ll M ik e J r . , 7 3 2 -2 6 4 -5 1 2 2

combined leasing JDC

V c A iy M iK f y w i t h S t i f l e

7 3 2 -7 3 8 -8 8 4 6

15 Years of Professional Wall Finishes

KITCHENS

• N e w • R e fa c in g • C o u n te rto p s G E N E R A L R E M O D E L IN G L o w P ric e s , Q u a lity W o rk 2 5 Y e a rs E x p e rie n c e C a ll 7 3 2 -5 4 2 -2 2 7 4

. .. B y getting you the m o s t car for your m on e y.

7nn Toonnnt PH K^anolonan 700 Tenngnt Rd. -• Manalapan

7 3 2 - 8 4 2 - 7 1 5 4 L en ni

\ j? » /

E x t. m

HOT LINE NUMBER 7 3 2 - 6 2 5 - 1 4 6 3

“CALL US LASTT

BY T IM S AM PS O N

H A N D Y M A N - A ll J o b s . B ig & S m a ll. V e ry R e a s o n a b le . F re e e s tim a te s . 7 3 2 -6 7 9 -5 9 9 9

W E D O IT A L L ! F R E E e s t. C a ll 7 3 2 -4 4 6 -4 0 8 5

“Someone you know"

^ ( p jf ljip y

Fre e E stim ate s • In su re d

fjP G « P A P [|

H A N D Y M A N - The Hom e o w n e r ’ s F rie n d . A ll t y p e s o f h o m e r e p a ir s . C a r p e n tr y , p a in tin g , e tc . 7 3 2 -8 3 3 -1 3 9 7

• I N S T A L L * R E P A IR S • S E R V IC E 7 D A Y S • R E A S O N A B L E • F R E E E S T. M o n m o u th /O c e a n /M id d le s e x

0 7 9 c F lo o r F in is h in g

RE-NU FLOOR SANDING

W E STO P LEAKS! Financing A vailab le Fully Insured Free Estimates

E s ta b lis h e d in 1 9 6 9

IM P R O V E M E N T - Inte r. E xte r. P a in tin g , C a rp e n try . F u lly in s u re d . F ra n k 7 3 2 -7 8 7 -6 5 2 6

JD HOME REPAIRS

BARBARA EINBINDER V

732-928-6025 1-800-540-0315

7 3 2 -5 3 6 -9 4 5 1 For Your Free Estimate

CHUCK S HANDYMAN S E R V IC E - L ig h t h a u lin g , c a rp e n try , c lo s e ts , p a in tin g . F re e e s t. C a ll 7 3 2 -6 7 1 -0 5 3 9

★ JBA 'k ★CONSTRUCTION* A ffo rd a b le P ric e s ,Q u a lity W o rk • A d d itio n s • S u n ro o m s • D e cks S id in g • W in d o w s • B a s e m e n ts F re e E s t.. I& In s . 7 3 2 -3 6 0 -2 6 6 0

S E L L I N G ?

(Formerly F & I) •

A ll T y p e s O f: H o m e R e p a irs /Im p ro v e m e n ts 7 3 2 -4 3 1 -3 9 8 1 o r 7 3 2 -2 5 7 -2 7 5 0

A LL YOUR FENCE NEEDS R e p a irs /In s ta lle d . A ll ty p e s . - re e e s t.D - e n n •is — -9 4 6>-2280 -2 F 732-1

7 3 2 -5 8 3 -6 6 6 7 • 7 3 2 -5 4 5 -8 8 9 2

FRANK’S PAINTING

ALL AROUND HANDYMAN

F & RHOME

DON’T WAIT FOR THE PHONE TO RING!

FLOORS C LE AN E D & W A X E D • S t ill in b u s in e s s a f t e r 4 0 y e a r s . S a m D e lin F lo o r W a x in g . C a ll f o r f r e e e s tim a te . C aill ll 7 3 2 -5 6 6 -8 6 9 0

J&C CONTRACTING A L L H O M E IM P R O V E M E N T S S ID IN G • W IN D O W S • D O O R S 7 3 2 -5 2 5 -2 8 2 2 • 7 3 2 -3 6 0 -0 6 0 6

1-800-660-4ADS

W ADE S HARDW OOD F L O O R IN G Installations "S anding^R efinishing Q u a lity w o rk a t re a s o n a b le p ric e s . C a ll 7 3 2 -7 8 7 -5 8 2 9

The Seal tha t Seals!

• M u lt i S p e c k P a in tin g # M a r b le iz in g (Faux, sponge, etc.

Im provem ents

AFFO RDABLE HANDYMAN A ll J o b s . 1 5 y e a r s e x p . F re e e s tim a te s . C a ll 7 3 2 -7 8 7 -6 5 3 8

U N L IM IT E D W O O D F L O O R S In s ta ll., s a n d in g , fin is h in g 7 3 2 -7 2 7 -6 6 3 3 o r 7 3 2 -9 4 6 -1 0 7 8

0 7 9 b F e n c in g

# I n t e r io r

080b Hom e

YOUR AD C AN BE H ERE! C A L L C L A S S IF IE D

S C R A P IN G & R E F IN IS H IN G H a rd w o o d F lo o rs . R e p a irin g / in s ta llin g . O v e r 3 0 y e a rs e xp . G u a ra n te e d . 7 3 2 -2 2 2 -8 9 3 5

D E P E N D A B L E E le c tr ic C o . Lie. # 51 51 C o m p le te S e rv ic e . F re e E s tim a te s . 7 3 2 -7 3 8 -7 0 7 0

LET SOMEONE ELSE DO THE WORK!

INTEGRITY PAINTING U H i g h l y Este e m e d ,”

080a H andy P e rso n s

P R O F E S S IO N A L

PAINTING&PAPERHANGING

732-229-9039 Established 1974 Dep #94597 EBBEHBmZ H o m e / O ff ic e

0 7 9 c F lo o r F in is h in g

0 7 8 E le c t r ic a l

Relax Let Someone Else Do The work!

Free LawnSurvey • CustomerSatisfaction

B r in g B a c k T h e B

INDEPENDENT , MARCH 17, 1999 7 1

P A IN T IN G /W A L L P A P E R IN G

0 0

per month 27months

P rice s in clu d e alt co ats to c o n su m e r e xcep t license, re g istra tio n & taxes

ET n.S .W . u A . B T n tw i 1 I t n t in b

window film

AuthorizedDealer

Residential • Commercial • Factory • • • • • •

Reduces heat, glare, fade Reduces a ir cond. costs Reduces w in te r heat loss Security against crim e Safety against in ju ry Professionally applied on n e w o r existing glass

Pager: 7 32-375-1588 Phone: 1-877-GLASS55 ( M p )

OUR SERVICE DIRECTORY GETS RESULTS

TRANSCRIPT. BAYSHORE/MIDDLETOWN INDEPENDENT. EXAMINER

r

STRIVING TOBE THEBEST!!! (7 3 2 )

4 4 6 - 5 2 0 0

7 2

INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999 Greater Media Newspapers’ Classified Section is NOW Online! www.gmnews.com

081 Lawn Care Landscaping ABERDEEN Lawn/Tree A ll p h a s e s o f la w n m a in te n a n ce S p e c ia liz in g in & I, , K oi Ponds :all 7 3 2 -5 6 6 -1 9 0 0

ARBORCARE TREE EXPERTS R e m o v a l • P ru n in g • S tu m p s F re e E s tim a te s . F u lly in s u re d 7 3 2 -7 2 1 -8 6 7 1

BLAC OAK, INC. L A W N M A IN T E N A N C E LAN DSC APE C O NTR ACTOR S P R IN G C L E A N U P F u lly In s u re d . F R E E E s tim a te s C a ll 7 3 2 -6 7 9 -8 2 4 8

GREEN’S LAWNCARE & LANDSCAPING “ P e r s o n a ) a tt e n t io n is m y N o .1 G o a l” . 10% o ff c le a n u p s o r (1 )fre e la w n c u ttin g . F re e e s t.,fu lly ins R o b 7 3 2 -7 6 5 -0 5 9 9 L A N D S C A P E D E S IG N GROUP • S p r in g C le a n - u p • S e e d in g F e e d in g • M o w in g C a ll 7 3 2 -6 5 6 -1 9 2 2

LAWN BUTLER W e e k ly M o w in g /F e rtiliz in g M A R LB O R O A R E A O NLY C a ll 7 3 2 -7 2 1 -3 3 5 5

LAWNS THATCHED B ru s h re m o v a l, r o t o t illin g , s p r in g g a r d e n / c le a n in g se rvice s. B a r re n 7 3 2 -8 6 3 -1 7 7 2

MT TREE SERVICE • T re e R e m o v a l • T rim m in g • L o t C le a rin g • S tu m p G rin d in g • F ire w o o d F u lly in s u re d . 7 3 2 -4 4 6 -2 0 4 0

MULCH

O rg a n ic m u lc h . D o u b le s h re d d e d . $ 1 5 . c u b ic ya rd , 10 y a rd m in im u m . F R E E D E L IV E R Y . C a ll 609^443-4059 R & R L A W N M A IN T E N A N C E S p r in g C le a n U p s . W e e k ly C u ts . C a ll 7 3 2 -5 6 6 *8 1 7 7

STUMP &BRUSH LOTS CLEARED R u d y 7 3 2 -2 5 1 -5 9 5 3

T R E E S • T rim m e d • R e m o v e d •S tu m p s G ro u n d « W ood C h ip s R e a s o n a b le R a te s C a ll 7 3 2 -2 5 7 -1 4 1 6 A n y t im e

082 Lawn Mower Repair

084a Light Hauling U S E Y O U R V IS A , M A S T E R C A R D O R D IS C O V E R C A R D T O P A Y F O R Y O U R A D .C A L L C L A S S IF IE D . 1 -8 0 0 -6 6 0 -4 A D S L IG H T H A U L IN G & J U N K R E M O V A L. H O U S E S, ETC. C a ll S ta n 7 3 2 -9 5 1 -0 4 0 6

REMOVAL

A ttic s , B a s e m e n ts , D e b ris N o J o b T o o B IG R ic k 7 3 2 -2 5 1 -5 9 5 3

085 Odd Jobs Cleanups

•AAAC LAffordable E A N -U P S W e ta k e a w a y a n y th in g . F re e e s tim a te s . 7 3 2 -2 6 4 -2 5 2 0

ABC CLEAN-UPS B a s e m e n ts , g a ra g e s , a ttic s a n d y a rd s . C a ll 7 3 2 -2 9 0 -7 6 4 4

091 Roofing Siding

089 Plum bing

091 Roofing Siding

CALL CLASSIFIED

GLENN’S ROOFING UNBEATABLE RATES • N e w W o rk • T e a r-O ffs

I

1-800-660-4ADS

ALAN BLACKBURN P L U M B IN G & H E A T IN G W a te r H e a te rs , B o ile r In s ta lla ­ tio n s , R e m o d e lin g . N J M a s te r P lu m b e rs L ic e n s e # 5 3 2 5

BARGAIN HUNTERS

• R e -R o o 1s * T o rc h d o w n 2 0 Y rs . E x p . F re e E st. F u lly In s u re d 7 3 2 -9 4 0 -2 9 1 3

CHECK OUR GARAGE SALES CLASS (060)

R O O F IN G & S ID IN G F u lly In s u re d • F R E E E s tim a te s C a ll 7 3 2 -5 2 5 -0 7 1 2

MAGIC TOUCH

732-238-2945 A N Y T IM E , A N Y W H E R E

BACSOKA

PLUMBING & HEATING THE ROOF DOCTOR S e a ls y o u r le a k s w h e n yo u n e e d p ro te c tio n th e m o st. R o o f R e p a ir S p e c ia lis t

C o m p le te K itc h e n & B ath R e m o d e lin g . W a te r H e a te rs. S e w e r & D r a in C le a n in g R e a s o n a b le R a te s . F re e E st. L ic e n s e # 5 6 2 8 . W E D O IT A L L

GUTTER CLEANING F re e e s tim a te s . F u lly in s u re d . E v a n s M a in t. 1 -8 0 0 -3 0 3 -3 8 7 3

C O N S T R U C T IO N - R o o fs V in y l S id in g , A ll R e p a irs . F re e E st. In su re d . 7 3 2 -4 5 8 -5 6 1 9

GARDEN STATE

W A L T ’S C le a n -U p S a v e s U $$ H o m e s , y a rd s , g a r., e tc. G u a r. B E A T a ll p ric e s ! 7 3 2 -9 5 1 -0 8 6 4

7 3 2 -2 5 1 -5 6 6 0

ROOFING BY ALEX SMUTKO L o w W in t e r R a te s u n t il A p r il 1 s t.! A s k a b o u t s p e c ia l d is c o u n ts !

CALL732-727-0014 CARLINROOFING

C E N T R A L C LE A N UPS A ll t y p e s o f d e b r is re m o v e d . F re e e s tim a te s . 7 3 2 -4 3 8 -8 6 8 4

I n e e d y o u & y o u w il l s a v e m o n e y w ith m e . B u t m o re th a n th a t, yo u w ill g e t th e b e s t h a n d n a ilin g m o n e y c a n b u y & th e e x p e rtis e th a t o v e r 3 0 y e a rs o f e x p e rie n c e b rin g s w ith it. I a ls o d o b u il t u p r o o fin g & s o m e s u b w o rk !

FELIX THE CAT R O O F IN G C O M P A N Y

732-583-0412 1-800-794-7663

T e a r-o ffs • R e -R o o fs • R e p a irs G u tte rs . F re e e st., fu lly in sured . C a ll 7 3 2 -4 3 2 -4 1 1 7

E x p . & In s . 7 3 2 -8 4 6 -7 5 2 5

S & R R O O F IN G & S ID IN G W in d o w s , C a rp e n try . F u lly Ins. F R E E E stim a te s. 732 -6 79 -2 2 91

092 Special Services

083 Masonry Paving

USE YOUR V IS A , M A S T E R C A R D O R D IS C O V E R C A R D T O PAY FO R Y O U R AD.

096A Window Treatments M A D E in m y h o m e , d e s ig n e d in y o u r h o m e . R e a s o n a b le $ C a ll 7 3 2 -3 0 8 -9 3 8 4

C A LL CLASSIFIED 1-800-660-4ADS o r 732-254-7979 L O N G / S H O R T T R IP S A ir p o r t s « A t la n t ic C » ty*N .Y .C . C a ll M a rk , 7 3 2 -6 2 5 -9 3 6 0

J & J W IN D O W C L E A N IN G R E A S O N A B LE RATES J o s e p h 7 3 2 -3 2 7 -1 0 9 5

C U S T O M S L IP C O V E R S U p h o ls t e r y , D r a p e r ie s , F o a m . 30 y rs . E x p . G u a r. W o rk m a n s h ip . 7 3 2 -8 8 8 -2 7 7 5

DOLL DOCTOR

MR. FIXIT

DOLL REPAIRS “Keep The Memories”

Basement Waterproofing

D r. K a th le e n • 7 3 2 -4 6 2 -3 5 8 9

1 - 8 0 0 - 7 6 5 - 2 7 9 3 F re e E s t. D e a l w /o w n e r $ a v e

094B Telephone Installation

096A W indow Treatments

PHONE Installation R E P A IR • J A C K S • W IR IN G 2 5 y rs . e x p . w /N Y N E X C a ll E d 7 3 2 -5 3 6 -2 4 7 7

C U S T O M B lin d s , S h a d e s , U p h o ls t e r y , D r a p e r y . F r e e S h o p -a t- H o m e 7 3 2 -4 3 1 -6 6 1 0

A C U R A IN T E G R A ’ 9 6 : S ilve r, 5 S P D . 5 5 ,0 0 0 m i./1 0 0 ,0 0 0 m i. w a rra n ty . A ll p o w e r, m o o n ro o f, 6 C D c h a n g e r , a la r m . M in t c o n d ., $ 1 3 ,2 5 0 . • 6 0 9 -7 5 0 -1 0 5 9

CADILLAC

SEDAN DEVILLE

’86 . 4 d o o r, e x c e lle n t c o n d itio n . O N E O W N E R . 6 6 ,0 0 0 m ile s . $ 5 , 0 0 0 . o r b e s t r e a s o n a b le o ffe r. C a ll 7 3 2 -2 5 1 -7 2 9 5

Winner of The North American Customer Excellence Award For The 6th Year!

085J Outdoor Power Eqpt. sM*SNOW A L E R T ! ^ S n o w -b lo w e r tu n e -u p & re p a irs . L A R S O N S V C S . 7 3 2 -5 3 6 -2 6 1 3

086 Painting W allpapering

in

A C C E N T P A IN T IN G - A ll J O B S E x c e lle n t In d o o r & O u td o o r P a in tin g . R e s id e n tia l & c o m m e rc ia l. F re e e s tim a te s . F u lly In s u re d . 7 3 2 -6 7 9 -5 9 9 9 A F F O R D A B L E P A IN T IN G In te rio r/e x te rio r, re lia b le , q u a lity w o rk , re a s o n a b le ra te s C a ll R o o m b y R o o m P a in t in g 7 3 2 -6 0 7 -2 5 7 7

to r S A V IN G S !

AL’S PAINTING In te rio r & E x te rio r G E T TH E B EST FO R LESS! F re e e s tim a te . 7 3 2 -5 8 3 -3 3 0 6

199^ mercury

ALL PAINTING IN T E R IO R /E X T E R IO R Q u a lity W o rk . R e a s o n a b le R a te s. C a ll M ik e 7 3 2 -3 6 3 -2 7 8 6

m o u n ta in e e r

BUSY B’S PAINTING ln t ./ E x t ., W a llp a p e r in g In s., F re e E st. 7 3 2 -2 3 8 -5 5 5 3

L A R S O N S E R V IC E S R e p a irs » P a rts * P /U & D e liv e ry C A L L 7 3 2 -5 3 6 -2 6 1 3

094G Transportation

J & R R O O F IN G & S ID IN G

FOR GREAT BUYS!

P L U M B IN G a n d H E A T IN G W ATER HEATERS R E P A IR S & R E M O D E L IN G G E O R G E S A H U L JR . L ic e n s e # 5 5 6 8

091 Roofing Siding

Lease For

C R E A T IV E F A U X P a in t in g S p o n g e • R a g • M a rb le K id ’s M u ra ls • 7 3 2 -3 0 8 -0 0 5 6

FILL’S PAINTING

In te r io r . L ig h t c o n s tr u c tio n & re p a ir. C a ll 7 3 2 -6 1 5 -2 3 6 3

KELLY’S PAINTING ANTONIO A. SANTOS

P A P E R H A N G IN G PAPER R EM O VAL O v e r 15 Y E A R S E X P E R IE N C E F re e E s tim a te s . 7 3 2 -6 7 9 -2 1 4 2

QUALITY WORK BEST PRICES LERIO PAINTING 7 3 2 -3 6 0 -1 9 3 8 D riv e w a y s , P a tio s , S id e w a lk s , S te p s , P o rc h e s , B e lg iu m B lo ck

CHIMNEY REPAIRS A LL W O R K G U A R A N T E E D C A L L J O H N , 7 3 2 -5 2 1 -0 2 6 7

P a in tin g , P la s te rin g , T a p in g S h e e tro c k , P a p e rh a n g in g F re e E s tim a te s

MIKE’S PROFESSIONAL

P a tio s • S id e w a lk s • D riv e w a y s 2 5 y rs . e xp . C a ll 7 3 2 -4 4 6 -1 7 3 3

P a in tin g & W a llp a p e rin g Inc. In t./E x t. 10% o ff. F re e E st.

C USTO M M ASONRY e x p e rie n c e e q u a ls q u a lity w o rk B ric k w o rk a s p e c ia lty NO JO B TO O SM ALL C A L L E R IC 7 3 2 -5 2 1 -6 0 6 9

P A IN T IN G & P A P E R H A N G IN G I n t . / E x t . F re e E s t. H o n e s t p ric e s . C a ll J o e 7 3 2 -3 6 0 -0 9 4 3

FERNANDO MASONRY C tpncrete, b lo c k s , b ric k ,p a v e rs , d riv e w a y p a v in g , s tu c c o , etc. S n o w p lo w in g . F u lly In s u re d . F r e e E s t. C a ll 7 3 2 - 4 4 6 - 5 8 7 7 M A S O N w ill fix & re p a ir ste p s, s id e w a lk s & p la s te r in g . V e r y re a s o n a b lee.. 7 3 2>-988-0029 - f ------M A S O N R Y - FO R A L L Y O U R N E E D S - M cM ullen Construction. C a ll 7 3 2 -5 42 -8 0 44 M ASO N R Y - NEW W O R K R E P A IR S . R e fs . A v a ila b le C a ll 7 3 2 -2 5 4 -0 6 4 3

084 Moving Storage

1 -8 0 0 -8 2 0 -1 7 1 1

PAINTING

R e s ./C o m m . 2 0 y e a rs e xp . O w n e r p r e s e n t o n a ll jo b s . F u lly lic e n s e d & in s u re d . L ie .# 0 0 2 7 5 . C a ll 7 3 2 -2 2 3 -2 4 4 6

FURNITURE HAULING #1 in F u rn itu re C a re A n y w h e re . F u ll h o u s e h o ld /p a rtia l m o ve . Lie. P M 0 0 2 7 6 . F u lly in s u re d . C a ll J im 7 3 2 -3 0 3 -1 0 5 5

084a Light Hauling

new ^ mercury v illa g e r Lease For

In te rio r/E x te rio r - W a llp a p e r re m o v a l. P o w e rw a s h in g . Q u a lity w o rk . 2 0 y rs . e x p . In s u re d . J o h n 7 3 2 -2 5 1 -0 8 9 3 P A IN T IN G : IN T E R IO R a n d E X T E R IO R • G e n e ra l R e p a irs . L ow rates/free est.7 32 -5 2 1-6 1 84

Van, Auto, FRWD,V6,PB, PS, A/C, Dual Air Bags, P/Win/Lcks,Tilt,Cruise, AM/FM Stereo Cass, Stk#X1338,VIN#XDJ13087. MSRP: $24,500. Based on a 36 month closed end lease. Total due at lease inception: $534...($0 down w/$500 lease renewal & $500 off lease rebate, 1st month pymnt, $275 ref sec dep & $0 bank fee and $400 college grad rebate).Total lease pymnts:$9324+tax. 12,000 mi/yr,excess mi @$.15 thereafter. Residual:$12,500.

PAPERHANGING $ 1 3 ./s in g le roll. O v e r 3 0 y e a rs e x p . C a ll M ik e 7 3 2 -7 9 3 -3 0 8 1

PHIL POLO & SON P a in tin g & P a p e rh a n g in g In te rio r/E x te rio r • F u lly In s u re d F R E E E stim a te s 7 3 2 -7 8 0 -3 5 7 5

36 Months

N O M O N E Y D O W N ! N O B A N K FEE!

POPCORN CEILINGS P ro fe s s io n a lly s p ra y e d Int. p a in tin g /w a llp a p e r re m o v a l C a ll 7 3 2 -5 2 5 -1 6 2 5

SUTKOWSKI’S WALLS • W a llp a p e rin g • P a in tin g

BILLY’S MOVING

36 Months

732-390-8655

CONCRETE

D O N ’S C U STO M M A S O N R Y F ire p la c e s /P a tio s /F o u n d a tio n s F re e e s tim a te s . 7 3 2 -2 5 1 -4 3 5 2

SUV, Auto,V6, P/ABS, PS, A/C, Dual Air Bags, P/Win/Lcks/Mrs/Sts, Ti11, Cruise, Alloy Whls, Moon Rf, AM/FM Stereo Cass w/CD Player, Stk#6384,VIN#VUJl 5633/28,535mi. MSRP: $22,995. Based on a 36 month closed end lease. Total due at lease inception: $3144...($2000 down, 1st month pymnt,$400 refsec dep&$495 bank fee).Total lease pymnts:$8964+tax. 10,000 mi/yr,excess mi @$. 15 thereafter. Residual:$ 13,550.

B

rj

732-290-1712 P o lis h H a rd w o rk W ith G e rm a n P re c is io n

WALLPAPER

)

H u n g w it h T L C . P a t ie n c e & N e a tn e s s ! M a ria 7 3 2 -8 8 8 -1 3 3 7

iL IN C O L N (7 3 2 ) 7 4 7 -5 4 0 0 • w A.T.C.

HANDY PERSONS (2)

P lu m b in a & H e a tin g , In c. A ll Y o u r P lu m b in g N e e d s REASO N ABLE RATES

W ith p ic k -u p . L ig h t m o v in g . C le a n -o u ts , g a ra g e s , a ttic s , g u tte rs , e tc. 7 3 2 -4 6 2 -0 1 1 5

7 3 2 -5 3 6 -4 9 5 4 Lie. # 9 8 1 6 , F u lly In s u re d

S h rew sb u ry A ve

M ERCURY w w .g e o r g e w a ll.c o m

•Shrew

sbury, N J

Lease subject to primary lender approval. Available to qualified buyers on select models, see dealer for details. Price(s) indude(s) all costs to be paid by a consumer, except for lie costs, reg fees and taxes. Expires 4/1/99.

Greater Media Newspapers’ Classified Section is NOW Online! www.gmnews.com

99 7 3 INDEPENDENT , MARCH 17, 1999

110 Autos fo r Sale

110 Autos fo r Sale

YOUR AD CAN BE HERE! 1 -8 0 0 -6 6 0 -4 A D S

D O D G E C A R A V A N ’ 9 1 : B la c k C h e rry . A u to ., a /c , tilt, c ru is e , 7 7 ,0 0 0 m ile s . C le a n ! $ 5 ,0 0 0 . o r b e s t o ffe r. 7 3 2 -5 3 0 -4 9 4 7

BMW 315 ’84

In

O rig in a l 7 6 ,0 0 0 m ile s . F u lly lo a d e d , a ll p o w e r. R u n s g re a t! A s k in g $ 2 ,0 0 0 . * 7 3 2 -7 2 3 -3 8 3 4

c a s e y o u ’v e f o r g o t t e n

w h a t a fa ir p r ic e lo o k s lik e .

C A D IL L A C ’86 F L E E T W O O D B R O U G H A M , b u rg u n d y w ith le a th e r.M e tic u lo u s ly m a in ta in e d $ 4975. C all M r.T. 7 32 -9 57 -9 5 22 C A D IL L A C ’9 7 , S E D A N D e E le g a n c e - B la c k B e a u ty ! B lk le a th e r, fla w le s s ! $ 2 3 ,9 0 0 . C a ll T o m , 7 3 2 -9 5 7 -9 5 2 2 C A D IL L A C S E D A N D E V IL L E ’ 9 2 . E x c e lle n t c o n d itio n . L o w m ile s . W h it e w /b lu e in t e r io r , s u n r o o f. G O L D P A C K A G E . $ 1 0 ,5 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -4 0 8 -1 1 1 1 . P a g e : 7 3 2 -3 1 5 -1 3 5 2

You may have heard that buying a Saturn is actually a rather pleasent experience. What you might not know is that leasing a car from us is no different. We’ll carefully explain every agreement, disclosure, item and sub-item. That’s because we want to make sure the lease you sign is right for you. And that includes making sure the terms are right for you. Just in case you’ve forgotten what courtesy, honesty and respect look like, as well.

NEW 1999

AutoIrons, VIN#SXZ279593.4cyl, outo Irons, p/s/b, o/c. M SRP $13,815. Total pymts: $6981.$1195dueat signing+tax&M Vfees.

SATU RN SL14DR A U TO M A TIC , A/C

‘9 4 M i t s u b i s h i E c lip s e G S

‘9 3 H o n d a C iv ic L X V IN # P L 0 3 5 7 4 9 , S tk # E 9 0 2 5 3 A , 4 DR, o u to ,

V IN # S F 6 0 1 0 2 7 , S lk

# £ 9 5 0 9 7 * . 2 DR, M to ,

IB P 0 6 8 0 , 4 DR, « l o .

4 c y L a ir

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6

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c v l., d u a l a i i b a g s , a / c ,

p /s /L /w ta d s /lu ,

p /s /b /w iw l/lls ,

a m / f m , d u a l a ir b a g s ,

o m /fm , 4 8 ,2 6 5 m l

a m /lm ta s, 5 8 ,8 5 3 u i .

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*6,900 *9,995 r n

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‘9 6 N i s s a n M a x im a G X E

‘9 8 S a t u r n SL2

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8 0 , 2 9 4 m i.

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‘9 5 D o d g e In t r e p i d

V IN # R E 0 i l 3 3 7 , S tk

LEASE FOR:

BUY FOR:

V IN # 5 4 3 1 4 3 7 0 , S lk

Y IN I W Z 2 5 1 7 7 2 , S t k

I V IN # T T 1 2 0 3 1 5 , S lk

# E P 0 1 6 5 A , 4 DR,

I # F N 1 0 4 7 , 4 DR, o t t o , 6

a v t o , 4 c y l., a llo y

c y l., k e y l e s s e n t r y , a / t ,

w h ls , a / c , d / a m s ,

a m / f m , d u o l a ir b a a s ,

a m / f m , su r f , 9 , 4 7 9 m l

'

‘ d s /H c s ,

a m / f m , 5 0 , 3 2 6 m i.

s i , 4 1 , 1 3 5 m i.

$14,900 *15,000 15,500

67 R t 36, E a to n to w n 7 3 2 - 3 8 9 - 8 8 2 2

n

JIS A T IR N ® Prices include all costs to be paidby a consumer, except for lie, taxes, MVfees. *39 mo closedend lease req$1195 due at signing (1st mo pymt + 1moref sec dep + bank fee + capcost reduction). 12,000 mi yr limit/. 15 mi thereafter. Lessee respfor maint &excess wear &tear at lease end. Subj toapproval thruprimary lender.____________

s ig n

C A R S $ 1 0 0 .-$ 5 0 0 . a n d U P ! P o lic e Im p o u n d s : H o n d a s , N iss a n s , M u s ta n g s , C h e v y ’s, J e e p s a n d S p o rt U tilitie s . C a ll N o w ! 8 0 0 -7 7 2 -7 4 7 0 e x t. 6 0 6 3

a n d

F O R D P R O B E ’9 2 - W h ite , a u to , A C , a m /tm c a s s . s te re o , $ 5 ,5 0 0 o r b e s t o ffe r A s k f o r A le x 7 3 2 -3 1 6 -5 5 1 9 F O R D T A U R U S ’ 93 P /S , P /B , c r u is e , A M /F M C a s s e tte . V e r y c le a n . A s k in g -------------5 4 5 -3 2 6 0 . $ 4 ,1 7 5 . C a l l i7 3 2*-5 F O R D T A U R U S G L ’ 9 3 - A u to . A lu m . w h e e ls , a /b /s , d u a l a ir b a g s . L o a d e d . E x c . c o n d . G a r­ a g e k e p t, 1 o w n e r, 7 0 ,0 0 0 m i. $ 7 ,0 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -2 9 0 -8 2 7 6 FORD TA U R U S W A G O N W h ite , 3 rd ro w s e a t, a /c , /b , ro o fr a c k , 5 1 ,0 0 0 ;8 ,4 0 0 . 7 3 2 -9 4 6 -1 7 9 4 a ft.

FO R D T E M P O ’92 RED 4 D R . A u to ., a /c , a m /fm c a s s . E x c e lle n t c o n d ., $ 2 ,7 0 0 . M o v ­ ing m u st sell. C a ll 732 -8 66 -9 5 89 H O N D A A C C O R D E X ’9 1 A u t o m a t i c , 1 2 0 , 0 0 0 m i le s . $ 7 ,0 0 0 . o r b e s t o ffe r. C a ll 7 3 2 -6 0 5 -0 2 4 0 A s k fo r W ill. H O N D A A C C O R D L X I ’ 88 . H a tc h b a c k . 2 D R . 5 s p e e d , p /s, p /b , a m /fm C D . R u n s g o o d . A s k in g $ 2 ,6 0 0 . * 7 3 2 -2 9 0 -0 4 6 8 H O N D A A C C O R D S E ’ 9 1. A u t o . F u lly lo a d e d . L e a t h e r s e a ts , a ll p o w e r. G a ra g e k $ 8 ,0 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -9 3 8 -6 0 ^ "

C H E V R O L E T C E L E B R IT Y W A G O N ’ 8 9 . A u to ., a /c . E xc. ru n n in g c o n d . W e ll m a in ta in e d . A ll n e w tire s . E x h a u s t s y s te m 1 y rs . o ld ., $ 9 5 0 . F IR M ! C a ll a fte r 5 :3 0 p m - 7 3 2 -5 3 6 -5 9 9 8 .

H O N D A C IV IC E X 9 3 ­ 5 s p e e d , 1 5 6 ,0 0 0 m i. E x c e lle n t c o n d . $ 6 , 0 0 0 . o r b e s t o ff e r . 7 3 2 -6 0 5 -0 2 4 0 A s k fo r W ill

C H E V R O LE T C O R V E T T E ’93 C o u p e . E x c e lle n t c o n d it io n , 7 0 , 0 0 0 h w y . m i le s , a m / f m c a s s ., A /C , p o w e r. $ 1 6 ,5 0 0 . o r b e s t o ffe r. C a ll 6 0 9 -7 3 7 -0 9 0 3 C H E V R O L E T Z -2 4 1 9 9 8 L o a d e d , E x c e lle n t c o n d itio n ta k e o v e r le a s e P a y m e n ts . C a ll 7 3 2 -9 7 2 -9 4 8 6 C H E V Y B E R E T T A G T ’9 3 B la c k , ru n s & lo o k s g re a t. 1 1 0 ,0 0 0 m i. A s k in g $ 3 ,8 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -4 3 1 -1 5 6 5

D O D G E 600 SE 4 DO O R ’87 A /C , A u to tra n s .,P /S , P /B , P /W C ru is e /T ilt, A M /F M , N E W tire s . 6 1 ,9 0 0 m ile s . B e s t o ff e r . C a ll 7 3 2 -5 6 6 -8 1 3 2

H O N D A C IV IC L X ’ 9 3 - B L U E . 4 c y l. , a u to ., p /s , p /b , a /c , 7 8 ,4 0 0 m i., p /d /l, p /w , c ru is e , tilt, a m /fm c a s s ., a irb a g . A s k ­ in g $ 7 ,5 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -4 2 2 -8 4 0 5 . L IN C O L N T O W N C A R ’9 2 B la c k , 9 3 ,0 0 0 m ile s . E x c e p ­ t io n a l m in t c o n d it io n . F u lly lo a d e d , 1 o w n e r fro m n e w . E x ­ c e lle n t ru n n in g o rd e r, $ 7 ,5 0 0 . o r b e s t o ffe r. C a ll 7 3 2 -2 7 4 -1 8 2 7 M E R C E D E S B E N Z 3 0 0 S E ’88 W h ite , 1 7 3 ,0 0 0 m ile s . G a ra g e ke p t. E x c e lle n t c o n d itio n . A s k ­ in g $ 9 ,8 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -4 0 9 -0 0 5 6 . M E R C U R Y G R A N D M a r q u is L S ’ 9 2 . L o a d e d . E x c e l le n t c o n d . N e w tire s , 1 1 1 ,0 0 0 h w y. m i., $ 5 ,3 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -5 3 6 -1 7 6 8 M E R C U R Y S A B L E ’89 A u to . A ll p o w e r. S u n ro o f. M in t c o n d ., lo w m i. A s k in g $ 2 ,9 0 0 . o r b e s t o ffe r. C a ll 7 3 2 -2 4 7 -4 4 3 0

d r iv e l

UNTIL MAR. 31, 1999 YOU CAN BUY OR LEASE THE VERY POPULAR VOLVO S & V 70 SERIES INCLUDING THE CROSS COUNTRY I f y o u buy*

I f y o u le a s e * $

o MONEY DOWN

sO

D O W N

up to 60 months at 4.9%

$0 SECURITY DEPOSIT $0 FIRST PAYMENT $ O BANK FEES

0 %F I N A N C I N G

up to 48 months with 40%down ( On S & V 70 GLT models & S 70 all w heel drive models)

N o e x t r a c h a r g e f o r V e h ic le s n o t i n s to c k

*Of course...Tax, Motor Vehicle & Doc Fees are not included N o w

is t h e

tim e

to

ta k e

A d v a n ta g e

O

f T h is

G r e a t V o lv o

P ro g ra m

Red Bank Volvo is the Only Dealer In North America in Volvo’s Top Ten For Both Customer Satisfaction And Sales Of New Volvos*

HERE'SNOFINEPRINTATREDBANKVOLVO.IT’SALLRIGHTUPFRONT


_•*>

Sales, Leasing, Parts \ __

Service & Body Shop

100 East Newman Springs Road • Red Bank, New Jersey *As of 1 2 /3 1 /9 8

m ,741-5S86

’9 5 p /s , m i., 4 pm

C H E V R O L E T C A V A L IE R ’9 7 2 D R ., R /S . L o a d e d . A u to ., 2 2 ,0 0 0 m i., 1 o w n e r. M u s t s e e ! A s k in g $ 9 ,7 9 5 . • 7 32 -2 51 -3 7 2 9

C H E V Y B IS C A Y N E , ’ 6 0 4 d o o r, 6 cy l. s tic k , m a n y n ew p a rts , ru n s d a ily . $ 1200.00 C a ll 7 3 2 -2 6 4 -1 9 1 5

A DIFFERENT KIND o f COMPANY. A DIFFERENT KIND o f CAR.

J u s t

C A R S $ 1 0 0 -$ 5 0 0 a n d u p ! P o lic e im p o u n d s : H o n d a s , T o y o ta s , C h e v y ’s, J e e p s a n d S p o rt U tilitie s . C a ll N o w ! 8 0 0 -7 7 2 -7 4 7 0 e x t. 6 3 1 0 (S C A N e tw o rk )________

c y L , a / t , a ir b a g , '

| p / s / b / w iB fls /I t s / a n t /

p /s /b /w iM s /H c s ,

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C A R S $ 1 0 0 ,$ 5 0 0 & U P . P o lic e Im p o u n d s . 1 9 8 0 ’s -1 9 9 7 ’s. H ondas, C hevys, Jeeps & S p o rt U tility . C a ll N o w ! 8 0 0 -7 7 2 -7 4 7 0 e x t. 7 0 4 0 . (S C A N e tw o rk )

FO R D E SC O R T W A G O N LX ’9 5 - 4 D R ., p /s, p /b , a /c , a m /fm , 2 8 ,0 0 0 m ile s . M IN T c o n d itio n , $ 7 ,0 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -6 1 3 -5 8 6 5

V O L V O

7 4

INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17,1999 Greater Media Newspapers’ Classified Section is NOW Online! www.gmnews.com

1 1 0 A u t o s fo r S a le

1 1 0 A u t o s fo r S a le

1 1 0 A u t o s fo r S a le

1 1 0 A u t o s fo r S a le

M E R C U R Y S A B L E ’9 6 - A u to . V 6 , 2 0 0 H P . E x t. w a r r a n t y , 2 7 ,0 0 0 m i., a ll p o w e r, a lu m i­ n u m w h e e ls . A s k in g $ 1 2 ,5 0 0 . C A L L 7 3 2 -3 8 2 -8 1 1 3 , lv . m s g .

N IS S A N 3 0 0 Z X ’9 2 - M u s t se ll B o s e s te r e o , n e w c lu t c h . 6 7 ,0 0 0 m ile s . E xc. c o n d . $ 1 1 ,4 0 0 . n e g . 7 3 2 -2 9 7 -5 9 0 8

YOUR A D C AN BE HERE! 1-8 0 0 -6 6 0 -4 A D S

C A S H FO R Y O U R C AR A R T Y ’S A U T O S A L E S E a s t B ru n sw ick. 7 3 2 -2 5 7 -6 7 0 0

M E R C U R Y S A B L E L S ’ 89 A u to . A ll p o w e r. L e a th e r in te rio r, s u n ro o f, A /C , 1 4 6 ,0 0 0 m ile s . $ 1 ,2 0 0 . • 7 3 2 -7 2 7 -9 2 7 9

110a Sp o rt U t ilit y V e h i c l e s

FORD EXPLORER XLT '9 7 . 4 W D R , S O H C V 6 .

P O N T I A C G R A N D A M ’ 91 2 D R . A U T O ., 4 C Y L ., P /S , P /B , A /C , A M /F M . W e ll m a in ta in e d , $ 3 , 0 0 0 . o r b e s t o f f e r . C a ll 7 3 2 -2 9 7 -1 3 5 5 . ______

AUTOM O TIVE C LASSIFIED (P riv a te P arty O n ly ) 4 LINES * 4 W EEKS -$28.

M IT S U B IS H I S T A R IO N ’88 T u r b o , 5 s p d . , a la r m , a b s , 9 5 ,0 0 0 m i. V e r y g o o d c o n d ., $ 2 ,0 0 0 ./be st o ffe r 7 3 2 -2 6 4 -6 5 0 9

(e a c h a d d itio n a l lin e $ 7 .) s o m e re s tric tio n s a p p ly M u s t c a ll e v e ry 4 w e e k s to re n e w .

N IS S A N 3 0 0 Z X ’86 2 + 2 . A u to ., T -to p , b ro n z e . N e w b o d y , 1 1 2 , 0 0 0 m i. $ 2 , 7 0 0 . P le a s e ca ll 7 3 2 -5 8 3 -4 6 3 8 .

1-800-660-4ADS

.

LOCAL 732-254-7979

D en is D iF eo's &

V O L K S W A G E N F O X ’ 93 B la c k , 5 s p d ., 4 d r. A /C , c a s ­ s e t t e , 6 0 , 0 0 0 m i. E x c e lle n t c o n d ., $ 4 ,5 0 0 . * 7 3 2 -4 3 2 -9 0 9 4

P O N T IA C G R A N D A M ’ 88 . 4 cy l., 2 d r., a /c , 1 4 5 ,0 0 0 m i., w /n e w e r e n g in e G re a t s h a p e ! $ 1 ,9 9 5 .,n eg . C a ll 7 3 2 -4 4 1 -9 150

$ 2 8 .

M IT S U B IS H I E X P O ’ 92 7 p a s s . A u to ., a ll p o w e r, A /C , a m /fm c a s s . V e ry g o o d c o n d i­ tio n, $ 5 ,2 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -7 2 7 -9 0 0 7 M I T S U B IS H I M ir a g e L S ’9 7 4 c y l. B lk., ta n in t. m a n u a l, a llo y w h e e ls , C D c a s s ., a /c . S p o rt p kg. $ 9 ,3 0 0 . C a ll 2 0 1 -2 3 9 -1 7 0 5

O L D S M O B IL E S IL H O U E T T E ’ 9 2 - V 6 , L e a th e r, lo a d e d . 8 9 ,0 0 0 m ile s . $ 6 ,4 5 0 o r b e s t o ff e r . C a ll 7 3 2 -3 9 0 -8 4 5 4

Run ’til It Sells!

MERCURY S AB LE W AGON '9 3 - T a n . E x c . c o n d . 6 4 ,0 0 0 o rig . m i. A li p o w e r. $ 6 ,1 5 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -6 7 9 -3 9 3 1

O L D S M O B IL E D E L T A 88 - ’ 9 5 F u lly lo a d e d . 2 3 , 0 0 0 m ile s . L e a th e r in t., C D p la y e r, a llo y w hee ls, $ 1 0 ,99 5. 7 32-251-5791

L e a th e r. A M /F M /T a p e /C D C h a n g e r. T o w p a c k a g e . R u n ­ n in g b o a rd s . 2 3 ,0 0 0 o rig . m i. U n d e r w a rra n ty . $ 2 1 ,5 0 0 . L IK E N E W C O N D IT IO N MUST SEE! C a ll 7 3 2 -4 4 6 -8 9 0 8

P O N T IA C T R A N S A M ’ 81 w /T - T o p s . R u n n in g c o n d . L o w m ile a g e n e e d s b ra k e s . M u s t se e . $ 1 ,0 0 0 . C a ll 9 0 8 -5 7 5 -1 2 6 2 T O Y O T A C A M R Y ’91 - A U T O . A ll p o w e r, 5 7 ,0 0 0 m i., s u n ro o f. W e ll m a in ta in e d , $ 5 ,5 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -6 3 4 -8 7 6 6 • 7 3 2 -7 9 2 -7 2 2 9

G M C S U B U R B A N S L E ’ 94 4 W D . B la c k w ith T a n trim a n d t in te d w in d o w s , 5 3 ,5 0 0 m ile s , in c lu d e s 3 rd s e a t, re a r h e a tin g a n d a ir , t o w in g p a c k a g e . S h a rp e s t c o lo r c o m b o . C a n n o t be d is tin g u is h e d fro m N E W ! $ 2 2 ,0 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -5 3 6 -3 6 3 1

T O Y O T A C R E S S ID A ’91 A u to , W h ite , m o o n ro o f, F u lly lo a d e d . E xc. c o n d . $ 5 ,5 0 0 . C a n 7 3 2 -4 9 5 -3 0 1 3 a ft e r 6 p m

L aw rence la n n a cco n e's

110a S p o rt U t ilit y V e h i c l e s

F O R D B R O N C O II X L T ’88 4 X 4 . A u to . E x c . c o n d . N e w tra n s ., n e w ly p a in te d , a /c , p /s , p /b , c ru is e . C a ll 7 3 2 -3 9 0 -4 0 0 4 JE E P W R A N G LE R S A H A R A 9 3 - 5 S P D ., 6 c y l, p /s , p /b , A /C , 3 to p s , P io n e e r 1 2 -D is c C D c h a n g e r. G A R A G E K E P T ! E x c e lle n t c o n d it io n , 6 0 , 0 0 0 m ile s . A s k in g $ 1 1 ,9 0 0 . o r b e s t o ffe r. F R A N K - 7 3 2 -2 3 9 -5 5 0 8

112 A u to s/ T ru c k s W an te d

A B S O L U T E H ig h e s t V a lu e

DONATECARS!! T o help, th e u n d e rp riv ile g e d o f M o n m o u tn & M id d le s e x C o u n ty . S a m e d a y F R E E T o w in g . IR S F o rm s a l P ic k u p

T A X D E D U C T IB L E C a ll 7 3 2 -3 8 2 -8 0 6 0 A n ti-P o v e rty F o u n d a tio n

112 A u to s / T ru c k s W anted

112 A u to s/ T ru c k s W anted

A &A A ll a u to s /tru c k s a c c e p te d . A n y c o n d . W e p a y th e m o s t ca sh! 7 3 2 -5 3 6 -8 0 3 1 • 6 0 9 -7 5 8 -8 8 5 0

AAA'CASH PAID

CALL CLASSIFIED

A ll m a k e s & m o d e ls . C a s h on th e S P O T . C a ll 7 3 2 -4 7 7 -0 2 2 8

1-800-660-4ADS

CASH PAID

F O R D H I-T O P C O N V E R S IO N V A N ’ 9 3 - 6 0 ,0 0 0 m i. T V , V C R , S u p e r N in t e n d o , c a p t a i n ’ s c h a irs , e le c tric fo ld -d o w n b ed . R u n s g re a t. L ik e n e w le a th e r. W o o d trim in te rio r. N e e d s m in ­ im a l b o d y w o rk , $ 1 1 , 0 0 0 . o r b e s t o ffe r C a ll 7 3 2 -4 0 9 -3 5 6 1 .

A A A A B L E & D E A D 7 D ays F re e R e m o v a l o f J u n k C a rs . $ $ to r n e w /o ld . 7 3 2 -6 2 0 -4 4 6 0

F o r ju n k c a rs , tru c k s , fo r re c y c lin g . C a ll a n y tim e T o m m y D e ll’s 7 3 2 -7 8 7 -5 4 5 3

ALL SCRAP CARS

J U N K O R R U N N IN G A U T O S

AND TR U C KS , LARGE OR S M A L L . A N Y C O N D IT IO N . H & H AUTO W RECKERS 7 3 2 -5 9 1 -0 3 6 6

FAST CASH

7 3 2 -7 2 3 -9 2 9 2 o r P a g e r 7 3 2 -4 9 8 -5 6 3 6

W A N T E D - R U N N IN G a n d R E P A IR A B L E C a rs & T ru c k s $ 1 0 0 . a n d U P . J u n k C a rs R e m o v e d . 7 3 2 -2 3 8 -9 4 8 1

CARS/TRUCKS FOR EXPORT

W E BUY JU N K CARS M a rlb o ro A u to W re c k e rs C a ll 7 3 2 -5 9 1 -1 4 0 0

’8 6 -9 7 . p a y in g 1 ,0 0 0 ’s o v e r d e a le rs . H i m ile s O K . L e a s e & b a n k p a y o ffs O K . C a s h at y o u r d o o r. C a ll 7 3 2 -4 6 2 -5 0 1 7

^ D O N A T E YOUR C A R * FR E E p h o n e c a r d t o d o n o r s . T a x D e d u c t ib le , F re e T o w in g

HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND 1-800-2-DON ATE AD #3004

117 T ru ck s Vans

FORD RANGER ’84

A U T O ., V 6 , P L U S C A P , $ 1 ,8 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -2 5 1 -2 1 7 5 .

G M C S 1 5 H IG H S IE R R A ’86 4 X 4 P IC K U P . A u to . N E W _ r e b u il t e n g in e . R u n s g o o d . $ 3 ,5 0 0 . O R B E S T 0 F F £ R . C a ll 7 3 2 -2 9 7 -3 6 9 1 . M A Z D A M P V ’9 3 - A u to ., A /C . A ll p o w e r, 7 5 ,0 0 0 m ile s , n e w tire s & b ra k e s . E x c . c o n d . M u s t see, $ 8 ,3 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -4 9 9 -0 6 9 9 P L Y M O U T H G ra n d V o y a g e r L E - ’9 2 . L o a d e d . S e a ts 7. N e w b a tte ry & tire s . 7 8 ,0 0 0 o rig . m i. $ 5 ,9 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -5 3 6 -1 4 6 9

DODGE DAKOTA 95 E x te n d e d C a b , $ L T . IM M A C U L A T E ! $ 9 ,0 0 0 . 7 3 2 -2 5 4 -4 5 7 2 o r 9 0 8 -6 8 6 -8 0 0 8

P LY M O U T H V O Y A G E R SE ’ 9 2 - A u to ., a /c , 6 c y l., 3 .0 L , 1 0 8 ,0 0 0 m i. G o o d c o n d itio n , $ 3 ,5 0 0 . C a ll 7 3 2 -4 2 2 -9 4 3 5 .

COAST

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• f j n ¥ i r HavPcA "VALUE PKG." SEDAN

4 dr, auto, 4 cyl, p/s, p/b, am/fm st, a/c, t/gls, r/def, bkt sts, spt. mirrs, all ssn stl bltd rdls. VIN 2HGEJ6610XH529588. M SRP $ 1 6 ,0 4 5 .3 9 month clo sed end le a se with ,$ 2 5 5 0 down, 1st pyt, 1 mo. s e c . dep. $ 5 4 5 bank fee. TOP $ 4 7 9 7 . Residual $ 1 0 ,5 8 9 .7 0 .1 2 ,0 0 0 mi peryr. 150 thereafter.

LEASE FOR ^

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LXSEDAN

4 dr, auto, 4 cyl, p/s, p/b, am/fm c a ss, p/winds/Iks, a/c, t/gls, r/def, tilt, cruise, dual air b a g s , bkt s t s , rem mirrs, all s s n stl bltd rdls. VIN 1HGCG6655XA064796. M SRP $19,705. 39 month le a se with $ 3 0 0 0 down, 1st pyt, 1 m o s e c dep. $545 bank fee. Top $5421. Residual $13,724 12,000 mi per yr. 20$ thereafter

LEASE £ FOR

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4 cyl, auto trans, ps, pb,, Air Conditioning, am/fm stereo, tinted glass, dual air bags, r/def, spoiler, fog lights, Vin #XD123528, Stk #9056, MSRP: $14,588, Consumer Rebate $1500, $400 Coll Grad Reb if qual. Dealer Disc. $ 1 6 9 ^ D ^ k n n is c

H O N D A

PRELUDE 2 dr, 5 spd. man., trans., 4 cyl, p/s, p/b, am/fm S t . , a/c, t/gls, r/def, dual air bags, bkt sts, spt. mirrs, all ssn stl bltd rdls. VIN 1HGEJ6121XL015851. Stk. #17015 MSRP $14,290.

New, 2 dr, auto, 4 cyl, p/s, p/b, am/fm cass., p/winds/locks, a/c, t/gls, r/def, gauges, bkt. sts, sun roof, all ssn stl bltd rdls, alloy whls. VIN JHMBB62YIXC002059. Stk #16912. MSRP $24,865.

3? * 1 2 , 9 4 6

SX? * 2 1 , 9 9 5

DURANGO

NEON SPORT COUPE

PER MONTH

- P R E O W N E D V E H IC L E S ... A L L B A C K E D B Y O O R 7 -Y E A R /I 0 0 ,0 0 0 M l. W A R R A N T Y * '9 7 H O N D A C IV IC L X 4 dr, 5 spd. man, 4 cyl, p/s, p/b, am/fm stereo, a/c, t/gls, cruise, bkt. sts, sport mirrs, all ssn stl bltd rdls. VIN VHS67541, Stk #1798. 29,974 mi.

'9 7 H O N D A C IV IC E X 2 dr, auto, 4 cyl, p/s, p/b, am/fm cass/cd, a/c, t/gls, r/def, cruise, bkt. sts, sport mirrs, sun roof, all ssn stl bltd rdls. VIN VL016663. Stk #1797.28,421 mi.

* 1 5 ,0 2 5

= 1 G ,a 2 5

‘9 7 H O N D A ACCORD I X 4 dr, auto, 4 cyl, p/s, p/b, am/fm cass, a/c, t/gls, r/def, cruise, bkt. sts, sport mirrs, all ssn stl bltd rdls. VIN VA074908. Stk #1800.23,928 mi.

v r V

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‘9 7 H O N D A ACCORD SE 4 dr, auto, 4 cyl, p/s, p/b, am/fm cd, p/wds/lks, a/c, t/gls, r/def, bkt. sts, sport mirrs, all ssn stl bltd rdls. VIN VA231594. Stk #1803.32,070 mi. V

s 1 7 ,1 4 0

6 cyl, auto trans, ps, pb, Air Conditioning, am/fm stereo w/cass., pl, pw, p/sts, cruise, tilt, console, alloy whls, leath int, full size spare, tinted glass, dual air bags, Vin #XN532972, Stk #9080, $1968 Dealer Disc., Opt. Pkg. Disc $780, MSRP:$21,045, $1000 Consumer Reb., $400 Coll Grad Reb. if qual.

v

1996 DODGE DAKOTA

1996 SATURN

1995 DODGE

C U B C A B SIT 4 X 4 V6, auto w/OD, ps, pb, ABS, A/C, cruise/®, am/fm stereo w/cass„ tg, Air bag, 6 month

S W I I W A G O N 4 cyl, auto w/OD, ps, pb, ABS, A/C, pl, pw, cruise, tilt, buckets, r/def, am/fm stereo w/cass., 6 month warr,, 65,932 mi.

warr., 48,935 mi. VIN: TS608415, stk#5608

VIN:TZ315900, stk#5609

B A M 2 5 0 0 SLT 4 X 4 8’ Box, V8, auto w/OD, ps, pb, ABS, A/C, pl, pw, cruise/tilt, console, am/fm stereo w/cass„ air bag, 1 Yr. warr., 53,352 mi. VIN:SS218749, stk#5614

* 1 4 ,7 5 0

* 1 6 ,4 0 0

* 9 ,9 5 0

1996 JEEP

1997 FORD

1993 MERCURY

1994 CHEVY

6 cyl. auto w/00 ps. pb A/C. p/seats, pi. pw. cruse, tilt root rack, buckets, am/lm stereo w/cass console r/del. tg air bag. Bal of 4 yr/75.000 wan. 51,700 mi VIN TC227358. stM5596

R A N C H I C LU B C A B XLT 4 X 2 6 cyl, aulo, ps, pb, A/C, am/fm stereo w/cass., tg, cloth int, bedliner, sliding rear window, 1 yt./12,000 mi. wan., 31,771 mi. VIN:VTA36514, stk#5558

S J I B lf 6 cyl, auto, w/OD, A/C, ps, pb, p/seats, pl, pw, cruise/tilt, am/fm stereo w/cass., air bag, 6 mo./600Q mi. wan., 65,473 mi. VIN: PG665882. stk#5636

B U I Z H I 4 D R 4 J M 6 cyl, auto w/OD, ps, pb, pl, pw, int wprs, cruise, tilt, r/del, A/C, am/fm stereo w/cass., 6 mo./6000 mi. warr., 76,258 mi. VIN:R2176619, stk#5637

i s

, 7 6 5

* 1 3 ,1 9 5

* 6 ,1 9 5

* 1 2 ,1 5 0

WERNER

*2 0 , 8 4 0

7 -Y E A R /1 0 0 ,0 0 0 M l. W A R R A N T Y * • Concierge Emergency Service • Drivetrain • Rental Car Reimbursement • Electronics • Trip Interruption Benefit • Chasis • Roadside Assistance • Trip routing • Quality Service • Transferability O u r g i f t w it h y o u r u s e d c a r p u rc h a s e !

DenisDiFeo's& Lawrence.lannaccone' [W i H

* 1 7 ,8 4 0

4 cyl,5 spd, ps, pb, A/C, am/fm stereo w/cass.,console, buckets, dual air bags, 6 mo76000 mi. warr., 47.100 mi VIN.S0169698. stk«473 * 6 5 0 0

'9 7 H O N D A ACCORD 9E ‘9 7 H O N D A CR -V EX 4 dr, auto, 4 cyl, p/s, p/b, am/fm cass, Mini Van, auto, 4 cyl, p/s, p/b, am/fm a/c, t/gls, r/def, bkt. sts, sport mirrs, cass, p/wind/Iks, a/c, t/gls, r/def, bkt sun roof, all ssn stl bltd rdls. VIN sts, sport mirrs, all ssn stl bltd rdls. VA069479. Stk #1770.24,564 mi. VINWC042013. Stk 31824U. 8,400 mi.

* 1 7 ,2 4 5

• Heating/Cooling

j

1995 PLYMOUTH

S T R A T U S

V 8 , a u t o tr a n s , p s , p b , p l, p w , c r u i s e , tilt, A ir C o n d i t i o n i n g , a m / f m s t e r e o - c a s s , r / d e f , c l o t h in t, r o o f rack , 3rd s e a t, 3 1 x 1 0 .S R 1 5 D W L t i r e s , t i n t e d g l a s s , d u a l a ir b a g s , V in # X F 6 2 1 0 7 4 , S t k # 9 2 7 0 , M S R P : $ 2 9 , 9 6 0 , D e a l e r D i s c . $ 2 3 2 3 , $ 4 .0 0 C o l l G r a d R e b if q u a l .

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1999 DODGE

1 9 9 9 DODGE

1 9 9 0 DODGE

d o d g e

Sales Hours: Mon.-Fr. 9-9, Sat. 9-6

C O A ST O

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7 32 -9 7 4 -2 2 11

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Pricesincludeall coststotiepaidbyaconsumerexceptforlie., reg. &taxes. Leasesexclude$400administrationfee&subjecttoapproval byprimarylender. Pricesinfa ofall rebates&incentives.Exp.7daysfromdateofpub. ‘7-yearsor100.000mi. (whichevercomesfirst) fromdatewhensoldasanewvehicle. Tirewear&offroadusenotcovered. Oilchangesnoteligibleforrental reimbursement.

C a ll 1 -8 8 8 -A I-D O D G E Pricesincludeal!coststobepaidbyconsumerexceptlicense,taxes&M Vfees. NOM ONEYDOW N,1stpaymentdueatsigning. 38mo,dosedendtees, pricesincludeailrelate&incentives,12k/yr.15eover,NEONSPORT-T0P4458, DURANGO,T0MI4,334, STRATUS-T0P=S11.892.§1999Mayer&DunnAdvertising. [email protected] ORLDNET.An,COM

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INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999

'95 Chevrolet Beretta

'94 N issan Pathfinder

‘96 Saab 900 Turbo

trans, 25K miles.

4 Door, Black, automatic trans, 43K miles.

'96 N is s a n A ttim a

'96 P ly m o u th B r e e z e '93 Nissan 240SX

4 D o o r , B lu e E m e ra ld , a u t o m a tic tra n s , 3 0 K mMes.

4 Door, Red, automatic trans, Only 15K miles.

2 Door. White, automatic

'96Plymouth Neon

2Door, Green, automatic

trans, 43K mites.

'97 N is s a n M a xim a 4 Door, White, automatic trans, Only 17K miles.

'96 N is s a n M a xim a Uam 56K mile*

4 Door, White, automate trans. Only 19K miles



20r, Black, automatic, 3>4Kmiles. 2-fioar, Black, automatic WTO, 38K miles.

'98 Toyota Tacoma

9 5 N i s s a n M a x im a

4 Door, Beige, automatic rans, 50K miles.

'94 N is s a n M a x im a 4 Door, Ruby Red, automatic trans, 42K miles.

'95 N is s a n Q u e s t

Pick Up, Grey, 5Speed Maual Tramnwsion, 3949 Miles.

Van, Beige, automatic transmission, 68K mites.

'95 Geo Tracker 4x4

'98 H o n d a C R V

4 Oooty Black, 5 speed, sport utility, !5K miles.

Blue, automatic transmission, 23 Kmiles, ;

'95 N issa n Q u e st

'94 Cadillac Sedan Devllle

Van, Red, automatic transmission, 31K miles.

Leather Int, Stiver, automatic trans, 5SK m iles.

'9 3 M a z d a 6 2 6

9 5 N is s a n A ltim a

'97 Nissan Maxima 4 Door, automatic trans, white, 21K Miles.

'9 7 N i s s a n A ltim a

4 Door, Black, 5 speed, '93 Nissan 240SX 32K miles. Convertible, White, Automatic '9 7 F o r d R a n g e r Transmission, 30K Miles.

4 Door Beige, automatic trans, 24K miles.

P ic k U p , 4 W h e e l D n v e , a u to m a tic tra n s , O n ly 2 7 K

'95 Saturn S C 2

'9 7 H o n d a C R V

Leather, Silver, automatic transmission, 58K miles.

2Door, Beige, SSpeed Maual Transmission, 28K Mies.

S p o r t U t ili t y , a u t o m a t i c tra n s , g r e e t i 1 9 K m ile s

'96 Nissan Sentra 4Door, Green, Automatic Transmission, 28K Miles.

..... —

VtsR Us 9a The

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w w w .a c i i i e v i i s s a i i . c o m Orty Mhutes A w ay From Routes 1,18,27,287 &1he N ew Jersey Tumake

General Sales Manager

__ 1 8 2 1 9 3 0 0 >l-M g h u ja y 1 3 0 • S o u t h B r u n s u k k

Prices include all costs to be paid by consumers except licensing, tax, and registration. All leasing & financing subject to credit approval. All leases are closed end(terms listed above; Maxima & Altima 10K mi/p/yr andl 5
f f w W f f ? | ® **> -

INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999 7 7

WOODBRIDGE DODGE»DODGETRUCK " f a m

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S A f E l Y IN S P E C T E D !

F O B T H IS S A L E !

J u s t A S a m p le O f T h e V a lu e s A t

WOODBRIDGE LINCOLN-IVIERCURY

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BIB LOCATIONS

2

WARRANTIES

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J u s t A S a m p le O f T h e V a lu e s A t T m

90 NIITSUBISHI ECUPSE

93 CREVRMETCAVAIERWAGON

2 dr, 4 cyl, 5 sp d m an tra n s , p w r strn g /b rks, A IR , A M /F M s te re o , i tilt, r/def, bckts, 50,909 1 m i, V IN # L M 9 8 1 6 2 1 .

4 cyl, a u to tra n s, p w r strn a /b rks/lo cks, A IR , , A M /F M ste re o , r d ef, 1 6 6 ,4 3 6 m i, V IN # P 7 1 91 80 8 .

strn g /b rks/w in d /lo cks, , * n w , i A IR , c ru is e , 6 9 , 1 0 0 * l - i , » miles, VIN.#P1208198.

93 DODGECARAVANSESPORT

'9! CADillACCOUPEDEVILLE 4ihchevroicts -iopickupis cyl, a u to tra n s, p w r

4 dr, 8 cyl, auto trans, pwr strng/brks/wind/locks/ant, , AIR, AM/FM cass, tilt, cruise, I r def, 97,186 mi, STK #99336A, VIN #M4269133.

6 cyl, auto trans, pwr

strng/brks/wind/locks/mirr, . AIR, AM/FM cass, cruise, I sunscrn gls, r def, 71,703 mi, VIN #PR 295595.

s trn g /b rk s , A IR , , A M /FM stereo, 52,270 { m i, S T K # 9 0 0 2 9 A , V IN # R K 1 6 7 4 5 0 .

'95 FORDAEROSTAR

95 MERCURY SABIf

6 cyl, auto trans, pwr

'00 DODGE INTREPID ES

4 dr, 6 cyl auto trans, pwr strng/brks/wind/locks, AIR, tilt, cruise, r def, t/gls, b /s! mldgs, child safety Icks, 58,293 mi, VIN #TF100923!

6 cy l, a u to tra n s, p w r s trn g /b rk s , A IR , , 5 3 ,7 7 2 m i, V I N l #S (bA 19892.

strng/brks/wind/locks/mirr/ A seats, AIR, AM/FM Stereo, f tilt, cruise, lthr, 33,941 mi, 1 VIN.#SG633624.

MrTSURISHI ECUPSE GS ’92 DODGER250C0NV VAN 295 dr sports cpe, 4 cyl, auto Hi-top, 6 cyl, auto trans, trans, pwr strng/brks/ wind/locKs/trnk/mirr, AIR, | AM/FM cass, tilt, cruise, r def, " bckts, 60,426 mi, VIN #SE164278._____________

p w r s trn g /b rk s , A IR , AM/FM stereo, rf rack, TV, bckts, 50,172 mi, V IN #NK135169.

'95 FORDW1NDSTAR LX

'97 CHEVY HIAUDU

4 dr, 6 cyl, auto trans, pwr strng/brks/wind/locks, AIR, AM/FM stereo, tilt, cruise, r i def, 67,158 mi, STK #98038A, VIN #SBA31565.

4 dr, 4 cyl, auto trans, pwr strng/brks/wind/locks/mirr, . AIR, AM/FM Stereo-cass, r / d e f , 2 0 ,9 6 5 m i, VIN.#VY135283.

97 SATURN SL2 WAGON

4 cyl, auto trans, pwr s trn g /b rks/w in d /lo cks, J , AIR, AM/FM cass, tilt, £ cruise, r/def, 16,000 mi, VIN #V2344307.

93 PONTIAC BONNEVIUI |

6 cyl, auto trans, pwr

‘07 SATURN SL1

4 dr, 4 cyl, auto trans, pwr strng/brks/wind/locks, AIR, AM/FM stereo, air baa, I cruise, 9080 mi, STK 1 m 0 1 8 , VIN #VZ175311.

'98 NISSAN SENTRAGXE 4 dr, 4 cyl, auto trans, pwr strng/brks/wind/locks/mirr, j AIR, AM/FM cass, tilt, cruise,* 5430 mi, VIN #WC717325.

*98 VWJETTA TDI

'95 TOYOTACAHIRYIE

4 dr, 4 cyl turbo diesel, 5 spd m an tra n s , pwr strng/brks/wind/locks/mirr, i AIR, AM/FM cass, tilt, i cruise, r def, moonrf, 19,297 mi, VIN #W Z571113.

4 dr, 4 cyl, auto trans, pwr strng/brks/wind/locks/mirr, AIR, AM/FM cass, t ilt , , cruise, r def, 48,856 mi, VIN #S0282540.

7JEEP( '97 HONDA ACCORD SE Club '98Cab DO DGEDAKOTASIT 4X4 4*9 Pickup, 4WD, 6 dr, FWD, V8, auto trans,pwr

4 dr, 6 cyl, auto trans, p w r s trn g /b rk s /w in d . /locks/mirr, AIR, AM/FM I cass, tilt, cruise, 22,363 ^ m i, VIN #V A 1 069 79 .

cyl, auto trans, pwr — stmg/brks/wind/locks/seat, i AIR. AM/FM cass, 6 ft | bedliner, Tonner cov, 13,340 VIN #W S615320.

stmg/brks/wind/locks/mirr/ant, AIR, cass/CD, air bag, r def, tilt, cruise, 23,945 mi, STK #8944A, VIN #VC753450.

'91 FORD PRODE GL

90 DODGEDYNASTY

2 dr, 4 cyl, auto trans, p w r s trn g /b rk s , A IR , . A M /F M stereo , r def, i 80,303 mi, STK # L M 2 ,’ VIN # M 5165471.

4 dr, 4 cyl, auto trans, p w r s trn g /b rk s , AIR, AM /FM slereo, r def, i 5 9 ,7 5 0 m i, VIN^ #LD874027.

'91 BUICKPARKAVENOE

4 dr, 8 cyl, auto trans, pwr stmg/brks/wind/locks/mirr, AIR, AM/FM cass, cruise, 7 0 ,8 3 5 m i, V IN #ML823561.

'02 ISUZU RODEO 4X4

pw r strng/brks/, wind/locks, AIR, AM/FM J cass, cruise, 35,122 mi, VIN #TC804499.

173422

‘94MERCURYGRAN

4 dr, 8 cyl, auto trans, pwr strng/brks/wind/locks/ant, AIR, AM/FM cass, tilt, cruise, i r def, air bag, 63,605 mi, STK ■ #82040A, VIN #RX693771.

'95 CHEVROLET CAHIARO

2 dr, 6 cyl, a uto trans,

p w r s trn g /b rk s /w in d / , lo c k s , A IR , A M /F M I CD, tilt, cruise, 39,7 08 1 m i, V IN # S 2 1 5 5 0 9 5 .

manual transmission, pwr J strng/brks/wind/locks, AIR, i AM/FMcass, tilt, cruise, rf rack, mi, VIN #NC .

'871

NISSAN SENTRA GXE IXLTPICKUP 4*90 dr, 4 cyl, auto trans,

s trn g /b rk s , A iR , 5 0 ,5 0 5 m i, V IN | #R TA 98887.

4dr, 4WD, 6cyl, 5speed 75,175

6 cyl, a u to tra n s, p w r

strng/brks/w ind/ locks, . AIR, AM/FM cass, cruise, I r def, sunrf, 29,035 mi, VIN #TE379047.

w ind/locksfsea^f A^l AM/FM cass. tilt, cruis

‘0 7 1

126FT.MOTORHOME 4 ‘961 dr, 6 cyl, auto trans, pwr

4 dr, 6 cyl, auto trans, pwr strng/brks/wind/locks/mirr, . AIR, AM/FM cass, r def, tilt, | cruise, air bag, 17,053 mi, STK #796, VIN #VA645264.

strn g /b rks/w in d /lo cks, AIR, AM/FM cass, tilt, I cruise, leath int, 20,997 1 mi, VIN # T 4818300.

MERCURYGRAK '00 HONDA ACCORD EX 4‘97 dr, 8 cyl, auto trans,

4 dr, 6 cyl, auto trans, pwr strng/brks/wind/locks/mirr/ant, AIR, AM/FM cass, r def, tilt, cruise, air bag, 32,646 mi, STK #LM5, VIN #TA009949.

CHEVROLETBLAZERLS4X4 IGS 4 dr,964WD, V8, auto trans, pwr

p w r s trn g /b rk s /w in d , AIR, cruise, 23,584 mi, VIN #VX661014.

, 97 MERCURYII

‘97 FORDCONTOOR

4 dr, 4 cyl, auto trans, p w r s trn g /b rk s /w in d , AIR, cruise, 27,172 mi, i VIN #VK107018.

MITSUDISHIGALANT ‘92 LINCOLN TOWNCAR 4'00 IIS Signature, dr, 4 cyl, auto trans, pwr 4 dr, 8 cyl, au

Classic C, Sleeps 6, 4 dr, 8 cyl, auto trans, pwr strng/brks/wind, AIR, AM/FM stereo, cruise, r/def, j sunrf, sink, bed, bathroom, range % oven, storage rm, 37,860 mi, STK #89022A, VIN #HHB08930.

I 4 cyl, a u to tra n s , p w r I s trn g /b rk s /w in d , A IR , A M /F M c a s s , t i l t , { J cruise, 29,9 45 mi, VIN I # V D J 16466. .

93 FORDCROWNVICTORIA

4 dr, 8 cyl, auto trans, pwr stma/brks/wind/locks/ant, AlR, , AM/FM cass, air bag, r def,. tilt, I cruise, 68,350 mi, STK #95006, VIN #PX164363.

IGS

strng/brks/wind/locks, AIR, , AM/FM stereo, r def, tilt, I cruise, air bag, 28,770 mi, STK #772A, VIN #T2254051.

KOLNTOWNCARSttNflURE I '97 LINCOLNC0NT1NEN1AL 4'9dr,68LB cyl, auto trans, pwr

4 dr, 8 cyl, auto trans, pwr s trn g /b rks/w in d /lo cks/ seat, AIR, tilt, leath int, moonroof, 29,279 mi, VIN #VY623910.

AIR, AM/FM cass, air bag, t/gls, r def, tilt, cruise, 31,581 mi, STK #807, VIN #TY723449.

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N E W J E R S E Y T U R N P IK E E X IT 11 A N D G .S . P A R K W A Y S O U T H E X IT 1 2 9 - F o llo w s ig n s to W o o d b rid g e , firs t lig h t tu rn left, yo u ’re here! G .S . P A R K W A Y N O R T H E X IT 127 - G o R O U T E 9 NO R TH a p p ro x im a te ly 1/2 m ile, e xit a t R O U T E 1 8 4 W E S T -F O R D S E X IT - firs t lig h t tu rn rig h t, y o u ’ re here!

O O D B R I D G E ,

h t t p : / / w w w . d e n n is a a a m s . c o m

T A K E N E W JE R S E Y T U R N P IK E T O E X IT 11 & G A R D E N S TAT E P A R K W A Y S O U T H t o E X IT 1 29 Follow S ig ns to W oodbridge, 1/4 Mite o n R ig h t A fte r 2 nd Light, You’re H e re ! G A R D E N STATE P AR KW AY N O R T H E X IT 127 - G o RT. 9 N O R T H , A pprox. 1/2 M ite, E xit a t R O U T E 1 84 E A S T - 1 / 4 m ile on right.

Prices include all costs to be paid by consumer except for license, registration, doc fees & taxes. Not resp for typos. ‘Available on all financed vehicles ■subject to approval ot primarylendingseivicejfqualif^

____

(H ) H O N D A

T h e R a re , B u t W e ll D o n e !

A r e

A r e

Free 2 Year Scheduled Maintenance And A 10-Year, 100,000 Mile Warranty

1999 vw

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Lower Prices, Delivered In A Straightforward, No Nonsense Stvlc [• ree Service Loaner Lars

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B ra n d N e w 1999 H O N D A

4-Dr., 5-Spd. Man Trans, Traction Cntrl, 4-Cyl Turbo Eng., PS, P/ABS Brks, Air. Dual/Side Air Bags. P/Winds/lks/Mirrs. Rr. Def.. Tilt, Cruise. Inter Wprs, T/GIs, Sec. Sys., Keyless Entry. AM/FM St. Cass. VIN #XE356451. Stk. #99-9527 MSRP: $21.725.

P T V T f

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VjlVIL UA IH6EJ6677

4 -D r. Auto Trans. 4-Cyl Eng., PS, PB. Air, Dual Air Bags. P/Winds/Lks/Mirrs, Rr. Del.. Tilt, Cruise, Inter Wprs, T/GIs. AM/FM Stereo VIN #XL014814. Stk #99-7448. MSRP: $16,045.

Lease: $999 Down Payt., $550 Bank Fee, 52491st Mo. PayL. = 798 Due At Lease Inception. Total Parts: S9711.Total Cost: 1260. Purch. C^)tn. At Lease End: $13,035. Mileage A Per Year/15e Mi. Thereafter. NO REF SEC. D

s Inception

Lease Per M o. 39 M o s.*

TotalCosi:'$7555. Purch.Optn. At Lease End:! W

l i f

feiV r GOLF GL

B ra n d N e w -

2 -D r., 4-S pd . A u to Trans, 4 -C yl E ng., PS, P /A B S Brks, Air. D u al/S id e A ir B ags. P /Lks, Rr. D e f , T/G Is, In te r W prs. Sec. S ys., K eyless Entry, A M /F M St. C ass. VIN # X W 34 9 55 0. Stk. # 99 -9 45 8 . M S R P : $16,400.

4-Dr., Auto Trans, Fmt Whl Drive, 4-Cyl. Eng., PS, PB, Air, Dual Air Bags, PA/Vinds/Lks/Mirrs, Rr Def, Tilt, Cruise, T/GIs., AM/FM St. Cass. VIN #XA046486. Stk. #99-7305. MSRP: $19,605.

ACCORD LX

1999 H O N D A

ink

Lease: $999 Down

$200 Ref. Sec. Dep., $545 Bank Fee,

7 9 1 st Mo. Ref. Sec, Dep 4 1

" D u e At Lease Inception. Total' lalPayts:

Due At Lease Inception. Totai Pavts: $7761.

i. Purch. Opln At Lease End:$1 3.725.

Total Cost S9480. Purch. Optn. At Lease End: S9348. Mileage

3 Allowance 12,000 Mi. Per% ar/20c Per Mi. Thereafter.

Allowance 12.000 Mi. PerYear/15c Mi. Thereafter.

The New 1999 Jetta

4-Dr., Auto Trans. 4-Cyl. Eng., PS, P/ABS Brks. Air. Dual Air Bags. P/Winds/Lks/Mirrs, Rr Def. Tilt, Cruise, Alloy Whls, T/GIs.. Sec. Sys., Keyless Entry, AM/FM Stereo/CD, Moon Rf. VIN #XA057450. Stk #99-7404. MSRP: 522,115.

, $550 Bank Fee, $1841st Mo. Payt. - $1733

!., $225 Ref. Sec. Dep.,

:: $7176. Total Cost: $8725. Purch.

$1991st Mo. Payt.=$'1i

w Allowance 12,00(

$7761, Total Cost: $9530. Purch.

.ThereateN0REF.SEC.DEP.REQD.

1999 V W

W

Mileage Allowance 12,000 Mi. Per Vear/20e

BEETLE GL

_____________ 2-Dr., 5-Spd. Man. Trans, Fmt Whl Drive, . PS, P/ABS Brks, Air, Skte/Dual Air Bags, P'Lks, Rr. Def. Inter Wprs, T/oHs, Sec Sys., Keyle Entry, AM/FM St. Cass. VIN #XM425379. Stk. #99-9451. MSRP: $16,525 L ease: $ 99 9 D ow n Payt., $ 550 B an k Fee, S 1 6 3 1st Mo. Payt. = $ 17 12 D u e A t L e a s e '

Per!

Total C ost: S7906. P urch. (

39 Mos,*

M ilea g e A llo w a nce 1 2 ,0 0 0 .

ACCORD EX 1HGCG6679

1999 H O N D A

GL Series, 4-Dr.. 5-Spd.Man. Trans, Fmt Whl Drive, 4-Cyl Eng., PS, P/ABS Brks, Air, Dual/Side Air Bags. P/Lks, Rr. Def.. T/GIs, Inter Wprs,, Tilt, Sec. Sys., S' Keyless Entry. AM/FM St. Cass. VIN #XM01028:17. Stk #99-9338. MSRP: $18,075.

"

"

"

IHGC665X

‘ " , ;: S6357.

i. A t L e a se End: 111,403.

81

1999 H O N D A

PASSPORT LXV 456CM58W1

4-Dr., S .U .V ., Auto Trans, 4W D, V6 En a ., P S , P B , Air, Dual Air Bags, P/Winds/Lks/Mirrs, Rr. DefAA/pr, Tilt, Cruise, Inter Wprs, Alloy Whls, T/GIs, Keyless Entry, Moon R f., AM /FM St. Cass. V IN # X4411887. Stk. #99-7470. M S R P : $27,415 . Dealer Discount: $2816.

N O FIEF. SEC. DEP. REQD.

(0 H O N D A

D riv e rs w a n te d . RO UTE

732-462-5300

V

' 732-462-530(1

P r e s id e n t ’ s A w a r d W in n e r ! - ‘ 9 6 , ‘ 9 7 &

Prices includeall coststobepaidbyaconsumerexcept forlicensing '' " “ •• •

‘ 9 81 ■

H onda’s Best! consumer

fee, &downpayt. dueat lease inception. Noaddit. liability otherthanextraordinarywear&tear. Subjecttoapproval thruprimarylender. Prices/payts. validonadvertisedin stockunitsonly, Offerexpires March30,1999.

L, 1 st mos. payt, ref. sec. df inception. No addit. l i a l t y other than extraordinary wear & tear. Subject to approval thru primary lender. P ric e s /p ;....................... tised in stock units only. Offer expires March 3 0 .'

INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999 7 9

S h e lly L o C a s io & K e rry Irw in O w ne rs Ir w in L i n c o l n - M e r c u r y

New W 9 9 A h m m w

• V8 Engine • Automatic w/OD • Power Windows/locks/seats • Air Conditioning • Power Steering/Brakes • Cruise/ Tilt • Floor Mats • Air Bags • AM/FM stereo-cass • V I N #XY640263 • Stk #367 • MSRP $38,995 •FU LLY LOADED!

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•Automatic Transw/OD •Powerwindows/ locks&seat •Air Conditioning •Powersteering •ABS •Cruise(tilt

Lease for only..

"floorMats 'DualAirBags 'Buckets 'AlloyWhis •AM/FMstereo w/cass 'Root Rack 'RunningBoards

*

5

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9

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B u y F o r O n ly . J 3 0 , 4 9 5

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Buy For Only.J 18,995 J

/

w/OD •P ow er Steering • Power widows

Lease for only...

• 4 Cyl

‘ Dual Air Bags

#X5640389

»VIN# XG606513

• 5 Speed Trans

'C o n s o le

• Stk#X250

Conditioning

•MSRPS19050

• Power Steering

'I n t Wprs

• MSRP $16,645

• Cruise & Tilt

'$ 5 0 0 Rebate

•P ow er Brakes

‘ AlloyW his

• $400 Coll Grad

•P ow er windows/

• AM/FM stereo-

‘ Air

•A uto Trans

/locks

• Keyless Entry

*$ 50 0 off lease

'D u a l Air Bags -AM /FM

reb If Qual.

locks

*$400 Coll Grad

stereo-cass

reb if Qua

w 9

w9

cass

•A ir Conditioning

'F lo o r Mats

• Cruise & Tilt

• VIN

rebate if Qual. *$ 5 0 0 Renewal rebate

L e a s e f o r o n ly ...

L e a s e f o r o n ly . . .

0 / m'2

VMDJ11701 Stock1X 440 M SRPS23.010 S400CollGradRebate IfQual $1000Rebate m Renew alfiebIfQual $500OffleaseReb

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L e a s e f o r o n ly . .

Buy For Only...525,995

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•CruiseSit •FloorM ats •DualAirBags •AM /FMstereo w/cass •IntW ipers •RearDefroster •RoofRack

V 6 Automatic Transw/OD Powerwindows/ locks ■ AirConditioning Powersteering PowerBrakes

»V6 •VINIXUJ10626 'Stock1X147 •MSRP$29,730 . •$500Offlease rebate#dual. <(400Coll GradRebate IfQual

L e a s e f o r o n ly ...

lm

• V8 Engine • Automatic w/OD • Power Windows/locks/seat • Air Conditioning • Power Steering/Brakes • Cruise/ Tilt • Floor Mats • Air Bags • AM/FM stereo-cass • V I N #XX640249 • Stk #427 • MSRP $22,825 • LOADED!

'

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Buy For Only...514,995

Buy For Only.J 15,995

N E X T TO TH E F R E E H O LD R A C E W A Y M A LL

Houles 9 & 3 3

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Showroom Hours

9 - 9 M o n . - T ln ir s ; 9 - 6 F rid a y ; 9 - 5 S at.

SALES' SERVICE • PARTS • LEASING • RENTALS

M ercu ry

4 6 2 -1 8 1 8

Price includes all cost to be paid by consumer except license, registration & taxes. 36 mo. closed end leases ( Except Brand Marquis 38 mo. & Town Car Gar 24 mo.) $999 Down/Trade (Except Town Car $1995 Down) $0 security Dep $9 Bank Fee And 1st Pay't Due at inception 12,099 miles Per Year 15c Over. Inc All Rebates. Prices Expire 3/24/99. TOP=VILLAGER $11,898 & SABLE $9,993, M0UN1AINEER $12,069, GRAND MARQUIS $11,538, COUGAR $8,883 TOWN CAR $11,651. © 1999 Mayer & Dunn Advertising. D O N 'T M I S S T H IS S A L E .

8 0

INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999

S P E C I A L P U R C H A S E D IR E C T F R O M F T H IS OFFER IS EXCLUSIVE TO CIRCLE INFINITI N

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'98:VIN#WM501292/ 12mi

NO M ONEY DOW N!

Auto, 4-Cyl, PB, PS, Clim Cntrl, Air Bags, VIN#XT002384. MSRP: $22,290.

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ONLY *999 D O W N !

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0

'9 6 I n f i n i t i 1 3 0

'9 6 I n f i m t i I 3 0

*15,900

*16,500

'9 6 I n f i n i t i 1 3 0

'9 6 I n f i n i t i I 3 0

62,799mi, Stk#5846R VIN#TT304418

54,288mi, Stk#5852R VIN#TT017042

50,580mi, Stk#5777R VIN#TT301253

47,858mi, Stk#5839R VIN#TT017142

'9 6 I n f i n i t i 1 3 0

'9 6 I n f i n i t i I 3 0

'9 6 I n f i n i t i I 3 0 t

'9 6 I n f i n i t i I 3 0

*18,200

*18 ,4 00

44,839mi. Stk#5815R VIN#TT019017

43,305mi, Stk#5735R VI N#TT011704

56,156mi,Stk#5799R VIN#IT015010

41,322mi Stk#5837R VIN#TT011732

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39,256ml, Stk#5701R VIN#TT012747

35.525mi. Stk#5844R VtN#TT018862

*17,200 *17,900

*18 ,4 00 *18,600

*19 ,9 00 *2 0 ,9 0 0 30.555ira, Stk«734R VIMVT403580

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T o ta l S avings: 37,525mt. VWTTS45232

38,121mi.Stk#54HIR VIWSM212012

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'93 Range Rover Country W B

*17,900 52.75W .S IW N 549A VIN#RFG08949/5-Spd

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56,773mi,Stk*NY12A VIN#PA637393

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300 ROUTE36 • WESTLONGBRANCH,NJ • (732) 389-1200

PRE-OWNED CARS

INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999 8 1

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VIN #XR332737, 4 cyl., auto, p/s/b, a/c, am/fm st/dock, r/del, t/glass, r/wpr wash, dual nit bags. MSRP: 520,055. Incl $400 recent college grad rebate, if qual, SI 000 factory rebate. 42 Month lease.

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VIN #XR329853,6 cyl, auto, p/s/b a/c, am/fm st/cass, dual doors, t/def, p/winds/mirrs/dllcs, lilt, t/gloss, r/wpr wash, cruise, dual air mgs, MSRP: 524,400. Includes $400 recent college grod rebate, if qual. $1000 factory rebate. 42 month lease.

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VIN #XF605572,8 cyl. auto, p/s/b, a/c, am/fm st/cass, r/def p/winds/mirrs/dlks/trunlc, tilt, r/wpr wash, cruise, roof rock, dual air bags, onti-spin rear. MSRP: $27 415. Incl $400 recent college grod rebate, if qual. 42 Month tease

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| VIN #XDl30826,4 cyl, auto, p/s/b, a/c, am/fm dock, r/def, t/glass, int wprs, dual airbags. MSRP $13,745. Incl $400 recent college grad rebate if qual, $1500 factory rebote. 42 Month Leose

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VIN #XN5B04I7,4 cyl, auto, /to, p/s/b, a/c, am/fm st/cass, r/def, p/winds/mirrs/dlks, tilt, t/olass, cruise dual air bags, bogs, MSRP: 518,025. $18,025.U « ra Indudesl $400 recent college grad rebate, if qual $1000 factory rebate. 42 month leose.

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VIN #XE090673.6 cyl., auto, p/s/b, a/c, am/fm st/cass/cd, r/def, p/winds/mirrs/dlks/trunk, tilt, t/alass, cruise dual air bags, r/spoiler 16" wheels & tire pkg., MSRP: $20,240. Incl $400 recent college graa

VIN #XH525045,6 cyl, auto, p /sA , a/c, am/fm st/cass, r/def, p/wi i/winds/mirrs/dlks/trunk rel tilt, t/glass. cruise, dual air bogs MSRP $' 20 , “ 1,585. Incl $400 recent college grad rebote, if qual. 36 Montn Least

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VIN #XK525626,8 cyl, outo, p/s/b, a/c, am/fm stereo, tilt, int wprs, duol I air bags, MSRP: $22 000. Incl $400 recent college grod rebate, if qual. $1063 commercial rebate, if qual. $500 factory rebate. 42 month lease.

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VIN #XG176785 8 cvf, auto, p/s/b, o/c, am/fm st/cass, p/winds/mirrs/dlks, I tilt, cruise, dual oir bags, MSRP: $23,920. Indudes $400 recent college grod rebate, if qual. $300 commercial rebate, if qual. 42 month leose.

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VIN #XS228484,6 cyl, outo, p/s/b, a/c am/fm st/cass, t/glass, dual air bogs, spoil pkg, alum whls, MSRP: $18,355. Includes $400 recent college grad rebate, if quo/. $1080 factory rebate. $300 commercial rebate, if qual. 42 month lease.

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s a y s n o b o d y b e lie v e s in t h e i r c a r s m o r e t h a n t h e p e o p l e a t H y u n d a i. " a m e r i c a 's

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4-Dr, Auto w/OD, 2.0L 4-Cyl, PB, PS, A/C, Dual A ir Bags, R/Def, AM/FM Stereo Cass, Stk#99018, VIN#WU694544/11,526mi. Based on a 36 m o nth closed end lease. Total due at lease inception: $894...($0 down, 1st m o nth pym nt, $250 ref sec dep & $495 bankfee).Total lease pymnts: $5364+tax. 12,000 mi/yr,excess mi @ $.15 thereafter. Residual value: $3952.

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10-year/100,000 mile powertrain limited warranty. 5-year/60,000 mile bumper-to-bumper limited warranty. 5-year/100,000 mile anti-perforation limited warranty. 5-year/unlimited mileage Roadside Assistance Program.

DR ^I*V I N G IS B E L I E V I N G !

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Hurry in and test drive any New 1999 Hyundai TODAY! Price(s) ind(s) all costs to be paid by consumer, except for license fees, registration fees and tax. Pictures for illustrative purposes. Not resp f0f%>os. Ad supersedes previous offers,

S t o p B y o r C a ll U s A t: /

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1998 Model, 4 Door, 4Cylinder Engine, Automatic Transmission, J Power Steering, Antilock Brakes, I Air Conditioning, Dual Air Bags, j Cruise Control, Power Windows/ Locks, Rear Defroster, AM/FM Stereo w/Cassette, Cloth Interior, Bucket Seats, All Season Radials | Stock#2589P VIN#W6169126

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1998 Model, 2 Door, 4X4, 4Cylinder 1 Engine, 5Speed Transmission, Power S te e rin g , P ow er B ra kes, A ir Conditioning, Dual Air Bags, A M /F M Stereo, Cloth Interior, Bucket Seats, All | Season Radials, Stock#2580P V IN # \ W 6 9 18861

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1998 Model, 2Door, V6 Engine, Auto Transmission, Power Steering, Antilock Brakes, Air Conditioning, CruiseControl, Dual Air Bags, Power Windows/Locks/ Seat/ Moonroof, Rear Defroster, AM/FM Stereo w/CD Player, leather Interior/Bucket Seats, Tilt Wheel, Alloy Wheels, All Season Radials Stock# 2521P VIN#W9286358 MSRP: $22933

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1 9 9 8 M o d e l, 4 D o o r , 4 C y lin d er E n gin e, A utom atic Transm ission, Pow er Steering, Power Brakes, Air Conditioning, Cruise, Dual Air Bags, P o w er W in d o w s & Locks, R eor D e fr o s te r , A M /F M S te re o i w /C a s s e tt e , Cloth Interior, Bucket S e a t s , A ll S e a s o n R a d ia ls S to c k # 2 5 8 4 P V IN # W Z 4 2 9 1 7 3

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1998 Model, 4Door, V6 Engine, Auto Transmission, Power Steering, Power Brakes, Air Conditioning, Cruise Control, Dual Air Bags, Power W indows/Locks, Rear D efroster, A M /FM Stereo w/Cass, Cloth Interior, Tilt Wheel, All Season Radials Stock#2586P VIN#W1120148

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t1 LUi 1998 Model, 4 Door Model, V6 E ngine , 4 W h e e l D riv e , Automatic Transmission, Power Steering, AntiLock Brakes, A ir Conditioning, Cruise Control, Dual A ir Bags, Tinted Glass, Power Windows/Locks/Mirrors, Rear Defroster/Wiper, Luggage Rack, A M /F M S tereo w / i Cassette, Cloth Interior, Bucket Seats, Tilt W heel, All Season Radials, Center Console, Alloy W heels, S tock#2575P V IN # W K205775

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1998 Model, V6 Engine, All Wheel Drive, Automatic Transmission, Power Steering, Antilock Brakes, Air Conditioning, Dual Air Bags, Power Windows/Locks, AM/FM Stereo w/Cassette, Luggage Rock, Cloth Interior, Bucket Seats, Tilt Wheel, All Season Radials, • Alloy Wheels, 8Passenger Seating, Stock#2537P, VIN#WB204215

1998 Model, V6 Engine, Automatic Transmission, Power Steering, Antilock Brakes, Air Conditioning, Cruise Control, Dual Air Bags, Power Windows/Locta/Mirrors, Rear Defogger, AM/FM Stereo w/Cassette, Cloth Interior, Bucket Seats, Tilt Wheel, All Season Radials, 7passenger Seating, Stock#2581 PVIN# WD311249

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C e n tr a l J e r s e y 's F a s te s t G r o w in g C h e v y D e a le r !

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Visit usontheweb www.freBhoWGhBvrolBtCOT

Prices include all costs to be paid by consumers except licensing, tax, and registration. All leasing and financing subject to credit approval by primary lending institution. All prices include all applicable factory rebates/incentives. All leases are 48 month, closed end w /12,000 mi/p/yr, 20$ p/mi thereafter, and require $495 Bank Fee, $995 Cash or Trade, $0 Security Deposit, all Inception Fees Due at Delivery, TOP/LEP/TCost: S-10:$9042/7308/9042 (11555 Program Miles). PRISM:$9042/5897/9042 (28622 Program Miles). BLAZER:$ 14322/11726/14322 (16775 Program Miles). ASTRO:$14802/9137/14802 (23432 Program Miles). TRACKER:$8562/6336/8562 (2527 Program Miles). VENTURE:$ 14322/9279/14322 (23140 Program Miles). METRO:$7602/3616/7602 (22628 Program Miles). LUMINA:$ 10482/6062/10482 (30857 Program Miles). MALIBU:$ 10290/7072/10290 (29087 Program Miles). MONTE CARLO:$ 13362/9246/13362 (4671 Program Miles). All prices include $400 Coll/Grad/Rebate (if qualifiedJ.Consumer has to qualify for Chevrolets' special financing programs. All photos are for illus. purposes only. Not resp for type errors. This ad acts as a coupon & supersedes all prior offers. Credit Union membership card must be presented at time of purchase to receive sale price.

LINCOLN • MERCURY

RT. 3:5 KEYPORT AT PARKWAY LX. w r it* *

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V8, auto w/od, ps, pb, ABS, AC, p/locks/win, cru ise *, alloy wheels, r/def, am/lm stereo-cass -CD player, power sunroof, leather interior, dual air bags, running boards, tow Pkg., $1750 opt pkg discount, $500 lease renewal,

Ford Credit

$400 college grad rebate if qualified,VIN#XUJ18044, Stk#9710, MRSP $33,790.36 month dosed end lease, $2999 cap cost reduction, $300 refundable security deposit due at inception. 12000 miles per year .15® over, Total of Payments $13,766, Lease end value $18573.

Lincoln Town Car Executive Series 36 month/36000 Mile Red Carpet Lease Capitalized Cost................$30,918 First Months Payment $0 Security Deposit................ $0 Down Payment $0 Cash due at signing $0 Total of Payments ~7. $17,964 15c/mile over 36,000miles

V8, auto w/od, ps, pb, air condition­ ing, p/locks/win, cruise/tilt, rear defogger, am/fm stereo-cass, floor mats, int wipers, dual air bags, VIN#XX621235, Stk#9505, MRSP $23,790.36 month closed end lease, $1999 down $0 security deposit due at inception. 12000 miles per year. 15C over, Total of Payments $14,562, Lease end value $12133.

Lincoln Continental 36 month/36000 Mile Red Carpet Lease Capitalized Cost................ $31,846 First Months Payment $0 Security Deposit................ $0 Down Payment............... $C Cash due at signing $0 Total of P a y m e n t s $17,96^ 15®/mileover 36,000 miles

§ LINCOLN' M

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Prices include all costs to consumer except license, registration & taxes

@

86

INDEPENDENT, MARCH 17, 1999

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O L D S M O B IIE R O U TE 3 6

in K E Y P O R T

(GSP Exit 117, Jet. of Rts. 35 & 36)

(7 3 2 )

Prices include all rebates (incl. College Grad Rebate), $1000 GM Card Earnings rebate, $750 GM Rebate, $500 loyalty rebate (If , ap , & cust. cash assigned to dealer and all costs to be paid by a consumer except lie, reg & tax. Ad is a coupon & must be presented prior to sale. Leases req., down anc fees totaling $1999 - no sec dep req (Nissan), (own pymt and $400/lntrigue/Alero, $2164/Cutlass, $2312/Bravada. Lease incl. 10K mi per year (12K for Olds), Olds), Subject subject to approval by Dy primary lending source. s), $.15 addt’l thereafter ($.20 for Olds). Total Payments/Residuals:Altima: $5655/$11,135, Maxima: $7761 /$13,831, Pathfinder: $8931/$16,076, Quest: $9204/$12,700, Intrigue: $8964/$12,953, Alero: $5724/$“9621, Cutlass: $6084/$11,402, Bravada: $11,232/$19,361 .**Fin avail for up to 24 mos. *Subj. to qualified buyers thru NMAC up to 60 mos. tO n select models. Offer good thru 3/15/99. On ____________________________________________ in stock vehicles only.

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FREE 1000 MILE SERVICE 4 YEAR /50.000 MILE ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE LOANER CARS WITH OVERNITE SERVICE

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New' 1999'SMB

New • 1999 • SAAB

9 -3 5 DOOR »4 C yl T U R B O • A u to w /O D T r a n s m is s io n • P o w e r S te e r in g > P o w e r w in d o w s & lo c k s • A ir C o n d itio n in g > C r u is e & tilt w h e e l

P o w e r B ra k e s A la r m ABS F lo o r M a ts P o w e r S u n ro o f R /d e f K e y le s s E n tr y A llo y W h e e ls

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A M /F M s te re o C D P la y e r L e a t h e r In t. 4 A ir B a g s V IN : X 2 0 0 3 7 0 5 M S R P $ 2 9 ,2 2 0

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• • • • • • •

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