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The^festfield Record Thursday. May 9,1996

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U> ine reien attend the F well to W tendent of S c . omith is Wednesday. The party is scheduled for 6 p m at L'Affaire Restaurant on Route 22. The $45 fee includes h o n cfoeuvTe*, a hot buffet and a gift for the departing superintendent Call 780-4430 for reservations. : After 10 yean as the Wert ; field •chook' chief. Dr. Smith will take the helm of the Framingham, Mass. school district.

Plant sale I ;

Tamaques Elementary School's annual Sprinf Plant • Sale will be nekl 8 a.m.4 pjn. : tomorrow. Among the items offered for sale will be annuals, hanging baskets, herbs and vegetables starting at $1,50. Proceeds benefit the Tunaques School PTO. Call 3U-MU or 233-8290 for information.

Glee club The Westfield Glee Club will present its 71st Spring Concert S pin. Saturday at Roosevelt Intermediate School, 301 Clarke St

A Forbes Newspaper 50 cents

Franklin principal appointed ^.

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One talent-searching expedition is over for the Westfield Board of Education. Tht school board voted unanimously Thursday to appoint Margaret Dolan principal of Franklin Elementary School. The current principal of the pre-kindergarten to eighth-grade DeerftoM School in Mountainside, Dr. Dolan win take the helm of Franklin School Monday, Jury IS. She will be paid 186,500. Dr. Dolan will replace Kenneth Wark, who left to lead the Chatham Middle School this month Franklin School Assistant Principal Patrick Rooney will act as interim principal until Dr. Dolan comes on board. "Westfield is known as a community that values its children and supports education," said

Dr. Dolan in accepting the position. "I am looking forward to working with the staff and parents in Franklin School to continue to raise the standards for all children." Franklin's new principal said her first order of business will be to meet with members of the community to hear their concerns. "Everything you do has to be made based on what is best for the children," she sakL Dr. Dolan has been principal of Deerflekl School since 1992. At Deerfield, which had more than 500 students, she implemented a three-year plan for the computer networking of all classrooms and school offices and initiated an integrated system of school goals, professional improvement plans and staff development

The Westfield Community Players' production of Lend me a Tenor continues B p.m. tomorrow and Saturday and Friday and Saturday, May 17-18. Tickets exist $12 and are available at the box office (232-1221), Rorden Realty and The Town Bookstore. The theater U located at 1000 North Ave.

Plant sale II The Rake and Hoe Garden d u b of Westfield will hold its annual plant sale 9 a.m.-3 pjn. Saturday in tht Board of Education parking lot on Elm Street CJub members will b» on hand to provide expert advice on plant selection.

Bike auction The Westfield Police Department will hold its annual bicycle auction 7 p.m. Thursday, May 16 at the Westfield Memorial Pool Complex, Scotch Plains Avenue. These bicycles have been in the possession of the police for at least six months. Bikes will be available for inspection 6-7 pom. May 16. Anyone who feels their bicycle may be in the police's possession must bring proof of ownership to the police department by 4 pjn.

Marketplace Redeemer Lutheran School will holds its annual Spring Fair and Mother's Day Marketplace 10 ajn.-4 p.m. Saturday. The rain date is Saturday, May 18. The fair will offer games, food, beverages and plant* for Mother's Day.

Estate planning The Westfield Symphony's Millennium Society will launch its first in a series of free seminars on estate planning 3-5 pjn. Sunday, May 19 at Coldwell Banker Schlott Realtors on Central Avenue. Call 232-9400 by Wednesday, May 15 for registration and information.

Art display A show of landscape art created by members of the Westfield Art Association is on view through Thursday, June 6 at Children's Specialized Hospital in Mountainside.

Record E-mail The Record now accepts letters to the editor and press releases via electronic mail at [email protected] your lull name, address and telephone number (for confirmation purposes only).

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Before joining Deerfield School, Dr. Dolan served as school improvement coordinator (1991-92) and educational planner (1988-91) for the New Jersey Department of Education. She worked as a teacher in fifth-eighth grades in the Irvington public schools 1981-87. She was then promoted to vice principal of a kindergarten to eighth-grade school. Dr. Dolan taught kindergarten-sixth grade in the Scotch Plains Fanwood Public Schools District 1979-81 and in the Bayonne public school system 197879. The new Franklin chief earned a bachelor's degree in music education from Douglass College and a master's degree in administration from Rutgers University. She also holds a doctorate in educational administration from Rutgers.

Jefferson principal is needed TOE RECORD

Community players

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Dr. Dolan headed Mountainside school m

The Westfield Board of Education has a "Help Wanted" sign in the window — again. Just as it filled one principal position, just as it enters the candidate-gathering stage of the superintendent search, a retooled intermediate school administration has the district casting its nets for a new elementary school principal. Jefferson Elementary School Principal Kelly Kissiah will vacate her position to become Wcstfldd's director of Intermediate School Education — a newly created post which will coordinate education programs between Edison and Roosevelt intermediate schools. Departing Superintendent of Schools Mark Smith told The Record he intends to have a new principal in place before he leaves the district. "I am planning to recommend a new principal, I hope, by the end of June," said Dr. Smith. To achieve that goal, the district will step up the timeline used in the Franklin School principal search, said the superintendent That search — which ended last week — spanned 10 weeks. It also MC88A KlAVffVTHE RECORD produced several candidates who Canter for Hop* Hospice voruntter George K«anm, 79, shows may be considered for Jefferson tht plaque ha received for "Outstanding Volunteer Service to School, said Dr. Smith. An advisory committee com- Hoaplce." posed of three Jefferson School parents, three teachers and Human Resources Director David Tuller met with the superintendent this week to shape the search. Advertisements for the prindpalship ran in the Hew York Times Sunday, the Star-Ledger this week and will continue in the Sunday StarLedger next week, said Dr. Smith.

Memorial parade meeting is Friday The (x>chairman of the Westfield Memorial Day Parade — planned for Monday, May 27 - will hold a planning meeting 8 pjn. Friday at the American Legion Post Any group or individual interested in marching in the parade should write to the at American Legion Post No. 3,1003 North Ave., Westfield, NJ. 07090.

Hospice lauds loyal volunteer worker — George Keenen RECORD CORRESPONDENT

Longtime and former resident of Westfield, George Keenen, was honored recently with the Outstanding Volunteer Service to Hospice Award presented by the Center for Hope Hospice in Linden. Formal congratulations were given by the Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders at a recep-

tion held in his honor recently at the Westwood in Garwood. "I'm not quite as agile as I used to be, but I will do whatever I can, whenever they ask, to the best of my ability," the 79-year-old Mr. Keenan said of his work with the hospice." Mr. Keenen has been a hospice volunteer for more than 10 years and for the last five years has been (Please turn to page A-2)

MARGARET DOLAN

Staff shakeup aims at Edison management ways to deal more effectively with what is a real growing period for THE RECORD middle school children," said Dr. In a move to bolster instructional Smith. "We were concerned about supervision and quell behavioral keeping closer tabs on children's problems at Edison Intermediate behavior and education." Dr. Smith said the gap in standSchool, a new management team will run the southside intermediate ardized test scores between the schools did not have a lot to do school next year. Now, Edison School has two ad- with the new structure. In restructuring the adminisministrators and two guidance counselors. Under a plan proposed tration, the district did a good deal by Superintendent of Schools of staff shuffling: • Jefferson Elementary School Mark Smith and adopted by the school board May 2, the new ad- Principal Kelley Kissiah will asministration will consist of one sume the positions of director of .fciU-time guidance counselor and Intermediate Schools Education three grade level deans. In addi- and Edison sixth-grade dean. Jeftion, a new director of Intermediate ferson School will need a new prinSchools Education will correlate cipal [seerelatedstory]. curriculum between Edison and its • Mr. Hazell will continue as Ednorthside equivalent Roosevelt In- ison principal while serving as assistant chairman of the managetermediate School. (Plcase turn to page A-3) "We are continuing to try to find

SRO crowd hails teacher Tuthill • y LYNNA.FOUY RECORD CORRESPONDENT

A standing-room-only crowd of parents, students and educators honored McKinley School fourthgrade teacher Bette Tuthill at the Board of Education meeting Tuesday night for receiving the Westfield Rotary's Charles Philhower Award The award is given each year to an elementary grade teacher who has taught in Westfield for at least five years and has demonstrated an exceptional teaching ability, great interest in children and a continued pursuit of professional growth. "I'm representing all of the wonderful teachers in Westfield," said Ms. Tuthill, who was nominated for the fourth annual award by nine parents. Upon passage of a resolution in her honor, the long-time teacher spoke of a commitment to seeing

the world through her students' eyes. "I try to make myself feel what the duldren feel," Ms. Tuthill said. In other business, YMCA administrator Lisa Christian, Roosevelt School Principal Ken Shulack and Edison Intermediate School Principal Sam Hazell outlined a grant program which joins the YMCA and the school district's two intermediate schools in a collaborative after-school pilot The program, one of six national pilots across the country, is funded by an Early Adolescence grant of $50,000, which will be doled out over a two-year period. The YMCA-sponsored programs will be run at the Roosevelt School and Edison Intermediate School after classes 3-6 p.m. each school afternoon, and will offer students a wide array of activities, including: homework assistance, athletics, hobby clubs and special trips outside the community.

Preservation panel seeks best restorations The Westfield Historic Preservation Commission is seeking nominations of Westfield buildings and sites of historic or architectural significance that have undergone renovation or restoration deserving recognition. The buildings should retain architectural integrity from the period, or periods of their significance. Nomination categories are: • preservation or restoration project — suitable for a successful rehabilitation/restoration of a building, or group of buildings, for its original use or a museum use; itinning use — suitable for well-

Salute to Mom Readers share why their mom's the greatest See page A-3

reserved commercial, industrial and civic structures (still used for original or similar functions) that have retained their architectural integrity due to continued and sensitive maintenance over the years; • adaptive use — suitable for a successful rehabilitation of a building or group of buildings for a changed use while maintaining the original architectural integrity, • structure/object/site — suitable for the successful preservation of a structure, object or site, such as a bridge, monument, garden, etc. or the successful preservation or excava-

nicipal building. Each nomination should be tion of an archaeological site; • special recognition - suitable for indi- submitted to the WHPC, 425 E. Broad SL, viduals, groups and governmental agencies Westfield, by Friday, May 24. A photograph displaying outstanding leadership which has must be submitted with the application. contributed to, or continued to contribute to, Self-nominations are acceptable. WHPC officers are: Don Leonard, chairthe preservation of historic resources in man and Bonnie Danser, vice chairman. Westfield; • education — suitable for a specific pro- Committee heads are: Procedures Commitgram, educational institution, publisher, tee, Bonnie Danser; Survey and Designation group or individual displaying excellence in Committee, Florence Malcolm and Todd increasing knowledge about historic preser- Evans; Review and Compliance Committee. Don Leonard; and Community Relations, vation and Westfield's historic sites. Nomination forms are available at the mu- Betty list and Bob Vivian.

Still champs WHS tennis team wins UCT crown

Hot stuff Freehold to host annual chili cook-off

See Sports, page A-11

See Weekend Plus

May 9,1906

Two teenagers charged in eight auto burglaries Amoco gas station on South Av' A 13-yearold Westfield boy and enue, accordingtopolice reports. A hit 16-year-old Ptainfield companman, about 30-yeanvold, ap4on were charged with receiving proached a car waiting for service stolen property and eight counts of burglary and theft Friday in con- urday after a verbal argument with and asked how much gas the drivnection with a rash of automobile • customer, according to police re- er wanted, police said. The driver break-ins and stereo thefts. ports. The customer allegedly ar- asked for $10 worth and handed '.The thefts occurred after mid- gued he had been shortchanged by the man her money. She then night Friday, according to police $20, then pushed the owner into a watched the man climb onto a blue reports. wall. The customer fled the store, bicycle and pedal away. The susThe boys allegedly drove into the police said, but was apprehended a pect was last seen headed west • A resident of the 1700 block of parking lot of Westfield High short time later. No charges were Central Avenue reported the theft School 7:45 a m Friday and hit • filed as of press time. of a propane tank Monday from his Marked car. Police said the two backyard Urove off and dumped the car on Burglary • A 13-year-old boy wai charged JTtinity Place before fleeing on foot • Majestic Creations on South •"• Detectives arrested the 13-year- Avenue was reported burglarized Saturday with shoplifting from ,t4d 3:45 p.m. The 16-year-old was Sunday. A rock was thrown Drug Fair. He was turned over to ^arrested 6:45 p.m. through a plate glass window, ac- the custody of his parents. cording to police reports. As of • A resident of the 500 block of press time, it was undetermined if First Street reported the theft of $16,400 in jewelry April 30. The vic••' • Kevin Sacra, 44, of North Eu- anything was stolen. tdid Avenue was charged with sim• A resident of the 100 block of tim was in the process of moving fie assault Saturday for allegedly Cacciola Place reported a burglary from the 400 block of Lenox Av.jMthing a police sergeant who re-Friday. According to police reports, enue to his current address and , ^ponded to several 8 U hangup the victim said his residence was hired a moving company to trans.calls. Mr. Sacco was intoxicated, ac- entered and the cord to a refrigera- port furniture, according to polios«ording to police reports, and in- tor was cut There were no signs of reports. The victim said the movers also took a bag filled with the (Jvolved in a verbal fight with an- forced entry. jewelry and the bag has vanished, , other party at his residence. Mr. according to police reports. Thefl ,' 9&cco was issued a summons and • A bicycle-riding con man• A resident of the 1000 block of 'released. ' " • The owner of the Music Staff made off with $10 Sunday after Irving Avenue reported a bicycle l 0n Elmer Street was assaulted Sat- posing as an attendant at thestolen from a garage Friday.

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OF CBAHWOOD

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Hospice lauds George Keenan from 1952 until February, when he (Continued from page A-l) 4he editor of the Hope Hospice moved with his wife, Lucille, to journal, "The Flame." Scotch Plains. He was an active ' "We have established this an- volunteer in various segments of nual award as a way to offer an community life, founding a concert ^additional thank you to our volun- series for Youth and Family Counteers," said Pete Shields, executive seling Services and holding board director of the Center. The Center seats and directorships at local ''for Hope Hospice, through its churches and hospitals. main office in Linden as well as "I believe volunteering is an esits satellite facilities in Elizabeth sential role of any person who has land Scotch Plains, provides care the time and is capable," said Mr. to the terminally ill, those having a i life expectancy of six months or Keenen. "We have to help people, .less. Staffed largely by volunteers, using the talents God gave us. I -the center nils the need for care feel great about hospice. I And it /that is typically not provided by extremely satisfying. There are hospitals where the focus is on lessons to be learned from people who are dying." •healing and curing. Mr. Keenen is the father of six ,'' "The contribution from volunteers is worth a lot of money to daughters and two sons and has 10 " said Mr. Shields. "Volunteers grandchildren. f os, of hours of ^contribute thousands EXPERIENCE service. If we hadtopay for it, we ^couldn't afford to provide this 'touch-needed care to the terminally ill." "It's hard to single out one volunteer," said Diane Coloncy, vol'unteer coordinator at the center. '"We have about 250 volunteers who have all made wonderful contributions. But George has been PWWE cusses Ovith us for a long time and has NIDfftTIM '•done a lot for our patients." "I know I can't do justice in deNEW PROGRAM STARTS MAY 20. scribing the kind of person George OPEN HOUSE ^ Keenen is," said Mr. Shields. "But Monday May 13ft.20from4to7 PM 1 will say he is a very caring perThunday May 16 from2to4 PM ^json, very dedicated to the hospice Saturday May I I from 1to4 PM niovement, as shown by his conNICOLE'S YOGA CENTER 'linuing work for and interest in (908) 7t» MM 'the terminally ill." 94 NORTH AVE CABWOOD »•* Mr. Keenen lived in Westfield

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May 9,1996

Tax deduction hearings draw leaders' comment the bad guys by raising property taws to make up for a shortfall in state aid." Sen. Leonard T. Connors Jr. backed the plan. I The Senate State Government Committee met in "TWs legislation offers real relief against spiraling f Union County May 1 to hear Senate President Donald taxes," he said. "Were taking up the charge to help • DiFrancesoo'a proposal to restore the property tax de- residents who've invested a long time in their property." tteeisplan• ductwn on state income tax. Hie Sen. Joseph Bubba, co-sponsor of the bill, also exT tun** to vote on the proposal today. : Concerned taxpayers and public officials filled the pressed approval ; Scotch Plains Municipal Courtroom, as Mr. Di- "Ihis is the first real step the Legislature has taken ; francesco described the need for S-l — the legisla- to restore a tax cut that benefits all property owners in our state," he said. i Jion to restore the property tax deduction. 5 * "In traveling around the state, I have had an op- While S-l is said to be designed to benefit all New 1 portunity to speak with homeowners from areas as Jerseyans, said its backers, it is perhaps most attrac; diverse as Alpine and Cap* May," said Mr. Di-tive to senior citizens, who must pay rising property i ftancesno. "Hiey all send the same message: reinstate taxes an fixed incomes. : ing the property tax deduction is a priority for the "There is great consternation among the senior population in New Jersey because they just can't keep ; people of New Jersey." ; ... The Senate president illustrated his point with a up economically,'' said Robert E. lira, chairman of • large stack of petitions, postcards and letters written the Property Tax Committee of the American Association of Retired Persons. • by local constituents in favor of S-l. "Property tax is the single most burdensome tax for • "The reality is that it is expensive to own a home in I New Jersey and property taxes are a significant part retired persons. They have begun to cut back on food and medicine. This bill would aUow seniors the ! of that expense," said Senator DiFTancesco. chance tostabilize the outward flow of their moneys." The proposed legislation would allow taxpayers to ; pp g Renters d t u p tto $10000 id R t e Mr. Lira went ontosuggest S-l be passed exclu• deduct $10,000 iin ty tyttaxes paid. be allowed deduct 18 8 percent of f rent as a lively for seniors if it proved too costly to implement |{ would ld b l l dto to d ! proxy for property taxes paid. A similar program was for everyone. in 1985 under Gov. Thomas Keen, but it was This would keep the cost of the program down '•^repealed in 1990 as part of Gov. Am Fkxio's $2.8 while covering a great number of people who need help right now," he said billion tax increase. The S-l bill was generally well received by mem- Other supporters of the bill included Scotch Plains Mayor Alan Augustine and council members Joan bers of the Senate committee. Westfield Mayor Garland "Bud" Boothe expressed Papen, William McClintock and Irene Schmidt Although the bill was not opposed by any speaker, support of the proposed legislation. "I am mayor of a community that is generally de- reservations were presented. Of primary concern was as 'affluent,1 " said Mr. Boothe, "This state- the effect the lowered tax would have on municipal is badly flawed — while there are many affluent aid from the state. Sen. Byron M. Baer brought this issue to the comin town, almost 20 percent of my constitutre over 65 and many of them and others are mittee's attention several times throughout the meetj but affluent They ate living in houses they ing. "I am concerned that this particular measure will ; yean ago, and now seek only to live comfortreduce revenue for aid," said Mr. Baer. "We must be ' in retirement" mayor also expressed reservations about frank about this fact" Mr. DiFrancesco acknowledged these concerns, but , I do not want S-l to make the state gov- said, T h e removal of this deduction was a mistake. I look like a hero with the deduction," said have been working since 1092 to correct i t You might Boothe, "And then we at the local level become say it is a pet peeve of mine."

fly fW$ theGreatest

I-ftECXMID CORRESPONDENT

From the response we received to our "My Mom's the Greate&t" contest, it is dear there are an awful lot of wonderful moms in our coverage area. The response was so overwhelming, in fact, that we decided to award three prizes in random drawings. The first prize award of a dinner for 4 at Medieval Times Dinner Theater in Lyndhurst went to Mohini Shah, 12, of MartinsviUe. The two second-prize win-

ners who will each receive a $25 certificate for flowem for Mom from Angelone's Florists in Raritan are Mary Hart of Cranford and Nina Khachiyan of High',J land Park. ,• On this page are the local entries in the contest. All entries reproduced are printed as written. No effort ' was made to correct misspelled words or grammar. ''

I'd like to start out and tell why That's how I feel about her... hard to keep the house clean. Shja my Mom is the Greatest If anyone Dont know how I could manage works very hard to give my sister needs anything she will offer it to To live life without her, and me the same amount of food. them if she could. She is always Yes, as far as Moms go, She is also a very caring person. If their to offer her support. She Mine's "The Greatest", it's true! you don't know something or are babysat three toddlers at one time Dont you think that your Mom is having trouble with something, til they were in school so her chil- "The Greatest Mom", too? she will help you. If you're having MARY HART trouble she would help you too. dren can keep jobs and make a Cranford When it is bedtime my mom albetter life for their families and themselves. She had five children ways tucks me in under the covSince I am only 2 years old I ers. My mom is very lvoable. She of her own and always walked us to school and was home for us af- have asked my Daddy to help me loves us alot If you don't underterwards. My Mom was the one to write this letter telling you whystand something, just ask rny drive or pick me up from ice skat- my mommy is the greatest You mom. She spends alot of money so ing every Friday night She was see for the last eight months or so I can have the things that I like. the one to make the traditional my mommy has been very busy, (She doesn't let me have everybreakfast for my brother* and she is getting ready to give birth to thing I want) She also spends their friends before the football my new brother or sister. She has some time going to my soccer and been getting me prepared for the games thru High School My mom is the greatest because new baby by teaching me to share baseball games. She is always she's the one who cooks all the with others and to help her around there for us. If you knew her, yo\i holiday dinners so everyone can the house. I love spending time would like her. She could be your be together and never complains with my mommy, she takes me friend. She always remembers to about doing it. She deserves to be shopping (Tnt learning at a young say please, thank you and you're waited on instead of always wait- age), I go to Gymboroe and gym- welcome. My mom's the greatest ing on others. Too many people nastics too! My mommy always because she's a very hard-working and family take her for granted does things I want to do and that's person and lvoes us. and she deserves a break. She will why Fm glad I have this chance to GARYIIERZBERG never complain about cooking or tell her why she means to much to Age 8, Scotch Plains babysitting because she loves the me. It's not that we are always • • • family and likes to see everyone going fun places and seeing new My mom is Ruth Fry of South happy. She's the best Mom anyone things, or Just sitting playing with Plainfleld She is the mother of 1, could ask for and I'm happy she's my toys, I enjoy these things so mine. I love her very much and much because I do them with the grandmother of 11 and grea£hope she knows i t That's why my person that means the most to me grandmother of 1. She has beejn ... my Mommy! She always has a married to my father for 51 years. Mom is the Greatest Over the years she has been >a great big hug for me and makes MICHELE EVANS Age M, Kerulworth me all bette when I scrape my constant source of strength for my • • • knee*. Even when I do something family. We've gone through a lot naughty she has patience with me over the years and she's always My Mom is "The Greatest," and teaches me why I shouldn't do been there to give support in the My Mom's "Number one," certain things. What's even more difficult times. She was there to There's no way I could thank her amazing is that for the last few help my dad get through surgery For all that she's done, months my mommy has been very and treatment for cancer, heart atlike rocking me gently busy with her work. She is a CPA, tacks and quintuple bypass surSo late in the night, Westfielders want in the next schools chief in special For singing me lullabies, she gets to work on these neat ma- gery. She was always at his side. By KEVMOOUMAN expertise and administrative style. chines they call computers. I just she showed what love is all about Holding me tight. THE RECORD "All respondents expressed pride in the strong com- And caring for me through the like typing on the keyboard, it's For me, she was there when I had of parents and community to maintaining fun! Even thogh she was so busy to have 4 major surgeries in '5 ;; He is open-minded, powerful and "strict but cool." mitment academic excellence in spite of fiscal restraints," said measles and mumps, she always found the time to play years with the most recent one And mending the scrapes and ;,'And he is quite possibly a she. the report "The two most frequently articulated with me and take me places. being this past March. My mom Those were some of the attributes contained in the educational concerns focused on the \TOefuT inad- bruises and bumps, I want my mommytoknow that can always be counted on for supleadership profile for Westfiekfs next superintendent equacy of the technology program ... throughout the For making me wear those mittens when I grow up I want to be just port and love. > Jof schools created by search consultant Hazard, district and the need to improve academic standards, and sweater, ; Young & Associates, Ltd. The profile is a digest of extracurricular programs and student behavior at the For drying my tears and "making like her because she is beautiful, My mother is a definate exsmart, fun and most of all the ample of a Godly woman, wife and it better", p; input the consultants culled from meetings with intermediate schools." 1; about 200 Westflekters and 327 responses to a quesResidents, not surprisingly, want the next superin- For kissing it when I stubbed my greatest mommy in the whole mother. She is an example I want world!!! tendent to "possess excellent interpersonal skills, toe, I • tionnairet mailedtoevery home in town. ASHLEY KATTAK to follow in my own marriage. I'm proud to call her my mom. > ;• The report covers everything from the district's highly effective communication and consensus build- For listening to my tales of woe, Age z, Westfield For loving me, no matter what I JANICE KRUG t- strengths to storm clouds on the horizon to what ing skills." • • • did, Age 36, Westfield My mom's the greatest mom beOh — the trouble I caused when I • • • cause she gives me food. When I was a kid, And today, even though we aream having trouble with my home- My Mom's the greatest because work or something, she helps me. she saved me from the monster diate schools. Mr. Hazell, who de- rate of pay. Dr. Smith said. miles apart, (Continued from page A-l) ' The internal administration of My Mom's always close to me,Even when I don't want help she under my bed. ment team and seventh-grade veloped the grade level managehelps me, She is very, very nice. JOEYBLEVB ment team concept several years Roosevelt School will continue un- right here, in my heart dean. She never interrupts. She tries so Age 7, Roselle Pant She's the best that there is, e Edison Assistant Principal Ri- ago, will be the team's assistant changed in 1998-1907. chard Konet will head to Westfield chairman. Since one guidance counselor High School (WHS), while WHS Administrative Intern Stewart retired and another guidance posiCarey will become Edison as- tion was eliminated, there is no sistant principal and eighth-grade net increase in staff. Nor is there dean. Mr. Carey will continue as an immediate increase in salary all staff members will continue in the WHS basketball coach. • Intermediate school Student their new positions at the same Assistance Counselor Carol Gerson will become the management team's guidance counselor. Our coNeaes am mHas away;but mfm at UCC The three grade level deans and earning summer ueills—ciwJtla that are guidance counselor will meet regularly and make joint management decisions. Mrs. Klssiah will head the management team and have final authority over both interne-

jNext superintendent to be 9 'strict but cool, pool says

Staff shakeup aims at Edison management

UCC Summer Credits Go A LongWay

RETRACTABLE AWNINGS

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STheWslfeld Record

Whatever your plans are next fiat, spend your summer at Union County College.

Forbes Newspapers, A Division of Forbes Inc. ©Forbes Inc. 1996 The Westfield Recofd IUSPS 006049) is published on Thursdays by Forbes Newspapers, adivisior* of Forbes Inc., 102 Walnut Ave., Cranford. NJ 07016 (908) 276-6000. Second class postage paid at Crantord, NJ 07016.POSTMASTER: please send changes to Forbes Newspapers, Fulfillment Office, F*O Box 699, Somervilte. NJ 08876, Subscription rates by mail, one year within Union County S10, out of county $20, out of siate S20. To subscribe call: 1-800-300-9321

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Commentary Tax break or mirage Who actually wins if legislature reinstates property tax deduction on N J . income tax? ; D i e welts from filing state income tax forms had barely healed when the Republican leadership in the state Senate hatched a bill that would reinstate local property taxes as a deduction from gross income. i Sounds great The property tax deduction was eliminated during a Florio administration taxation imposition and has yet to return. • At a hearing on the bill (S-l) in Scotch Plains i W n s h i p Hall May 1, Senate President Donald DiFrancesco heard some practical, hard-earned advice from Westfleld Mayor Garland "Bud" Soothe. The mayor, a lame duck who has served flj pair of two-year terms in the town, spoke volumes of truth, whether Mr. DiFrancesco liked i^ or not ; Bottom line? Mr. Boothe told fellow Republican Mr. DiFrancesco that he favors the Senator's proposal — of course. But there was a significant "but" "Bluntly, I do not want S-l to make the state government look like a hero with the property tax deduction, and then we at the local level become the bad guys by raising property taxes to make up for a shortfall in state aid (to towns and schools)," the mayor told the senator. In other words, the mayor was asking the senator who wins anything if the state simply

puts cash in income taxpayers' hands with the revived property tax deduction, then takes it back from the same citizens by having to cut aid to towns and schools and thereby forcing higher local property taxes? This is withering wisdom. Taxpayers can only cross their thinning fingers and hope that the mayor's message sinks into legislators' busy minds. But even more intriguing than the mayor's directness on the charade of a Peter-and-Paul "tax break" was his closing allusion. The property tax deduction, he said, "will be a milestone in the road toward developing and implementing a fairer, more rational way of funding — other than through local property taxes — local government services, and particularly funding of education in this state." Touche, again. Maybe Mr. DiFrancesco will see the light in Mr. Boothe's perceptive, studied presentation and get us on the road to serious local government structural and tax reform. Who wouldn't give up a year or two of local property tax deductions from Btate income tax to live under a rational, economical, lair New Jersey tax system?

Letters to the editor

Whatever our waking wish Aid shifts threaten us weather's whims will win Remember when the weather report, for lade of sophisticated measurement devices, was based on the assumption that if it was rainIng in Philadelphia it would rain in New Jersey, arid if it was raining in New Jersey it would rain in New York? Forecasting was probably no more or less accurate than when radar became the thing to use, and eertainly more than now, when satellites and balloons help show weather patterns. It would seem no one has really learned how to interpret those patterns. Today we are hard pressed to decide if we should make or break dates and plans because of weather predictions. A picnic in the rain is not desirable, however, a preplanned outdoor party might well go on under cloudy skies — so long as they don't open up into a downpour. How does one decide? I've just come away from a three-day golf weekend that almost didn't happen. Monday, someone from the resort located about 20 miles past Harrisburg and 20 miles north of the Delaware border, called and said the weather in that part of the country had been very rainy and more rain was predicted for the weekend. They were offering to hold our deposit for another weekend that would be more compatible weather-wise. Eight ladies were going on this trip. It would be nearly impossible to find another weekend in the near future that would be open to all eight people. We decided to take our chances. Before departure Friday morning I watched the Weather Channel, something I rarely do. A green glob indicating rain was above the Ohio Valley, Pennsylvania and most of

PhutosoDhles

New Jersey. The sickening wave of radar showed the green glob staying in the area for the next three days. Things did not look good for a golfing weekend. However, an hour later we packed the car, including a few games that a group might play if stuck in a hotel during a very rainy day. The clouds did not give way during our three-hour trip except for about two minutes when our excitement at seeing a patch of blue sky gave way to more pessimism when the patch was soon covered with gray. By the time we put our suitcases into our rooms, had lunch, and pulled our golf carts into line, the sun was shining through patchy clouds which, for the most part and for the rest of the day, were more blue than gray. We had a lovely day of golf. That night, thunderstorms and rain and an awful day were predicted for Saturday. Sure enough, the sky was not pretty the next morning and a few sprinkles hit us as we went to breakfast But once again, as golf carts pulled into line, the sun came out and we had a second lovely day. And once again, the weather prediction that night for the next day was not pretty, but once again, we

Theftfestfield Record Forbes Newspapers, A Division of Forbes Inc. © Forbes inc. 1996 Malcolm S. Forbes Jr. Editor-in-Chief Lou Barsony Publisher Edward F. Carroll Editor

Jams* fteiily Sports Editor

Cheryl Fenske

drove those golf oarte into th» morning tun, and by the time the round was over, all of us had pink noses and rosy arms, the result of a glorious sunny day. Obviously, our weekend was a great success because of the wonderful weather. Each day, we marveled at how we might have optioned to postpone the trip because of weather predictions. It made each beautiful day even more to. We were t o glad to be where we were, and so glad we had not considered changing plans because of dire weather predictions. I can remember other times in the last several years when weekends were postponed because of awful predictions that did not come true, and other weekends made less pleasant because weather did not live up to the predictions. When you think of the gazillion millions of dollars invested in satellites and weather stations, you wonder what's going on. Certainly, we are happy to have them tracking major storms and hurricanes and tornadoes, and the like. But even so, how many people have been evacuated from low-lying shore areas because of an expected hurricane only to find, when they returned home, they didn't even have rain. I know, better safe than sorry — but, gee, couldn't predictions be a bit more reliable. It seems weather folk understand the readings well enough — it's just their interpretations that need improving. In the meantime, we still have those hard decisions. Here's hoping all your decisions are the right ones this summer as you plan those barbecues and railing trips.

My view/

To The Recent: The Board of Education election always presents an excellent opportunity for community-wide discussion about educational issues affecting our schools. This year was no exception. One area that received significant attention was Commissioner of Education Klagholtz'a Comprehensive Plan for Educational Improvement and Financing and its impact on Westfield. The plan defines strict limits of "allowable" expenditures and would result in deep cuts in educational spending in Westfleld and most districts across the state. There was a unanimous feeling of concern about the consequences of the plan for Westfield on the part of all five board candidates. Assemblyman Richard Bagger has been outspoken about the plan's detrimental affect on educational excellence. At co-chairmen of Westfield's Parent-Teacher Council's Legislation Committee, we urge parents and citizens alike to pay close attention to the school funding issue as it makes its way through the Legislature. By court mandate, a new funding formula must be in place by September 1996. In the Assembly, task forces are studying both funding and curriculum standards. The Education Committees of both houses are holding hearings. The Comprehensive Plan, however, is the only proposal currently on the table. Regardless of positions on the plan, the Legislature has given itself little time to deal with such an important issue. Since December, the Department of Edu-

cation has been promising to update the figures originally presented in the plan's models. They now have committed themselves to release them in May. Currently our legislators are focusing on the state budget, and other issues yet to be resolved from the last session. The Assembly task forces are not scheduled to report until the end of July. And, everyone know* nothing is accomplished in Trenton during the month of August If legislation is not even introduced until the 11th hour, will the public be denied any opportunity to consider its ramifications and provide meaningful input? We urge all interested citizens to advise our legislators of their concerns regarding school funding. The state's responsibility to create the necessary funding plan to provide for • thorough and efficient education for all of our children should not be left to the last minute. Our committee is planning a town-wide forum on school funding during the month of May. Details on time and place will be forthcoming. We believe that information about this critical issue will be of significant importance to all Westflelden. We urge you to continue to follow the progress of school funding as it. proceeds through the Legislature. , Westfleld Parent-Teacher Council Legislation Committee

Why do sensational, divisive story? To The Record: A slow news week? Hey, let's liven things up with a little community divisiveness! Was a school board candidate targeted by a rabbi? Are the Jews really out to get the rest of us? Well, you sure got a rise out of me! I have enjoyed your paper since it began but I think you made a big mistake here. What business is it of anyone's what was written in a personal letter (the last time I checked snail mail was personal) sent by a clergyman to his congregation? If Ms. Masterson (or anyone else) felt offended by what was written, politics is certainly not the line of work for them. Not only was the letter none of Ms. Masterson's business but no names were mentioned. Rabbi KrolofT was merely trying to raise some con-

sciousness among his congregants. Ms. Masterson agreed that the letter did not change the course of the election/This is not front page news. I think you owe our community, especially the Jewish community, an apology for such a cheap, sensational headline. I would say the article smacks of anti-Semitism, but perhaps that if going a bit too far. I like to believe that you were trying to drum up some excitement There is nothing wrong with differences of opinion and our Bill of Rights still guarantees us freedom of speech. Let's show some respect and consideration for all members of our community. Save the banner headlines for real news. Don't print stupid and groundless accusations just to sell papers. Put this sort of article where it belongs, on the editorial page or else on the cutting room floor. M M M I U ALEXANDER SH0MHQ Westfield

Finish this sentence: Dear Mom,... (A pre-Mothers Day poll of area residents by Ellen Cahill)

Brian GNroy, Scotch Plains Thanks tor always being a parent first and a friend second. Thanks tor supporting me but also letting me face the consequences of my actions. And thank you for being a model of strength and courage for us.

Irma Con, Westfield Thank you for the gift of Ite^Thank you tor your love.

Executive Editor

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The Westfield Record (USPS 006-049) is published on Thursdays by Forbes Newspapers, aeHvision of Forties Inc.. 102 Walnut Ajie., Cranford, NJ 07016 (906) 276-6CO0 Second class postage paid al Cranford, NJ 07016 POSTMASTER: please send changes to Forties Newspapers, Fulfillment Office, PO Box 699, Somervjlle, NJ 08876, Subscription rates by mail, one year wthin Union County $10, out of county $20, out of state $20. To subscribe call: 1-800-300-9321

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Elizabeth Didonato, Westfield ! wish you all the happiness in the world. Thank you for always being there. As I get older, I realize how much you really mean to me and yoi/ll always hold a special place in my heart

Kattiy Leonard, Garwood My mom passed away eight years ago, but I would've told her that I always appreciated the wonderful relationship we had, and that I would've done anything for her. She always went that extra mile to keep our family together. To my mother-in-law, I want to say I admire, tove you a great deal and consider myself lucky to have you. Happy Mother's Day and many more.

May 9,1996

A-5

| Milestones

Haefelis mark 50th anniversary

MR. and MRS. GERARD HAEFEU

Mr. and Mrs. Gerard A. Haefeli of Roger Avenue, Westfield, celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary Saturday. The Haefelis have been living in Westfield since 1961. They were married in 1946 at St. Bernard's Roman Catholic church in Easton, PA. The couple have six children and 10 grandchildren. The coupole received a note from President Bill Clinton congratulating them on the occasion of their anniversary.

Children's charity A three-month service project resulted in the youth group of St. Helen's church donating more than $900 worth of arts, crafts and toys to the pediatric unit of Newark Beth Israel Hospital last month.

Zachary Cuca earns Eagle Scout rank Zachary C. Cuca, the aon of Gre- ily moved to Westfield. Mayor Garland "Bud" Boothe ment chairman of Troop 273, read gory and Claudia Cuca of WestThe ceremony was led by Scout- congratulated Zack on his aca number of letters from invited, field, received the Eagle rank of master Greg Boudreau, assisted by complishment, and thanked him guests who were unable to attend. the Boy Scouts of America at anDr. Eric Deutchman and Paul on behalf of the residents of WestZack was elected to the Order of investiture ceremony April 28 inWiehl. The "Eagle Trail" was the field for the successful completion the Arrow in 1903 and became a the Westfield Community Room. theme of the ceremony during of his service project. Assembly- Brotherhood member in 1994. AlZack began his scouting career which Zack recounted the ad-man Richard Bagger presented a though 21 merit badges are reas a Cub Scout in Pack 276 in St.vancement through theranksofjoint resolution of congratulations quired to be earned and learned Louis, Mo., and then joined Troop scouting as he gained the skills, from the New Jersey House and across a broad field of topics, Zack,' 273 sponsored by the Jefferson knowledge and leadership qualities Senate, sponsored by himself. As- earned 31 badges. He also earned School PTA in 1989 when his fam- that brought him to the Eagle semblyman Alan Augustine and the Alpha-Omega religious award award. Sen. Donald DeFrancesco. and completed BSA junior lenderZack's parents had the privilege Among those in attendance were ship training in 1992. He earned of pinning on the Eagle medal; the his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs.the BSA mile swim patch and is a. * pastor of his parish, Rev. Paul Harry Cuca of Berkeley, IB., and Red Cross certified lifeguard. Kucynda, also an Eagle Scout, had his godmother and uncle, Mr. and the honor of presenting the Eagle Mrs. Christopher Brooks of Charge and the Eagle Scout Prom- Wheaton, 111. Dr. Deutchman, asise. sistant scoutmaster and advanceThe Westfield Area Chapter The Overlook Hospital Auxilliary of the AARP is planning a will sponsor a free forum on two trip to the Festival of Lights forms of cancer 9:15 a.m. Monday in Wheeling, W.Va., Nov. 5-7. Rev. David F. Harwood, senior include in-depth Bible study, in Wallace Auditorium. Two Oven The cost of the complete minister of First United Methodist Faithlink: A Look at Contempo- look staff physicians will provide a package ii $265 for double Church, Westfield, Sunday will rary Issues and "Top Ten Dos and full update on breast and prostate end MARK MOSKOWITZ occupancy or $320 for a sinpreach on "Never Far From Each Don'ta for Raising Healthy Chil- cancer and address many common of Us." dren." Morning worship is 11 a.m. gle occupancy room. The price also include* bus fare, Sunday begins with the Seekers' Baptisms will take place during the fears and misconceptions about thq two nights accommodations, worship service 9 a.m. Church 11 a.m. service. Child care is avail- diseases. Light refreshments wil} two breakfasts, two dinners, school is 9:45 a.m. for all children able during both worship services. be served 9 a.m. and parking is and youth. Continuing education Lunch will follow at noon in the free in the lot across the street the Ogleby Park Festival of versity and her master's degree in from the hospital main entrance. , classes are 9:45 a.m. for adults and social hall, Lights tour and a performteaching from Fairleigh Dickinson ance at "Jamboree USA." University. She is a teacher in the Any member of the WestRailway public school system. I Your Home Care field chapter is asked to stop Mr. Moskowitz attended Northeastern University and is an in- by the "Trips and Tours" rHeadciuarters table to sign up with Marie vestment executive with Paine 1 • Vacuums Stauder. Webber, Westfield. • Central Vacuum Systems A July wedding is planned.

AARP group to visit festival in W. Virginia

Forum on cancers set for Monday

Rev. Harwood picks sermon

LARA BETH SELESNER

Lara Selesner, Mark Moskowitz plan to be married in July nuptial ritual Rita and Leonard Selesner of Scotch Plains have announced the engagement of their daughter, Lara Beth, to Mark Jay Moskowitz, son of Gayle and Joel Moskowitz, also of Scotch Plains. Miss Selesner received her bachelor's degree from Syracuse Uni-

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Gubernat private collection show to open Private collection* by artist Frank J. Guber- style. He paints rocks because of their fascinat- centive to create. I try to synthesize what I see nat will be on display at the Westfield Art Gal- ing and endless possibilities in composition, he into new forms, directions and arrangements. Painting is depth, movement and very often lery beginning Sunday, and ending Saturday, said. June 8. There will be an opening reception 1-4 Over the years, he has worked with petro- thoughtful emotion." In May, Mr. Gubernat's artistic talent will also p.m. Sunday at the Gallery. graphs and is inspired by their symbols of com"We are very pleased to have such a dis- munication. Mr. Gubernat has taken the chal- be shown in the AENJ A/T Network Group tinguished artist exhibit at the Westfield Art lenge of painting water to show the beauty and Show at the Louis Bay 2nd Library in HawGallery," said Kitty Schlosberg, curator of the visual capture of it's movement thorne. gallery. "Mr. Gubernat's unique style and creAlso this year, he exhibited at the Louis Bay He has created works with trees and flowers, ativity portrayed in his works is truly impres- portraying their color and symmetry from his 2nd Library Open Juried Exhibition and the sive." studies. AENJ A/T Network Group Shows at the MonMr. Gubernat developed a passion Tor nature When asked what inspires his work, Mr. Gu- mouth Museum and the Nabisco Brands Galwhich is uniquely recognized in his artistic bernat commented, "Everything I see is an in- lery.

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ty bundles Westfield Junior Girl Scout Troop 430, Tamaques School, presents Lillian Corsl of the Department of Human Services with 30 "Be Your Best Baby Bundles" filled with items for baby's first two years. Another 22 baby bundles were distributed to Raphael's Life House in Elizabeth. Scouts include Kasey Cass, Jill Woodbury, Bethany Carr and Cris Velazco.

Master Gardeners plan yearly fair, garden sale The Master Gardeners of Union side auditorium. County, a program of Rutgers Co- Admission to the fair is free and operative Extension, will hold its o p e n to the public. seventh annual Spring Garden Fair and plant sale noon-5 p.m. Sunday, May 19 at Trailside Nature and Science Center, Coles Avenue and New Providence Road, Mountainside. The fair features gardening lectures, displays and demonstrations. Children's activities, such as making bird feeders, are also offered at the Spring Garden Fair. Master Gardeners will be available to answer gardening questions. The lecture schedule begins 12:30 p.m. with a lecture on "Lawn Care" by Master Gardener Lewis Seagull. "Gardening Made Easier" is Master Gardener Len Storch's lecture at 1:30 p.m. Master Gardener Ed Petz will speak on "Ticks and Lyme Disease" at 2:30 p.m. Sara Strohecker, a recent graduate of the Master Gardener program, will speak on "The Master Gardener Program" at 3:30 p.m. The lectures are held in the Trail-

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Westfleld Record

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When it comes to customer service, they all have the spirit ofexcellence. V l / \ / HA RX A HAS SAII 11S I III RIC IPIIXTS iHI: SPIRIT OI i:\( 1111 x< i AWARDS. I N o other health care system in the state ot New Jersey has made a longer standing commitment to excellence—especially when it comes to customer service and patient satisfaction—than the Saint Marnabas Health Care System. The 1996 Spirit of Excellence Awards allow vis to recognize individuals in the community who adhere to the same high standards as our healthcare professionals.

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The Saint Barnabas Health Care System would like to commend our 23 winners, as well as all the individuals who were nominated by our 7,000 trustees, physicians, employees and volunteers, tor caring about people just as much as we do.

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MEL LASCOIA WALTER LEVY REVEREND ANTHONY R. LIPARI. si JOHN'S I W tmtuM

NIRANJANA N PATEL, RANI OF NEW 10RK

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GOVERNOR THOMAS H. MEAN, DREW

CARLOS GASPARD, mm STSCD fOOD SERVICE KELLY GATEL1, I I K D I K * « I E U N I N G mm

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HERBERT GOTTLIEB, SUPER i»»fR LIQUOR LOCUR

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GUIDA MECCA, MUST UNION

JEFF RUDY, UNITED son COFIPANT

REGINA COYLE. MGM MICHAEL CRAHER. RiNiuii's acwE* SHOP OFFICER JEFFREY CUSHMAN. LWIKGITO* POLICE DEPARTMENT

EllEEN HART, U F F E I R ' S H»I« M D SKIN U I E

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AILEEN SAFFORD. NORTH BOULEMRO ELEMNURY SCHOOL

ODETH WELLINGTON, si « m a « n NURSNG HONE

DAVE MILLER, A) PERR! m»r»
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OFFICER DAVE MINTO, LIVINGSTON POUCI DEPARTMENT

BRUCE MITCHELL

KAREN SCHAFFER, ncsc UIUNDHY JENNIE SCHEIRER, Off. VILLAGE CLEANflS

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Old Short Hills Road

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Affiliates oTtbe Saint Barnabas Health Carv System whichparticipated in the 1996 Spirit of'excellent:* Campaign included Sa.nl aamahus Medical a-»h-r. I ta Hospital. Saint Barnabas Outpat»ttl Famltylleahp Center in Elizabeth and Jour nuning bomei'—AtbbroakiJn Scotch Plains. Uanfair Huuse in VCaym: Grembrook Manor in Gruen liruok ami Cornell Hall In Vnion. ^ ^ ^

11 '

Community life

MJ6UST0 F. MCMEZES/ FOABES NEWSPAPERS

Audrey V. Mullinnlx sits at the piano in her Cmnford home last week. A kidney transplant a ysar ago ended years of tedious treatments, diets and anxiety. In B#th Qrarwy'a "Wtsh*n Chemistry" d a i s In th« W««HI«M Hands on Science program at RooaweK Intsrmediate School, Kevin Pyo ane)K>Tae Um measure the fat content of dlfferatit hinds of milk.

Hands-on science program attracts more thai!250 Hands on Science, Wcrtfield'a popular afterBchool enrichment program for children in kindergarten-fifth grade, recently completed its flfth successful year. Mars then 2SQ children from Westneld school* tot* p u t in the eightweek series of courses covering topics from the fields of chemistry, physics, math, electricity, computers and biology. This year, in a new development of the program, H.O.S. teacher and advisory board member MaryJo Juelis, in addition to teaching her usual "Count on a Story in Math and Science," "Critter Club" and "Easy Logo" classes at Jefferson School, also pretexted a class at Westfield's Neighborhood Council. Working in cooperation with the Neighborhood Council stair, Ms. Juelis conducted a fsnaral biology class for a group of 12-15 children from kindergartenflflh grade. Her class introduced the children to the study or invertebrates, mollusks and isopods as well as metamorphoses- in frogs, butterflies and meal worms. Mervyn Turner, who coordinates the program, jointly sponsored by the Optimists Club of Westfleld and the Westfield Parent Teacher Organization, said, "Once again, most of our courses were very quickly filled and the response from parents and children has been very positive" He quoted from the evaluation forms distributed at the end of the program. "Awesome! I learned a lot and it was fun," said Christina McCabe, who participated in Tom Reynolds's "F-Zero Rocket Car Club" for fifth-graders. The mother of Patrick Hughes, a first-grader who participated in Amy Bartley's "Our Amazing Body Machines," said, "My child's enthusiasm before and after each class says it all!" "We are very fortunate in Westneld to be able to find a dedicated cadre of teachers prepared to take on this demanding extracurricular program," Mr. Turner sakL "Hands on Science makes a real difference in preparing inquiring minds for the exciting world of science and engineering, which is a part of our everyday world, and crucial to our future."

Westfield High hosts 11th fine arts exhibit The 11th annual kindergarten-12th grade fine arts exhibit by students in the town's nine schools will be held at the Westfield High School gymnasium 9 a.m.-4 p.m. and 7:30-9 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday, and 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Thursday, May 16. Wednesday evening, visitors will be treated to live music and a reception. Two-dimensional works, ceramics, crafts and other artwork will be exhibited. The schools' fine arts calendar for May and June includes the following events: May 9 - Westfield High School orchestra, chorale and madrigals, 8 p.m. 14 — Wilson spring concert, 7:30. 15 — Franklin spring concert, 7:30. 16 — McKinley spring concert, 7.30. Edison musical, 8. 17 — Edison musical, 8. 20 — Washington spring concert, 7:30. 21 — Westfield High School choral concert, 8. 22 — Edison Broadway Singers concert, 7:30. 29 — Roosevelt Sharps and Flats concert, 8. Jefferson spring concert, 7:30. 30 — Tamaques spring concert, 7:30. June 3 — Roosevelt spring concert, 8 (sixth grade). 4 — Roosevelt spring concert, 8 (seventh grade). 5 — Roosevelt spring concert, 8 (eighth grade). 6 — All-City music festival concert, Roosevelt, 7:30. 10 — Edison spring concert, 7:30. 11 — Edison spring concert, 7:30. 12 — Westfield High School voice recital, 8.

Patience, transplant pay off Year after kidney transplant, mother finds renewed energy • y EUCN M. FEUCCTTA FOHBBS NEWSPAPERS

Never losing hope, Audrey resumed her life on dialysis and her name was placed on the CADAVER LIST for a nonrclated donor. Strong-willed and determined, Audrey continued to live life to the fullest, maintaining her full-time job and caring for her family. "1 was very educated about being a dialysis patient I restricted my fluids and watched my

This is the story of Audrey Mullinnix, a wife, mother and long-time Cranford resident who was touched by the extended circle of life. Hospitalized 16 years ago for another condition, doctors discovered, quite by accident, that Audrey was suffering kidney failure, an acute condition compounded by severe anemia. Doctors predicted the young mother would require dialysis within five years. Almost to the day, her hemodialysis began, two times per week, 3Vi hours a session for 10 years. "I was able to have a nurse come into my home and administer the dialysis," she said. "After eight years, I needed the procedure three In nearby Kenilworth, Audrey's cousin Pat times a week. Dialysis doesn't take the place of Kubik also celebrates the extended circle of kidneys, but it does provide life." life. Weakened by the long sessions, Audrey adAfflicted with keratoconus, a disease which justed her dialysis to best suit her lifestyle. separates the cornea from the eye, Pat's treat"Dialysis isn't painful, but it does leave you ment was to wear a hard contact lens to keep very weak and tired. 1 scheduled mine in the the cornea placed. evening, then I would go right to sleep," she "Everytime my condition got worse 1 would said. have to be fitted with a new lens. Then, the After one year on the program, Audrey's fa- cornea in my right eye curved so badly, a lens ther volunteered one of his kidneya. Although wouldn't fit over it anymore," she said in his 00s at the time, the initial medical workThree years ago Pnt had a cornea transplant, up found him to be in perfect health and a which miraculously restored vision in her right strong donor candidate. eye. "We were scheduled for surgery at Columbia "1 wasn't fully out for the surgery. I was Presbyterian Hospital in New York on Aug. 28. aware when they put the cornea on my eye. I The day of the transplant, the doctors found I could immediately see the light come through had antibodies in my blood that would have and started to distinguish objects right away," caused me to reject my father's kidney. The she said. Today, with glasses, Pal has 20-20 vision in that eye. Eventually she may need a transplant was cancelled," she said softly. "Of course my husband, Bob, would have transplant in her left eye if the disease condone anything to help me, but our blood types tinues to worsen. are different Even my daughters, Jennifer and "1 wish more people would consider donaSuzanne, wanted to donate, but they're so tion. If they only knew all the people they young and have their whole lives to look for- could help. This has been like a miracle for me," she said. ward to."

A new cornea brightens life

diet closely," she said. The severe disease, however, was taking 1U toll, weakening her body, but never her spirit Nine years had passed. Audrey stopped working and spent her days at home. "My blood count was so low, anyone else would have been unconscious. I didn't have an accident, but I fell asleep at (he wheel twice," she said. On March 12, 1995 all that changed. As the was conducting a meeting at St. Barnabas Medical Center, giving hope to others like herself, her call came through. "The call came from Columbia Presbyterian Hospital - they had a donor. My husband and I went right to the hospital. There was a man waiting who was also a candidate. As much as my heart felt lor him, I knew the kidney was mine. 1 hod waited so long," she said. The workups concluded the match, and Audrey's physical condition was acceptable. "I was in good health that day. Even the slightest problem, like a cold, could have prevented the transplant Everything felt right" she said. Surgery was conducted that night, and Audrey's new kidney started functioning four days later. "It was Bob's 50th birthday. It was a wonderful present." she said. One year after the transplant Audrey remains on a regimen of immunosuppressant drugs to maintain the organ function and prevent rejection. Although there have been some glitches along the way, high fevers, a rejection episode in December and a bout with pneumonia six weeks ago, Audrey feels reborn. "Being free from dialysis has made a big difference in my life," she said. "Things that are normally token for granted, like having an extra glass of water, or a soda if you want it are things that I can now do again."

Myths lead some to hesitate to donate There are many myths about organ donation and transplantation. What's fact? According to The New Jersey Organ and Tissue Sharing Network, a nationally recognized organ procurement organization, transplantation is now standard medical procedure and survival rates continue to rise. The one-year survival rate for kidney recipients is almost 9C percent; for heart recipients, over 82 percent, for pancreas recipients, almost 92 percent. Between 1988-93, one-year survival rates for lung recipients increased by almost 30 percent How can you donate? Signing a donor card and discussing your decision with family members can help assure your wishes will be carried

out The organ donor card is a legal document, and the donor card on your driver's license is also a valid document but family consent is required and will be requested at the time of death. Who gets a transplant? Organs are computermatched according to compatibility of donor and recipient tissues, determined by testing, waiting time and the medical need of the recipient According to The Sharing Network, there is no way to buy a place on the waiting list - it's a federal crime to buy or sell organs. Why donate? One individual can provide organs, bone and tissues for 75 or more people in need. There are more than 40,000 people across

the country on waiting lists for organ transplants - a name is added to the list every 20 minutes. In New Jersey alone, there are 800 residents waiting. "I waited an unusually long time," Audrey said. "The national average waiting time is now approximately two years, in New Jersey it't less. There's a better distribution of organs today." The Sharing Network is located at 150 Morris Ave., in Springfield. They can be reached at (800) 541-0075 or (201) 379-4535. Call The American Association of Kidney Patients at (800) 749AAKP.

Suburban lightspot MEWS I NOT GOING AWAY To

GOOD

COLLEGE

Quips, quotes, puns arid anecdotes from the lighter side of life in suburban Union County. Readers are encouraged to contribute by coiling 276-6000, faxing 276-6220, or writing this newspaper at P.O. Box 626, Cranford 07016. Anonymity is negotiable, but we need a signature and phone number for verification.

When the nest empties, it'll be just us, right? "Are we having fun yet?" my husband whispered to me during a; college night program for high school juniors and their parents. We had; been somewhat giddy with anticipation at the thought of being '^just us." again" as our youngest the junior, went off to college. We had visions of candle-lit suppers, cozy fireplace-conversations, I breakfasts in bed and spur-of-the-moment getaways. ; We had a bad moment when our junior announced he might go to a; local college. But we probably couldn't afford candles, firewood, break-; fast or overnights in Camden, if he didn't go to school locally. We decided that our children are among the most interesting and! entertaining people we know. The early years were: exciting (two emer-^ gency room visits in one afternoon>, sweet (the 9-year-old rode his bifce1, to purchase champagne glasses for our anniversary); rUnny — theyye"; tried to teach us to play Nintendo — and just plain wonderful — how.: else can a grownup splash through a rain puddle with complete aban-' don, if not with a small child? .'. My husband and I thought we would like at least a few years, while we still recognize each other, to do those things we all plan to do "someday." We did not plan carefully, of course, when we purchased another dog last year. "Life begins when the dog dies and the youngest child goes off to college." At any rate, we've concluded that we are in fact having fun right now,; and our kids continue to contribute greatly to that condition. Happy Mothers Day! Marie G. Higgins Westfield

May9,1996

Scudder House is on May 18 tour Historic dwelling among four on Woman's Club itinerary

Marilyn Shields and Michele Hely, Friends of Mlndowaskin Park board members Join Friends President Nancy Priest, Town Supervisor Dan Kelly and Town Engineer Ken Marsh in planning tip Saturday, June 8 community party In the park.

*Party in Park' set for Saturday, June 8 at Mindowaskin 'The third annual "Party in the ftrk" will be Saturday, June 8, 10 a}m.-3 p.m. in Mlndowaskin Park, Nancy Priest, president of the Intends of Mindowaskin Park has announced. I "Plant are under way with momtiers Marilyn Shields and Michelle llealy, and we have met several t|mei with Town Engineer Ken tyarsh and Town Supervisor Dan IfeUy to plan strategies for maintenance and (Uture care of the park," Ms. Priest said. ', "We are pleased with the ro $ » n s e that we have had and want tfc formally thank the Public Works

Department for all of their help." At noon on the day of the party, each member of the public works team will be honored at a special presentation and recognition ceremony. The public is invited. Party festivities will include continuous entertainment from the Workshop for the Arts coordinated by Theodore Schlosberg. Westfield resident Diedre Gclinne will head the children's activities for the day with help from Friends board member Susan Debbie. Volunteers are need. If interested, call Lela Kanter, volunteer chairwoman, or Ms. Priest

The John Scudder House on East Broad Street will be one of four historic homes to be shown on the Woman's Club of WestfieJd's Spring House Tour Saturday, May 18. An English country manor and a southwestern contemporary will also be shown. The Scudders were one of the pioneer families of the Westfield area, and settled on a large tract of land running from Elmer Street up what is now East Broad Street and across the mountains. The house was built about 1790 by the fourth John Scudder. His father was the officer in charge during the 1782 trial of James Morgan, a British soldier accused of killing Parson James Caldwetl during the American Revolution. He was hung for his crimes on Gallows Hill in Westfield near the Scudder property. The house is an example of an early transitional farmhouse, based on an English prototype. The gabled roof is flanked by two chimneys. Inside, Federal motifs are used on the mantels and in the cupboard in the kitchen. The original cooking fireplace and beehive oven have been preserved. Two smaller rooms were opened up, probably in the early 1900s, to make what is now the living room. During the years, additions were made to the house, but the look of the period has been maintained. The interior of the house is furnished with hooked rugs and ftirniture that has been collected by the current owners in keeping with its colonial roots.

Th« historic John Scudder H O U M IS among four on Woman's Club of Wsstfleld't May 18 tour. Six local homes will be shown 10 a m - 3 p.m. The tour will include a light lunch to be served at the Woman's dub, 318 S. Euclkl Ave. Refreshments will be served 11 a.m-2 p.m. only. Home-baked

oin our circle

^Friends

goods and flats of spring plants will also be available. The plants can be ordered in advance, and picked up on the day of the tour. The cost of the ticket* are $18,

and con be purchased in Westfield at Robert E. Brunner Opticians, Lancaster Ltd., Music Staff, Periwinkle's Fine Gifts, Rorden Realtors, the Town Book Store or by calling the clubhouse at 233-7100.

It ii far «wkr for the family. If a family plot It mmnajad prior to need. The coMMtntc ilaff at HIIMdc Cemetery will e a t * your •election. All lou art in fully developed areas and include perpetual care. HtlMde Cemetery, located on Woodland Avenue In Scotch Plains, ii a non-profit organization. Telephone 796-1729.

A Quaker-directed community.

Senior artists will vie in county's juried show All senior citizen artists, professional and nonprofessional, are invited to enter the 1096 Union County Senior Citizen Juried Art contest and exhibition. Pull information is on the application form available now from the Union County Office of Cultural and Heritage Affairs at 24-52 (Uhway Ave., 4th Floor, Elizabeth, NJ. 07202, or by calling SfiB-SSfiO. Relay service users should call <800) 852-7899. As sj»ce may be limited, artists wishing to participate should return their application forms as quickly as possible. Artists must be at least 60 years old, and may submit one entry which has been completed within the last three years. All work must be the original creation of the art-

ist Framed work may be no wider than 36 inches and no narrower than 12 inches and must be ready to hanfi, properly wired and framed. Sculptures may not exceed 14 inches in height, width or depth. The following are categories of eligible work: oil, acrylic, watereolur, pastel, print, drawing, photography, mixed media and sculpture. Professional artists will judge the exhibit. There will Ix; awards of recognition for professional and nonprofessional entries. Persons claiming nonprofessional status must not have sold the types of art entered in the contest/exhibition through commercial channels, exhibited in a professional gallery or have had membership in a professional artist guild.

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Open House and Construction Site Tours, Sat. & Sun. May 11-12, 25-26,12 noon to 4 pm

OF BRIDCEWATER

Health fair Saturday at Vo-lech More than 30 organizations, physicians, hospitals, police departments, emergency and service units in health, fitness and nutrition will be. at the second annual Health Fair, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday in Baxel Hall at the 177C Raritan Road campus of Union County Vocational-Technical School. , Tests and screenings include blood pressure, prostate problems,

breast cancer, eye, ear, nose and throat, diabetes, hearing, foot problems, body fat, flexibility and glucose testing, plus many more. Nutrition and physical fitness experts will discuss diet and exercise. Information on a career in health and other fields can be obtained from staff of Union County College and the Union County VocationalTechnical Schools.

A Fritndi Continuing Cart Rttirtmtnt Community

I need more information about Arbor Glen. Name Address



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Mail Io 100 Monroe Street, Bridgewater, New lersey 08807.

St. Theresa's Church

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Pastor. Rev. Joseph S. Bejgrowici Sunday Masses: Sat. 5:30pm Sun. 7:30-9:00 10:30- 12 Noon Weekday Masses: 7-9am Miraculous Medal Novena Following 7:30 pm mass SI Judes Perpetual Novena Wednesdays ai 12 noon & 7:30pm Novena Holy Hour

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Sunday Masses: Saturday. 5:30PM Sunday: ••00, 8:30 » 11:30AM Weekday Masses: MonJWed./Frl: 7:00AM * 8:00AM Tuas./Thurs: S:00AM a 5:MPM Saturday: ftOOAM

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TERRILL ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH 1340 Terrtll Kd.

Scinch Plains

322-7151 Rev. Michael Seaman. Pastor Sunday: *45am-Sunday School itOOam - Morring Wontxp S: 15pm • Church Training 7:1Spm- Evening Worship

Wednesday: 7:00 pm • Prayer Meeting Nunery Care PrmOtti

KENILWORTH GOSPEL CHAPEL Newa/fc Ave. ft 23rd St, Kenlrworth

908-272-6131 Sunday Services: 11am - Family Bible Hour and 6:00pm - Evening Services Monday, 7 OOpm - B o y i Brigade Wednesday. 7:30pm - Prayer nesday. 7:30p y H d B i b i i Study Frida 7 0 0 p m - Voulh Mealing Me Friday. 7:00pm Friday Night CN»dr«rf a Club 7 - 8 : » p m (Grad* School Age> CaU tor More Information

May 9. 1996

Westfietd Record

A-1©

Irving Tenenbaum, 74

Obituaries Headed state's largest cleaning firm living Tenenbaum, 74, who once B'rith; the Semiatzer Progressive Harriet Arthur Smyers, 91 was headed the largest wholesale Association, in Newark; and t h e

Thomas Murphy Jr., 72 Receptionist, truck driver, toll collector

Thomas P. Murphy Jr., 72, died American Association of Retired May 1, 1996 at Overlook Hospital Persons chapter, Bayonne. He served in the Navy aboard in Summit He had been a recep, cleaning business in New Jersey, Men's Club at Temple Emanu-El, the USS Moore in the North Attionist for the past nine yean for a died April 30, 1996 at St. Michael's on East Broad Street Harriet Arthur Smyers, 91, who Surviving are two daughters, daughter, Kathleen Murphy, a phy- lantic and the Pacific during World Surviving are his wife, Edith Medical Center in Newark. War II, and was a parishioner of St. He was born in Newark and had Finkelstein Tenenbaum; a daugh- died April 23. 1996 in Oberlin, Ann S. Livingston of Oberlin and sician with offices in WestAeld, Helen's Roman Catholic Church. Rahway and Summit Margaret S. Wolf of Carlisle, Pa; a ter, Arlene Pont; a son, Robert; five Ohio. She w u born in Cheswick, lived in Westfield since 1956. His first wife, Kitty, died in 1988. He was born in Bayonne and Mr. Tenenbaum joined Towne grandchildren; a brother, Joe; andPa., and had lived in Westiield son, William H. Jr. of Wethersfield, Surviving are his second wife, Conn.; 19 grandchildren; 14 greathad lived in Westfield since 1976. since 1932. Cleaners Inc. of Roselle in 1952; it a sister, Rose Fiske. Kathleen Hilla Murphy; another grandchildren; a brother, William Mr. Murphy drove trucks for the Funeral services were held bocame the state's largest wholeMrs. Smyers received a bachdaughter, Sheila Murphy of New R. Arthur of Quincy, Pa.; and two Standard Oil Co. of New Jersey Wile cleaners and he was its presi- Thursday at Temple Emanu-El. elor's degree from the University York City, three sons, Thomas P. sisters, Margaret K Arthur of and its successor, Exxon Corp., Burial was in Mount Lebanon dent when he retired in 1989. He of Pittsburgh in 1926. She was a Oberlin and Mary Helen Stephens Ill of BronxviUe, N.Y., Sean of from their linden and Bayonne was a first sergeant in the Army Cemetery, Iselin. member of the College Women's of Quincy. terminals from 1957-87. He also Westfield and Brian of New York Arrangements were by the Club of Westfield; the Westfield Air Corps during World War II. Her husband, William Hays, died was a toll collector on the New Jer- City, eight grandchildren; and two He was a member of the West- Menorah Chapels at Millburn, in Historical Society; the Presbyterian in 1990. sisters, Mary Greenan of Bayonne sey Turnpike from 1966-73. Union. fmld-Mountainside Lodge of B'nal Church, on Mountain Avenue; and A memorial gathering will take A former officer of Friendly Sons and Kathleen Cushing of Dunellen. Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority at place 1-4 p.m. Saturday at 229 Syl- of S t Patrick in Hudson County, A funeral Mass was celebrated the university. vania Place. Mr. Murphy was honored by that Saturday at S t Helen's Church, organization as Irishman of the following services at the Dooley Year in 1991. He was a member of Colonial Home. Burial was in Faira Knights of Columbus council and view Cemetery, Kathleen E. O'Connor Drabin, Oyster Bay Cove, N.Y.; a daughter, f>7, died May 4, 1D9U at Overlook Allison DuBois of Norfolk, Va.; her (1 Jospltal in Summit. She had been mother, Emilia Kehm Gansler of A funeral Mass was celebrated Ann Ryan DePalma, 89, died a volunteer in the Little Shop of Toms River, and a stepbrother, May 2, 1996 at her home. She had Monday at Holy Trinity Roman Robert Gansler of Springfield. 'JIKJ Westfield Day Care Center. Catholic Church, of which Mrs. DeA funeral Mass was celebrated been a sale* representative with Palma was a parishioner. EntombShe was born in Newark and had the former Elizabeth Daily Journal William Frederick Jr., 03, died County Golden Age Club in Florida Tuesday at St. Helen's Roman lived in Weslflt'ld since 1968. ment was in the Good Shepherd newspaper from 1831-41. April 28, 1D96 at the Brian Center and t h e Telephone Pioneers of Catholic Church, of which Mrs. ,! Mrs. Drabin won the Miss Union Mrs. DePalma was born in Cran- Chapel Mausoleum at St. Gertrude nursing home in Tampa, Fla. HeAmerica. County pageant for 1958 and par- Drabin was a parishioner. Burial Cemetery, Colonia. Surviving are a stepson. George ford and lived in Fall River, Mass., ticipated in thu Miss New Jersey was in Fairview CemeteryArrangements were by the was a cable inspector with AT&T before moving to Westiield in 1954. (• 'M'jasnt for that year, She received Arrangements were by the Dooley Colonial Home. Contribu- Corp. from 1942 until his retire- W. Smith of LuLt; a stepgiandchild;' and a sister, Mildred Mulligan of* Surviving are her husband of 55 tions may be made to the Center ment in 1967. ,;; degree in elementary education Dooley Colonial Home. ContribuMountainside. . in I960 from whnt is now Kean tions may be made to Helping years, Thomas; a son, Robert; five for Hope Hospice, 17fi Hussa S t , Mr. Frederick was born in WestGraveside services wax- held College of Now Jersey. Hands and Hearts, St. Helen's grandchildren and two nieces. Linden, N.J. 07036. field and lived in the town before Thursday at Fairview Cemetery." Survivin/: aru her husband, Church, 1600 Rahway Aw., Westmoving in 1980 to Lutz, Fla HeArrangements were by the Gray < .\-i>rf;i> T.; a son, Christopher of field, N.J. O7090-3615. was a member of the Hillsborough Funeral Home.

Had resided 64 years in Westfield

Kathleen Drabin, 57

Volunteer in shop; pageant contestant

Ann Ryan DePalma, 89

Former saleswoman for newspaper

William Frederick Jr., 93 A cable inspector with AT&T

Robert Tresham, 86

Chemical worker; once of Westfield A memorial service will be held Robert A Tresham, 86, died May 2, 1996 at the Ingleside Care Cen- tomorrow in Newark, Del. Arrangeter in Hockessin, Del. He worked ments are by the R.T. Foard F\ifor two chemical companies prior neral Home in Newark, Del. to his retirement. Mr. Tresham was bom in Brooklyn and served in the Army during World War II. He lived in Kearny and Westfield before moving in 1965 to Newark, Del. Call He joined the Amoco Chemical Co. plant in Newark, Del., in 1965 1-800-273-8449 and was a shift supervisor when he Ext. 6123 retired in 1975. Mr. Tresham earlier worked at the Keamy plant of E.l. To Get a FREE Du Pont de Nemours & Co. Surviving are his wife, Henrietta; Bridal Guide two daughters, Joann MehaRey and Rev. Kathleen A. TreshamAnderson; and four grandchildren.

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May 9,1996

A-11

You said it: J

77J/S does gfve me a little more incentive to do well in the states.'

The Westfield High tennis team has won 18 of the last 19 Union County tournaments.

— WHS tmnni* ptmymr Dan Matro (ttory below)

Blue Devils

up county tennis crown • y JAIWE» WO1LY THE RECORD

RECORD FILE PHOTO

Junior Dan Matro took second place at first singles in the Union County Tournament Tuesday as Wastfield High won its fifth straight crown.

There was good news and bad news for the Westfield High tennis team Tuesday. The good news was the Blue Devils won the Union County Tournament for the fifth straight season — and 18 of the past 19 years. The bad news was that junior Dan Matro fell in his attempt to secure the first singles title. "It's real good to win the counties again, especially since we had so much pressure on us to win," said senior co-captain Brad Jankowski, who won his third straight second singles crown. "We're expected to win so everyone is gunning for us, so it's great when you finally accomplish it But we were all pulling for Dan, and we really feel for him. He played a great match — but so did the other guy." Union Catholic's Felipe Fonseca, a transfer student from Brazil who almost became a Blue Devil last fall, topped Matro 3-6, 6-4, 6-4 in the county final at Hub Stine

Tennis Courts in Plainfield. The rest of the Westfield contingent emerged with Union County titles — Rich Cohen at third singles, Dan Aquila-Jon DiGiovanni at first doubles, and Ken DiamondChris Camuto at second doubles — as Matro settled for second place. "For now it's disappointing to lose," said the talented junior, who had beaten Fonseca 7-5, 6-3 in regular-season action three weeks ago. "But eventually I'll learn from my mistakes and try to correct them for the next big match. I played well in the first set-and-a-half, but then I got a little tentative and let him dictate the points. He stepped up his game after that and took the momentum." Jankowski made few mistakes in his second singles championship win over Plainfleld's Ken Martinez

Holy Trinity runs away with meet

Westfield baseball scales Summit • y JAMES BPU.V THE RECORD

Faced with a formidable one-two punch, the Westfield High baseball team figures to stick-andmove this weekend. The Blue Devils will travel to Summit for the quarterfinal round

HIGH SCHOOL PREVIEW

mmw

Westflcld

at Summit Saturday, 3 p.m. of the Union County Tournament, where Hilltopper pitching ace Steve Schroeder and slugger Alfle Critelli will be ready for action. Westfield feels ready, too. "We've got a tremendous amount of respect for Summit, basically because of Schroeder and Critelli," said WHS Head Coach Bob Brewster, "Now, they've got a solid all-around team, but Schroeder is like 6-3, 220 pounds and throws lefthanded, and Critelli's about 6-2, 245 and swings the bat real well. It'll be a challenge." Rising to a challenge in the UCT is nothing new for the Blue Devils, who've won two straight titles — both times beating Elizabeth ace Al Hawkins. "We're not a team that gets intimidated by big names," said Brewster. "Well go right out and go after them. That's the way we play here at Westfield and we're not about to change now." Westfield reached the quarterfi-

6-2, 6-2. Cohen also cruised into title territory with a 6-0, 6-2 win over Cranford's Jeff Tlerney. Aquila-DiGiovanni beat Scotch Plains-Fanwood's Jared DuvoisonKeith Kopnicki 7-6, 6-2, and Diamond-Camuto whitewashed SP-F's Adam Ross-Ian Lefkowitz. Every Blue Devil wa3 seeded first and played three matches to reach the final, which was pushed back twice — first Friday, and again Monday — due to rain. "If you look at our team, we have good depth," said Jankowski. "Our second doubles guys could play third singles, and (hat's a good sign of the team w '• have. Now that we've gotten the counties, it's time to focus on the state tournament, which is our true goal this year." The Blue Devils have their eyes on the Group 4 state title, with an arduous road through the sectional, with a determined Matro leading the way. "This does give me a little more incentive to do well in the states," said Matro. "And if we can win the states, I won't be thinking much about the county tournament"

RECOflD FILE PHOTO

Chris Schwarzenbek will be one of the speedy Westfield players battling Summit Saturday In the quarterfinals of the Union County Tournament.

nal round with a 10-3 win over Roselle Catholic Saturday, while fourth-seeded Summit topped New Providence 3-0. Saturday's game will feature a clash of styles. The Blue Devils will likely go with their own ace lefthander, senior Brian Ciemniecki. But besides the fact that both Ciemniecki and Schroeder are southpaws who also manage to excel on the football field, the players are quite different. Ciemniecki is a natural outfielder who has switched to the pitcher's mound out of necessity and made the most of it. Sporting a 3-1 record, including Saturday's

sparkling five-hitter, the speedy senior is also dangerous with the bat and on the basepaths. "Brian plays hard all the time and contributes in every way imaginable, but then somehow he always raises his level of play in the tournament," said Brewster. "He's a winner and a very intense leader. That's the makeup of our entire team." Ciemniecki's batterymate is Bill Hedden, and Bill Sweeney will man first base. Second baseman Bob Meyer and shortstop Matt DeMasi anchor the middle infield, while slick-fielding Jorge Amorim plays the hot comer.

Chris Schwarzenbek slides over to patrol center field while Ciemniecki's on the hill, and Mike Barone will be in left. Marcus Mattieli and Matt Cognetti split time in right field. "Schroeder throws strikes, so we'll go up there swinging and once vve get guys on base we'll run and bunt — that's our game," said Brewster. "Well test their catcher and apply pressure every chance we get With Brian, Schwarzenbek, Cognetti and Amorim we have guys who can fly, and most of the other guys are quick and smart enough to take the extra base. "Defensively, we'll have to make

sure there are no runners on base for Critelli to knock in, and then we'll just play him deep," said Brewster. "There's no fence in Summit, so we'll just play back, and if he does hit it out, it's only one run. What's important is getting the guys out in front of him," Although technically the underdog with the fifth seed, Westfield is the defending UCT champ and knows it. "Although they know it'll take an awesome effort, this team has been using three-in-a-row as a rallying cry," said Brewster. "We need to take it one game at a time, but this team believes in itself."

Holy Trinity Interparochial School (HTIS) of Westfield won six individual events and five relays Sunday at Gary Kehler Stadium to score 82 points and win the overall team title at the Holy Trinity Interparochial track meet St. Virgil's of Morris Plains scored 46 points to edge St. Mary's of Rahway with 44 points for second in the team standings. The meet was for fourth-eight grades from nine area parochial schools. Other schools competing included Holy Family (Florham Park), SL Clare's (Great Kills, Staten Island), St Michael's (Cranford), St. John the Apostle (Clark), St. Leo The Great (lincroft) and Assumption School (Morristown). Holy Trinity won the girls sprint relay races in the 5th, 7th and 8th grade divisions, and the boys sprint relays in the 5th and 8th grade divisions. Double gold medalists (individual and relay) for Holy Trinity were Joseph Korfinncher, Alice Ryan, Matt Vidovich, Alexis Anzelone, Judy Mathew and Leah Smith. All of Holy Trinity's 5th grade competitori were actually 4th graders who participated despite there being no 4th grade division. Holy Trinity fourth grade boy winners include Joseph Korfmacher who took the 200 meter run in 31.4, and Dennis Angeles, Andrew Clarke, Kevin Behr and Korfmacher won the 4x100 relay in 1:09.3. Girl victors include Alice Ryan in the 200 meter run (34.3) and Samantha Gregory, Dini Quinn, Megan O'Shea and Ryan took the 4x100 relay in 1:08.6. Seventh-grade winners include Matt Vidovich (6:43.7), and Alexis Anzelone (5:56.9) in the 1600 meters, and Tricia Yudd, Wendy Schundler, Karen Manahan and Anzelone won the sprint medley relay in 2:20. Eighth-grade winners were Joseph Serzan, Daniel Egan, Daniel Matthews and Matt Vidovich (2:14.2), and Lindsay Lamarre, Caitlin Hilliard, Leah Smith and Judy Mathews (2:20) in the sprint medley relay, and Judy Mathew 1:12.9 in the 400 meters and Leah Smith (2:57.9) in the 800 meters.

Two-hour rule threatens fabric of national pastime By DOUG RAP23EW1CZ THE RECORD

The game of high school baseball is changing for the worse, not the The reason? There is one particular rule change which was made to save money and time. The sad fact is, the rule is idiotic. THE RULE is there to speed the game up, get it over with. It is there so the umpires don't have to spend an undetermined amount of time officiating a game. It is there so the administrators don t spend money on buses and drivers waiting for games to end. In short, it is there because people don't want towork. Here now is THE RULE. Simply stated, it's called the Two-hour Rule. No new inning may begin exactly two hours after thegarne begiT^In laymen's terms - start a game at 4 p.m., get it over by 6 p.m. or the umpires will end it for you. Keep in mind, this rule is used only on the junior varsity level. It hasn't meandered its way to varsity games as of yet The question that immediately comes to mind is, "Who are we playing the Eame for — the kids or the umpires?" . . ThTquaUty of high school baseball in New Jersey is already lacking due to tfVe amount of decent weather available dunng the season Teams spend the majority of their "spring training" time in the gym during the

While teams in warmer areas of the country are playing close to 40 games in great weather, New Jersey's high school teams should feel fortunate to play 25 games in a season, and if half of those games are played under "baseball weather," it's a miracle. Secondly, as a coach, the entire strategy of the game changes when you know you have a time limit staring you in the face. Instead of managing your personnel for seven innings, you've got to carry a watch around at all times. Players don't have the opportunity to play under a pressure-filled lategame situation with a one-run lead because the two-hour rule never lets teams play that far into the game.

COMMENTARY

There is no sense of finishing what you started. Teams simply must get an early lead, then hold on until the umpire's two-hour alarm clock rings. In addition, players who make up end of the roster rarely receive the opportunity to play because by the time the last two or three innings would normally be played, you're on the bus back home. In short, the quality is becoming even more saturated. Why does this rule exist, you ask? It's very simple. Administrators are having a diflicult time getting S S 3 . rfMarth and are sometimes lucky ^ ^ey even see a fieUtefore umpires for baseball because softball games run dose to an hour shorter opening day. And even if teams do manage to practice outside, its than baseball games. Umpires are getting paid the same amount for both u S ? b e l c £ 40 degrees and either in a parking lot or on a mud-covered sports, so to avoid a lack of umpires, you have th« two-hour rule. field.

Some umpires will tell you the two-hour rule is the best thing to happen to baseball since the designated hitter. They point out games where a team is leading 15-0 after the second inning and the two-hour rule lessens the embarrassment the losing team suffers. First of all, there IS a 10-run rule in high school baseball. Basically, if n team is leading by 10 or more runs after the fifth inning, the game is over. But what are we telling these kids who are on the losing end of a rout? Are we saying,"Don't worry son, it'll all be over in two hours. Don't trouble yourself trying to make a comeback. You won't have to compete much longer." Is this where New Jersey baseball is headed? Are people who never played the game going to control its future? The rule is just plain bad. Baseball is about competition and giving your best effort for the entire game. It was never meant to have a time limit If it did, Abner Doubleday would have figured something out. The installation of the two-hour rule is the result of some person or committee folding under the pressure of people saying, "We don't want to work." It's not good for the game, it's not good for the kids who play and dream of getting to the next leveL Get rid of the rule. It's terrible. ('Editor's Note — Doug Radziewiez was a baseball standout at Sornerville High and the University of Georgia, where he helped the Bulldogs win the 1990 NCAA Championship. He was drafted by the St. Louis Cardinals and played four seasons in their minor league system, hitting .342 in the Class-A Florida State League in 1993. He's now coaching JV baseball at Somerville High.)

May 9,1996

A-12

YOUTH SPORTS-

Devil delight

BASEBALL TRIPLE A Cubs 12,Mets 0 Joe Korfmachor, Adam Gercken^ and Peler llz combined to pilch a shutout as the Cubs ttofoated the Mets in the triple A division. A strong defense led by Mike Strearnan and fjrancton Pantano helped the pitchers to protuct tho stiutout Trio Cubs led 1 -0 on Knrirriacher's drst-inning single until they erupted lor nino runs in IHe Iturd Brady McGale becjan tho big mlly tjy knocking in the second run, fall o w ! by Nick Gisnioncii's double which scorijtl two more. Later in the inning, Adam Gerckunii and Kevin Tuohy each had throe RBIs wild hase-clearing triples.

Westfield volleyball team takes Bulldog Invitational r

niecki tossed a rhe Westfield High girls volfive-hit, 11WESTFIELD leyball team picked up a first-place strikeout game finish in the BuUdog Invitational from the Tournament at Dayton Regional. mound and WHS plowed through roundadded a double, robin play, defeating Roxbury, New single, run batProvidence, Livingston, Dayton H S Roundup ted In, two runs and Rahway without dropping a scored and game. The net players headed into the single elimination round with three steals in an all-around gem SOFTBALL the top seed, including a bye in the of a game. FITNESSE TWINS Matt DeMasi doubled, singled first round. Tlie Fitnssse Twins o1 the American Legion Westfield topped Caldwell in the and scored three times, and Mike lusl two close, hard-fougiit Softball games last championship round with tri- Barone had four RBI on three hits week In tho 17-14 loss to Loughlin's Angels, Nicolr Cunningham, Suzi Gottdenker and Jen captain Marcy Heller sparking the for Westfield, which will play at Rosonthal ably handled trts rnouncj duties for team with two acos to start the Summit in Saturday's UCT quarthe Twins with battery mates Mary Lygate and game, and Lauren McGovern and terfinals. fiachol Wagner doing the job behind the plate. Suzanne Vinegra making a huge Westfield 3, Linden % - Matt Aiin^a Lombard, All Klass and Nicole Tomasso block. Sophomore Katie Bralum Williams improved to 4^) on the were nil^nslve standouts, while a furious lastserved the last five points of the year with six-hit, five-strikeout win inning live-run rally was koyed by Katie Dura, Katie McGuiriGss, Heather Fishberg and Tara game to propel Westfield to a 15-2 over Linden Wednesday. Mark win. Cerefice delivered the big hit in Chris takos The Lady Devils faced Johnson the sixth, when he doubled in a In a tense 12-11 loss to tho Union Hard Chromo White Sox, Jessie West and Jen Phill- in the semifinal round, and Jana pair of runs. ips excelled at pitching. Shannon Look sparZetjkovic had nine serves and five Mud deforreively at first base in both games aces, while Sara Mankoski conTRACK AND FIELD Fishborg, Ctiristrikos, Lygalo and West scoiori trolled the offense with six kills two runs each. Threes were wild Saturday at the and solid passing. Sophomore Union County Relays as both the Meghan Davitt intimidated op- Westfield High boys and girls Orioles B, Rangers 7 Tho Crucible Sleel Orioles defeated the Ciar- ponents from tho middle hitter porocca Chiropractic Rangers in an exciting sition with four kills and strong teams took third place on the strength of outstanding distance extra-inning game Saturday. The Hangers blocks. performances. scored seven runs In the seventh Inning to tie Th« Bulldog Invitational champion Westfitid High volltyball ttam. "It was just one of those days the game and sand it to extra Innings. The The boys team totaled 30 points when everyone on the team played Rangers comeback was started by hit* from — trailing Union and county WESTFIELD HIGH Jennifer Stai and Lindsay Ciarrocca and was to the best of their ability," said champ Elizabeth — with three outcapped by Jenny Koracky's two-out RBI single. Mankoski, who earned team Most standing distance efforts which Tho Rangers also got good pitching from Valuable Player honors despite sufChristie McDonald and strong defense from All times p.m. unless noted fering an ankle injury prior to the topped the field. The sprint medley Katie Schott. relay squad of Randy Standing, THURSDAY, MAY 9 tourney. "We came together and With this win, trie Orioles raised their record Jaaon Sanders, Laurence Ho and Golf — County Tourney, 9 a.m. to 2-1 behind another big game from Courtney won as a team." Matt Elmuccto set a meet record Tennis — at Mountain Lakes, 4 Thornton. Thornton hit her third home run of in 3:31.9. The distance medley the season, plus a double and two singles. SOFTBALL relay came in a t 10:53.0 for first FRIDAY, MAY 10 Ths Orioles Dana Passariantl continued her A pair of errors proved costly as hot hitting, with Kristin Grey, Jill Veltri, Bethany place as Abdallah Simaika, Tim Softball — at Johnson, 4 Dresely, Mara Judd and Jenna Davino also Westfield exited the Union County Clark, Mike Krug and Elmuccio Volleyball — Elizabeth, home, 4 getting big hits. The Orioles got clutch pitching Tournament Saturday with a 1-0 outran the opposition, and Krug, Tennis — at Kearny, 4 Irom Thornton and Michelle Panagos and a loss to Cranford. game-winning flBI from Erin Biggio to end the The Lady Devils (14-3) made two Ho, Ryan Stefiuk and Gordon SATURDAY, MAY 11 errors in the fifth inning which led Kaslusld won the 4x800 in 8:12.4. Baseball — at Summit, 2 On the girls side, the Lady Devto the lone Cranford run, and despite two singles by designated hit- ils placed third with 52 points — Lacrosse — Voorhees, home, 2 SOCCER ler Lyndsay Greenwald and a tri- behind Plainfield and county MONDAY, MAY 13 Rangers 4, West Orange 2 ple by Shannon Wagner, couldn't champ Scotch Plains — as the Avunijino, an early :>ensDn loss tci ttur Tlum Baseball — Shabazz, home, 4 4x800, mile relay and distance plate a run. Uoi. ih'.- Webtfiold Runners charged \o n <\ 2 Golf — State Tourney, 9 a.m. medley relay teams were at the WestHcld 8, Kearny 7 The victory ! ho Rangers scored in tho firsl rninuty'-i Volleyball — at Summit, 4 • 3 Season living • Bug Free ol the; iiarne when Sagiv Edelman pushed a Lady Devils got a clutch RBI single head of the class. Lacrosse — at Fair Lawn, 4 • Uniquely Designed For You Laura Brucia, Megan Shutts, pass to tho outside and Scott Calender madp from first baseman Lauren Vidov'DonroUppry to cortr«cttalr«ady written an umazing, snoi from the wing. ich to cap off a four-run rally in the Lauren Saul and Sage Stefluk set Tennis — East Side, home, 4 The defense was led by Greg Spoir n\ seventh inning Thursday in a new county record in the 4x800 t ' . i l l I - o i l i c e l-.st i m a t c s swoeper Chris Tropeano and Scott Fialibuig TUESDAY, MAY 14 in 9:59.4, while Saul, Lindsay ToKearny. at fullbacks. The Thunder's only scorn of tho Westfield 11, Linden 0 - Shan- tems, Sharon Gambino and KimGolf — Livingston, home, 4 hall came on a penally kick as goalkeeper non Wagner fashioned a nifty two- Robinson also set a new county Tom Trosnan thwarted every oilier attempt But WEDNESDAY, MAY 15 the Rangers responded immediately. On the hitter Wednesday in Linden. standard with a 22:47.4. Westfield ensuing kick-off, Sngiv made a textbook pass Greenwald had three RBI on a sin- also captured the distance medley Baseball — U. Catholic, home, 4 H< I M . n r i S i • S n m . - r \ i l l c to the wing Robert Broadbcnt. who blasted it gle and double, and Lauren Vidov- relay with Shutts, Suzy Komb, Softball - at U. Catholic, 4 in. Tennis — Linden, home, 4 (9O8) 725-84OI ich had a double, two single and Aiiisa Dujnic and Liz Shannon In tho second half, tho Rangers continued to Volleyball — at Union, 4 coming in at 13:20.0. dominate with aggressive play by Joll Shults, three RBIforthe Lady Devils.

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Evan Schor, Jeff Greenlaw and Alec Wassrjrtnan. The Mangirs' Ihird score camo again from Ihe vying as Scott Callonder tallied his second of the game. After tho Thunder dosed the gap with a second score, Saglv Edelman took a corner kick from Grog Speir and headed it into the back ol lh
LACROSSE BASEBALL Weslfield advanced into the Westfield pounded Princeton 16quarterfinals of the Union County 1 May 1 as the Blue Devils' record Tournament with 10-3 win over improved to 3-7 on the year. Roselle Catholic Saturday at Edi- Liam Werthhekmer. Kevin Sulson School Field. livan, Kevin Mansfield and Bryan Senior southpaw Brian Ciem- Gates each scored a pair of goals.

SCOREBOARD TENNIS LADDERS MEN'S SINGLES May 1 marked the beginning of the 1996 Wostfiold Tennis Association Men's Singles Ladder competition. Below are ths final 1995 standings, New 1996 participants as of April 15 have been added to the bottom of the ladder in tho order which their applications were received. The next standings will reflect results of matches reported by e p.m. Sunday. All playera participating In WTA laddtri must t » West•field r t i l d t n t t and have valid Weitfield tennis pormlts. Evaryona on tho ladder la allowed two .free challtnget • month to "find their level." :Rules are contalnod within the membership directories sent to all participants. Match scores jor questions pertaining to the men's singles gadder should bo directed to Alan Shitieman, |tho 1996 moil's singles ladder coordinator M '654-2788. 1 1 . VinCB Camuto. 2 John Nason, 3. Gary Wassorman, A. Irondo Aliche. 5 Peter Shatpc, ;6. Don Flosemhal. 7, Aim Shinomnn, a. Jofi jPollack. 9. Bill Gottdonki>i, 10. Sirnon Lack, ! 1 . •John Tirono, 12. Etvin Hoot, 13. Simon Loe, 11. Juan Antonio Peroz. 15. John McLaughlin, 16. .Dwirjht Evans, t 7. David Print?, 18. David Lciz, .13. Dan Hill. 20. Flank QcSantis. 21. Mike 'McGlynn, 22. Tod Moss, ?3. Charles Call, 1M. ;Mil
10. Pat Page, 11. Sheila O'Donnell, 12. Churyl Robbins, 13. Monica Gundrum, 14. Robin Bailey. 15 Ellen Shapiro, 1G. Jan Vclasco, 17. Diunne Mroz, IB. Leslie Streit, 19. Charlotte I^ce, 20. Lisa Sharkey, 21. Kiithy O'Neill, 22. Ellen Smith, 23. Pamela Ixrnrr, 24. Terry Macri, 25, Karen Fried, 20. Carol Cross, 27. Janel Rock, 28. Paula Long, 29. Andrea Lowcnstcin, 30. Susan Mackay, 31, Carol Smillie, 32. Diane Fleming, 33 Maureen Foley, 34. Janet Cornell, 35. Debbie Roldan, 36. Suzanne Wolford, 37. Jill Cyr-Loewer, 38. Glnny Lelt, 39. Betsy Hogarth, 40. Allison Jacob, 41. Beth Kroncke, 42. Joanmarie Korn, 43. Lori Dlnenny, 44. Maureen Meylor, 4S. Di«ne Barabas, 46. Susan Amonette, 47. Mary McClellan, 48. Maryellen Doyle, 49. Joelle Hobson, 50. Felicia Demos. New members include Pat Clark, Chiiriotte Clevenger, Linda Colernan, Joan Dreyer, Dale Morgan, Andrea MacRitchis\ Jean Power, Marcia Sawyer, Jill Sharpe, Lorraine Dt'Sorbo, F.ilren Osterrniin, Patricia Iludelson, Rebi'cca Tiimborlane, Theo Taniborlane, Melissa Gould. Rikke Thomson, Tina Wasilowski, Kileen Mitchell, Sara Strohocker, Marsha Detrano and Veronica GrcH'Ttway.

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Bring In any competitor's ad or coupon and w* will m««t or beat that price »ub|«ct to ABC regulation!. WOMEN'S DOUBLES LADDER Following are the final standings o l the 1995 WTA Women's Doubles Ladder. New teams will be Included In the next listing. The next reporting period ends 8 p.m. Sunday. Teams that don't play at least one match per reporting period will be dropped three places. Please report all ladder scores within three days to Andrea MacRitchie at 654-9375. 1. Lee Perry/Cindy Fechter, 2. Shelly Nichols/Carol Thompson, 3. Jaan Powar/Jacklt Rogers, 4, Kathy Ostrowskl/Llillan Louie, 5. Jane K»rpln»kl/P«t Page, 6. Joan Dreyer/Lydlt Maiterton, 7. Ktren Oornt/Oale Morgan, t, JoAnn Purdy/LlM Shtrkey. 9. Karen Brown/ Robin Bailey, 10. Kathy O'NelH/ThereM Macrl, 11. Eple Bentacourt/Carol MaHowa. 12. Patty Hudelson/Andrea Lowensteln, 13. Gen Cohen/ Anne Latarta, 14. Janet Cornell/Maureen Foley, 15. Linda Coleman/Ginny Lelz, 16, Barbara Gigon/Sheila Parlzeau, 17. Georgia Aquila/ Jody Feifer, 18. Susan Shusman/Liela Barnstein, 19. Catherine Berry/Diana Barabas, 20. Maria Jackson/Barbara Goldberg, 2 1 . Anna Murray/Sarah Strohecher. 22. Lynn Ackarman/ Patricia Layton.

MIXED DOUBLES LADDER 1. Valla/Puzzi, 2. Boyle/Karp, 3. Karpinskt/ Candia. 4. Robins/Robins. 5. Louie/Darmanin, MEN'S SENIOR SINGLES Vlach/Vlach, 7. Allen/Hainville, B. The Westlieid Tennis Association's Senior 6. Mon's Ladder competition bugan May 1. The Goldberger/Machle, 9. Bernstein/Bernstein, 10. lollovumg list represents the final standings at Evans/Evans, 11. Coleman/Coleman, 12. tlio end ol the 1995 season. New players (or Inman/lnman, 13. Panagos/Panagos, 14. tho season will be added as their applications Drittle/Drittie. 15. Brindle/Brindle, 16. Foley/ are received Standings will be published every Foley, 17. Jacob/Jacob, 18. Morgan/Lawson, other week. All match scoros must be cat'od in 19. Clevenger/Clevenger, 20. DeSantis/OeSanto Bruce Long at 654-1874. Deadline for the lis, 21. Goodman/Goodman, 22. Page/Oonnolo, 23. Parker/Parker, 24. Fisch/Ftynn, 25. nexi publication is 0 p.m Sunday, 1. Elvin Hoel. 2 John Tirone. 3. Stan Karp, Thompsqn/KlingholBr, 26. Salasky/Salasky. 'I. Dill Ritter. 5. Irwm Boinstein. 6. John Dalton. 7. Joo Candia, 8. Mike McGlynn, 9. Paul SPORTS BRIEFS Hanas, 10, DBwray PamviMe, 1t. Jim DaClerico, 12. Bruce Long, 13. Ted Moss. 14. Charles SOUND OFFI Carl, 15. Saul Diittle, 16. Noal Snitow, 17. LowGot a score to report? Have a story or feat'll Do.ik, m Dick H,nc5ler. 1'J. Wallv Kat.', 30 Joe Donnolo. ? i Chatlos Gibilaro, ?2 Jerry ture iden? Or do you just want to vent youi Fostrr. ?3 Cd Pinkman, ?A Lon Albanese, 25. splcan to 1he local sports editor'' Donald Dohrn, ?s Mike Sananman, 27 Hal II your answer to any of the above is 'Yes'.' WOMEN'S SINGLES please call Jamos Reilly at 276-6000 or lax to All \oCyi\ womoii IfMirnr, plnyiMs nuy join the Hh 276 6220. Our address is: 102 Walnut Ave.. Westlicld Tennis Association and participate in CranlorrJ. N.J. 07016. WOMEN'S SENIOR SINGLES Ons or rnoro ol Hie t«nnis Uiddors organized by The Wnsttiold Tennis Association is adding a the association. Applications may be obinim-d PAL SOFTBALL TRYOUTS now laddoi this season, offering singles com nt tho Municipal Bwklinq in !ho flccteation Do The Westfield PAL girls summer league is petition to women 15 years-old and older. List- holding tryouts (or girls ages 10-16 at Westfield partmeittotfico. Each bddor has pljyors intoreslod in meet- ed below aro current participants, anyone else High Saturday and May 18 at 3 p.m For more ing other players for friendly competition. Play- interested can c.ill Geri Cohon at 233-7520 (or inforrnai'on, call Lisa Perotia, PAL Softball coorers arrange marches berwee 1 [hemsolvos nnd applications, information and scores. Play dinator, at 2327105. ihe winner calls in th-? r.iroio to tho Indder bpgan May t. fcoordin.itor. Season piny began Wednesday. 1 Georgia Aqiiila, 2 Pamela Dudr, 3 Ch.vSUMMER SOCCER and wrll continuo through Labor Day. Lsrtder lotle Clovenger, 4 Gert Cohen, 5. Joanne The annual Raider Soccer Camp will bo held Btandings nre posicil m Tin 1 ilVslfiWii Ougle, 0 Sus-in Fraser, 7 Ann Latartarn, 8 this summer nt the Scotch Piains-Fanwood /{ecuirf. For n u i n " ltifuntKititin, f.)H Jran Paula Long, 9. Susan Parkoi, 10. Carol Smillie, High School soccer complex. There will be two Vowvr at nSil-741H. A l l playrrs ;m ullciwi-il 1 I. Rita Wtnnicker, sessions offered — the weeks of July 8 12 and two free chnllen^cs nnd must ur;c tlu^ni bv Augusl 5-9. •June 1. Afterwnrd, players may challenge MEN'S DOUBLES LADDER The directors of the camp are Tom flnyone up to e^iGht positions hiRhor on the The following lists teams entered in the 1996 larjdiT. Tho first rpportinfi peruxi con- Men's Ooiioles Ladder. Regular season match- Brernrtsky, head coach of the Scotch Plainsf i i 8 p.m Sunday Bekiw are the final es began May 1 and runs through Labor Day. Fanwood High School boys team, and Tom Tumbull 03 Soccer Skills and Drills Inc, a year f r o m last year. Teams interested in joining the competition are round soccer tutoring school. I. Jacque Boyle, 2. Cindy Fechter, 3. welcomed. All scores should be reported The camp Is open to soccer enthusiasts In Jane Karpinski, 4. Clara Karnish, 5. Karen promptly to Mel Blackburn at 233-6458. grades K-10 with special segments for goalDome. 6. Joanne Purdy, 7. Anna Murray, 1. Chieas/Cincox, 2. Waiss/Zack, 3. Candia/ keepers and Lady Raiders. For more informa8. Evelyn Matino, 9. llelaine Wasserman, Camuto, 4. Aliche/Lyons, 5. Lo/Vo. tion, call Breznitsky at 322-8102.

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Periwinkle's shop is * Spotlight' honor business for spring t h e Westfield MainStieet Design above through tree branches and Committee hai recognized Peri- forsythia, adorned with large colorwinkle's, located at 9 Elm St., as its ful butterflies. "Spotlight on MainStreet" for Diflused light illuminates the spring. unique gift items displayed below, IWa distinction is presented sea- creating a warm and inviting sonally to the downtown merchant springtime feeling. whose window illumination most Acconling to Ms. Moffett, "tightefflKtivety contributes to the wel- ing is very important in a window, coming and safe atmosphere of it allows youtocreate a feeling." Westfield at night From the outside in, Periwinkle's With a commitment to serving provides a welcoming feeling as the public. Periwinkle's offers unu- well as personal service to its cussual gift items for sale in a visually tomers, including customizing gift pleasing, spacious new environ- items and free gift wrap. ment. Just down the street from its Store hours are 9:30 a.m.-5:3Q former location. p.m. Monday-Saturday, and until 8 Elaine Moffett, store owner and p.m. Thursday. "Spotlight on Mainoperator for six and a half years, Street" is the work of the Westfield has provided customers with a MainStreet Design Committee breathtaking touch of spring in her whose goal is to make downtown Elatow Moffttt of Parhwlnklt't poaa* In front of MM shop's facurrent window display. Tree light* Westfield an appealing place to cad*, which won MalnStrott't nkjhttlma Illumination award for ing is strategically aimed from visit dasfgn for tha aprlng aaaaon.

The Westfield Symphony cel- sponsoring platinum, gold, silver ebrated its 1995-98 Season of Flirts and bronze holes. The hole in one with its first benefit golf outing at prize, a 1996 Lincoln Mercury, was provided by Tom Giordano of Canoe Brook Country Club. With WSO board member Jim Maple Crest Lincoln Mercury. Wright as chairman, the April 29 The program for the awards dinevent received nuyor support from ner was provided by Print Tech PaineWebber and drew golfers and prizes such as the award for low gross — won by Joel Moikowfrom Washington, DC.toNew York to play on Canoe Brook's re- itz of Westfield — were sponsored stored and redesigned North by Michael Kohn Jewelers, NFL Properties and area businesses. Course. Proceeds will benefit the WestMorgan Stanley Funds, Midlantic Bank, JMK-BMW Saab and Colo- field Symphony's subscription connial Mutual Funds were joined by cert series and educational proindividuals and local businesses in grams.

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2010 • AnltaiMt »03Q • Appliances 3030 - Art 2O40 - Auctions 2090 • Clothing 20*0 • Collectibles 2070 • Computera

20*0 • Farm * Garden. 2090 - Flea MMtnlf, Sales and Baiaars 2100 • Free to flood 2110' Furniture 2130' Oarage tales 2125' Merchandise under 1100 2130' General Merch 2140 Office Furniture and Supplies 2150' Software 2160 Wanted to Buy

2010 Antique* A SPECIAL SPRING BOUTIQUE... The Martlnsvllle Antique Center Spruce up with Patio & Garden Decorating deas, Furniture, Fine Gitts & Home Furnishings. 1944 Wach. Valley Rd, Tues-Sun. 11am-5pm. 908-302-1229 Limited Deelere Space Now Avallabte CELEBRATE SPRING GO ANTIQUING... Somervllle Antique Outlet Center. Central NJ's Bargain Spot for Antiques & Collectibles. 17 Division St. Open 7 days 90B-526-344S LAFAYETTE MILL ANTI QUES CENTER- Lafay ette (Sussex Co.) NJ 201 383-0065. 40 Friendly dealers displaying affordable antiques and quality collectibles. Cafe' on premises. Closed Tuesday and Wednesday OVER 100 SHOWCASES VILLAGE ANTIQUE CENTER Antiquing At It's Beat An exciting new Antique Center filled with the fin est antiques and col lectables from 50 of NJ's Premier Dealers. Open 7 days Sat-Wed. 10-5; Thurs. 1 Frl 12-7 44 Y/ast Somerset St. Raritan, NJ 908-526-7920 Denier Space Available

SCOTT ANTIQUE MAR A BABY TO L O V E - KET— 1200 Antique Ex Stay-at-home mom, de hlbilor Booths May 18 voted dad must adopt 19. Monthly - Novambe We oiler wonderlu thru June, Ohio State home, security, and s Fairgrounds - Columbus college education Cn Ohio 1-71, Exit 17lh Av Bob/Judy 1-SO0-4O0-941 onue 614-569-4112 ADOPTION— Creative WAR RELICS WANTED loving coupla has a cozy Swords, unltorms, med homo for your baby, din als, patches, helmets provide best opportuni- civil war Items. 633-5243 ties. Great family. Gill & Kris (BOO) 342-7044 2020 ADOPT— Affectionate, Appliances happy, financial secure couple want to share their love with a newAPPLIANCE SALE born. Call Nancy/Ben 1- Refg. S85, washer/drye 300-448-7746 or ourS75. Fully guard,als agency, Days 1-600-841- service $19.95. 908-754 S553. Evenings 1-B00- 7209 B48-S2B7 GE SPACEMAKER— BECOME A HOST FAM- Washer & Dryer, largo ILY— Scandinavian, Eu- capacity lyr old $300 ropean. South American, 767-0557. Asia. Russian High School Exchange stuPREOWNED dents arriving August. APPLIANCES American Intercultural Student Exchange Call Guaranteed $8S, and up. 1-800-SIBLING. Major appliance repairs. Call 903-566-3233 SUPPORT SYSTEM WASHIER— $75. Dryer, SHUT IN? $65. Stove, $75. RstrlgVou talk—I listen eralof. $170. Can deliver. Call lor more Info Color console TV S100. JUST TAUC, INC Pis call 722-6329. 908-359-8176

CLKAHMt P S I - 150012M; 200OI33B; 3500i m ; Honda Contractor 4000-$ 1199, complete. factory direct, tax free. Lowest prices guaranteed, catalog. 24 Kours 1800-333-9274

AUCTION SOMERSET, N.J. 0 A.M. MAY 11 E.G.Hsller * Son will (ell he personal .property of L.N. Dmuehowekf j VOlVivrvvit SAT. T.,May11, $a.m. Thll IS • CONTINUATION of quality antiques, glassware, collectibles, furniture, still to b* unpacked from the attic, house, barns, and other outbuildings. It takes many sales to find new homes for the large variety ol rare, unusual, collection of over 70 years. We have no idea what we will unpack.

NOTICE; AN OAHAOE arc MVAMLC IN AD'ANCE by ea%H. chack, VISA er Matter Card. HOUSISALIS UNLO By Lori Palmer ull t Partial contents soa-e»-a5&2

DIRECTIONS: From Somervllle Circle, RT. 206 S o Hlllsborough, L on Amwell Rd., R on River Fid., L on Blackwells Mill Rd., R on Canal Rd., L on Jacques Lane. TENT LUNCH COUNTER ROBERT C HELLER 9O8-2M-219S

BERNAHDSVILLE 1 M Clarement Itoaei

M W O L M I X - IS Oak Dr. (opp. lake) Sat. 5/11, • e n v i p m . MOVINOi Ccmnt, meat grtndef, TV, Purn. ruga, M/H Hems. C R A N P O M - 1st Bap- MIDOLBSEX- 717 Hatist Church 100 High St. •kMMtel Awt Sal. 8/11, Flea market/plant * bake S-4om, AnUquee • mlec. sale Sat May H , Sapm Rain or Shin* NO. PUUNFIILD- Sal. Cenalaninant BauMeiue 5/11 I am to 3 pm, 61 OOUBLBTAKI Coddlnglon Ave. (oil High quality women's de- Somerset) Many Itsmt signer clothing and s o new * used. Something ceasortes-Armanl, Calvin lor everyone. No early

B R AN NC C HUBN UN a a- 17 M Mary Lynn L Lew* L MOV , MOVINO OVBRSBAS LOTS OF STUFF May 10 A 1 1 9 to 4. NO EARLY BIRDS

Klein, Eacada. Valentino, Huge selection of Spring i Chanel. AN Hams art at Clothing a Accessories least 75% oft the orig. for Women, Children A coal. I locations: 6SS Men. Semi Annual mat Pasaalc Avs. Wast CsldSato on Winter Ckrthlnp wsll 201-*0S4S6« and on May IS, 17 a I S . 7Sa Morris Tpk, Short Stop by * register lor a HIHS aoi-e«4-a464. Both Mother's Day Drawing. RONNIE'S AUCTION stores now open Sun. SERVICE noon-Bpm We Handle all kinds of NEW ARRIVALS In our Auctions. Specializing In furnishings dept: Iron OARWOOD- SAt. 5/11, Antiques, toys, Tools, Furn,, Country French 211 Cedar St, (off North Chairs, Pine Armolre. t • am To 3pm, HH Art, Qlast, Estates, Divorce, Bankruptcy, Oak Mission, Mahog. taname, toys, crystal, llnbles, Norltake China, nene, books, records a AND APPRAISALS. Buy Chandeliers, Lamps, much more. No early Ing Small tots, or Estates, I S YEARS IN Rugs, Mirrors * more. birds, Rain Date 5710 Consignment by appt. BUSINESS. PLEASE OREEN BROOK- 121 ENCORE QUALITY CUP AND SAVE. Jelferaon Ave. Across CON8IONMCNTS (904) S34.20S0 from 0B Middle school. Tue-F 10-6, Thurs. til 8 9 to 2.5/11, Rain Data, sat. 105. s o t T S t m 8/18. No early Birds. IT'S TIME BRIDQEWATER0.RECN BROOK- Rock Wed,Thur,FrltSat, CounFORA try Squire, Riding mower, Ave No. left on Louise craftsman weed whacker, Ave to S Bluerldge Ave, GARAGE SALE! spreader, new Inside Frl. 5/10, »-3pm. RainLuan Flush doors 1/2 data S/17, Maple twin price, golf clubs & bag, bads, antiques, kids 2070 clothes. 100e of Items. girls blke.356-ai 70 IBM COMPATIBLE $295. We also buy and repair computers, monitors, printers and boards. 90B-464-74M SMALL BUSINESS SPECIALIST- Networks custom apps. Repairs, Sales & Upgrades, Point of Sale Sys. 388-2485

2080

Farm a) Garden PRIVACY H E D Q E Cedar, Arborvitae seed lings: 6-12" high. Fast growing and Free delivery. Regularly $3.96 NdW: 50 tree minimum $1.95 each. Limited offer. 1-600-4B9-8238 TOPSOIL/MULCHESAt Wholesale Prices Pick-up or Delivery Cell 908-560-8000

2085 FIREWOOD- Off season special. 100 per qortt, cu to order, 908-673-212" leave mess.

2110 Fumrtun BRIDQEWATER— Single bed, dresser, 2 small roll top desk, entertainment center, call 722-8950. ENTERTAINMENT CENTER— new, stained oak with glass slda door A bottom storage area. Fits up to 25" TV. 53" W X 45* H X 16" D. Asking S3B5. 226-1999

Appeare every w e k In Classified To Place An Ad Call 1-600-559-9495 Outside New Jersey Call 1-908-722-3000

2JJ0

2110

2030

BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORIES

AD DEADLINES

CUSTOMER SERVICE

ve^p eP*jBe^B|

1020 • Singles Organ. lietlons and activities 1030 . Lost ft Found 1040 • Personals 10*0 • Coming Events 10>fl • Announcements

1ad*aiaaaiaalaoadllnFortoeetlawvtaaant*Mubiect to final approval by the PubM9her. m meenm tharighttoooimctly edit or ~ cla»e#f copy, to refect or cancel any advertiaement at any time. GMaTaHaiaaWL. Aecapta* up to 2p.m. Monday priortopublication. You* »ah» mpteeantathm mm h t w i w anumbmt at the mm elthe cancellation of mclmiWedad. TN» k your record of cancmamilon. * kgllUeWeatei M M M chack your ad tor error* tha FIRST WEEK it appear*^ Forbat Newapapera win NOT be retpomibte tor inoorrect ad* after tha tint weak. Foraaaaatvmaa noHnanclalraapontlblKtytOfarfonortortha omifion of copy, Brror MabaHy *haU not exceed tha coat ofthat portion of tpaotf occupied by tuch error. Major ed/uttment ctaiim mtmt be mad* wtthtn 30 • day* or Invoice, ottmrwtm much etakna wUI not ba oonakMrmd. K iWaa. taattarCard, chadnorcath.

Blind Adt-$15.00tor30 Oaybmnntal and mailing chary*. ^ * All capital or boUlaOanfO$ par Una. par watt ,';'• ^dajmJ^MBalieaal ClitXHcr ram am oommlutonabla to raoognlxad., aotndat at 15%. -.'.

Call your sales representative for details CLASSIFIED HOURS

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F O R SALE

ANMOUMCUMNTt

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SO. PLAINHBLD- 125 Mawtan Ave 5/11 * 12,84pm. No early Bkdsl Lots oTOoodiMl SO.PLAIMFICU)Sal. 6/11, 9 to 4 . 1225 Walnut St. E*. blka, baby Hems. No early Bird. Something for sveryonsl

Timing la •vorythlng. U ssf tFF to t m N e w i p a p t n C1a«slfl»d to »«1I your "tr«asur«)sH. Phon« 1-800-SS9-9495 or (908) 722-3000 Mon.'Fri. 8:00am-Si00pm

SO.PLAINFIELO- Vard sale. 5/18, 10 to 4. 407 Marsh Avs. No early birds. Something tor sveryone\

COMPUTER- Packard Bell 3 M , memory 1 mega SEMI ANNUAL byte, viedlo VOA, doa CLOTMINQ SAO SALE S.Q, disc drive 100 megaPtSCATAWAY- 127 Ellis MAY 1», « * IS bytes, mouse, primer Parkway Sal. May 11 Encore Quality Okldata LetterPertecl, mta3at May 10, Skiing Consignments crcllne 93. Asking $750; •quip, all tl 5/11, »-3pm. Block long Track, Hip k Thigh maWESTFIELD— 244 Edge chine. Call 756-3776 or yard Salel wood Ave OH Clark Sir •VS. 754-8867 SO.PLFD.— Muttl Ismily Moving overseas sale SALE A 1 yard sale May 11 9-4, h/ May 10,11,12. 9-spm rain F O R fi, clothes, turn, new i of shine Garden tools, CONO.- Full alze Pool old Hems, r/d S71S near lurnit, appliances, TV.table). Avail. Immed. 8475371 after 8pm Spring Lak« Park, VCH, radio* fans a mote

IT'S TIME

GAR

Hours Monday - Friday 8: 00am-5:00pm

Mall With Check or Money Order To: Classifieds Forbes Newspapers P.O. Box 699, Somerville, NJ 08876

OR CALL 1 -800-559-9495 Name:

Cty: Zip:

Phone: VISA/MC#:

MIMOPAUIETT PM8TT 100% Natural Creaml fWlevee Symptomsl NO Side Effects! Call 1-S00-390-W29

NATURAL B E E F — NO hormones or antibiotics. Pure Black Angus from local farm. Grain fed, lender A delicioue. S2.4S Ib, helves or quarters, cut to your custom o r d e r , vacuumpacked * labeled. Thli Is NOT a freeier plan. CALL Glenwvlew Farm, 908-632-2122 PAROCHIAL UNIFORMS SAVINGS- Lorraine's Jr. dept. store Somerset NJ 249-8228 I - Klmball Spinnet, walnut finish. $1200. Klmball Spinnet, paean wood $1350. Mehlln a Sona, Studio Spinnet $1295. Sohmer console walnut beauty $2100. Sohmer Ebony Studio $2400, Stelnway Ebony Studio $3250. Behr Bros. Baby Grand $2100, Hallet 4 Davis Ebony Baby Orank $ 3 3 0 0 . Knabe 1925 mahongy rebuilt Ilka new $7800. Yamaha, C3 S'l Ebony Grand $10,000. Fully wararrteed, delivery avail. 752-7890

WOLFF TANNING BEOS— Tan at Home. Buy DIRECT and SAVE1 Commercial/Home units from $199.00 low monthly payments. FREE Color Catafoa call TODAY 18O0-842-1305

Advertise In tho Classified!

2160 WatttadtoBuy * 1000-$ 10,000 paid for antique oriental rugs. James Proctor 90B-5454868, 1-800-358-7847.

Street:

State:

»aseva.

DOLLS FRO* THE S0> s, TanMHtf. Ti

Any cond.-WIrl triva*. Cell sCathyt »7a>TaaW G U N S . S WOMt, OM

KNIVES, MHJTAWA^ h a Fed. He. Top cash paid. House ealla made. Bert 821-4949 HM»M PRICES PAID-*>r postcards, sheet music, old toya, baseball Hems, cameras, military, TV's, Worlds Fair, lountaln pens. Call 272-5777. • ; PAVINQ- Cash foe old furniture, toys, civil-w,ar military Items. On* Hem to entire estate. Qftty, SHI or Bob. 908-52M913 or 201-514-8914

3000 PETS fl/VD 1/VFSrOCK 3010 • Birds 3020-Cata NKDHI 3 O 4 O - F1SB

30M-Horses 3080 • Livestock 3070 • Other Pete Training * Qroom|na 3100 • Mlscerlaneoue $M»plles * Satvtaa*

30M $1$O C A S H - buys any Pup in Kennel. All tyges. Values to $750. All Pups must be sold. Open; May 11 • 12. Hrs. 1 M . t*C/ Visa. (No Checks) J.P. O'Neill Kennele. US-Hwy 1, Princeton, NJ. (KSnnel Cloaing May 20)

E N G L I S H COCKER SPANIELS- AKC Chfnp. bloodline 3 female 1 male. Parents on premises. 526-5564 _ ENOLISH SPRINGER SPANIEL- AKC. liver & WEIGHT UFTINQ white, female 1yr. old, all Qual. equip, incl, barbelle a stand, 235 Ib. shots S300 or b/o.-9oa-. weights, bench, elect 246-0771 vibr belt, mach. S2S0/BO $800 value.908-754-4424

Place Your $17 Garage Sale Ad and Receive • FREE Signs • Rain Date Guarantee REACH OVER 300,000 READERS!

! - Hutch, Coffaa table. Fam. room furn. crib. Make offer. CaH S7143M day 762-

BUYING CAMERAS & Photo Equip, i p c c whole studio. No polarold/movle. . aoe-M$-7$11 CASH FOR OUITARSAmps, affects. Any condition. We coma to yo>. Call 908-580-4598. T ? COINS WANTED- F l y cash, top prtaes! Paper money, lorelgn, stamps, scrap gold, old Jeweiry't sterling- Estates and Collections. 908-782-0840. Rasb Coin, 4 Bloomfii Ave., Flemingjop.

EXD.:

Rll in 1 Character per box, allowingfor spaces and punctuation as necessary. Additional lines add $1 each, use separate sheet of paper If necessary.

A BUYER O F ALL LIONEL & Flyer trains, Hobbyist pays top dollarl Any condition, age, or quantity, 906-271-5124 S$$ ALL LIONEL, IVES, AMERICAN F L Y E R and other toy trains. Collector pays highest prices. Call 1-B00-484-4671 or 201-829-1006

3050

BEDMINSTER-OLDWICK A R E A - Box stall* In bright, airy barn. Superb care for your horsesf NO mudl All-day turn", out. Large ring. Prof'l trainer avail, for dressage, xcountry, stadium Jumping, clinics. Fabulous trail system. 325. 908-832-2122 QUAILTY BOARDING FACILITY— Arena turnout adjacent to trails908-781-0474

3080 Adoptabla Pata ADOPT A FRIEND AND A SMILE— Somerset Regional Animal Shelter his pets of all size* and species lor adoption at reasonable cost. Missing a Pet? For more Information call 72S-03OB. " KITTENS TO ADOPT Shots, tested rescue donation. 908-815-1634

I May 9,1996

A-15

AT YOUR SERVICE 4060 • Coiwalaaam Cara 4090 • HaaUti Cara 4105 • Inoomt Tax 4110 • Inatruetlon/Educatlon

4010 - Adult Day Cara 4020 - Butinw 4040 • Child Cart 4050 - CfMning

WITH TOUR DRIVERS UCRNSS1Suepenelena, Havocs-

CHILD C A R E - In my Middlesex horn*, Inf/tod. non-smoker, exp I re's. 3S8-07B1

CHILD C A M - Montrose Ave. In my S. Plamlisld home. Will care lor your inUnt/loddler. Non *mokROTOTtLUNO- All Ex- f Ino pets, 755-4019

port TILL e*tfi TroySM ostokilsh eerdene M I eg. y d . I M 1 I < »n*. BM.ENBINB REPAIR • I V . - Lawn mowtn, Iraetera, bio were. Mmmara, We. Free aAi ft

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A H M M AWAY . .. H O M E - tft yra. u p . | l ^ _

A0UTOC4CANUP Aitto/Bemt/aaroffo • Remodeling Dean*

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PROPERLY UCENSEO

UVB IN MAaBtY/AUPAM- Leg* tor 1fi moo. Aver, ooal ttOO/Wk, 17t-7S7».

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ALPHABET KIOZ

rajKYsaT'anajBjajBla)

O A V I - IST-eHM #864) ftumMng,H.aalng, Carpentry, Sneetroek, *

A now child day cara center opening toon in So. Plalnfleld Enrolling now tor Sept. Call foi more Info t brochure

MOTHER OF 1 — Will provide child car* in my Piscalaway homa. Begining late in Juna. Hot meal* provided 9OS-7526062

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C«iy Cubby Hal* Family Child Cara Carlld * ln» • I/C CPR 90657I-207* EeNaen

EICELLENT CHILD C A M - Lied., First Aid. CPfl, playroom. fenced yard. So. Plfd. 755-39B4. « * . CHILD CARE- In my Piscataway home. All ages, meals provided, a CLEANINO LADIISR m rales. Flsx. hrs. Will clean your home or 908 - 985-3430 otlice, Low prices. 8 daya per week, 560-1554 GOOD CHILD CAR! In my Duhall*n h o m e •FIASILIAN- Cleaning Expar'0. loving Mom. lady, will cltan home on Rail. SOS-Tsa-tftSJ own t r a n s p o r t . retNOME CHILO CARE • 2 «r*nc*s avail. Call 201485-3904. ctring Mo m i w/toacrv • up. ref*. Brldge/fl*r. CLEANING Momea/Aatl/ art*. 908-429-0446 C » n « a i / L O W RATES 140) Prof, quality avc. Supp. incl. reliable, Exc. rala. 908-754-2674 Carol. CLEANINO SEftVICESCynthla ft Carman, Qood lets. & good sxp. LOW pricDJ. 560-05T»

•00-754-7135 OVNAMIC RESUMES WRITTEN- w/Nsjh Im- CHILD C A R E - Do you IN HOME CHILD CARE pad cower letters. Other need qualified, screened Uv t In/Llva Out

Insured care tor your prePart Time/full Tim» cious child? Only MonAfl*r School Service*. SOS* day Morning inc. ha* III Call 906-754-9090 or Somerset Cty 526-4*84 11 801-5939090 Middlesex Cty 263-S595 Hunlerdon, 7SS-S83I INFANT CAMESmall you leoMnf for afford• «gillered Hllliboro able LMo mouroneei l < group. 12 y n . n p , £«c. CHILD C A M - imam or f»l». Afford. 359-2093 toddtor to car* for A lov* PAMTNM A W A U M - in S. Plilnfleld homo. Ex- MOM OF 1 - Will giv* P I R I N O - Unkjue wait perience 1 Excofl*n< ref- TIC lo your Intant/Tod. design. Corn. Palming, or*nc*i. Call Mary Lou at in my Manvllla home. 20 FNMNMniirt yra. e»p 9O6-SaS-5O62 •M-rsr-4474

CLEANING •EBV»CB«Raasonably rataa EKP. own transponailon. Call 757-8712 HOUSICLKANINO* E*p hard working, rail. low ial*i. Honaal A dapandable- 756-0*80 KITCHEN C A B I N C T t CLCANID- Dull atlcky, nickad, scratcrwd * mom ara«> rapalrsd. Kllchan Tune Up. XW-755-1977 THE VOtlSHtD LOOK Prol, "Hh a paraonal touch. No crew*, Era. Rail. Ral*. SchadUad to your n*«d* XW-78M

417S - Moving 41*0 - Party * EnUrtaHmtnt 4210 - Profaaatonal 4225 - Saaaonat

4120 - Inauranca 4140-Lagal 4150 - Loans ft Financa 4170 • MlacaHaaMoua

ADVERTISE IN FORBES NEWSPAPERS C l ASSir IEDS 1 CAL I. 1-800 Sr)9 94
COMPAMKMt/AHMI- For TOM1* LAWN MOWER tldarly man, to admlnl*- C R e e o l M Year R l e M Monte*.—All m*k*a A «*r m*dic*lion, ptapara Career A MoMws tVe mod*l*.W*ad*alar*.Trlmbraaktatl and lunch. Exp. TrewiMlHi A Courae For mor*.Ch*lnS*w*.Fr** not na*«. S30 • Spm M-f Women-CaH Martfyn Cot*t.P/U,daHvary.O«O-oaaa Call lor datail* 000-23*- liar, M.S..M.A. Allgn7177 9-5 **k lor Ell**n. meant inc. 808-7864312 4171 COMPUTER T U T O R Loam how to> uaa your eomp. In your homa. I PALMIERI H O K M coma to you, tun and "AlMOhjta" lowaat prlc** aaay way to warn. Can on all small" or "iarg*" Paul' mov**: 1 p>*c* H*ms, CCMMOMUMO- wHh a U.VACKY piano*, Apia., rtoma* 4 Ftotooalonol an Adoption, Jaaehar O f PAVHMTOO •mau otflcot. U C # O O S M . AFC • • • • * 4 « - a t T » Dopnsaalon, IMvorco, Qam my nonrv ai M M M FOR NSALTH At*ard*bla'Prola**ion*l* l t M l N % now or**M rlatrlcs, Oriaf 4 ttro«a. I N t U R A N C E T - Your WaNOWI1W%Ugal. LOW choioo of Doctor, your of HoapHoi, V o - •TOOK MARKET- Oat •MHTAH N W T R - H yrt. ehotoa Dantal, Indi- you aloiplaaa In NJT H T**crtlng A parlormlng acrlptlan, vidual or OrouB Covar- you WOMM Itfc* Irtvoalciall •«p. All atylaa, from mant rotumo that ara a> uaakaapa car*, ROCKTOR A M . Pick or oaa, cm i-aoc3ii-7»
NIRVANA Personal Cara Ma***g* Cantor. Qraan Bfook ffXMM24-«X>W METROPOLITAN OPCRA M * n o Soprano vole* leason* In araa usa* natrl lach. 312-T24-««H

OFFICE SUPPORT— Data baaa mamt. clerical. Invoicing, computer h*|p. CaiaM-Ma-im OVEHWBIOHTT F**l Hopatn*? I can h*lp. I

toil 100 Mw. Qhw ma 1 Mr.: Your Homa or Mtn*. I'D chongo your iifal

lUMITlil Iv.msg. TYPSSITTINQ. Flyera. forma jand much moral MPI PRtCEaV Call E0M24-M1I

ABCDJ'S

USE FORBES CLASSIFIEDS!

PiANO kaSSOMS- In M^

tWCOoM TAX PREPARATION- Fad•ral, NJ, NV ft PA. by as*Mla> I n MtWaar KAMhat *AaV. • M i l H I WviaW r w w v t w^^^

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dgewetor, Hlllaboi$$ANYCRKDIT ougfij inTCaB TUTORINOi Reading, math tn yr. homo. 10 yra dayo • • t . Mortaaa* public achool anp. Mono* Unlimited, ITD. C*rt.K4 A M.t. Ma*:MA CMt7t-N1».

BARGAIN HUNTING? FIND IT IN FORBES CLASSIFIEDS!

OSfltOO M N.J. D*pt

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fJavnviBWWfJi * v

rnertaaaa*. notion* only oVoot purotMOor.

N*w. Sarvica, rebuild, opening. Iroo o i l , aal price*. All Work Co. 000-350-3000 - w _ Fool Pfto> ITOIYI MSB. Also c o m p M * service A repair*. C A M Pool* 1400-718-7886

4in MLUCA9 Local * tonf «*tanc*. CEDAR PKIHC T A B L E ! - Cuatom mad*. Any all* or ahap*. Ordar now for your Memorial Day picnic. Call W«Hy 764-0071 HOT NEW IMTIP.NET MALL— looking for n*w advartlaar*. Put your ad on In* information super highway. For fre* Info. CM! fM-7IB-M47

MAKE YOUR HOUSE A HOME

Frompt tor, moo. R M O *

Frao prompt Jur* ear raYour afwaya on a dlat but kjat got foHorT Your rrton»* oonl baMawo you anymoro wnon you tod thorn your dlotfofl, wo know what your up •tairwt, wo eon hotp Juoi COM: 7I7-WO-0023

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SpeclallilngT In Woman'* « ChUdr*n * clothing. AltcraUOM, custom dailgns using your malarial. Call aft Opm OQt-404-2924

A G u i d * To Locol Profostiorwl* Servicing Your Needs For: • 4030 - Carpentry • 4130 - landscaping & • 4070 - Electrical Tree Care 41*0-Mo*onry • 4075 - Owners 41M-Pointing • 4 0 M - HorWyrnon Service* 4?00 - Plumbing • 4 0 * 5 - HowUnaj A Cl*or> Up Hoofing ft Cooltno • 4 1 0 0 - Home Improvement 4230 - Roofing • 4125-Interior Oecoroiina 4290 - WoHpopering •4127-KMchen*

* PAINTING* ELECTRICAL- AN type* of w i r i n g , Service cnonooo A paddle lane. Uc. l i n t . »0M7247BO ELRCTHICAL- Fro* E*4 Service Upgr*dee, A.C, Poola, FoM,>hoMi, a* of Coot. Uc AN 134*0.. SaW4)0tO Paddle Fan*, lervlces Lighting, Free EM uc# f i a r f S M - 4 0 4 0

RONSON ELECTRIC-

MLA.CRATBR DomoMIOn/Hauling Conei. Rot. Dobrlt Free Eat. 10% 880 1900)232-7113 AFPORDASLE- Junk Removal, neaaonabl* fUte*. Free E*t. •00-79«-7J«3 ALL TYPES CLIANUPt Hauling, Demolition, no job* loo big or small fre* aal. »3S4Sl-7S«7 CLEAN UP ATTICS

Semis a Yard* fan*, roof fan*, outaid* Free Eel. lighting, ovc. change*, Call Rudy 722-6918 appliance hooh-upa, and much more. Uc. W32, C L E A N U P A 1.10MT In*., fro* eat.. 29 yr*. H A U U N O - of t i l typai. CmWX752-5M3. Free eotlmate*. Insured.

4077 CARPET INSTALLATION A Sales at Wholesale Prices. Cuetom Work. Call OnB Iflfl m i

4tM

Dooro. StMora APorchee •00-3A4-H10 ALL ASPECTS- HWarlor. Exterior Homo Repair, Gutter*, Siding. Door*. 1**1

A

QUTTWtS A LEADERS Throughly deonod and tiuaheo. OuaHty acreoo* Installed. Repair work done. "I'D b* there to do the tob." Qregory Cort •OS-7S4-2S17

Low rates. We work weekend*. Call Tony " " 7S1-4MO0 LEAF CLEAM-UF UflrtHewNfHJ Snow plowing Call Jamas 754-6508 HILLA'S CLEANINQ » CARTH4O You call I hauil Debrla removal ol all «rnd.tO*>7S4-6«7S.

SUFftSMC REMOVAL Yard. HouMhold. Attlci Spring Cleanup Construction Demolition Contractor*, Home Ownare. Free Eatlmate*.

^ ^

Inc. Dan SOS 8SS 0676

•••

ALL PHASES OP HOMffi MEiAW l n o r t o f / # f window. door«« bathOVTM» panfaWIQi OtC. C W

John M S - 7 M 4 f H 7 _ CARPENIRY Int/Ext. Homo Improvement, Deck* A Bath*. $400. on wtth t*ia ad. Sheet flocking, Painting, Etc. Ins. Free Est. Call Chart*»90O-44W-t9a4

DECKS DICKS DCCKS

A A J KINMORE • WHIRLPOOL- W*»hor k CCRAIHCTIU Dryer repair. DtecounU Marbel. Qrantt*. Initallafor aentora 752-—W tlon by maeter craftsman R e s i d e n t i a l A Corn OOOJOfM merciojl. 17 years e«p From t*aky laucets Complete remodel*, wire water hooter*, window mesh floor*, mud paw*. replacement*, A painting. 1 marble butlnoetng. Oan Call for Free Eat. 9So- Falcnanaa 90B-534-1152 3953

STIVE'S CAMPRMTPtY Window*. Doer*. tri**t rock tin., paint, plumb Attic*. ba**m*nta, yard* Uc. 5379 35OTO27 Call Joe 2S7-1281 WCT fMSEMCNTT NAMLAWNCAKE QUEST Odd lobs, free Mrvlc* Basement Molding*, eheotrock, plan, lawn cara, A main- g u a r a n t eWatarproofino door* A general repairs. tenance. e d . Sump 900-722-94W CaNToma9»4)215 pump* and trench drain* OOD J O M A QCNERAL !n*t*llid. 1400.7A6-96BO REPAIRS- Lt. naming, AAATRVWALLA 4070 brush cleered k reSPACKUNO moved. Expert lnt/*xt. Over 20yra Sheetcarpentry, painting, re- rock, PaintingExp. 4 Carpenplacement window* k try. Greet price* 636ALK ELECTRIC- resld.. deck*. Tree work, log 6«55ein\24 comm. A indost., avail, days, weekends, night*, AODITIONS— Bas*rmnt FREE EST1 Fully Tn*., finishing, painting, all reasonable rate*, Lie. homa repair*. FREE EST. 9732. fully ins. 906-821-6989 today tor a FHEE Our r 2^1tf* ASPEN ELECTRIC- All mate. ALL REMODELING A residential need*: house REPAIRS- Handyman fan*, smoke detector*, •anrice. 14 yra. exp. Fr*e lighting, telephones, etc. . N T ^ ^ Eat. irwurd. 9OB-220-5O7 Quick response. Lie. Deck and Fence Bleaeh #7534. Catl 359-3041; I n g , S t a i n i n g and ATTICS TO BASEMENTS 873-0137. or 704-W70 Waterproofing.. Driveway All prt*s*e of remodeling s e a l i n g . O d d o b iFree Estlm*t—S81-7164 COONEY ELECTRIC "aasonabla A (Watt*- B A S E M E N T / W A T E R For all Electric Work. Lie. • C*H POP*, 317-W4S • P R O O P I N O — Sump 297S- Insured, Compump*, Ext. Drainage, petitive Pricing. 46B-18B1 BUNT-A-SON free eel. A ineurod Qaneral HANDYMAN COONEY ELECTRIC— CaH Mark at 424-2083 I DottAUJi5yTe.eiip. All type* , Read/Comm. Quality work. Qrjjl r a w BATHROOMS Lie 2978, Fully Insurd. Free est. tWS-TW-7310 000-4*0-0it1 Complete ranovitlons, repair*, plumbimg, reELECTRICAL WORK orouong. Free EM. Fully Track Lighting Dryer A In*. Call Randy, range ckts, ac. pools, 753-2759 or 322-3560 scat, outdoor lighting, BATHTUB A TILE REservice upgrades, violaS U R F A C i N O - 5 yaar tions corrected inspecwarranty, free eatlmaitas. llons. *tc. Quality work Call 90ft-7S6-5351 Quick Response, Free Esi. License 102S2 BLOWN-IHSULATiOH 908-603-9316 Qarage, calling*, attics. Non-toxic. High R velue ELECTRICAL W O R K HAULMO A CLEANUP Fteeher Z72-S299 CommerclBl, residential junk removal, bamt. and Industrial. Licensed, attics, yarda, pool* No. 9141, and tnsur*d. Proleealonal Powerwaah 1n*t*rt Quality Servtae Free e s t i m a t e ! . Call Sprlna Special S M & up You Call We Haul Vine* Santonutaso Elec908-903-9030 9O8-24B-5411 tric 968-1 «O9. __ Cuatom Bum Any Shop*. Special Spring Prices In*. Refe. Color Portfolio

JUNK REMOVAL

FREE!

if if if

MPERIULa O f PWUAJiLI

A LAWN Hlh VjWaVngro WW f P | i |

o

eHlasn dioeeunt*, free eet. Cei Denny 4—-7862

LAWN C A M - AI rate*

OFA8TI eFREEl •EFFECTIVEt

Homa Jmprovamant Raaourca Services

CARPENTRY A HOOP INO— repair. Celling A floor p o r c h * * , stepa paint, Call 356-OOW

•>AVINO A PBNCtNQ BY CATENA. DH

CCHAMICT1LE Remodeling. Installation and repair. Fro* *>tl male*. 9O8-23«-7t35

PfMJOMMON CONTRACT NfO— Cuatom bull (tar*, addition, add-e^*v*l. roofing, aiding, deck*, • - - S0*«M-11S8

rst

Sertrw, 393-C328 D«C COMSTRUCTIONaddltlona, Dwmei*, Re-

Inauraneo Restoration 1 a yeara eavorlonce Referencee A OuorerrUe* Can today 808-661^684

HOCK A placement Window* and SPACKLS- PatehM to wall*, wW bum A ttntan Door*. All phases of car j*ntry. Free Est. 908- •II. Ineured yy-000-1701 «ee«»8 •VAOCUNa. PARsTINO SpeceHilna In reatormg 9RIVEWAYS- Parking old crack damaged pjaao t s . Black toppecf, ttonod, scaled, Belgium tar wsHv A OVOWI^I R*«W•onaWe rate*. blOCki. 906-722-1862 900-8S2-SS14 DECKS BY BUILDERS QENEPIAL Reasonable Fr*e Est.

906-707-9843 Quality work at competiDECKS DECKS DECKS tive ratee. Wo do M ALL Free 19 page picture Wo- from DaaernOfn to roof chur* A eel. TC Car-Office IrtoTtor*. Fully Inpentry 906-549-8398 sured. Referenoeo oveM -7042

DRIVEWAYS- Patloa, T A N K H E M O V A L A walkt, drainage work, grading, oil tank remov- From S29O. Ewtromentol ed. DBS Property Im- Remediation A AaeeM< provement. 908-873-0151 ment, SOS 00S-6707 DRIVEWAYS/SEAL VASTtNO__ COATING- Deck* Mai LUNBIRUCIION powerwashlng, rotoCustom Renovation, |, Qual. work. 5 yr*. Addltlona, Kitchen* exp. Free est. 626-7478 Bathroom*, Basement Fully n * . Free Est DRYWALL J0+9OS-78S-7SM Repair*, addltlona. new homet- Free Estimate* 1-400-286-0573 Aak for Rich FENCES- New A repair, wood or chain link, free est. Mar-NIc Fence 908CUSTOM SLIPCOVERS B2B-9109 Draperies, Reupholstery. Formerly at Steinbachs A OARAQEDOOR k Hahne I . 47 year* esp. OPENERS Senior diecount. Free Saloi/lnatallatlon/SarShop at home aanrlce. vice. Ins. A Exp. Alao W. Canter. 906-757^855 avail. Eves. A Sat. 874-5084 412T OARY'S FLOORINO Sanding Staining Raflnlsli Frsa Htlmate. 466-3970 NfTCHCN REMODEL IN

X

7SS-71*!

MAtOM CONIHACIORS

Meckwerk *«e. PuSy IniNretf. Free

CtOOA4J80 A (JnaOO Otll-

Hoe. Free fsaimMii. CaH Anthony SOS-TtJ-1706,

TOOaMALl.

ROOFING SIDING 20yrs exp. Very high quality. Very nest A dependable. Lowest prices. Super refe.

OetritltVUvfl

you aaytoomuch! Call Spencer McLelsh

«JO9

OJNPPITN PArNTHM So. Flfd. Int. A Ext. Wellpapering, Powerwaehing Free est SS8 MS-11TT.

A/C A HEATINa TECH. .-Now A Mln. Byr* Comm, A Ind. repslr. Povera, pettee • xp. Qood driving HAVE YOUR HOME record. Top pay, van w/ PAINTED •7U47I1 AC , Haalth Insurance, For under S200. MASONRYPotloe, Vaca., ProfH aharlno . HOME PORTRAITS Lawn malnt. Sprln VWTiiVVsnB; etoope, walk*. Ete. No Tempmatlc Inc. Call 722clean-upa, fertlllting, wancojCo. Joblo emeM. Pros eet ^ " r i r i a » artful A M I 7020 A mulch, Toptoii A oil P#*vtfoWa) LJc< Ff 626-1741 90S7S9-2950 typee of landscaping. CaHsOS-TM-SaiO CENTRAL A I R - ReMASONRY- AN Type* Fflch 008-7S4-12fb placement cond. unite, HOUSE PAINTING MSA 10 years Experience turn, colls. Room I thru Ext/lnt., Wallpapering A cut above the beetl Free Eettmeieo wall *e. 572-1700 FREE eat. OuaHty work Lawn* n i l , fertHlied A laU141« • • l a ^ a i hallnaasl iBkatk Calf tftS SJS MS1 FORECAST HEATINO A •eeded. Spnngcleanup, ffiin pticaw i i v i w vnw Alt) CONDfTtONNM CO roto tHtlna , power waeti- not. Free EeVFuay bio. MASONRY- All types Sal**/ Service mo. CaH nowfor 10%off »A hr. emeraency eervlee Sldewelks, steps, S P E C I A L - Free 2nd Concrete work, Brick k Installation A Free Eat. Forts * Sons coat, gutter cleaning Block*. 38 yri. exp. Cett SOa-241-OWS window waeh with every fieed/Comm. 581-4524 Tree A etump JohnatS0S-BM-ia44 exi. palm Job. Free extl- MCTAXAS PLUMBUM A fjfwnjfje^ Swisli BEAR PAWS mate*. We can pakit your HEATINO— Repairs, InPETER DHMZO Stump Removal faded aluminum aiding to •tallallon and *l1*rnaMason Centrectet SOS-722-3395 M%* Ine. Curtlous, Prompt, All masonry work. Fre* look like new. lions. Free eat. Llo, Competmve SSKW77 MULCH/STOMB- Pick eatlmate 90S S8S S771 10227 908-725-5696 908-561-7164 Up or prompt deev*ry. CLEAN-UPS J.B.M. PAINTING QUALITY MASONRY OIL TANK Retail or * h o l e s e l e . LAWNMOWHM Int./Ext. Profeselonel. Removed or Sand Filled Eagle Fence A Supply Steps. Sldawalks, Patloa Quellty work. Affordable Basement waterproofing S0S-826-S77S Quality Servtc* at AffordPrompt profeeelonel serrates. F r e * Estimate able Price* 906-560-7306 Insured, Fre* Eailmate* vice at rasonable rale*. PANZARELLA LAND- Csll Mark eO8-4>4-aOS3 J**on. 627-1972 Free eat. 908-7JM623 • C A P I N Q - Cleonup, OIL TANKS KALLAS- Painting Sand tilled or removed. Lawn M*in.,Trlmmlng. 8 YOU NEEO M A S O N NINA COMPLETE WORK DONE? And w* A Paperhenglng, Reptw. eos-ooio East Coaat Marine Sor. pairs. Pleater/weetrock. Spring clean-up, monthly ROSEOAROCN - L a n d - want lo do it. Brick, 27 SOS-S164732 yrs. exp. 322-4030 cara, repair lawne, shrub scaping , Spring Clean- block, concrete, patios, maybe a garage or 2. PLUMMNO. A HEATINO OLDOUYrAINTINO work ft trimming. upa. Landoeoee Deelgu. You name K-w*'ll do It. Low rate*. Qood service. Free Est. 201-376-2165 Int. Painting ? Lawn MalnTFuHy Irtaurd. U*e t h l * Ad and set Need Drain cleaning. Free eetlCall The Old Quy 10% Off. We giv* fre* es C R E A T I V E L A N D - Free Eat. 7M-7683 mates. Ucense #10116. 906-755-6104 timates. Will do work In SCAPE— Lawn MalnCaH John! N.J. & PA. Call P A I N T I N O 6 4 0 PER tence Schrub and tree SCHNEIDER PLUMBING planting, seed and sod, TROY BILTS, EstabNaned R O O M - Mln 3 rm*. Your 610-769-0233 pavere walk* and patio*, Qordena a * low a * 125. painta. Immediate est. 16 State lie. 487S. Service, Remod Repair*. Est. retaining walla. Free Eet. Cuatom lawn work. Free yr»*»p. 954-2461. 1916 9O8-W8-O138 Call Scott Mellon 41*0 est. 9O6-726-322S PAINTING by BRUSH 908-722-6686 WORKS- alt kinds, bldg repair*. Exp S Retlabia, O. MURPHY TREE SRVC Mowing 4220 Stev* 908-528-5134 23 yra. Exp. AH tree cara CHRISTADORE mi A stump removal. Quality PAINTING Walka A P PAINTING work at low rate*! Fully P r o t e n l o n a l Painting Exterior/Interior fr*« est, Insured A free wtlmate*. T J'S LAWN A LAND- Fully Ins. Rea*. Free Est. Its ROOF1NO- Hayes Conhard to beet our prlc F I R E W O O D - I 1 2 O . / SCAPE- Spring clean 276-1127 tracting. Specialising In esi Neat and Reliable Lawn cutting, mkig, A SnV Freeoet. SOS-711-1S62

1-800-551-4477

CERAMIC T I L E - Marble A Qranlte. Free Est. 12 Eip. R*i*. avail. :it, Bths, A foyer* Call

LAWN CARS- Spring

at,11

M U S PAINTINO A PAPERING- Int/Ext. Kit. cabinet* ieflnl*h*d instead of refecmg. Fre* Est. 906-782-7848 FERDtHANOI PAMfLV Painting Inl./Eat. Roofing, OuHara A Leaders Roes. Rates. Meet a Clean. {80S) 984-7359 FROSTY'S PAINT1NO Int. only. Quality work maniNp. Refe. CaN Oary 9OM1S-1S33

big, S i m * Tnmmlno A Inaiellatlen, Sprlna Oeen-Up.JeffTSMTtf

ROTOTILUNQ

463-TREE/245-6423

tAL CLEAN UP> Lawn cutting, Thatching RaaaonaUerRellabla Charlie 755*429

up. Thatching, Seeding, Mowing, Rotolllllng. Scfirub Trimming.Free Eat. 908-673-2248 TICK CONTROL T R E A T M E N T S - AI*O lawn care programs 6 step* to a beautiful lawn. Free E M . Exp., Uc. * Inured 900-216-1796

Nobody Covers It Bert*rl

J

Cell S.W. Painting <908) 847-6436

Res. Hoofing. FREE EST. Fully Ins 753-5372

PAINTING Interior A Exterior WeNpeperlng

ROOFING Stringta SpedeMet Quality work guaranteed

900-0*6-5770 JOHN MACNAMARA HN PAINTING MACN« WINDOW REPAIR CAFICf! CONST Int/Ext. R*ccomened by Puttying. Broken Glass Rooting Of AH Type* Exp'd. In Spiral. Squor*. Int. Decorators.10 Yrs r e p a i r s , Caulking k Shlngras/Flal/Slate Round, Pom-Pom. Up. or Washing. Fully in*,, Free Le*fc Repairs 968-8241 E»p. Call John 709-0915 Small at axcellentpHci TRIE A SHRUB CARE •St. 27 yr*^*jrp. A S J PAINTING DANNUCCI ROOFING SPECIALISTS- lie. A A POWERWASHINO Fully Insured, Free est. Ins. Insect control » deep A INSIST ON QUALITY! Over 20yrs. experience. root feeding, free consul- int/Ext-Housea A Decks Complete lawn cara, tation 908-218-0798 washed & sealed. Senior 908-996-8462. landscaping, etc. Free PAINTtNOInl./Ext. discount. 908-386- 0717 E*t. Fully Irisu. 662-5935 Paper Removal k Hang- ROOFING- Siding, GutTREE A SHRUB CARE Ho. A ANTHONY'S PAINTING Ing. Free Est. 30 yrs. ters, Leaders k Aepalr* JUST LAWNS-Quallty SPECIALISTSInterior/exterior. Roofing, Exp. Csll John 602-1535 Free Est. Fair Price* ins. Insect control A deep Care, No lawn too email. root feeding, free consul908-753-0642 gutters clsaned/lnstalled. PAINTINOLet a Reas. rate*. Call EmU for tation 906-253-0193 Free *»l. 7SS-S441 WHATTON HOOPING woman do your painting. Free Eet. at 752-7110 B A LENOX C O N T . - Nest, clean quality work. A leaky roof doee't mean YOUPUTURET KAROOS) LAWN CARE Int./EKt. Quality work t Insured. Free Est. Call a major expenael Free SO to 80 % DlKourrt* atOEM. CONTRACTOR— 41*0 Cleanups materials, Exc. nels. Free Maryann 906- 560-9235 Eat. Fully Insu. 75OOC20 Carpenter - Mason - tract attention . How Spring/Fall Mulching, Rototllling Est. IZyrsexpSaS 4399 Dumptruck S*rv. Insured, about 'cabinet for CabiPAINTINO— Exterior Fully ine. 90is-0o4.2iV> net, we beet any price." reasonable. S08-S6BBILL'S INTERIOR only, Exp. College stuA1 REP MASONRY- WO Our methods era not KESLOWt LANDSCAPE 3174 Nor. Const. 4290 PAINTING dent, naade money. Call unique to the kitchen Indo It en. Big or am. SpeCompM* prof. S*rvtc* Free estimator Quality Den 906-469-3341 J. OARRETT ASSOC. dustry, fuat fonjotten. Let For video * brochure call cializing In Brick, Block A work. 906-356-3536 Complete Home Remo- u* anawer your question, 7347,9-Spm Concrete. Fully Ins. Free PRESSURE WASHING dllng, Siding, Roofing, meauur* A ahar* daelgn Eet. Honeet Work/ Fair House, deck*, sidewalk*, WALLPAPERMO. BY Quttort, leader*, doors, Idea* from the comfort of KUSTOM SCAPE Price*. B2S-8847 FEMININE TOUCH fsnees. Fully tnsu. Free windows, porch enclo- your homa. NO OBLIGA- Spaciallzing in redesignEst. 906-755-8676 Reasonable rates. sures, decki. bathi A ing existing scapes by TION. Prompt service. Free es* Painting kitchens, Wator proofing. RJfNASKO transplanting trees or timates. No lob loo 906-808-4450 • Paper hanging No job too small 1 w e Fully In*. Free Eat. shrub* to obtain a new A imell. Call 231-0282 KITCHENS BY DESIGN. * Specialty Applications glad
CUSTOM

I

•4 * * " "

1

i'

p*^w*y 9t- *4WHy

Employment Guide WERE GROWING SO FAST WE NEED YOUR HELP! ACCOUNTING CLERKS - FULL TIME

Fulltlm. Mary.

Part-Time CMitl* tariff

Forbes Classified phone room is looking for an ENERGETIC, ASSERTIVE, POSITIVE person to join our advertising team. If you are qualified and have telemarketing experience, call

(90S) 712-3000 «xt. 09S0

Entry level positions available in our busy corporate headquarters. Candidates should possess calculator, data entry and clerical skills

WAREHOUSE: - SUMMER Seasonal opportunities available in our busy distribution facility. No experience necessary. We will train.

DRIVERS - FULL TIME The Slar-Ledjcr hM tirly moraine psrt-nmt work. A foofcar It s mull. Suiting talary i i tlijpsrwaafcjiliucar npcniet. Commiiilani •re svailiU*. Frinse btaeflu include Vlilon. omul and vsCMloni. Rapid incnutt in ultry. Six momlBgi per week Ft» a few hour* a day.

Coil Toll-Free

for more information.

SOMERSET TIRE SERVICE, INC. 400 West Main Street • P.O. Box 2001 Bound Brook, NJ 08805 • (908) 356-8500

NURSES Join Ifie INTERIM* Heattricweteam. We are seeking experienced prolesalonal*. We offer enceHent pay Abeneffis, HsbtWy cowenge * fleaibillty to work a lew hours...or as many a * you want) NEEDED STAT...RNS * LPNs with IV trisr spy * ventilator experience. CaH us today at:

FuH & Part Tirra, Day & Evenirss Shifts

PART TIME

RARITAN HEALTH- 633 Route 26, Raritan. Certified Kurae* Aides- F/T, P/T all *hltt«. 626-8950 Pat Cncc»v«tll

Would you like lo earn an extra S5OO-S600 a month? We have early morning routes available In the following areas:

e STIRLING e GILLETTE eBASKINQ RIDGE • BEDMINSTER e BERNARDSVILLE

A POSTAL JOBS* Permanent, Full Time, S13./hour, with goverment benefits. Apply today for clerk/carrier application Info. Call : 219- Call TOLL FREE: Tl1»1t»1.e«t.P2617 1-888-4-LEDGER ACTIVITIES ASSISTANT Looking for pleasant friendly person for care center to work Full/Part Time, experience a plus. Call {908)722-7022 lor appointment.

1-898-453-3437

L A N D S C A P E HELPERS— Hard work, good pay. «6-S10hr, 27ZoSflQ LANSCAPC LABORERS Hard Work Good Pay, S8-J10 Psr Hour EXP. Helpful 908-272-3960 LAWN CARE APPLICATOR Must hava e«p, own transportation to A from work. Clean driving record. Call tor Interview (90S) SSO-SOM, 10am-3pm, Mon.-Prl. or apply In person to Natural Qreen Lawncar* 798 East Main Bt. Brldcewafr, MJ. LEOAL Partner of •mall, busy Somerset County firm. Seeks skilled secretary with matrimonlai/lltlgalion experience. Experience with WP 5.1 a must. Competitive salary ft benefits. Pleas* fax or mall resume to Lane and Mantell, P.O. Box S539, Somorvillo, NJ 08876 fat 30B-253-9339

DENTAL ASST.— F/T lor Surburban Dental practice. S0B-276-5330 DRIVER COMMITMENT M E A N S : - Top teams ADMIN. ASST. earn * 104,000/year, FT, Temporary position $2,000 sign-on bonus, (starting In June) for "94 or newer Irelghtllner Gladstone firm. Seeking Conventlonals, excellent organized, reliable benefits. CONVENANT Individual to assist TRANSPORT: 1-500-441LPN/MED. ASST. President ft handle v»H- 4394; Graduate Students: F/T In OBQYN In central ous office lunctlons. 1-600-538-6428 N.J. Rotation to 3 locales Microsoft Word 6.0 & req'd. Assist physicians Excel S.O expar. req. w/patlsnts & examinaDRIVER Stono or fast longhand. tions. Fax resume w/ref'9 Pleas* send resume * Wanted for low truck. to: Diane Full/part time. Exp. presalary requirements to: (9O8) 754-3»31 Att: Karen, P.O. Boa 19. ferred. Please call (908) 322-4870. 7AM-7PM aiadatone, NJ 07934 or MAINTENANCE Fax to: OOS-2M-0712 DIRECTOR DRIVERS For YMCA In Metuchen, CDL Class B with P must have basic mainteARE YOU A Endorsement. F/T or PA. nance Exp. Ikilla in elecPlease leave message. trlal TELEPHONE & mechanical su(90S) 572-5195 SALES EXPERT? pervisory skills needed. F o r b e i n e w s p a p e r * DRIVERS- Experienced Good sal. & benefit package apply In person or over-the-road flatbed need* a Telemarketing Specialist. You Must be drivers/trainees. Average send resume to Megan LaBarr Metuchen Edison S30.0QO/yr. Company team o r i e n t e d , selfmotivated, Imaginative, paid medical and dental Y M C A 6 5 H i g h S t . Metuchen NJ 08B40. confident, patient & disci- insurance. All convenplined. Sales experience tional!. Must be miniMANAGEMENT a plus! Excellent salary, mum 2 3 , Commercial TRAINEES commission & benefits. Driven License. TSE 1- Seeking Manager TralnSend resume: Forbes 800-54B-3120 ext. CB-5. 'ees/Asst. Mngrs. & Newspapers, PO Box Regional and Salespeople for Immwl. 699, Somervllle, NJ 08876 DRIVERS OTR Positions available positions. 1st yr. mgmt Attn: Rick Kestenbaum. nowl CalArk Intsrnatlonal earning poll $24,000offers GREAT PAY. BEN- $60,000 yearly. AdvanceEFITS, and the chance to ment, bits. & Incentives. Call 518-0852 GET HOME MORE OFFAdvertise ask for Mr. Qrap TEN I Must bs 22 with or Mr. Wenlura CDL and HazMat enIn ffie CiessWed! 9O8-2S4-53O1 dorsement. 800-950-8326

Rd.,So. PlalnftaM

SALES

BANK FORECLOSURE

B-3PM Must hav* valid driver's llcena*. Call fMt-T07-M44 Eat. 11J

package. Home* often. B5-M conventional*. One yr. OTR t 6 months flatbed 1-SO0-a4S-M20

tOCIAL SERVICES W**kend aid positions avlatable. Providing direct car* support In group homes for folk* with development*! disabilities. Edison, PI scataway and Brldgewatet locations. Friday, Saturday ft Sunday hours available. Entry Isvsl, will train. Call personnel, 908-707-8844 Ext. 113

WAITf*.ESt/WAITtR Diner neede F/T ft P/T halp, Days or Nlghta. Apply In person:

Sales

Aflft PART-TtMB

MANAGEMENT IMMEDIATE OPENING Are you ready to eam between J30,O00-»50,00O your l l f s l year a n d SSO.OOO-SBO.OOO your second year; Then we'd tike to spook to you, the leading NATIONAL REAL ESTATE office In NJ Is looking lor 2 CAREER minded eopia lor residential, new homes sales, commercial Investment sales & leasing In Central Jersey area. WE WILL GET YOU LICENSED AND TRAIN YOU. For confidential Interview call Ken Worden at: CENTURY 21 Warden A Green, 908-874-4700. SEC./ACCOUNTING — Medium size contracting firm seeks Job-cost & accounting Sec. Good typing skills & exp. with windows & Microsoft work* a pis. Career pos. with good Sal & ben'. Call 9OB-272-900O.

homo in your tear* WHO. area* pay. Free detail*

CfWCUCATIO»VCUST0aHUI

rnUIIV s* fosn C M of MJ'e twa. (PEE) (or tht* M VOIMOMMI papers. Clerical M M w w m c u a * ftw wesw»wiawc«V w y Btssitf nans* arood*v«4opmeni of •ubMrttwr aecount* MormaMon, UBHS M Mfe^^teiWM i l ^^^A' CAC Matteflcal data and P M I OMoa oa i*uws»iujJas1ii i * ' J 1 Resell tor otg arottto. #*TV IftrOfifMtMeli Owly WMflBOC* WHIiVHtf Very emaH InVeetmaM. phone orktntaei. ahoi *»*i. AddWcnat tk> F o r £ ^ C a » O t * o o M n i

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To find out more' about how the Army can help give you nn cctge on n career, call your local Army Recruiter today.

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WORK AT HOMS- Eam from $50042000 P/T per mo. or from I2O0O-MO0O F/T per mo. For more info. eali-eoo-«i fJ-T2«j tMotsoomta Mailing travel brochure*. No eperience neceasary. For Information send a self-addreseed Hamped envelope to: Unlveraal Travel, P.O. BOR 6101M. Miami, FI asset

SELLING, BUILDING, REPAIRING, HELPING ETC???

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CIRCLE ME My partner a I a v g . $10,000 comm./mo. It your not afraid of hard worfc, wa want to help you. 90B-317-2929 SALES/SALES

t-fn Sam-7pm ft Sat 9am-1pm

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Windsor Diner 1030 Reritan Rei. Clark

It you'rs a licensed realWAITRESS/WAITER tor, experienced, (we will Full or Part Time. consider newly licensed) P»y depending on exp. we need you to help ue Exp. pref'd but will train. LIST A SELL BANK Apply In person: FORECLOSURE properRarltan Valley He*. We have over 200 Coumry^Ctufc) properties and 20 major TEACHER— Alphabet « 3 ^ ^no^»>Ws>tof BANK clientsl To learn K l d z - N*w day car* more about this dynamic center with prs school A WAITREH/WAITER growing field and a CA- prs K classes, starting Hillsboro Diner under REER opportunity In the Sept. 1996. with early nsw management. Hiring STATES #1 Century 21 childhood exp. or pre- ffT or P7T. Pleasant office. Call Ken Worden school certification. working condition*. BO6-754-7335 Call (90*3) aai-*S9S CENTURY 21 Wordan A Green, 908-874-4700

M our 'On

1411 U.S. Route 1 South (By henlo Park Mall)

Interim'

HOST/HOSTESS WAITER/WAITRESS Apply Mon-Frl. between 2-4. Benntgans, 4 M i Steiten

*£xceilent pay •Fun working environment •Employee meal discount •Ftewrjte schedules •Great BenetiU •Fresh, no greasy fryers -

Now Hiring All Posittom •Servers -Cashiers •Kitchen Staff •Drive Thru Apply In

Feeling like you're out on a limb?

AUTORtMTALAOfMT Immediate Opening Estab, ctr a van rental The Star-Ledger agency In Union seek« has Adult Routes F/F rentsl agent- Exp. MAFrKaTTIIM TtUINEE pref'd. Computer e»p. a D R I V S R S — S o l o * , I'm available in early 28 yrs. old, have my + . Must be at least 21 teams. Industry'* top pay bualrwu and need yre. old, have valid driv- lo start loaotd/*mpty. own morning. Earn M/F to help me expand. er's lie. * own tranap. Three raise* flr*l year. •Mlngual a h $500 - $650+ per Benefits. 401K. Assigned Pleas* call MS-MI-MOf equipment. 22 CDL 'A'. month. A good AVON HEPS WAMTf D 1-800-633-0&50 Up to 6 0 * commission. Ext. EY-9 car Is a must. Nati Ct), Mali* leeal Free gift. Th* fun way to (9O6)54»-2210 bil m«a)(*al earn S U - 1 6 yrs. or DRIVER- To do Hani de(908)725-1820 livery work, must have Older. 1-80O-842-3O38 —twia. MuM bs) (609)449-1711 own transportation, Call • B D M I N I T M - Summer •na'si. Call O*rv ft snSteve MO-1615 Racfsatlon Program. • w 1—C1H 8M4 Teacher to serve a* BARN S10O0 Weakly stuffing anvelope* at NANNIES/ Music/Drama T*ach*r. HEALTH CARE Jun* 25, 1998 through home. Start now. No *xCOMPANIONS 2S South Main St.. Jjly 26,19S«. Call for ap- porienc*. Free ouppilee, Info, No obligation. Send plication, Randy OiauarEdison. NJ 06837 SASE to: Fairway, D e a l hoU (9O«) anSM3 F/T, P/T Uv* tn/out, Eqwd Opportunity Emptoyst 1038 • « 4SMF. Weal Drlver'e Uoanea H M M H T M - Summer C«wi*ria,Ca.>iyi. and exper, req'd. Recreation positions Jun* 25, 19SS through M M I s OH O l r T S I CHOICE CARE July 26, 1996. Position* Naw hostess and dealer •vaMsbl* for College ag* program lor a Ira* Infor<>1« •Ml Required Training ing company In Bridgemortgage) experience. Rahway, must be able to •Unllorma Furnished water. work from ofPOLICE OFPICM work some weekinds A CaH for appointment • A d v a n c e m e n t Op- fice. Must Earning* up to ATTUNTIONl poiilbly eve. Exp. help- Experienced preferred. portunity S2S.00O with commisRarltan Pollco DepartIf you havo 15 hour* • ful 90S-381477S sion. 8om* Insurance e«ment. Resumea are now week that you woulit Ilk* HAM STYUBTS- F/T Ii being accepted for the psrlence helpful. 908Call for Info: to mak« productive, work P/T, (alary • commis- position of Police Officer. 722-7600 or fax 722-7007 out of MM horn* It de908-981-1995 sion, sxcellent beneflta, Deadline tor filing I* May velop $10OO./mo. Incom* no followtng netsesary. 13. 1996, 12 midnight. with a prominent world (00*) 981-0440 Three tocatTon* In Mid- Application* are availTILCMAHKKTOM corporation with excelWELLS FARGO From your horn*. lent fringe benefit*. Call CONSTRUCTION U O » - dieiex county, S72-1814 GUARD SERV. Men needed to Install Any hours call 90B-722-SM2 Police Headquarter* IMMC0. CMPLOYI teamleai rain gutitf. Vr. Jack 90S-M7-31S0 ZO Flrai Street ass oid round employment vac. Fast growing Bus. Seek* Rarltan, NJ New Brunswick fld TIltPHONE • ! • 4 hoi. noipltalliatlon dependable parson with Plscatsway, Nsw Jerssy E.O.E. ••ARCHCIIS— Wanted svaH. License req. lots of phona exp. evening hr*. only. Steady work 90SImmediately! No selling REAL CITATE CAREER overtime. The RalnmasS E M I N A R - Relocation SHIPPINO * mcffivmo no * u r v * y l n g . MUST TELEPHONE ACCOUNT tar Corp. 336 Grove St 658-5555. specialists needed, eam Parson wanted for FIT HAVE ACCESS TO A FAX JOB COACH/ M A H A a O l - Ft/Pi, So Brldgewater 725-7444. OR E-MAIL ADDRESS. I while you loam. Call Plilnfleld, »B - $17. nr. CUSTOMER SERVICE JOB DEVELOPER- FT Janet 1201-538-8878 pos. Must bs mature, Average 110/hr. 1-«0Oresp., t willing lo learn 599-7B3S "r«*eareh®*ur18.00 to etart Increase REP.— Nstlonal Mtgr. to work In Somerset Wslchert Reetlora Immed. hiring, Engilah .25 every 3 mth. to $17. has opening for ener- County area. BA required spesking. 9-5pm . Grow fen.com" Send return* : C/O, Box getic Individ, with •olid (yew for year working In RECEPTIONIST/ with usl CaH 518-0050 TOW TRUCK O P I M 288 Forbes Newapapet sal** service *xp. Ap- HS will be considered), MED. AS8T T O N - Full • Pan time, P.O. Box 699 , Sonwrvlll* plicate should enjoy valid OL necesaary. Must F/T In OB/QYN In Central SOCIAL SCftVICES be enargetic, flexible, NJ. 06876 N.J. Computer literate, challenge* A continued 7T Position Avail, pro- eome flex tws. exp pretalehone, fax contact* •elea oriented, able to l i t e t y p i n g , h e a v y viding On* on On* sup- ferred must live local to with customer. Order meet challenges and phonea, •••1st port for a Young Man North Branch no cdl raq. entry, CRT skills s must deadlines. Potential for w/patlenta. Fax resume with • developmental dis- Call 908-707-«122 F/T dayt. full benefit* 37 s i g n i f i c a n t g r o w t h . w/reti to: Dime) ability living Independ- TRISM TRANSPORT1/2 hr. wk. e/o/s m/f Please FAX resumes to: ently In Hillsborough. Company (*O8> 784-2831 Drivers 1300 Dlr. of Empl. Services send resume to, Box 273 Tuet. 24PM, Sat. KJPM sign-on, excellent benefit 609 29I-3SS2.COE Restaurant OFFICE H f L P - Gtneral C/0 Forbei Newspapers A every other Sun. office FtyPT, S. Pit, Con- P.O. Box 899 Somervllle vtanent to Rt. 287. Pl*a** NJ 08676 • * n d R i i u m i to: Box 209. C/0 Forba* Newspaper, P.O. B0K 699, DELIVERY Sgmervllle, NJ. 0O876, or tax 908-755-7349 POSITIONS

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Driving and distribution experience preferred. Applicants must have a valid NJ driver's license and a good driving record. SALES-FULL TIME Candidates should possess excellent sales, telemarketing, organization and follow-up skills. Knowledge of truck parts helpful. We offer outstanding compensation and benefits. Send resume, apply in person or call for more information.

ATTRA^TREADERS!! GET RESPONSE!!! ASK FOR A N A D ENHANCER I N YOUR AD. IT COSTS AS LITTLE AS $ 7 PER WEEK

Forbes NEWSPAPERS 1 i m ision <» FORtlS INC.

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IB - Chooee protaoatonal tun-key or own custom program. Year round tor very oeay Call 1-SOo-SaM1St for JOB w\ Pssnusrli vire. oam* oicmng dstoMa. M t a m , Mon-Sal. AN0/0R Wed.ftFrl,H I A O A C H B It you trunk you quattfy night* from S:4Spm- S U F P B R E R S carCALLt7S*«106 7:Jopm. sas tor each 4S WANTCD-Honeet, Ing doctor who h a * helped hundrod* of pain ASST. euftefor*. NoMnvealve, conaervatlva care. All Frtendty worfctng onvtron- caro provided by Or. W I H BTHn i i y m f V v Mutt be energetic, f t * * mont of mo|or ooeurtty Trish Stypka DC. For Info isis ana **•**) onensea. n companyl Uoht but AC- on how you can receive you are an anthualaaHo CURATfJE TVPtNQ. Com- etiSO value In tree person wa wootd lov«) to eervtce*. CaH S3S-7070. S*Mms e i must bo Rave you Join our team. CanSSa*M Umrted to IB caller*. Weekend* required, car able, poreonable ft paKEVIN TRUOEAU ttienl l t to handle busy bi . ft Hcenee required. Mr. Mega Memory, C H Barbara B b at: t EXCELUKTSALARY tar phonee. CaH sweeping the nation wrilt mdlvktual. Can 908-358-8900 hie now MLM. Unlimited M-F. 10-3 S I C R I T A R V - F^T, Income potential. CaH for oUon on upcoming fksxlaOio two. No wkofid*. inform* BASYSITTIR Far amaM Pharmacoutlcal seminars 006-382-2904 WAMTBO— Morning*. Coneumng Farm. Duties NATIONAL REAL ESAfternoon* ft Evening*. Include, WordProc***- T A T E C O M P A N Y In w o m e n * R a r l t a n I n g ^ d o c u m e n t * * - Seek* Motivated Potion Health ctub. W»ses caH •amoHng ft ganeral *oc. to Locate Distressed •I SX)*-31B-115S roap. Position req. proll- Property In your araal concy in WorkPerfed 5 2 Comprehensive Training! •OOKKIBPIR/SBCRSWord S.O (Excel ft Career Opportunity! Spirt TART- Must be oroan- ft WordPerfect 6.1 a plus). Big Profit*! Free Info: Iwd ft experienced. Cot- Can •Oa-704-ieet tor ap000-204-3444 leettonaTA/R. A/P, point. OWN YOUR OWjj_ TtUHUUtKCTIRS APPAREL OR SHOE f»/T • F/T t:JO • 1:M : M -10:30. M-F . sal Choose: Joan/SpotttCOMPANION- Mature •bonuaaa for money mod. wear, Bridal. Lingerie, reap, pereon wtth car- Individ. CaH Mfr-I&a ekJerty tady - fJridgawoWeaternwear, Ladle*, ter. Klndne**, earing, M a n ' * , largo a l t * * , W l PAY POR YOUR •xc*l. exp. rot. P.O. Box Intant/pretaen, petite, 3MftamanNJ0Met. dancewear/aerobie, maEam SiSVaaaalen. Seekternity or eccessorles ing people to participate OtNTAL ASSISTANT teat*. Hours •tor*. Over 2000 Name Chair side, aproa. M In last*k4ftp*n B r a n d * . I2S.S0O to IsVF hrs. par week. ekp. hetp- SdSanv Inventory. trainLocated In Somerset. S30,900: M . but wtH tr*ln the right Can Food Opinions. Ing, fixture*, grand openInc. Ing, person. P1*a*ant Fanetc. can open t s •00-2*7-4256 M-F wood offfca. day*. Mr. LaughHn (612) 60«V6SSS SOB-323-7111

CUM o # ^ nensja BeB •houider. Visit* t a n * plaee during the slay from 7:30 AM »o 1 M l .

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area SIS oar hr. oomo «*• 4ay* 12tpm, Sat. *-«pm approx. IShr*. wk Call 9 0 M M Semt mit UtttJ in tbii cUt»17Ttv.m*g. rificMion m*y rtamitt * ft* to purcbti* imformuttBH mdlar mtttrUU rtf«ti*t Mrvrr imyntmnUt snd/or Every Sunday H r s . opportunities. 7:45anv10:4$am (or until noon If postitMo) •1000 WEEKLY- stuffAND/OR 1pm-3;30PM. Ing Envelopes your locaOnly 1 hr. of driving, bat- tion. Easy work, sxcatlent anc* is waiting time hi «y, PT/FT. WORKERS church tot w/frea break EED N0WI FREE DEtime from Oam-IOamft2- TAILS send SASE: P.O. 3pm. Good salary, Call Box 500-KT, Lima, PA 18037 *o»-iis-4«a

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FASHION AOVtSOR Wear ft show ladle* jewelry 2 eve*. S1S0. No Investment, 80S-758-30ee OYMNAtmCS INSTRUCTOR Pan time, flexible hours. Contact Barbara at OOP) 074-XW1 HOUSEKEEPER- Frkfn Top 10hr«7wk (M W Th Mom) S7S. Dlshea, laundry, food chop, own car. Cell 973-1117

S3S.OO0/VEAR INC O M E - Potential. R*adIng Books. Tod free 1800-896-9778 Ext. R-5139 for details.

POSTAL ft OOITT J O E * S21/hour + Benefits No *xp-WW train For appl a Info 1-800-636-3040 UNIQUE O P P - Take charge ot your life ft find financial opportunity on your own term*. Build • home based business. (1000 training. FREE If you qualify. 800427-2527 ext.87S4 WATKINS BUSINESS O P P . - Ranked in top ten home business opp. by ' Business Startups Magazine' 350 consumable products everyone uses. No monthly quota* low retail prices, sharing not selling. Start for under $40. Call 1-aoo814-8240

$3S,000yVR. INCOME WILDLIFE/ POTENTIAL CONSERVATION JOBS Reading books. Toll Free Game warden*, security,
Friends star hits the big screen page 10

Local troupe promises exciting evening

Bernards Inn offers classy cuisine / page 15

SATURDAY,

And Svtwifar Promises to ie

CHIL

DkNCilOMOlDiiSAil OATtONG/il

TASTfI CUPS fO* CHAJNTT *flUI5tt'S CUSTOM CAM SHOW

SPONSORED IT

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FREE FACE PAMWG

Htw do rau like raur chili? Mfaiy or brain" Sweei or spin 0 Come to Freehold Raceway this Saturday for our Eighth Annua] New Jersey State Chill Cook -Off. Sample' ihe Garden Slates best chili and cast your vuic fur (lit Prunes Choice Award. Cruise by [he Oldies J07.! Circus Waeon and meet Bi2 Joe Heiin- ami Bob Hendnx See (lassie roadsters, like Model Tsand T Birds, ai Kniisers Cusiom Car Show. But best of all. u-atch the nations top irotters compfte In the $200,000 Deiter Cup Rice, Ihe on track. Plus a full day of Creat harness racinn and top ihoroimfibred simulcasts. If you like yoiir action so hoi its cool, come to Freehold this Saturday for a smokin' Good time'

Vour BEST BET for 3 G(X}D TIME

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Weekend Plus, May 8-10

The 'Duh' files

Don't Miss This Limited Opportunity! You arc Invited to A Spcrldi iil«ir One Diiv Oppoiliin

Red Itfe stories ftm the police • An English Court, BridgcwaUr resident burned his feet while trylogsof fites Newspapers: ing to put out a fin; April IT,police • Fetco at the Blue Star Shopping said, Center in Wantn recently reported The victim extinguished the fire, that an unknown chemical was which he accidentally ignited in added to the tish tank filtration his laundry room, by stomping it system and killed off an assort- with his bare feet ment of fish valued at $1,500, po- When fire officials arrived, thu lice said. The fish department victim had both feet submerged inj manager said Petco had no com- cold bath water. He was taken to| ment on the ongoing investigation. Somerset Medical Center for treatment.

Our <3Sth Annlvei Suburban Jewelers Presents AN OPEN HOUSE Saturday, May 18,1996 10:00 om-5:00 pm

Chance 16 get a ERIE Diamond! with any jtwtlvy or COIIKIIM 'We're giving away ttonet Yourt may be o diomondl (One free per customer) PATTI, the nil God's Children 1996 Special Event Figurine is available at Suburban Jewelers only during this presentation. Limited Quantities Available.

All God's Children

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126 E. Front Street, Plainfield, NJ 07060 r

The Collectors Place 908/756-1774

1-800/272-1315 (New Jersey Only)

Who we are and what we are Weekend ftut is a piping hot bowl of chili cooked by Forbes Newspapers, A Division of Forbes Inc.,cForbes Inc. 1996, and appears in the Hills-Bcdminster Press, Somerset MessengerGazette, Franklin Focus, Bound Brook Chronicle, MiddlescxDuneUen Chronicle, Metuchen-Edison Review, Piscataway Review, South Plainfield Reporter, Highland Park Herald, WarrenWatchung Journal, Green Brook-North Plainfield Journal, Wcstfteld Record, Scotch Plains-Fanwood Press and Cranford Chronicle. The chef is Nathan Shashoua and you can give him your favorite recipe by calling (908) 722-3000, Ext 6307. All press releases, chili peppers and seasonings can be sent to Weekend Pius at P.O. Box699, Somerville, N.J. 08876 or faxed to (908) 526-2509.

Weekend Plus

WEEKLY CROSSWORD, Fowl Language"

Boulevard Wholesale Foods •REE FOOD

AC1OSS ICttfs SThtMtmtFind Nil ' 10 SmUlimounls Mttiybmyresident 15 Graefc marketplace 16 Jacob'itwta

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(908) 469-8401 Chef Pride MA's Old Fashioned Soda Tortlno Brand Beef Hamburger Patties Sweet Italian Sausage Per Case 24-12 oz cans

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ALL FLAVORS

Mater's BAR-B-Q SPARE RIBS IHot Dog or Hamburger Lb Rolls

1.49 1.69 Packed 30 LbBox

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Best's All Beef Skinless Hot Dogs ' Packed 1Lb»3Lb'5Lb or 10lb Package

Sabrett All Beel Skinless Hot Dogs

PerLb Packed 10 LbBox

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CHARCOAL BRIQUETS

110 a.

B & G Brand Relist Pickle Chips IISweet Relish

Per 20 Lb Bag

Heir's Snack Foods 20oz. Value Pack Size Potato Chips Regular or Ruffle

Furmano's All Purpose Crushed Tomatoes

Restaurant Style TotiltaChip

1.79

2.4 3.49 per gallon

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Lehlgh Valley Milk

Fountain I I Heron or flam/nyo 20 June honorees 71 English njlers 23 Manage 24 Trains lo a bottle KCotoagues 27 Mate id Ji 28 Captain & others 32 Chemical erelingj M Evergreen 34 Change places 35 Sum 38Exlat WLookad cunningry 42 Pdish riw 43 Sinned 44 Egg layer 45Q9drode 46Fdowipaaceorhay 48 New Jariey university 49f¥rn S2 Homjr SS Albatross 57 Hatfly companion MThoiougNart SgComunad eOMInad? 61 QutrttlesiAlxv. 62 Show bias 63 BoUtnds DOWN 1 ffneft 2 CapUofWestam Samoa 3 A/kniuKhspot

4 Planters 5 Handled clumsily 6 Muslim niers 7 ...peas in a 8 Gotten up 9 Mr Ctaus 10 Demeans 11 Saudi Arabian district 12 Homer & Marge's son 13 Beer Slang 19 Accelerated 21 Elected officials 24 Songbird • 25 Norman Vincent

26 Smoke 27 Ms. Farrow 29 g X Rowed 31 Wood measure 33 FBI agent 14 B i O and N Y Central 36 Somber 37 Atom

40 42 44 45 47 48 49

Cues NCAA erding strategy ConttWnfl spices Mr. Schwarzenegger Anltem'i author Common contraction Taj Mahal locale

50 "

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51 Canot.e.g. 52 Small bmn son&td 53 Bread spread 54 Marries 56 Initial Teaching Alphabet abbr

Qunlahfr Quote

c/othesmafte fine men,

George Wuhtogton PB. B a 461, SdcaccUdy, NY U301

Answers on page 11

Weekend Plus, May 8-10

1,000 WORDS

Contents Miscellaneous

2

Confidential er story 4,5

Theatrics • •«•«*«> / Club Mix lltCRS

8,9 10

IMdtlltlMI

What to do.... 11-13 Introductions, Dining out

* x*

15

Cover photo; Chef Ken Burg of Lakewood stirs up a kich of chili PHOTO COURTESYOF FREEHOLD RACEWAY

AUGUSTO F. MENEZES/WEEKEND PLUS

Damon Splvey lands after 8 high jump at last month's Highland Park Relays.

A warped choice of torchbearer Once again, Weekend Confidential is venturing off our own turf (sorry, Jeffrey Cohen) to aim a metaphorical shaving cream pie at one of our own writers. This time our target is young Art Swift, who wrote last week about Joan Jett's upcoming appearance in the area, We appreciate the towering contribution Ms. Jett has made to the rock music industry, what with her records consistently being at the top of the charts for the last decade or so - you may wish to pause here to mop up the dripping sarcasm - but surely there arc female vocalists who better deserve the title of "she who epitomizes the women's liberation movement" in American musi? Some of us would lay that laurel at the feet of such greats as Joan Baez, who was singing about women's liberation long before Confidential was bom. Or Grace Slick, who has consistently demonstrated that a woman can play and sing kick-butt rock and roll just as well as the guys. "Una Turner also personifies the essence of women's liberation in rock music Her rise from battered wife to rock icon epitomizes a principle of women's liberation - that

everyone, regardless of sex, has the right to believe in his or her own talents, and has therightto make the most of those talents in his or her search for excellence. Ms. Jett has merely followed admirably down a trail blazed long before by women of true substance, hard-earned dignity and greater talent.

cholson as the lead in the movie version will not be disappointed with Charles Wagner. This is the play's last weekend, though, so hurry on over.

Smart television?!?

The recent conclusion of TVs season-long saga, Murder One, left us with a bittersweet feeling, Confidential was riveted by the captivating performances and Confidential recently had an op- compelling storytelling which elportunitytosee One Flew Over the evated the drama beyond just conCuckoo's Nest at the Villagers The- cern over whodunnit But we're atre in Somerset and heartily rec- well aware that, unlike TV auteur Steven Bochco's other shows, MUT* ommends it Set in therecroom of a psychi- der One has struggled to find an audience all year. The concluding atric hospital, the actors playing the patients do a masterful job of hours showed good ratings, but it remains to be seen whether that's staying in character and holding enough to get it renewed on to their affliction throughout the evening. We wish the producIt would be a shame if ABC tion fared as well with the nurses, doesn't give it a chance. Granted, especially the actress playing Daniel Benzali (the chrome-domed Nurse Ratched, who needs to add star of the show) isn't most Holmore authority to her portrayal. lywood executives' idea of a leadThose who remember Jack Ni- ing man, but he filled the moral

Play's the thing

center role to a tee. Benzali made the character of defense attorney Ted Hofrman worthy of comparison to protagonists in classic detective novels, just as the quality of the show's writing measured up to such classics. So, in a TV universe populated with such junk as The Nanny and Melrose Ptace, we're hoping the network gods will smile on Murder One, a show that actually left you thinking after iu> closing scene each week.

Radio's in trouble One band that Confidential can't stop raving about is Trouble. "Hie band's been around since the early '80s but hasn't sold out to the people who program FM rock stations. Talk about great music. The latest album, called Plastic Green Head, can be described as a cross between the more psychedelic Beatles stuff and Black Sabbath, if you can believe that It's heavy but also melodic. Of course, you won't be hearing Trouble on the radio because New York and Philly stations are busy playing no-talent, watered-down punk bands like Green Day.

Weekend Plus, May 8-10 .

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Freehold Raceway's chili cook-off in culinarv creations fly STEVE IMVMGE WeetendP/us writer

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rom all across New Jersey, they've come to cook chili They are the chilihcads - legions of culinary fans dedicated to the precarious art of creating sometimes the simplest, but more often than not the most outrageous chili combinations imaginable. "We do it a little differently here," said Steven Wolf of Freehold Raceway, site of the 8th New Jersey State Chili Cookoff. "The International Chili Society events only allow pure Texas-style chili. No fillers like pasta or whatever. Here, you can include anything that you think makes good chili. 1 mean the whole thing is about having fun, not following some arbitrary rules." Wolf is organizing the 8th Annual New Jersey State Chili Cookoff Saturday at Freehold Raceway in Monmouth County, which will run in conjunction with the 37th Annual Dexter Cup Trot for 3-year-old colts. In order to open up the cook-off to extensive variety and foster a more creative atmosphere, Wolf decided not to try to make the cook-off an International Chili Societysanctioned event, "Actually, 1 think I've been banned,'1 he said. "But who's to say what makes a good chili." Because of that, cook-off chefs are not restricted to traditional chilis with pinto beans, ground beef and tomatoes. Oh no. Carrots, potatoes, green beans, peppers, peas, celery and even fruitier fare such as pineapples, raisins, apples and oranges accentuate the chili brews, Others opt for meatier recipes ranging from simple chicken and beef to fish, ostrich, even rattlesnake or other slippery reptile, amphibian and avian concoctions. "Last year, I made a batch of peanut butter and jelly chili with ostrich," said Steve Urcvitch, a cooking consultant and author of the book Sensuous Cooking. "Some people thought it was really good. I didn't win but it was still good and it was fun. That's the whole point of these things anyway. Some people get so nervous and afraid when they have to cook. TTie chili cook-offs, especially the Freehold (Raceway) one, are really for people to havefanand to get creative." Last year's winner whipped up a batch of Caribbean chili that included the Atlantic Conch. "It was our fust chili cook-off ever (last year)," said one of three winners from R&R Caribbean Chili, Ron Joho. "We had toyed with the idea for 2 while and just decided to do it. And the chipheads were coming around, wondering where we were from and how we did it." Joho described the event as a great activity and something he wished there was more of in New Jersey. "Everyone had to list the ingredients," Joho said. "And we did. The chili heads I think held out a little, not really

Matthew Andras of Freehold, winner of the B n l Booth Display prize at the 5th New Jersey State Chili Cookoff, samples some chili. willingtogive up their secrets. But we let everyone know." Urcvitch said the Freehold cook-off is among the best he's attended because of the diverse "carnival atmosphere" with the races going on while the cook-off is being run. • "Some people actually build buildings there, like one person laid down a mining shack to serve his chili from," Urevitch said. "It's really an event Something kind of unusual and different from what you'd expect." While obviously the chili is the most important element to the cook-off, the presentation is important as well. Some contestants construct elaborate displays and restaurantstyle booths, "That's what I look for," said Gene Hart, the former Voice of the Philadelphia Flyers' and a race and sports announcer in southern New Jersey for several years who will be a cook-off judge this year. "There's a lot more to it than just chili but how it's cooked, what's included, where the recipe came from, what

the display looks like. It's not just beans and meat. I had some chocolate chili that was really interesting a couple of year's ago. But I'll tell you, it takes a special kind of judge to be abletotaste 32 different kinds of chili." Hart said the Freehold cook-off has a "very homey" atmosphere reminiscent of old time state fairs, which should make the event particularly appealing to young families with children. "It's not glitzy and high tech and that's what I like about it. You couldn't have the same feel if you weretohold it at the Meadowlands because the raceway, with everything going on, just adds so muchtoit." Chili, also known as chilli, chile and chili con came, derives it's name, obviously, from the chile pepper or any member of the chile pepper family - a key ingredient in most recipes. The roots of the chili dish stretch back qver one hundred (Please turn to page 5)

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Weekend Plus, % 8-10 (Continued from page 4) is $15 and all of the entrance and years to the legendary southwest- registration money, aside from the ern chuck wagons - make-shift $2,000 in prise money and gifts, kitchens serving cowboys on cattle will go to support the Western drives - as a combination of left- Monmouth County Chamber of over stew, make-do dinners and a Commerce and the United Way specialty of certain cooks. Food Pantries of Monmouth CounUrevitch said undoubtedly there ty. Most chill cootoffi support is an initial bias favoring southlocal charities, western chili cook-olTs over ones At the Freehold cook-off, pain New Jersey, primarily because trons can purchase a $5 spoon to of chili's endemic roots there.. sample all the chili being cooked Hut one of the biggest chili cit* and also get a votingg ticket to ggive ies is the entire h chef off to the country, believe favorite tot moretoft their it or not, is Cinchili. cinnati," he than just chili but how it's The chef with said, "When cooked, what's included, the most tickets someone told wins "the Peomo 'you've got where the redpe came ple's Choice to tiy Ohio from, what the dfep/ay Award." chili,' 1 just said "Last year we 'come on.' But looks like, It's not just had a guy giving when 1 visited beans and meat 1 away free hot there, I was re- G e n e Hart ally surprised people who gave at how much him their ticket," and the differWolf said with a cnt kinds of chili available." chuckle. "I give him credit, it was "It all depends how you make a great idea but we had to shut it," Urcvitch added. "How creative him down." you can get and more importantly, you've got have fun doing it That's x ^8th New j j ^ s u t e g ^ what cooking is all about Having fun and making people feel good." or shine, 1 pjn. SatThe cook-oflTs, which are held urday, In addition to the cook-off all across the country, began in and race, there will be pony rides, the early 1960s with groups of clowns, craft vendors, a i friends holding parties based around cooking and sampling « • " s h o w *">*** ***•* ^ ^ ^ chili. Now the events have a festi- Kruisers and festive dancinf and val atmosphere with prize money mttS*c provided by the WZVU for the winners. 1W.1 FM "Oldies Party Van." For Registration for chefs, who must mow information, call Steven Harry and Evelyn Cutler of Spring Lake Heights won the People's Choice Award at last year's make at least four gallons of chili, Wolf at 462-3800. cook-off with their Boot Kickin1 Chili.

Chili fans can also enjoy great racing

The event also offers something for the kids, with clowns, pony rides and a car show on hand to entertain.

The 37th annual Dexter Cup Trot for 3year-old colts, worth $200,000, will be held in conjunction with the 8th Annual New Jersey State Chili Cookoff Saturday at the Freehold Raceway. The top four finishers from the May 3 $25,000 elimination races will advance to Saturday's finals. Since the race's inception in 1960, some of harness racing's greatest trotter's have won the Dexter Cup, which has the largest take home purse so far this year and attracts some of harness racing's best competitors. On Friday, the 37th Annual Lady Suf- • folk Trot for 3-year-old fillies isa wide open race. The Dexter trot is named after the world champion horse Dexter, sired by the great Hambletonian in 1858. Dexter didn't race until he was four and was gelded because of an ill temperament At the age of six, after being sold for $400 and being properly trained, he won 50 of 55 starts. After becoming ahousehold name, New York ledger publisher Robert Bonner bought Dexter for $33,000 and allowed

Gen. Ulysses S. Grant to ride him through Central Park while Grant campaigned for president in 1868, Grant asked Bonner for Dexter as a gift but was refused. Dexter died at the age of 30 in 1888 but lived on as the model for weathervanes, and as the namesake of an Iowa town and numerous companies, including the Dexter Washing Machine Company and the Dexter Hog Oiler Company. The Lady Suffolk race is named after the first great mare of harnessracingand immortalized by the song "The Old Grey Mare." She was foaled in 1833 and after being sold for $90, she pulled a meat and oyster wagon for a shop in Smithtown, Rhode Island. Lady Suffolk set a world record in 1854 at a race track in Hoboken. She was sold at the age of four, went into training and raced for the next 1G years - placing in 93 percent of her 162 races, including 89 wins, She died at the age of 23 without ever being foaled, Both races are sponsored by the Hambletonian Society.

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Edison's Tripodo takes on raunchy comic role £

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self to personally and professionally by this type of material." Since live theater U a larger and n the Forum Theatre'sproduction of Sophie, Totie and less intimate surrounding than the Belie, Edison resident Vicki nightclubs Barth played to, TriTripodo re-creates Belle podo explained, "I play the characBarth, a bawdy comic 1950s night- tcr loudly. I think loud is funnyclub entertainer so does the audience." Laughter, torch songs and mem- TVipodo attributes her comic ories are the key elements in this flair to her mother, who did standmusical comedy about the legend- up comic routines and enjoyed ary lives of Sophie Tucker, Totie performing whenever she had an Fields and Barth, who hustled into opportunity. TVipodo, once a math the male-dominated world of ris- teacher in Rahway schools, has que humor long before female been able to explore her love for comics were ever accepted. the stage as managing director of "Barth, the the ForumTheatre for the past '' Pty #® character 11 "I always had dcrground-type /oud/y, / tfrjnk /OL/Cf fe J an interest in pcrformer/'TVi- , , • podo said. "She JUOny - SO QO6S the theater, especially musical sold 2 million recordingsdur\n ura J ~ comedy," she — VfCWTnpOOO said, "and have ing her career. been very fortuPeople listened nate to have and laughed to landed roles this overweight throughout the matronly woman telling raunchy jokes. I re- years of my career with the member my mother listening to Forum." Among the productions Tripodo those albums. Even by today's has appeared in are: Funny Girl, standards, which have been stretched, Barth's material would The Rwk, They're Playing Our Song, Dreamgirk and TV Best litstill be considered risque." "In developing the character, I tk Whorehouse in Texas. She played Hannah in Conversations created my rendition of Barth's with My Father, a more serious performance, shying away from imitating her style," Tripodo con- role. Although she welcomed the tinucd. "I listened to tapes with a challenge, she admitted she pre* Walkman while working out in the fers musical comedy. gym, visualizing what this unusual Although her husband of 25 woman must have subjected her- years has always been "very sup-

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Vlckl Tripodo (Mcond from left) plays Belle Barth In the Forum Theatre production of Sophie, Totfeandfief/e. portive" of her theatrical pursuits, seeing her in the role of Belle Barth tested his limits. "He's always in the audience on opening night, although he was a bit shocked at this character," she said. "His response was not because of the material, but because he always told me that I couldn't tell jokes. I think the audience's

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response surprised him." After 11 years of being involved with professional theater in management and performing, she is thoroughly satisfied with the longevity of her career. "Now, I would like to spend more time playing the role of an aunt with my nieces and nephew," Tripodo said.

Sophie, Totie and Belle runs at the Forum Theatre, 314 Main St., Metuchen, through Sunday, May 19. Performances ire 8 p m Thursday through Saturday and 2:30 pm. Wednesday and Sunday. For tickets or more information, call 54&4670.

Next week in Weekend Plus: Theater critic Michael Scassera reviews the Crossroads Theatre production of The Screened-//) Porch, starring Eeanor McCoy and Bika Ewing.

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ocal dancers who have formed a new troupe will present theirfirstcollaborative modern dance efforts this month at Playhouse 22 in East Brunswick. The members of ...and dancers, a Dance Collective were once togetber in the Jannetti/DiBianca and dancers company, but split up after three years of performing together. Some of the members decided to continue to share the stage, dropped the first half of their troupe's name and formed the new company, member Joanne Carey said. 'It's a group venture and we make collective decisions," the Mctuchen resident said. "The members do the choreography." ...and dancers consists of five

her own baby -torelate to the audience the different emotions experienced during a pregnancy. Dancer Kelly Borden-Joye has a key role in "Modem," because she is now pregnant with twins. The emotions runfromfrustration at not being able to conceive to the joy of birth, Carey said The group Wild Asparagus provided the sound score for "Miracle." Troupe member tynn Robertson designed sets for the piece. Troupe member Debbie McCarthy, a South Plainfield resident, choreographed the show's unu'Ued closing piece, which uses a score by local band "Whirling Dervishes, and, Carey said, "sharp movements with the dancers moving in unison." The ...and dancers performance features the work of two guest artists; Lorretta F^" and Andrew

per" are part of Jannetti'sNew York Gtyrepertoire.In "October Morning," which features a sound score by Sweet Honey in the Rock and costumes designed by Carey, a trio of dancers tells the story of autumn. "It's a very moving and an uplifting piece," said Carey, who herself dances in the piece. "It's good for women in the sense that it is very earthy." Jannetti himself dances in "Whisper," performed to the reading of a poem by Ken Freeman backed with music by Ronnie Cuscoming evening. It's entertaining in the respect that it is very peaceful," said Carey, who also dances in "Our Minds Are Not Separate" and the closing piece. "It's a transition for all of us and I think the pieces reflect that"

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All God's Children give music some hope ay tm SWIFT

VW»tend Hi* writer n a musical climate rocked by negativity and angst, with seemingly little hope for the future, it is refreshing to discover All God's Children, appearing Friday, May 17 at the Court Tavern in New Brunswick. This Jersey City-based band is inspired by the luscious choirboy harmonies of Brian Wilson's Beach Boys, infused with a dash of Latin jazz andklezmer. The ninemember unit is one of the rays of light on an increasingly bleaksounding horizon. All God's Children formed in 1990 and hasdeveloped an intense following in the New York/New Jersey club scene. Devotees have been enticed by the group's eclecticism and their funky improvise-

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tlonal jams outage. Earlier thii year, the band released the propulsive four-track EP, Nice Ganfen. It i i A collection that is difficult to categorize: one minute it's '60s happy-hippie pop, the next it's reflective-meditative poetry, set to brooding chords. Nice Garden stands alongside Zapata and Other Low Song* as the band's representative titles. Zapata is heavily influenced by political discourse, as with "Andrew Jackson Was a Very Bad Man," while Garden goes beyond politics. The new EP is for the listener who, after having identified the myriad problems of society, is now seeking solutions. Adam Bernstein is the leader and co-founder of All God's Children, Serving as the primary vocalist, lyricist and bassist, Bern-

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stein eagerly discussed the upcoming (Uture of the Children, He retains an air of peaceful certainty as he watches his creation advance to greater prominence. "Right now we're shipping the Nic« Garden tape diligently to record companies," Bernstein said. "We're getting offers to tour." t h e band's vibe has shifted from worldbeat to American pop in the last few yean, and Bernstein said it is due to a religious conversion. "I became a Buddhist All questions about politics seemed different than what they seemed before. I questioned my feelings closely and instead of concentrating on a political point of view, the songs 1 became more personal' This spiritual awakening coincided with a "rediscovery" of master composer Brian Wilson, and the latest rhythmic incarnation of All God's Children was bom. "He (Wilson) can write incredible melodies, as well as being an incredible vocal arranger" Bernstein said. "His sense of harmony is very advanced; there's an extreme amount of emotion in his music" The Children will soon be experiencing personnel changes, but the core rhythm section will remain intact, he added. "(Vocalist and percussionist) Katie Evans is leaving, but me and (guitarist and vocalist) Brian Mueller are staying. The band will probably be smaller in order to tour." The tive shows are a positive experience, marked by abundant audience interplay, Bernstein said "We're about empowerment for change "he said. "We can be really wacky but really intense. Often well be playing and someone will jump on us and well have a wres-

All God's ChlWrtn In trwlr mctt w p m l w Incarnation. tling match. It's like a ritual, as if going to church." Bernstein recounted the incident which inspired "Gripperman" on Nice Garden. "We were playing somebody's wedding in New Hope and I was in the bathroom with mops and pails all around. There was this cement drain in the middle of the floor and the words 'Caution, stand

clear, The Gripper'wefe by the drain, I left the bathroom and got on stage and started ringing'Caution, stand dear, you're The Gripperman.1 I think it's pretty hysterical that one of our main songs came from going to the bathroom." For information on the All God' Children show, call 545-7265.

Pressure sours Cranberries album SYANDYGOAENBERG

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WbetendPfusooTOspoodent The Cranberries: To 5fte Faithful Departed (Island) Two possible situations arise when a band becomes very successful. The first is that the record company pressures the band to maintain the sound which made band uses a horn section to embelthem successful in the first place. lish "Salvation," which deals with The second is that the band has parents' and children's views generated enough revenue for the about drugs. The horns end up decompany and may do as it pleases. tracting from the song by further With sales of their last album, burying Dolores O'Riordan's alNo Need to Argue at 17.5 million ready murky vocal in the mix. worldwide, one can assume the The slower, more melodic songs Cranberries were allowed some lat- (in the style of "linger" fom their itude for this new album in terms first album) highlight the Cranberof studio and time constraints. ries' strengths better than the upThe lyrics on To The Faithful tempo rockers, and "When You're Departed, recorded in four weeks, Gone" on the newalbum is no exreflect on when people or relation- ception. Themusic in this song is ships pass away, although most of a combination of lullaby and the music conjures the band's 1950s-style doo-wop. Another numftantic life of the last few years. ber similar to this is "Joe," which This album, their third release, uses a mandolin to good effect finds the Cranberries in abit of a Perhaps the most interesting rut "Hollywood" should have been track is "Electric Blue," in which called "Zombie (Part ID" because OTUordan uses layers of vocal it is derivative of that hit The overdubs to enhance the mood of

the song. Other highlights of the album are "Warchild" and "Bosnia," Both songs employ an orchestral backing without overwhelmi] the band. These songs deal with political subjects but steer clear of the preachiness that mars 'Tree tol Decide" and 'Tm Still Remembering/' which gives both JFK and Kurt Cobain an unnecessarily flattering treatment To the Faithful Departed deals primarily with emotional loss. The | album succeeds in conveying that feeling on the slower, melodic ballads. Unfortunately, these types of] songs are aminority and the album is dominated by repetitive, wailing rockers. To sell 17.5million records around the world on a] second album is a tremendous accomplishment Many bands hope to sell that much in an entire career. However, the pressure to try and equal or surpass such success is simply too much for anjjband, much less one on its third album. The Cranberries'album^uxrts this week's AlwHk BeeardsTop 1 Seepage 12. :

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Ammonia: Allan Bilmont (drums), Davt Johnttont (guitar, vocali) and Simon Htniworih (bin).

Aussies plan to 'entertain' Ammonia promises 'pretty loud' show at the Metro May 17 ByHKHSimON VJeekendPtus writer t's a long way from Ammonia's home of Australia to New Jersey, After swings through the West Coast and Midwest, the trio will perform at the Metro in Long Brunch on Friday, May 17, Daw Johnstone, the singer/guitarist for Ammonia, spoke to Weekend Pius from Louisville, Ky.( recently. He was fighting a slight touch of the flu, which he said shouldn't affect his performances. "I'll be able to sing OK, but I may not be able to move too much," Johnstone said in his distinct Australian accent. Johnstonc said American audiences aren't that much different than ones in Australia. However, he said, Americans want to be "entertained" more. "They want to see a show. We just get up and play uur songs and don't rely on too much production." In the United States, Ammonia is probably best known for their song "Drugs," which is the first single from the Epic Records album Mint 400.The song has been receiving a good amount of airplay on rock radio. The song has been banned from some stations because of its title, but Johnstone said people shouldn't look too deeply into "Drugs." "It really has no meaning to us. Don't take that one too seriously. It really misrepresents what the band is about." The song was written in just a few minutes during an informal jam session. Ammonia's history dates to 1992,

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when Johnstonc and drummer Allan Balmont first began playing under the name Fuzzswirl. After a few names and a few bass players, current bassist Simon Hensworth joined the band in 1993.Ammonia recorded a couple of EPs and then went to work on Mint 400, which made Australia's charts. Johnstone said the band came up with the name Ammonia from looking through a chemistry book. Mint 400 isnamed after a car race in Hunter Thompson's book Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, he said. In fact, the 12-song compact disc's cover features a race car with "Mint 400" painted on it. Johnstone said he didn't know what kind of reception Mint 400 would get from Americans. "I really didn't think about how it would do. I thought it was the kind of music that could do well. But you have to maintain a level

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Example* include the doowop paro^/MiuteMAny Way the Wind H tank 2m$: Vm Lost Ephate 8towi and the men terioui Jazz (Nykodtoc) bluet number M AfcyC*"fiMtuir« Unto ths cfttnly sccHmed Captahtoihaart, would haw inada HMfln' Wol* proud, Running fnoff Miles, tNi M N A ) nltisfi focuMt on itudo ratifW mWch about TO minute, The tost # • n w f i p p m d on twin ta^dnMto soon • a p M nonunion TOT Zappa nooptytes and hk^y rat> ommendedforZapwiNte. tfppi nanCrfMCNN iPB wBGKI Just bobmhUdeilhln 1993. The

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FIRST RACE PROMPTLY AT 6:00 PM

For more information on the show, call 229-9186.

the Mrioty of musical style* Zappa

-

Free Admission - Friday, May 17th On/y|JonQ(|f)n „ m U m 4pm Expanded Fori/Ules ' ChiWwn under M m

OPINING M Y " M M 1 "SATURDAY ITS MILLER TIME

from 1958-92 and piwkte i fwdnjtin^ Insi^ittormv

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also.Jn our COMMUNITY CENTER GIDT& NOVELTY SHOP • PASTRY SHOP • GROCERY STORE (Bakaliko) • ARTS & CRAFTS SHOP RELIGIOUS TOURS • TAKE OUT ORDER BOOTH

head about those things" he said. Another Australian hand on Epic Records, Silverchair, has done exceptionally well in the United States with their song "Tomorrow" The bands' members are friends, Johnstone said. Johnstone doesn't know what the future holds for Ammonia. "In the worst-case scenario we'll be broken up; in the best-case scenario we'll be touring the States," he said. He did say the next Ammonia album, which the band has already HASCAR MODIFIEDS - REMINGTON MODIFllDS written three songs for, will be more consistent than Mint 400. • "Right now, it's just a collection of I DAYTONA U T I MODUS • LATE MODEL ROOKIES songs. They'll be more solid, more consistent (on the next album.)" What can people expect at the Metro show? "It'll be pretty loud." M R S OPEN 10:00 AM • PRACTICE 3:00 PM

."•..* * \ I

OUTDOOR TAVERNA

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Fr/ends star's flick has four laughs, maybe Appalling goings on in The Pallbearer BYmm

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their unborn child, dying.

Weekend Pius film critic

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,ft KM For discount admission coupons callMMIO-HOO AT 1*207. EXIT 6 Wore May 10. WHWII

BRAS Site 32AA-46DDD and E, F, FF 32*46

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Pallbearer, another purported

A couple of weeks ago, Mrs. laughfest, starts off with a mother Winterbourne began with a home- finding ^ r son in the garage after less pregnant woman in a train he's wrninitted suicide. While itmay be hard not to wreck with the only two people chuckle at such goings-on (that's who had been kind to her, and sarcasm, folks), it suffices to say it's not as funny as it sounds. David Schwimmer's attempt to parlay friends into movie stardom is about as much fun to watch as minor surgery. Schwimmer plays Tom Thomp|Classes starlit son, a Brooklyn boy (yeah, he's 25 |the following years old, but he's still a boy) who I locations: lives in his mother's house, has taken a year to find a job and still MfttKnlfrEflitOA TNCA hangs out with his friends from high school. When he gets a call that a classmate has died, Tom struggles to MOA. I Wid> EvtfinQi remember this supposed friend but can't. When he's asked by the suicide's sexy mom (Barbara HerScotch PlitflsFwiwoodYMCA shey) first to be a pallbearer, and Tutt. a Thure. Evenings then to deliver the eulogy, we see Beginning June t where this movie is going: to sitcom land, but without the laughs. Highland PirtWHA It starts off as a kind of hybrid Mon.lWed. of the Mary Tyler Moore Shaw's Beginning June 3 "Chuckles the Clown's Funeral" episode, in which repressed laughMiddl(«i County C f l l ^ tcr is the joke (and as played here, Thurs. Evenings a seriously unfunny one), then Banning J y w « metamorphoses into Tte Graduate OCEAN EXPLORERS Goes to a Funeral, when Tom ends up in bed with AQUATIC CENTER _ ., r , . i 180 Lafayette Ave. ' the dead man's

SCUBA

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(in front of Menlo Mall)

Edison 906-8400

(

PUBLICITY PHOTO BY: BARRY WETCHER

The Pallbearer director Matt Reeves mires David Schwimmer and Barbara Hershey In a laughless sitcom.

ing to spark a re- attempt tO Ddrlsy Friends lationship with . , , .

his Friends character, only more whiny and indecisive (he makes Hamlet look like Han Solo) and Paltrow does her best, but can't convince us she even likes this guy. The Pallbearer, it turns out, is too long a title. It should have just and then it gets been The Poll. complicated to the breaking •

Julie (Gwyneth

^t Then? are The Pallbearer

Matt Reeves and written by Reeves and Jason Katims, wants to be a realistic art-film kind of view of repressed relationships, longing and release, but it's just one of those tilings in which some^_ body tells some, body else a lie

mother and try- Daw bCnWlMmerS

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Paltrow), another abOUt 3S (YlUCh fUfl tO ex-classmate , . from high school WatCfl dS fli/flOf SUf^tJ.

whoconvenicntly shows up in a friend's apartment one night for no good

Italian Bakery & Cafe

rcason

'

The PallbcaitT, as directed by

138 W. Main St. Somerville • (908)253-9700

We're Famous For Our CANNOLI Cookies • Biscotti Come and Pasteries • Breads Ilnjoy Our Pies • Rolls • Muffins Cappucino Danish • Bagels ami Visit Our Other Locations In Raritan & Flemington

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In How to Mate an American Qufft (Columbia TriStar Home Video), V/lnona Ryder plays a woman trying to decide if she should marry a guy who not only loves her, but puts up with her constant flowery dialogue about Ufe and love and the Meaning of Thin# without flinching And her name is Finn, That should tell you something right there. She makes her decision with the help of her grandmother's (Ellen Burstyn) qbjMrfc circle, which includes Anne Bancroft, Maya A n $ b u , Lois Smith

maybe four chuckles (not the clown, alas)

in the movie, and they're not worth sitting through the rest of the 108 min-

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°

for

-

Schwimmer plays a variation on and Kate Nelligan, among others. They each tell their story, and they're all a heck of a lot more interesting than hers. Disney's latest assault on literature, Tom and Huck, is a blatant attempt to cash in on the pre-teen popularity of Jonathan Taylor TrKms and Brad Renfro. As a retelling of VK Atenfures of Tom Sawyer, it's about as good as that musical version wltn Johnnie Whitaker about 25 years ago. The American Pmkient (Columbia TriStar Home Vkteo) Is a very entertaining, not especially convincing concoction with Michael Douglas as the President, Annette Bentng as the woman who catches his eye and a host of wonderful character actors in supporting rotes. The wisecracks are plentiful, and you may find yourself wishing we had a President like this before It's over.

Directed by Matt Reeves. Wrftien by Jason Katims and Matt Reeves. Rated PG-13. Tom Thompson DAVIO SCHWIMMER

WieDeMarco Ruth

GWYNETH PALTROW BARBARA HERSHEY M

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seT!rzizirr.MicHttLVAmAN Mrs, Thompson

CAROL KANE

Top ten rentals L Bridges ofMxtison County 2. Watting to Exhale 3. Braveneart 4. Money Train lAWatklntheOouds 6. Copycat 1. Something To Talk flbotf 8. Seven 9. Home For The Holidays 10. Dangomus Minds New releases: Uie American Pmldent, Powder, Jwmjt, Casino, Dead Presidents, Nkk of Time, Dunston Checta In, Get Shorty, VV7W B;/L - U s t courtesy of Easy Video, Bedmtosier

•M—•

May 8-10,1996

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What Tc DC

Happenings

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ALLTHINQIWWGHT ANDBEAUWW. (908} 534-4644

I I I vOII0Pl»(ntttin.iM(»iun
•Tour of churches In Stockton, Sergeantsvllle and LamberMlle, 10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m, May 9 - 1 1 Admission $25. ART IN SUMMIT The Green, Summit

iMi

•An show and craft tab outdoors In the Union County city, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. May 18. Free admission, BUCKS COUNTY DESIGNER HOUSf 388 Brownsburg Rd. East New Hope, Pa,

(215) 348-5835 •Meld this year on the Clark estate outside the town, to May 26. Adults $12, senior citizens S10; call for each day's hours. DOC WALK'96 Giralda Farms 575 Woodland Ave., Madison

(201) 514-5888 •Waik-a-thon for St. Hubert's Giralda animal welfare complex, 10:30 a.m.4 p.m. May 19. Registration required; catl tor specifics. ftEA MARKET Union County College, 1033 Spnngfieid Ave., Cranford (908) 709-7505 •Sponsored by the college's alumni association, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. May 11. Rain date May 18. Free admission, FLEA MARKET/MOTHER'S DAY PLANT SALE St. Luke's Episcopal Church Route 27, Metuchen (908) 548-0100, Ext. 10 •Held msioe and outside the church, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. May 11. Free admission. GREAT TRAIN R0BBERT Remington to Rmgoes •!908) 782-9600 •Charity benefit along the Black River & Westem Railroad. May 18,19. Adjtts S7, children 3-12 S3.50. children under 3 free; call for departure times. GREEK FESTIVAL St. George Greek OrtnMJcu Cfiyr:n. 1101 River Ra.

TCP U CDS lEvilBmpim (Rage gainst the Machine) 3. C M (Dave Matthews Band) 4. Fait/wither Johnson (Hootie&TheBlowfteh) $, To the Faithful Departed (The CranbefTies)

6. Falling into You (Celine Won) 7. SWeen Stone (Bush) 8. (mats The Stoty) Morning Gtotf? (Oasis) 9. Dance Mk USA Vol. 4 10. Sweet Dreams {La Bouche) -Sales figures courtesy of Ahvilk Records

(908) 453-1642

<9Q8j 873-8718. 355-2237

•Shorthetr (Morris-type, etc.) cats of more than 30 breeds. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. May 18,19. Adults $7. children $5. SPRING FLOWER FAIR Rutgers Gardens Ryaers Lane, New Brunswick

(908J 932-8451 •Including a rnododendrum show, 10 a m - 4 p.m. May 11,12. Free admission. TERRIER TRIAL Hunterdon Historical Museum, 56 Main St., Clinton

(908) 735-4101 •Show of Jack Russell temers, 9 a.m,-4 p.m. May 1 1 . adults $4,

616 S2.

U

0When p l o w much $ [xJPhone number

•Food, culture, etc. fron Greece. Way 17-19. Aa'j!ts S I , children u^oer 12 free; ca;i f:r eacr day's hours. POTTERY SHOW AND SALE Hageman Farm Ro-ie 615, Middlebush

(9O8i 417-1400

iHiitmiN)

Singkt 13 Send Information at least 10 days ahead to: VM To Do Weekend Plus P.O. Box 699 44 Veterans Memorial Drive East SomervUle NJ 08876 Our fax is (008) 528-2509. We want to know;

(908) 273-9121

•Benefit for the New Jersey Artjsts Guild, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. May 11. Free admission. SHORTHAIRS UNLIMITED New Jersey Conventon Center Rantan Center. Edison

• •

Innovative guitarist Michael Hedges plays the Pollak Auditorium in West Long Branch 8 p.m. Saturday. See In Concert. UNION CENTER STREET FAIR Stuyvcsant Ave., Union (908) 996-3036 •Held along a mam street of the township, 1*6 p.m. May 19. Ram date May 26. Free admission. A VIOLET BY A MOSSY STONE Cranford

(908) 276-5077 •Tour of six gardens in the Union County township, noon-4 p.m. May 19. Admission S10 in advance, $12 day of event

WESTF1ELD ANTIQUES FAIR Sm Street Field, Westfield (201) 763-6947

May 12. Adults S3, children under 12

CROSSIrVORD ANSWERS FROM PAGE 2 FOWL LANGUAGE

Community Theatre 100 South St., Womstov.Ti

(201) 539-8008 •The Prokofiev standard, perforrea by tte New Philharmonic of Ne.v Jersey. S10, SOMERSET HILLS CHARLOTTE'S WEB 1 and 3 p.m. May 19 Wilkjns Theatre, Kean College of New Jersey, Union (908) 527-2337 •Musical based on the E.B. White story. Admission $5.

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CHILDREN'S CHORUS 7 p.m. Saturday, May 11 Moms Museum, 6 Normar.iy Mornstcv.Ti

(201) 538-6069 •Spnng concert, featuring folk so-gs fron E/ifiapi^ Europe a.id L3tn Arrerca. ACT, " s r . V /

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Weekend Plus, Miy HO •Work« o f « « , Barber and SaW-Saeni, per-

Prtnceton

•Ttwa bands on one staaiei part of the /

y y y p ^ tm, AduKi M M 1 3 ; students (30 mtoutti bttoi* curtain) 30 percent discount flroop

(809) 28*8000

IHiUmdfc«fa^fctri—AAdMtJl rhiMwn/

SVMPM0NV 0 M H H 1 M 3 p.m. Sunday, May 12 Richardson Auditorium, Princeton Unfctntty (609)258-5000 •Mother1! Day concert. Admission $25-$15.

under 10 H t .

7 p.m. Saturday, May 18 descent Avenue PmbyMan Church Rout* 29, Stockton 716 Watctmi^ A M . , PiatntaW (908)213-1100 (908)2764572 •All-women trio performs Fivnch Impressionist •llOth-annivefsary concert, featuring songi in (800)4884873 and Romantic music. Adults $15, senior cltl•rheMawBaKWuroVMym/y.or German and Enf i&h m assistance from simiI p m, Saturday, May 11; Poilak Auditorium, M M and students $9. of lha UJy DumftfW 11:30 i.m. May 12. lar ememWet Admission $11 In advance, Grove H , Chejter Monmouth University, West Lonf Branch Admission 139.05. (908)179-7304 (908)571-3483 $12 at the door. ROMANTIC PHKATHAUANS •LoatftVonfce/s, Neil Simon comedy In the •Guitarist from the Windham Hill stable. Ad8 p.m. Saturday, May 1 1 HNNCCTON UNIVERSITY The Carriap House New Yfl* suburb. To May 25, Mutts $12, mission $20. Edward Nash Theatre JAZZCNSCMBUS 129 Watson Rd.,Farwood unlor cttUens and students $ 1 1 ANNCHULS Raritan VaHty Community 8 p.m. Saturday, May 11 (906) 322-8686 W G N I COUNTY PUYHOUK College, North Branch 7 p.m, Sunday, May 19 Richardson Auditorium •A Wew torn th» Bridge, melodrama by Arthur 70 South Main St. (906) 725-3420 Watchung Arts Center (609) 258-5000 Miller. To May 25. Adults $10, senior citizens New Hope, Pa. Watchung Circle, Watchung •His Symphony No. 3 In F and his German •The Concert Jazz Ensemble and the Jaz* En$8. (215)662-2041 Requiem, performed by the Central Jersey (908) 753-0190 semble II. Adults $20, senior citizens and stuPLAYHOUSE 22 •Nunscnse, off-Broadway musical about the Symphony Orchestra and Master Chorale. •Folk singer from Chicago, Admission $8. dents $10, children under 12 $5. 210 Dunhams Comer Rd, Little Sisters or Hoboken. To May 19. Adults Adults $10, senior citizens and students $7. MEESUN HOW/ADAM East Brunswick PRO NWS $20-$17, senior citizens $18-$15, Group CAROL RCDFIELOBNOWNINa/ DAVIS/MISAKOTODA (908) 254-3939 rates available. CHAMBER SINGERS ANITA CERVANTES 8 p.m. Saturday, May 18 •Joseph and the Amaz/ng Tec/wtoo/or DreamCIRCLE PLAYHOUSE 8 p.m. Saturday, May 18 8 p.m. Saturday, May 11 Taplin Auditorium, coat, early Andrew Lloyd Webber musical. To 416 Victoria Ave., Piscalaway Westminster Choir College Princeton University Stanley Congregational Church May 12. Admission $15 opening night, $14 (908) 966-7555 Williamson Hall, Princeton (609) 258-5000 94 Fairmount Ave., Chatham other times; discounts available. •Gemini, South Philadelphia comedy by Albert (609)921-2663 •Violinist, cellist and pianist (respectively) per (908) 526-3925 PtAYWRIQHTS THEATRE Innourato. May 10-June 1. Adults $11 Friday form works of Franck, Kodaly and Brahms. •Cellist (former) and pianist (latter) perform •Performing works of Monteverdi, Mozart, BritOF NEW JERSEY and Saturday, 19 lor ono or $16 lor two works of Beethoven, Felix Mendelssohn, J.S. Free admission. ten and other composers. Adults $10, senior 33 Green Village Rd., Madison Sunday; senior citizens and students $10 FriBach and Vaughan Williams. Free admission. ALICE HUANG citizens and students $7. (201) 514-1940 day arid Saturday, $3 for one or $15 for two CASSATT STRING QUARTET 8 p.m. Wednesday, May 15 RICHARDSON Sunday. •Sister Calling My Name, world premiere of 8 p.m, Tuesday, May 14 Taplin Auditorium, CHAMBER PLAYERS drama by Buzz Mclaughlin. To May 19, AdmisCRANFORD DRAMATIC CLUB Taplin Auditorium, Princeton University sion $17 evening, $15 matinee: discounts 78 Wlnans Ave,, Cranford 8 p.m. Friday, May 10 Princeton University (609) 258-5000 available. (908) 276-7611 Richardson Auditorium, (609)258-5000 •Pianist performs works of Brahms, Schubert, •Nunsense, off-Broadway musical about the •Ine Lower Cortw, worid premiere of drama Pnnceton University •Featuring Curtis Bahn, a graduate student at Purcell Bnd other composers with Rebecca little Sisters of Hoboken. To May 18. Admisby Robert Clyman. To May 18. Admission $17 the university, Free admission, (609) 258-5000 Myers, soprano. Free admission. sion $15. evening, $15 matinee; discounts available. COLONIAL SYMPHONY JUMP AT THE SUN •Performing works of Milhaud, Walton and DuCROSSROADS SHERATON AT 8:30 p.m, Friday, May 10 8 p.m. Saturday, May I B pare. Adults. $22-$12, students $2. THEATW COMPANY WOOOtRIOGE PLACE Chatham High School Ogden Memorial Church SAX PLUS 7 Livingston Ave. Route 1, Iseltn 255 Lafayette Av*., Chatham Route 124, Chatham 3 p.m. Sunday, May 19: Zimmerii Art MuNew Brunswick (201) 301-0562 (908) 766-7555 (201) 539-6286,288-9729 seum, Rutgers University, New Brunswick (908) 249-5560 •Murderous Crossings, murder mystery done •World premiere of Variations by Erica Muhl; •Two-woman ensemble performs in a contra (908) 932-7237 •/heScmmdln Perth, worid premiere of a dinner-theater style. 8 p.m. Saturday to May also works of William Walton and Anton dance with Ruth Sylvester, caller. Lessons drama by Marian X. To May 26. Admission 18. Admission $42. •All-saxophone quartet. Free admission. Dvorak. Related lecture 7:30 p.m, Adults $327:30 p.m. Admission $6; sneakers required. $32-$22, STAQEWOHKS/SUMMTT DANia SHAPIRO/ $10, students $5, JUHKHtSTMNQS Kent Place School EDISON VALLEY PLAYHOUSE DUOSORTtLEQE JCIFRCV WORKMAN 7:30 p.m. Saturday, May 1 1 42 Norwood Ave., Summit 2196 Oak Tree Rd., Edison 3 p.m. Sunday, May 19 Edison Intermediate School 1:30 p.m. Sunday, May 12 (908) 273-9383 (906) 755-4654 Watchung Arts Center Rahway Ave., Westfield Princeton University Chapel •The Sus/ness of Murder, mystery by Richard •Uttfe Women, adaptation of the Louisa May Watchung Circle, Watchung (908) 771-5544 (609) 258-3654 Harris (no relation to the actor). To May 25. Alcott novel with students from the school's (908)753-0190 •Stamitz's Mannheim Symphony; Sibelius's •Trumpet player (former) and organist (latter) Adults $10, senior citizens and students $8. drama department. May 10-12. Adults $10, •Performing works of Schubert, Ravel and Romance: the Broofc Green Suite by Holtz; perform works of Telemann, Handel, Mown FIRST UNITARIAN SOCIETY senior citizens and students $8. Group rates other composers. Admission $10. fine We/ne Nachtmusi* by Mozart. Donation. and Hovhanesi Free admission. 724 Park Ave., Plainfield available. EMERSON STRING QUARTET KING'S ROAD SWING BAND (908) 757-7707 THE SOLDIER'S TALE TECHNIQUES THEATRE 8 p.m, Thursday, May 16 8 p.m. Friday, May 10 •The Baker's Wife, musical. To May 11. Adults 8 p.m. Saturday, May 11 Middlesex County Vo-Tech Richardson Auditorium, Watchung Arts Center $13.50, senior citizens and students $11.50. Rues Lane, East Brunswick N.J. Center for visual Princeton University Watchung Circle, Watchung FORUM THEATRE (908) 521-3156 Arts, 6 8 Elm St., Summit (609)258-5000 (908) 753-0190 314 Main S I , Metuchen •The Secret Garden, adaptation of the chil(908) 2 3 2 4 1 1 6 •Performing works of Haydn, Beethoven and •Forties-style big band performs In a dance (908) 548-0582 dren's story. To May 18. Adults $10 evening, Ives. Adults $27-$19, students $2. concert Center members $8, non-members •A rarely-heard Igor Stravinsky work, per•SopWe, Tote and Bells, New Jersey premiere $8 matinee; senior citizens and children $8 FAIR BRITISH ISLE $10. formed by the Arbor Chamber Music Society. of musical by Joanne Koch and Sarah Blacher evening, $6 matinee. Group rates available. 7:30 p.m. Saturday, May IB LET THERE BE MUSIC Related lecture 7:30 p.m. Adults $17, senior Cohen. To May 19. Admission $27-$23; dis- UNION CATHOLIC Stanton Reformed Church 7 p.m. Sunday, May 19 citizens $14, students $7. counts available. REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL Route 629, Stanton Stanley Congregational Church STACEYSTIMAC/ QEORGE STREET PLAYHOUSE 1600 South Marline Ave. (908)213-1100 94 Fairmount Ave., Chatham CHERYL CUNNINGHAM 9 Livingston Ave, Scotch Plains •Music of Elizabeth-era England performed on (908) 665-2699 New Brunswick 8 p.m. Saturday, May 11 (908) 233-8444 viols by Parthenia, Adults $15, senior citizens •Songs from the 1890s to the more recent (908) 246-7717 United Methodist Church •Anything Goes, Cole Portef musical from earand students $9. past, performed by the Essei Chorale. Admis•Twist, musical version of Oliver Tw/st set in lier this centuiy. 8 p.m, May 10,11. Admis73 Old Highway, Whitehouse FIVE M i AND A J sion $8. Louisiana. To June 2. Admission S32-S24. sion $8, $6. (908)236-6606 8 p.m. Saturday, May 18 SUSIE LORAND A FRIENDS discounts available. VILLAGERS THEATRE St. John's Lutheran Church •Flutist (former) and harpist (tatter) perform 8 p.m. Saturday, May 11 HUNTERDONHtLLS 475 DeMott Lane, Somerset 587 Springfield Ave,, Summit Reformed Church, 23 South works of Debussy, Ibert, Saint-Saens and PLAYHOUSE (908) 873-2710 (201) 762-8486 Second Ave., Highland Park Rossini. Adults $10, students $5. Route 173, Perryville •One flew Over the CucAoo's Nest, stage ver•Works of Morales. Monteverdi, Mcssiaen. (908) 940-1553,828-3528 STEPHEN MATTHEW TAYLOR (800) 447-7313 sion of the movie that rocketed Jack Nicholson Fanny Mendelssohn, Felix Mendelssohn and •Performing in a contra dance with Use Ro8 p.m. Friday, May 10; Borough Improvement •Scuflfib/es, comedy by Marshall Karp, To to fame. To May 12. Admission $17 Saturday, Jannequin, performed by the Summit Chorale. manov, caller. Instruction for beginners 7:30 League June 27. Group rates available; call for ticket $15 Friday and Sunday. Adults $12, senior citizens and students $8. p.m. Admission $7. prices, 491 Middlesex Ave., Metuchen WESTFIELO FROM GOOD HOMES PATH LuPONE JOHN P. STEVENS COMMUNITY PLAYERS (908) 632-8502 8 p.m. Friday, May 10 7 p.m. Saturday, May 11 • HIGH SCHOOL 1000 North Ave. West •SinBer-songwnter performs in a coffeehouse Community Theatre State Theatre, 19 Uvingston Ave., New Brun855 Grove Ave., Edison Westfield 100 South St.. Morristown setting. Adults $4, senior cituens and stuswick (908) 549-1434 (908) 232-1221 (201) 539-3008 (908) 246-7717 dents $3. •Damn YankeesF baseball musical from "The •Lend Me a Tenor, or Opening Night Meets •Rock band from Sussex County now signed •Modem-day diva of musicals [Evila on Broad- TESTAMENTS TO FREEDOM Year the Yankees Lost the Pennant." 7:30 Murphy's Law. 8 p.m. May 10,11,17, 18. to a major label. Admission $15. way, Sunset Boulevarcf in London), Admission 8 p.m. Friday, May 10 p.m. May 9-11, Admission $4 In advance, $5 Admission $12. FROM MOTHERS TO $5O-$2O. United Reformed Church at the door. BLUES AND JAZZ MUSIC 3 0 8 100 West Main St., Somervilte McCARTER THEATRE 1 p.m. Saturday, May 1 1 8 p.m. Friday, May 17 (908) 281-8509 91 University PI., Princeton Peppermint Entertainment Taplin Auditorium, SOMERSET VALLEY PLAYHOUSE (609)683-8000 •Woite of Randall Thompson and Aaron CopComplex, 175 Ernest Howard Princeton Univenyty Route 514, Neshamc •A Doll House, play by Henrik Ibsen. To May land, plus Negro spirituals, sung by the Raritan Blvd., Orange (609) 258.5000 (908) 369-7469 26. Admission $40-$15. Valley Chorus. Admission $7. (908) 214-0113 •The Last of* t/w Mara Brothers' VWifers, com•Works of undergraduate and well-known MIDDLESEX COUNTY COLLEGE •Featuring the Jazz of New Bwnswick Youth VICTORIAN SECRETS edy whose premise is self-explanatory. May composers, performed by music students at Performing Arti Center Ensemble plus jan bands from two Newark 8 p.m. Saturday, May 11 17-June 8. Admission $12, the university. Free admission. Route 514, Edison high schools. Adults $8 in advance, $10 at MUSICAL CELEBRATION First Presbyterian Church (908) 906-2545 the door; students $5. OF MILTON BABBITT Route 34, Matawan •Wwtong, musical version of the Studs Terfcel FROM OPERETTA 3 p.m. Sunday, May 19 (908) 583-4007 book about wording people, 8 p.m. May 10, TO BROADWAY Richardson Auditorium, •"Sonp of Passion and Propriety" performed 11. Adults $7; senior citizens, students and 8 p.m. Saturday, May 18 Princeton University by the Arcadian Chorale. Adults $7, senior college's employees $5. Watchung Arts Center (609) 258-5000 citizens $6, students $5; group rates availPAPER MILL PLAYHOUSE Watchung Circle, Watchung •His works (and those of other composers) able. Bfcokside Dr., Millburn AMERICANS IN PARIS (908) 753-0190 performed for his 80th birthday. Free admis(201)376-4343 8 p.m. Friday, May 10 FREOERICAVONSTADE •Featuring Florence Lazzeri, soprano; Rick sion. •Cafl Me Madam, living Berlin musical about a State Theatre, New Brunswick McElhiney, baritone; and Bel Musica. Admis 6 p.m. Tuesday, May 14 THE NERDS/NIGHT TRAIN/ DX. socialite/ambassador. To May 26. Adults 8:30 p.m. Saturday, May 11 sion $10. BUMS IN THE PARK Drumthwacket $46-$31; students (15 minutes before curCrescent Temple, Trenton GREATER PRINCETON Noon Sunday, May 19 Route 206, Princeton tain) $10. Group rates available, 3 p.m. Sunday, May 12 YOUTH ORCHESTRA AT&T Moorland Farms (201) 605-2525 THE PAVILION Symphony-Hall, Newark 8 p.m. Saturday, May 18 Route 202, Far Hills •Mezzo-soprano performs in a benefit for the 70 Middlesex Ave., Metuchen (800) ALLEGRO Richardson Auditorium, (908) 722-7903 1 CysticRbfosisFqupda^pn.^rri ,•••• . . ' ! ' • ' f • t i n * 7:3Op.m.Salurtay ) Mayil

NOW PLAYING

COMING UP

In Concert

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What to do 13

Weekend Plus, May 8-10 MIIIHIMttMttlMMMUMM

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{809)482-7800 10l.m.*10p.m.ev9fyaay, •"Art PrimiMn" by Barbara Harding Seibert •ndjUteeSkidmN* Cufbreth, to June 25. HUNTtRDON ART CENTER 7 Lowr Center St., Clinton

(908)735-8415

17, •Wasrwtfon Street Playtft, May 1 * .

ATRIUM U N N Q t 2 Albany St., New Brunswick

(908) 873-1324

41 Monti St. (201)5384328 •Rex March FMtor, May 11, RAMTANMVmCUJS

John Blanculll Trio, Saturdays. •Christy Baron, May 10, •Donna BiencuHl Hand, May 17, BIRCH HILL NIOHTCLUS Route 9, Old Bridge

(908) 5494110 Skip Robert*, Saturdays. •Andy Lawn, Randy Breeder, Al Foster, GeorajMni, May 10. STONE PONY 913 Ocean Ave,, Asbuy Park

(908)636-0650 •Son Volt, May 11, BOURBON STREET CAff OW lay Restaurant 61 Church St, New Brunswick

(908) 775-5700

(906) 246-3111 •The Gotham Playboys, May 10. •BWPerry, May 11. •"l$ThatJas"{DJ),Mayl2,19. •Herd of Bluet, May 15. •EX. Scott, May 16. •John Primer, May 17. •Bobby Pariw, May 18. BREAK FOR THE BOROER 703 Routs 202, Bftdgtwatar



•Local H, Stanford Prison Experiment, Dm* iMffw, May l u . •mtoAfWthertMayl6. THE STRESS FACTORY 90 Church SL, (906)5454242 Comatfydub. •Eddia BitN, May 10,11. •Joey Koia, May 17, IB,

(908) 722-8666 •Tr>eBastaR)os,MaylO. "Stanley Roots 4 Tht Tribe. May U . •Brian Quinn, May 17. •TheSoulEn|nea,Mayl8. CLUSBENE Route 35, Saymitt (908) 727-3000 •Joan Jett 4 The Blackhearts, May 1 1 . •Angela BaN, May 12. •Annie Hasiam, May 17. •Bobby Collins, May IB, 1HCCUMH0UM

116 Watchur^ Aw., Plalnftekl (908) 769-9267 •Fred Schneider, May 10. •love Pumps, May I t •Oread Zeppelin, May 16. •Rev. Soul InttwNew Woitd, May 17. •UBamba,Mayl8. COACH N'PADDOCK Route 173, Hampton (9C8I 735-7889 •ChetVamer.MaylO. THE CORNERSTONE 25NewSt,Metuchen

(90S) 549-5306 -Bill Chartap Quartet, May 10. •Mike Hashlm Quartet, May 11. •Kenny Davem Quartet May 15,17, IB. COURT TAVERN 124 Church S t New Brunswick

(908) 545-7265 •Cecil Whitebone, Loved Ones, BiDy & The Big laugiing Crazy Ladies, May 10. •Ff, Hello Dall Uama, Moped, Aviso. May I t •All God's Children, Fatty Lumpkin, May IT. •Bad Karma, Low Gas. Stress Magnets, Hung Ute Christ, May 18. JACK O'CONNOR'S 1288 Route 22, Bridgewater

(908) 725-1500 Gladys Richards (piano), brunch Sundays. Irish Willie Lynch, Thursdays. •Johnny Charles, May 10. •The Booglertzers, May 17. •Summit Stampers, May 18. MAXWELL'S 1039 Washington St. Hoboken

(201) 798-4064 •eioodloss, The Mad Daddys, Gus, May 10. •The Kaisers, The Neanderthals, Sit'n'SpIn, May 11. •The Garters, Scarce, May 12. •Fred Schneider, May 13. •The Fteshtones, The Woggtes, May 17. •Play Trains, May 18. •The Posies. May 19. METRO LOUNGE 369 Broadway, Long Branch

(908) 229-9186 •dada, Gren, May 10. •Ammonia, Lustre, May 17. MINSTREL COFFEEHOUSE Somerset County Environment Education Center, 190 Lord Stirling Rd.. Basking Ridge (201) 335-9489 •Bin Staines; Tom Gala & Ray Duffy; May 17. PALMYRA TEA ROOM 22 Hamilton St Bound Brook

(908)302^515 •Pusherman (v»MeMn McKnlgtit), May 10. •Mteha Platigorsky; May I t •3 to Six Inches, Man Needs Woman, May

Speakers THtARTOF THE S U M AND YUAN 9:15 a.m. Tuesday, May 14 MoCoehHal, Princeton IWvwsJty (600)288-3788 •Daytoflg vnpoeium nlatod to a currant « m. i ttitMetropolitan Museum of Aft. Free admWoni nfttntion itqukid.

fylleries •AKRON ART8CENRII 582RahwtyA*.,Woodbrid|e (908)6340413 11 a.fn,*4 p.m. Monday-Friday. •Art *om Woodbndga senior cfttons, May 1219. Reception 2-4 p.m. May 12. CORUANFMEMfrOALURY Haadquan*'fte* Routi 202, MonWown

(201)267-3730 11 a m - 5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. •Watarcolon by Evetta Chtttid and Sheila Grodsky, to May 3 1 MAKL SMITH DOUOUSS LIBRARY Chapel Dr., New Brunswick (906) 932-0411 Open during Wbnry noun. •PaMtingj by JanejEweibei to June 15. DREWUMVEMITY Route 124, Madison

(201)408-3466 Open during library hours, •Color photojaphs by H. Lisa Solon, to May 29. RENEEWOSANER GALLERY paper I M rtcyhouM Brookside Dr.. Millbum

(201) 379-3636, Ext 2272 hkwn-3 p.m. Friday. Also open one hour before performances and at intermission. Free admission. •New Jersey Watercolor Society members' snow, to May 26. GALLERY AT BRISTOL-MYERS SQUIBB Route 206, Princeton

(609) 252-6275 Free admission; call for each day's hours. •"Design and Content" in antique American quilts, to May 19. GALLERY « CROSSROADS Creeeiowh Theaftt Company 7LMn0tonAw. New Brunswick

(936) 249-5581, Ext 1 3 Open one hour before and one-half hour after performances. Atao open by appointment •Pslntngi by Emani S i n ,toMay 26. QRATOU GALLERY Fometal at Princeton RoutolPUnetoro

1 1 a.m.-C p.m. Wednesday-Sunday. Free admission for members. Non-member admission: adulU S2.5O, senior dUens $150, students $1. •"Adorf Konred: An Intimate View," to June 2. I M M STREET QAUEftY Montgomery Center Rout* 206, SkJIlmtn

(609) 683-8092 Open during store hours, •Works by Lucy Grant McVlcker and Charles McVlcker.toMayll. MEWCAlCfHTER ATnUNCETON 3O0WrthenpoonSt. Princeton

(809) 497-4191 Op«niMngdlnlA|hallhourt. •Paintings by (Mana Wilkoc Patton, to May 16. MCRRU. LYNCH ART W Q I R Y 800SeuddenM»Rd, Plajnsboro

MIMIIMIHMMMIIMUIKMI

Springfield Aw,, Cranford

(908)709-7155 1-4 and 8-9 p.m. Monday-Thursday; 1-4 p.m, Friday, Saturday. •Work* by the coHege'c architecture students,

to May 11.

JACOB TRAP* GALLERY UnMaitM Ctwrdi 4 Waldron Ave., Summit

(906) 273-3245 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-noon Sunday. Also open by appointment. •"Nature's Reflections" In watercoiors by Shirley Pu Wills, to May R •Young members' show, May 19-June 2. WATCHUNQ ARTS CENTER Watchung Circle, Wrtchung

(908) 753-0190 1-4 p.m. Monday-Saturday. Free admission. •Garden State International Photography Show, May 11-28. Reception 7 p.m. May 11. •"Insignificant Objects" by Constance Moore Simon, to May 3 1 . Reception 7:30 p.m. May 11.

ALVWAJLEYAMERKAH DANCE THEATER 7 p m May 10,11 (908)906-2586 Symphony Hal 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday. 1020 Broad St, Newark •"Mi pueblo y mi genta," photographs by Eve(201)643-8009 lyn Vete and Sakta Marina, College Center •Mwslds by Judith Jamison; SheMar by JaGallery,toMay 30. woie WHa Jo ZoAar, flMMont by Mr. Alley. •WrfcitoySheili Dchenbiatt, Presktefltial Art Admission 130-110; foup rates available. Ga«ery,toMay3L School performance 10 a.m. May 10, adMUNtCWAl C O M * 1 0 mission 112 (school foups). 455HoeiLana,Pttatawy ... AND DANCERS (908) 562-2301 8 p.m. May 16,17; Playhouse 22,210 Dun6:30 a.m.-4;3O p.m. Monday-Friday. hams ComarRd. •Human Potential Month u N * ,toMay 30. EastSrunswk* Recepbw7-9p.m. WaylO. (908)254.3939 NEW JERSEY CENTER •Al-woman dance cdectwe from Manhattan. FORmUAlARTS Adults $12, sartor ctfeens and students $10, 88 EknSt, Summit children $6. Reception after May 16 perform(908)273-9121 ance $5. Fret admtoJon; callforeach days hours. •"Intimacy and km" by tiat Block, Members' Gaiety, May 10-June 6. Reception 2-5 p.m.

AndipioMs

N J . SHAMESKARE FESTIVAL

(908) 233*1158

Bowne Theatre, Drew University, Route 124, Madison

1 1 a.m,-4 p.m. Monday-Friday. •Mibum-Shott HHIs Arts Center spring exriibi-

(201) 408-3278

OF NEW JERSEY 440 RivwRd., North Branch

(908) 725-2110 11 a.m,-4 p.m. Wednesday-Friday, 1-4 p.m. Saturday. Free admission. •"Icons: Iconography" by Lois Shapiro, Library Gallery, to June 1 . QUIETUDE GARDEN GALLERY 24 Fern Rd., East Brunswick (908)257-4340 Noon-5 p.m, Friday and Saturday. Also open by appointment. •"Sculpture Enhanced by Nature," to Nov. 2. RABSET GALLERY 120 Georges Rd. North Brunswick

(906)828-5150 9 e.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday. . •Paintings by Lyanne Malamed,toMay 11. •Ceramic vessels by Lynn Peters, to May 11. RIDER UNIVERSITY Studant Center GaMery Route 206, Lawrencevitle

(609)896-5327 Open by appointment only. •Student art, into summer. ELIZABETH ANNE SETON MEMORIAL GALLERY S t Peter's High School, 175 Somerset S i , New Brunswick

(908)846-8046 8 8.nv3 p.m. Monday-Friday. Also open by appointment •"Promises" from three artists, to May 16. SWAM GALLERIES 703WatchungAve.,P(ainfield

(908)756-1707 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Monday-Friday, 9:30 a m - 4 p.m. Saturday. •English and Scottish paintings of the 18th and 1901 centuries, to May 2, •08 paintings by Robert teber, to June I TOMASULO GALLERY Unkn County Coiefe, 1033

I

17.

y 10a.m.-4p.m. svaryday. •"Tht Humaniotlon of Ttchnototy11 by UWm S«rwaitt,toJuni7. IVOOfaUIX COUNTY COUtOf Route 514, Edison

Jy

Presbyterian Church 140 Mountain Ave., Weitfleld (908) 322-7240 •85-volca chorus that slnp oratorios! M a u n , Requiems and cantatas.

•Works by Vladimir Kanwsky and Boris Zherdin, May 17-June 13. Reception 7-9 p.m. May

(809) 282-1281,021-1142;

•Flowers "In Bloom," Palmer Ga%y, to June 9. urnvevemuv AT SHORT mil 5 1 JFK Pkwy., Short Hills

«l*M»MMIMtl|IMIIt

•For soring production of Two Genttemen of tewia. Canine auditions for Crab the dog 10 a.m, May U.Ca* for specifics. PREMIER THEATRE COMPANY Henderson Theatre Route 520, Uncroft (90S) 758-1118 •For 1996 season of musicals. Auditions 7 p.m. May 1 0 , 1 1 a.m. May 1 1 Prepare 16 bars of a song; bring sheet music Bnd be preparedtodance.

CANTABfLE CHAMBER CHORALE

BRANOIS DANCE THEATRE (908) 753-2300 •Ballroom and Latin dance at Ricochet Health and Racquet Club, South PlalnfleJd, 9 p.m, Friday. Admission (5. CENTRAL JERSEY TALL FRIENDS CUM " and tetter, •Bowling at Majestic Lartes, Old Bridge, 1 p.m. May 11. (908) 229-1142 by May 10. •International dining at Arauka's, Kendall Park, 7:15 p.m. May 14. (90S) 985-7027 by May

11. •Volunteer night at Food Bank of Monmouth and Ocean Counties, 6 p.m. May 18. (90B) 974-2265 by May 14. •"Founder's Day" party (call for location), 6:30 p.m. May 18. Cost $10. (908) 3296366 by May 14. DINNER CONNECTIONS (908) 221-1182 •Dinner (Jacket andtie)at Cuisine's, Batk^g flidge, 8 p.m. Saturday, Cost $90; must reserve by noon that day, (NTERfAfTHSlNOtH (4l«Mefl (906) 233-2278 •Social and discussion at First Baptist Church, WestfMd, 9 s.m. Sunday. Cost $2. JEWISH WOMEN INTERNATIONAL Hannah SeneaK Chapter (40t,S0s) (609)443-3593 •Meettm at Jewish Community Cantor of Mfr dtoex County, Edison, 2:30 p.m. May 19, T

(906)462-2406 •Dance at Radisson hotel, Falrfleld, 9 p.m. May 10. Cost $12. •Dance (25-49 only) at Sheraton hotel, lielln, 9 p.m. May 11. Cost $12. •Dance at Remade Inn, East Brunswick, 9 p.m. May I t Cost $12. •Dance at The Gate House, West Oranei, 8 p.m. May 12. Cost $12. •Dance at Van's Freehold Inn, 9 p.m. May 17, Cost $12. •Dances at Atlantic Club, Wall; Essex Hearth and Country Club, West Orange; and Foratel «t Princeton, 9 p.m. May 18. Cost $12, •Dance at Landmark Inn, Woodbrfdfle, 8 p.m. May 19. Cost $12. S0L0SWQLU (908) 786-1839 (7-9 p.m,) •Bridge at Central Presbyterian Church, 6:43 p.m. May 19, Cost $2. SOMERSET H l l i l SMQIE HIKERS

(908) 774-6759 •Hike at Coppermine Trail, Delaware Water Gap, 11:30 a.m. May 12, Meet in lot across from WUIie's Taveme, Bedmlnster. Coit $5: bring water. •Hike at Schermann-Hoffman Sanctuary, Bernardsville, 11:30 a.m. May 19, Meet in lot across from Willie's Taveme, Bedmlnster. Cost $5; bring water. TOWNtCOUNTRY SINGLES CLUB

(908) 766-4962 7:30 p.m. Wednesday •Social at Bridgev/ater Manor, 8:30 p.m, Presbyterian Church, 409 Wednesday. Cost $8. Mountain Ave., Bound Brook WEEKEND RACQUETS (908) 753-5424 (908) 937-9317 •Middlesex County ensemble with an empha•Tennis at The Club at Woodbridgp, 6 p.m. sis on new American music. Singers with choSunday. Cost $22. ral experience encouraged to audition. YOUNG SINGLE CATHOLIC ADULTS CLUB (25CELEBRATION 45) CHILDREN'S CHOIR (908) 381-5964, 725-7949 6:45 p.m. Tuesday •Dance at Immaculate Heart cf Mary Church, United Methodist Church, 201 Scotch Plains, 8 p.m. May 18. Cost $8. Lincoln Ave. East, Cranford YOUNG SINGLES' (908) 245-2339 SOCIAL CLUB •Newly formed ensemble of singers 9-13. (professionals, 20-45) CENTRAL JERSEY •Hiking in Lewis Monti Park, Mendham, 11 SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA a.m. Sunday. (908) 221-1182, AND MASTER CHORALE -Bruncfi (jacket and tie) at Trie Store, Sasking 7:30 p.m. Monday (chorus), Tuesday (orchesRidge, noon Sunday. Members $20, nontra); Arts Building, Rarrtan Valley Community members $30. (908) 221-1182 by noon SatCollege, North Branch (908) 231-8813 urday. •Volleyball at Warren Racquet Club, 2 p.m. •Regional orchestra and chorus based at the college. Openings in aO string sections; audiSunday. Members $5, non-members $10. tion necessary for orchestra. No audition (908) 647-9380 by Saturday. needed for experienced choral singers. -Dance and social Oacket and tie) it AT&T CHORAL ART SOCIETY Learning Center, Basking Ridge, 9 p m May 10. Cost $15 with corporate ID, $20 without OF NEW JERSEY (908) 221-1182. 8 p.m. Tuesday

May 8-10,1996

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jfl

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Weekend Hus, May 840

Bernards Inn offers its patrons classy cuisine SyPHW/SRECXEL Weekend Pfus culinary corespondent

T

jhcro's a small hotel without a wishing well or a Jacuzzi - but with a wonderful atmosphere ofoldfashioned statclincss, old world grandeur and timeless elegance and grace. It is a quiet oasis in the midst of busy Bcrnardsville; it is the 21 -room Bernards Inn. Just off the lobby is the restaurant, which serves "the classically French-inspired, progressive American cuisine of Chef Edward Stone, with an award-winning wine list," What that means is the food is wonderful, the service divine, and if you want fine dining in sophisticated surroundings, this is Oio place, but, ofcourse, you must be prepared to expect a highpriced, but worthy menu. Our dinner was from the Tasting Menu, a chef-selected six-course dinner with wines, available in an elegant overnight package of a room and dinner. The dishes are smaller portions of items on the regular menu and we found each one to be interesting, if not outstanding, Upon being seated, the firstcourse wine was poured and a small brochette appeared, compliments ofthe chef, which we noted was served to all diners. The Montrachet and sweet corn pancake served with an Italian Gavi di Gavi wine was interesting, the wine delicious. We asked to sample the evening soup, tomato with thyme and potato, which was served steaming hot. RANDALL MILLER/WEEKEND PLUS The second course (served with At the Bernards Inn, the tuxedoed staff will greet you at your a California chardonnay) was a table with delectable cuisine. gastronomic treat I don't like scallops much, more because of their glazed turnips and a roasted shal- consider the overnight accomconsistency than taste, but the lot jus. It was great with the barolo modations package: a welcoming Maine diver scallops, coming from from Tuscany. basket, the taste sampling dinner, and a continental breakfast, all for The final course was the asvorful morsels that should not be $275/couple, or the extra-special package, which adds "romantic acManzi. They are a dessert lover's cents for the room" and plush his deli ht her cotton terry cloth robes as e W 8 ) ^ ^ late hjuvest and en^ M ^ S S Z chardonnay&omQliforniawasa a gift, $375. The bar, in the front of the hotel, salad with pinot noir torn Oregon V*£* £ accompaniment - w a s awonderful mid-dinner rewid say, you is;a great place to visit before or iddi From that sample wth ^ ^ ° n after seang a movie down the spite. The Roquefort cheese, pears ™* g° ^ ^ e menu, from appetizers such as street to garden room, another and hazelnut dressing (served at dining area, is also rather charmlunch/dinner, $6/$7.50) was a gen- mushroom risotto for $9.50 and roast loin of rabbit for $12, or sal- ing. And if you're planning a spetly piquant addition that simply ads ($6.50-$7.50), or main courses cial party, the ballrooms on the flavored the salad without over($21-$28). Luncheon main courses, other side of the lobby are lovely. whelming the taste buds. Served Thcre's lots to choose from in which include several salads, with a gentle red wine, the salad this stately old inn which has range $7.50-$14. Wines are served and dressing made for a great transformed itself into a winsome by the glass ($5.75-$8.75) and by combination. old world get-away. Next came sauteed medallions the bottle. Obviously the menu is pricey, of veal served with, again gently but the restaurant and its food are The Bernards Inn, 27 Mine Brook flavored, angel hair pasta and a classy. Delectable dishes served by Road, Bemardsville; 766-0002. California merlot The flavors staff in tuxedos in a room with a Closed Sunday except for special made a wonderful combination. events. Hours: 11:30 a.nv3 p m , (The regular menu includes gnoc- mahogany-paneled ceiling, oil chi and wilted arugula with the paintings on the cream walls, and 5:30-10 p.ia, to11 p m Friday and Saturday. Reservations encourveal for$26). The same could be draperies at every window make said for the fifth course, roast rack this a wonderful place to dine. agtd. Major credit cards ac* of lamb with tasty honey-rosemary To plan a really special outing, cepted.

By Phyllis Reckel

I K n d Plus culin&y correspondent

Bring a picnic lunch and a blan- nover; il Capriccio, Whippany; il ket and listen to the sounds of M p a n o , Cedar Grove; The Phoenix Fire before or after tour- Manor, West Orange, Ram's Head ing the winery and sampling the Inn, Absecon. • * * 1995 releases found in lawn tents at Unkmvilk Vineyards, 9 Rock- At Best Chefs Night, sponsored town Road, Ringoes, at the Spring by Washington Rock Girl Scout Flint Festival 11 a.m.4 pm. Sat- Council at LpAffaire in Mountain' urday, The wine shop offers wine, side, more than 300 people asgrape jewelry and other wine re- sembled to vote for the best of the lated crafts as well as pine wine food and beverage industry in box furniture. For information or which more than 20 suppliers pardirections, call 788-0400, ticipated. Among the winners were Freshwater's of Plainfield for the A Cigar Dinner For Women best entree, baby back spare ribs; Only, including a five-course gour- Margie's Cake Box of Plainfield for met meal prepared by Executive best dessert; Ahrre's Coffee RoastChef Yves Vacheresse with com- cry of Westfield for best nonpatible wines, will be held 6:30-10 alcoholic beverage; Kings Super p.m. Tuesday, May 21 at The For- Markets for best table presentaratal at Princeton Hotel and tion; and Fcrraro's of Westfield for Conference Center. Cost is $115. Best of the Night, The next best Call Lee Wotton at (609) 452-7800, night is March 24,1997. • • • Ext. 5200, • » • Spago's executive pastry chef The American Automobile As- Mary Bergin, and other celebrity sociation has awarded its presti- chefs are on-line on the new intergious four diamond rating to six active real butter web site of the properties and nine restaurants in American Dairy Association & New Jersey. The restaurants are: Dairy Council listed at http:// The Ryland Inn, Whitehouse; The wu-wjealbuttw.com on the InterForrestal at Princeton Hotel and net Everything you've ever wantConference Center; La Fontana, ed to know about butter, plus reciNew Brunswick; The Terrace, pes, events and festivals, surveys Short Hills; Arcata Ristorante (for- and questionnaires are part of the merly Prima Donna), East Ha- program.

Guess I could walk the dog, again.

Guess Icould paint my toe nails, again.

Maybe, there 6 a football game on

Maybe, the Mets play tonight

m

Gee, it would be fun top to the ballpark with someone who loves like I do!

Gee, \t would be fun to go to the ballpark with someone who loves

INTRODUCTIONS FREE A WAY FOR PEOPLE

INTRODUCTIONS (iOWfUTED BY FORBES NEWSPAPERS. 44

ET PEOPLE

0W£,SOMEflVHl£.NJQlto

TO f U E i TOUR FMEE AD CALL 1 I H M l 4 5 8 2 OR SEE TODAYS "INTRODUCnOHr AD IN "WEEKEND PLUB"

I

May 8-10,1996

HERB PATULLdl • Flih Fry: Friid Floundtr, Shrimp, Scallops & Clams... 9 " • Lemon Chicken 8JJ • Shrimp Diane 10" Specials Include: Soup, Salad, Entree, Cottee/Tea & Dessert Country Western Night

Tuesdays & Thursdays

318 William St.,

fthEEM hOUfiE ftgfeTAURAWT

CIUBRATI M O f N i m DAY WITH US FAMILY PRICED MENU FREE Flower For Every Mom S«rvlr>g 12 • 7 PM

taway - 752-4474

By Phyllis Reckel

r M e o d Pius culinary conespondenl FUippo's Restaurant on East Main Street, Somcrville, is one of the first restaurants in New Jersey ,o receive the International Restaurant and Hospitality Rating Bureau Award of Excellence for 1996. •



Consumers arc now able to request The Jersey Tomato by name since the New Jersey Tomato Council was granted trademark recognition for The Jersey Tomato. Look forward to free samples in the supermarkets and ask for them at your favorite restaurant.

• **

Applebee's Neighborhood GriU and Bar introduces Pasta Americana which offers new menu items through Sunday, May 19. In addition to five new pasta dishes, the menu also features new items: grilled salmon and Alfredo pasta, smothered Tuscan chicken, Jambalaya pasta, low-fat garlic chicken pasta and fordessert, parfait caffc, Also, coming back is lasagna primavera and an appetizer, veggie patch pizza. The eatery is at several New Jersey locations including Route 22 West and Mountain Avenue, Watchung, and Piscataway Towne Center at South Washington and Centennial Avenues.

UVE ENTIMAINMINTFM.ftttl NUY10THA1UH

Come Celebrate

MOTHERS DAY

"ART k TNI FMULOUS HJUULI VOttLIITIMUir 4 IOOMS FOR IANQUETS 25-150 H O n t On* No, Voiwlltr Avt. leund Irook 336-2692 • 356-9888

luodiy »May 14th

BUZZTS

LUNCH A DINNIISEIVED DAILY IN OW NIW HMOOtllD GIHNHOUSI

Hours for Lunch I Dinner Tu«i> - Sunday »11AM-9PM

Food U Spirits Entrm Starting Fiwn»,«8

75X-UX9 200 Stelton Road • Piscataway

Reservations Accepted Seating 1:00-8:00 Mtjor Credit Cards Accepted

CARPACCIO Mother's Served with Salad and Vegetable Du. W* will b t happy to split any of our pitta Mttctions as an appatiiar

fAutm

580 Union t Middlesex, NJ 08846 (908)356-BOCA 2622

Let Our Family Serve Your Family This Mothers Day Serving Our Complete Menu Plus Many Mothers Day Specials 3 Settings • 3:00, 5:00 & 7:00

from $ 9 95 All Entrees Include Salad & Side Dish • Reserve Early

WCATONIVOOKA 9.95 Frttft Tomato. C f « m ind Vodka PACUA E riCNO &.9J Hom*m»)« p y u with mustirooms, pfoscuittc, p«M M d ctttm FETTUCCINE ALfHCDO 8.95 P u l l wild creim, egg. butter inJ tomino cht«u TOBTEHINl 9.95 wllli MUI Slutf StufFtd Chcm pasta with homttnidt mtat siucf fENNt AllA AIUUBIATA 9.95 Hometnidt M « ' » tomito »nd tioi red prpptr TACLIOUNA MIA PESCATORt 10.95 Pisu «iik ihrlmp, Killopt. clams and raUmarl WCATONI Dl fOMODMO 9.95 FrMh tomato, ontoni and protcuiflo L1NGUIN1 9,95 wild Red or White Clim Sauct TftENETO Al PESTO 9.95 Paiti with frtih bam uuca FENNE AILA PUHANESCA 9.95 Pinna, odvw, capan, tnchovits, Qarlic and fresh toroto

CHICKEN FRANCES^ 11.95 Bon*»u brtast of chicken, egg, whiti wint ind lemoo CHICKEN PARMICIANA 11,15 B r a « M bonaint braatl ol chtcttan with tomalo in
V l A t SALT1MMCA 14.9$ V«tf acalopptnt, mead p»o«tuflo, taga, thaliott andiptnach 'lALrAJWIClANA 13.95 Brtidad vail culial with parmlgtini chaaaa and frtth tomalo

Steak House 8 Country Western Dance Club Fresh Fruit Platter * been Garden Salad • Ceasar Salad • Vegetable Crudite • Soup Du lour • BBQ Spare Ribs Baked Sugar Cured Ham« Roast Prime Ribs ol Beef • Stuffed Sole • Chicken Allorno • Breast ofChicken Francalse • Oven Roast Potatoes • Fresh Vegetable Medley • Dessert Table with Cakes, Pies 6 Mint Pastries

' $19.95 Pit Person

JRSEAT1NGS §*PM,3PM, W5PM.7PM

$9.95

Children Undet 12

All Mother's Receive a Complimentary Pass For Club Entry Including Dance LessonsJ

UK]

Broitad tail and Net mignon STEAK ClAMBOTTA 11.95 Potatoes, hot and tweet peppers, onJom ami mushroomi LAMB CHOPS 14.95 FILET M1CNON 17.95 SIRLOIN STEAK 1€9!

BROILED SEAFOOD COMBINATION

19.95

with Ktfopt, ftounder, iiuded ihrimp I lotttttr

VEALP1CCATA 13.95 V«al tcaloppwa. Itmoo and wtin« mnt

tail BROILED SCALLOPS

14.M

VEAL AUA CARPACCIO 14.95 Vtal acatoppina with tun-dntd tomalots, mushroomi and whirt wina

wtlh lemon m d butter tauc* BROILED FLOUNDER

HIS

VEAILECUBAFFI U.95 Vtal wift anchovias, moziaralla chatM in

MOTHER'S DAY BOUNTIFUL BUFFET

SURf AND TURF

VEAL MARSALA 1 4 95 Mai acatopptna tautaed win muthroomi and Wartalawn* VEAL SOMENTtNA

U.95

Vaal « M eggplant, proaenrto and lontra cheew VEAL MILANESE CIAROMERA 14.95 Bnaded vaal cuilat topped with arrugala tiled VEALDECASA 14 Vaal with muihroomi, pfoaaittto and p u t In • pinhiauct

orfrancna

BROIUD RED SNAPPER orblackanad 15.95 BROILED 5WORDFISH or blackaoed 14.9$ STUFFED FLOUNDER with crabmMt stuffing SHRIMP SCAMPI 17.95 with a butter, garlic and wint sauct ovtr capclli LOBSTER TAIL* SHRIMP SCAMPI IMS Mrvedowcaptiii CAIAMARIMARINARA 11JS » u t M d In • light tomato sauce over linguM ULSTER TAILS 19.IS broiitd with butter and limon Kra Uiuvulo

i\

lail. slu imp, w

A uhriimt from out l*ti\lnCon

A clams

17.95

$5.95

p Irish

Children Under 6

IM Mr\iwn ?.(W) JjiruUan

5.IH) 5.IN)

J DAYS A WEEK, Lunch 11:30-3:3O Dinner 4:00-11:00

154 Bonnie Burn Rd. " S ^ s " Watchung • 322-7200 W » W ! .

651 Boundbrock RJ. ( Middlesex, NJ (201) 968-3242 1.1IJ

17

ers Day... Cater to Mom Sunday, May 1

iuii M I rm\>i: GRAND

Settings 12:00-2:00-4:00 <

*

'

Complimentary Dessert for all Moms! 645Routi202209• BridgiwiUr • 909-929-7090

I H I I KH.IL\R CONK WITH ANY tmiKK laKillASI Ofitrtiplrti •/«/»•

The Oik Tree C«iil«r 1655-215 Oak Tree M . opRilePlau)

:

You Dewrve The Best!

SPECIAL

Scarpellino's Restaurant Optn Mtttker\Ikiy IMtpm • H:Qttpm

I6H Mt. I M M KtL, Warren. NJ Mm* (WK)M7-I72H

Accepted

IT

Route 78 (EXIT 12) 4 Miles West of Clinton

(908) 735-7689

0/9 S Hours Open IW Coikiail Hour 7 Coiirsv Diinu-r,

LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS

*<, «, %k y*

'ii-ri'il WttlJniR (.ikf L'aiulrialuiiH HIHI 1 Imvrrs Jubili'i- Show. Private Mriilal , While (.iluvc Scrvnc

' WEDDINGS • BANQUETS • PARTIES FOR ALL OCCASIONS OFf PREVISE CATERING FOR HOME OR Of FCC

r*i

s Pa

atidmfilm12tk

s 10:00 AM until 2:00 PM May 12th

95 FOR ELEGANT

MOTHER'S DAY SEAFOOD BUFFET

adults / kids Kids 2 and under eat FREE! Holiday Dinner Menu - Noon-6:00 PM

Chef Carved: Prime Ribs, Turkeys, Ham, Lamb, Shrimp, Clams, Viennese Table 4 Fresh Fruit.

Rt$$rve

Daily Lunches 1™**"* Daily Specials w $

j CfuuijtaiufTw

chlldreniMenu

Park & Mountain Ave, Scotch Plains • 322-7726

$795

FRIDAY NIGHT DANCE May 10th Chet Varner May 17th Live Sounds of Magic





*



&.•

• .

NteyB-10,1996

W##k§M Phis

SOMERSET & MAIN Invites You For Mother's Day Enjoy A 4 Course Meat of Salad, Pasta, Entree, and Desert $ 2 4 9 S - Adulls

Somerset

Mmic Siig-i-Unc by Hobby & Hicti 3 FM» PM in Dining Kmni

$ 9S

9 -

Children

{phh jn.iluily ami lux)

BOBBT & MARTS

Kiwrvc lor our 1:00pm, 3:30pm and 6:00pm Siatings

318 William St., Piscataway*752-4474

2/5 Main Street White House Station, NJ

908-534-5055

the

Coachman Mother's Dov Buffet y

Served Noon'til 7 PM Fotttiriru): * IrofiShrimf) • Rout Ducftifty * Loinof Por* • Roasi Spring Lamb • Ikitfii Virginia Ham • Sea/oaf TfwnnUor

* * * * ( H o m c News) • * • % (Star ledger) (Courier News) * * * * { J c w s h Star)

Dino & Sam invite you tocelebrate Mother's Day at // humtioro. A special Mother's Day Menu will be presented, beginning al 1:00 PM, featuring the very best in Northern Italian Cuisine, uniquely presented and at very reasonable prices. Please call for reservation.

Cft^Carved Rout TWivy oni Roast Beef and Anaintndanct of ointr ddkades

VlllS Ta6d ami llntTOi)*

I W.llighSl.Somcrville (Corner of North Bridge St.)

10

Adults

(908)526-4466

Call (908)2724700 • At Parkway Exit 136 Cranlord

-aft:

Restaurant & Caterers

()pcn 7 Days \on Smoking Area j ^ j

\\\ Entrees $3.75^*S^g•••*:.'•£'#':•:»

All % Ib. Sandwiches $2.75 t;u intituled

Full Course Dinners Served in an Elegant Atmosphere

FOR MOTHER'S DAY A GIFT OF

m Enjoy Gourmet Dishes Such As: Roast Spring Lamb Baked Virginia Ham Veal Cordon Bleu

• Prime Rib • Steaks • Seafood

Seatings: 12:30 • 2:30 •5:00 • 7:00

• • » .

I

Meals to Go enu for theWeek of May 13,1996

Tuna and White Bean Salad

u

•«>

BBQ Chicken Salad (or) Eggplant Rollaniini

r FCC Flower to all Mothers May 12th

1714 Kaston Ave. * Somerset Reservations Recommended

469-2522

f»r

Mon. Chicken Fajitas (of) Ravioli w/ 3 Mushroom Sauce

...and hifinij otfons

Gift Certificates Available

%

\

All major credit cards honored

Th

Salisbury Steak (or) Pasta w/Asparagus & Mushrooms

p I '

Sausage Peppers & Potatoes (or) Fettuccirii w/ Shrimp Vodka Sauce

440 W. Union Ave, Bound Brook (Rt 28) 764-9255 62 VV, Main St., Somerville 722-8782

I 9

May 8-10,1906

La Petite

TREAT MOM SPECIAL • • • DINE WITHUS!

Hut h'riHih Cuisine in in ritgml, rthuid itmosphtrr

OPEN MOTHER'S DAY

MOTHER'S DAY DINNER STARTS AT 12:00 SPECIALLY PRICED DINNERS

Choi Gill Peet, formerly of NY. Lut6ce

CHILDREN'S MENU AVAILABLE (121 Undw)

"Very Good" NY. Tlmei 4/96 "A * * EKcellem* Asbury Pk. Press 4/96 H W * Star Ledgor 4/96

f »ch Mom Witt Rtct/vt A Complimnt$ry Ctmation OHSilD!

431 North Avc. • Westflcld • (90(1) 232-1680

Call ForReservations Sow!

ii Ttw WnlHrlrf INN)

Evening diners will be treated to the Sounds ol tho Sirvoriones starting at 6:30 We make every occasion special but you don't need a special occasion to eaf hew!

The Willows

Bvirif|iH'ls For EVEHV Cudgel.'

Park Avenue Restaurant

Ma/or Crtdff Cwtfi 4cc«pfttf

(908) 968-2739

May Early Bird Dinner

1013 N. Washington Aw. (on m m . ) Gfttn Brook, NJ.

BRIUAI, snow iV I:\IMI JFK Conference Center

COMPLITI Dinners

$

Including... Soup AND Large Gordon Salad AND Coffee AND Dessertlll Ewry Day 4-6PM, exept Sunday 12-4PM

6

LUNCH SERVED MON THRU SAT STARTING 11 AM

70 James St.,Edison Fashion Show Band Show Door Prizes & Much More!

Tuxedo's



Grooms are FREE with this ad

BANQUETS FOR EVERY BUDGET!

Live Entertainnwnt Every Fri & Sat THIS WEEK

MAY 21st j

Thurt. M«y |» • 0. J 'Uneh HhlC 10*411*.

2000 PARK AVENUE (Rt, 531), SOUTH PUINFtELD • 908-755-6161

Tuesday | % 6:45 P.M. I

Call For Reservation & Registration To Win Discounted Honeymoon to Hawaii •908-257-8544

f Sfeni Tour Mother's Day With One of |Centro( New Jersey's Ciassk Restaurants I

Mom's

Ristorante

Mother's Day Special fr Ala Carte Menu ^

Special menu/or Easter afcni) witfi affyour ottf/avorites

Sellings: 12:00PM, 2:30PM, 5:00PM & 7:30PM RESERVATIONS REQUIRED

^Reservations now 6eing accepted

For More Information Call (908) 658-3000 1251 Route 202 206 Bridgewaier

Also Serving: • Lunch and Dinner Daily 19tt4Rt27,Edison (908)2872778 Catering for Every Occasion

» •

May 8-10,1896

LOWEST' PRICES OF THE YEAR

LOWEST PRICES IN MEW

i Confidence. Bring All Competitors' Advertisements, CouponsftQuotes. Compare Our Prices, Selection I I Service. You'll BE Glad You Oldl It 18 Our PoRey To Maintain Tho Lowest Prices In New Jerstyll I ONE OF A KIND POOLS 'Compl»to With P—I WWW U * n , MM

' ONE W M K SALE "

MM

IBM MM Century CrwUl H ' M W |10M | T M IWMfMt 1 I M 4 I ' ft14M I B M $2000 112H topwltr 2T«4r IMO0 I 1 I M Mavauit I I ' M M * $2000 11400 AM 1000 $2M0

$22t I

•1 ?x38" Quick Swim. .

II

|iGfK42"CarltM



nor

IMtl

I t 5'K36" Quick Swim..

L?..

MM I $TM|

| 1 6 W Lakewood ||15'x48" Fairmont i18'K4eirFaifmoni

j''"^'^'•^"•••j-•••-"•"jj-••^'•^"a™ i«»^|Tgl

COUPON

!



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300" VALUE

!K!

'WITH 52" POOL l»«?^

II

CHLORINE

* < 1 •* I

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90 DAY FINANCING

fS t 4#T

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w.m i w.-.r? i^i^i"fclI V ,»;i.;.U: ,.*"*• J

« * * •

SAVE O N HUNDREDS OF IN-STOCK SETS

FREE UU-WIT AYIILULf

.FREE

Huge Selection Replacement Cushions & Umbrellas in Stock.

Baby Boom Box

Always Immediate Mut-lay Mtvary

'Get a free Mesh Gear Baj by purchase or plus ftoHcrbladc

Not all brand* in all ttoras. No Patio Dtpt i t Eitt Bruniwtck.

I I I I I I

F l i t SOtAR HI AT WITH SOLAR COVERS 10-15 DEGREES WARMER WMEfl IICTANCUIAI $17 16i33 |4» 119 1 t i 3 t $59 129 30 HO $79 139 2SHS $119 149 15' WARMER

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REPLACEMETN FILTERS Columbia Ampro . Jacuzzi . Perllex . Hayward , Muskin. .

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POOL CHEMICALS AUTOMATIC VACUUMS 1 Pelican Guarantees Prices in I!I Lowest New Jersev I Plus Gel FREE I Rollerblade Rental I

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buy Rollerblade* skates Agear and get

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f-rtF'ni

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toU U Fw P MFw I * P*M Tha Har*T»FM

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(908)2545125

3 HUQE UEOA STO%$ * POOU OH DtSPUY • WORTH TH TtUP * K-F 1C4t SAT. 94, SUN. 10-5

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Forbes Newspapers

1996

May 8,9,10

ERA touts protection plans for buyers and sellers

ERABifirtJillif

INDEX New homes Realty notes Property 8ales_R 9

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* Top Rated Sckok * Spectacular Mountain Views.

* Smd Town Living * Skply A Great Place ToCall Home. AH inclusive in the purchaseprice of your newhome at Tamaron Ridge. Less than five minutes from Routes 78 & 22 3 Fully Furnished Models!

IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY your choice summer, fall, or Spring 97 Sales Office # (908) 638-8128 Directions: Rt. 78 west to Exit 18(Annandale) Take the third right onto West Street (Route 641 North-turns into Dewey Ave.). Proceed 1.6 miles (under the railroad bridge) to Tamaron Ridge on the right. Sales office open Thursday to Monday 12 to 5p.m. Additional hours available by appointment.

.«.* A Forbes Newspapers Supplement

May 8 , 9 , 1 0 , 1 9 9 6 - 3

Forbes Newspapers

Real Estate C

0

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EN

Cheryl Fwiike Ewcuilw Editor

DawPila Rial Etttta Editor

Judy Hawkktson

Arthur Kurek

T S

Cover house

ClauifM Uwiarkeling

Clamtw) AdwrtHlfig lUtanagw

Coroil* Mahoney Clauitad T^phtwe 8al«ft ftapriuntatlve

Michael C, Homyw R M I EK*t» Account Emcutlw

Matookn 8. Fortwi Jr. Editor-ln-ChM o1 Fortm M«guin« and Forba loub 8. Banony

Realty notes

Adv«rt*tiog Diractor

Hmpym

Qeorgi Gannon RDtil Adwiiwig Manager

Com house; GnwBrook is one (A sewn commun/l/M planned

8,9

Property sales

Foimoreintomiiion, contact the corporate headquarters at (908}tiQM007

Forbes Newspapers Somerset Messenger-Gazette, Hill5-Bedmin»ter Press, Bound Brook Chronicle, The Chronicle, Metuchen-Edison Review Piscataway Review, South Plaintield Reporter, Franklin Focus, Green Brook-North Plainfield Journal, Warren-Watchung Journal, Highland Park Herald, Cranford Chronicle, Scotch Plains Fanwood Press, Westfield Record, Buyers Guide

To Subscribe to Forbes Newspapers call: 1-800-300-9321 • To advertise call: 908-722-3000

up

I $$$

MONTHLY

BI-WEEKLY

Payment amount

$

Total payments

$ 166,861.80 $ 156,39634

Total interest paid $

927.01 $ 66,861.80 $

463.51 56,39634 1

Country Atmosphere • Easy Commuting • Vo/ue 21 home traditional community, Enjoy the country atmosphere on a 3/4 acre lot, City sewer & water, underground utilities, maintenance free exteriors, fireplace, whlflpooJ, dramatic 9' ceilings, landscape package, Andersen windows, full basements and paved driveways are but a few of the amenities. Whether your family Is just beginning or still growing, It's a fine place to call home, ^ w i d open F r i . thru Won.

INTEREST SAVED... $10,465.46

11-4 or by appointment. SALES: 908454-7100

Comparison based on a 15-year $100,000 mortgage @ 7.50% APR. Payments are every 14 days and automatically deducted from your Peapack-Gladstone Bank checking account

JCP&L AQWOOMMNT

FIRST-TIME HOME BUYER/AFFORDABLE HOUSING PROGRAIS

Call us at 908-234-0700 for more information

PEAPACK-GLADSTONE BANK

§

MORTGAGE DEPARTMENT • 158 ROUTE 206 NORTH • PEAPACK-GLADSTONE, KJ Member Federal Resent Bank

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BI-WEEKLY MORTGAGES SAVE YOU MONEY I

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SYSTEMS! Geothermal heating, cooling and water heating, the most efficient technology available today, All homes built to JCP&L's Good Cents home building energy standards.

$199,900 Rt78W Exit3 miC) 1 mile

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RT22.WHITEHOUSE.NJ

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RealEstate Monarch Ridge offers a grand point of view A Forbes Newspapers Supplement

4 - M a y 8,9,10,

Somerset County's most scenic closets and a luxurious private and prestigious community, Mon- bath. Throughout the homes, the arch Ridge, offers breathtaking Edgewood attention to detail and views from the Watchung Moun- to quality is inevidence. The gourtains that extend all the way to the met kitchen includes a convenient center island. Manhattan skyline, and beyond "Our five luxurious single-family Other standard features include home models make wonderful use wood-burning fireplaces, luxurious of the panoramic scenery, at the wall-towall carpeting, central same time offering the kind of air conditioning, plenty of quality and elegance today's closet space, poured concrete homeowners demand," said Jack basements, two-car garages, Morris, president of Edgewood. and many other thoughtful "With the weather improving, fam- design elements, A sodded ilies find out views exhilarating. and landscaped front yard Just looking out across the land with an underground sprinmakes people want to live here." kler system further demonAll of the fine homes at Mon- strates the Edgewood dedicaarch Ridge make excellent use of tion toa comprehensive new generous space. The four-and five- home package, bedroom single-family homes here Prices for the spectacular range from 2,500 square feet to mountainside homes at Monmore than 2,900 square feet El- arch Ridge begin at $289,990, egance of design is the catchword proving that elegance and in this community. Entry foyers value need not be priced behave hardwood floors and rise to a yond the reach of most famidramatic two-story height Nine- lies. The residences in this foot first floor ceilings arestand- community combine the best ard. The formal dining room and elements of formal, traditional family room invite entertaining exteriors with innovative deand family gatherings. And thesign and modern convenience family spaces are similarly expan- throughout the stately, wellsive, making terrific use of open- constructed homes. plan kitchen and breakfast areas, In addition to Monarch Ridge in Green Brook, Edgeand a comfortable family room. On the second floor, bedrooms wood is developing Cardinal create ample room for growing Ridge in Bridgewater, Warren families. The master suite is par- Rise in Warren Township, ticularly lavish, sporting walk-in Jackson Estates in Piscataway

and Brandywine Estates in East Windsor - an award-winning community juart recognized a Community of the Year by the New Jersey Builders Association. Edgewood Properties also just opened Charlestown Crossing in Piscataway and Samantha Estates

(Warrcnville/Basking Ridge) and in the East Brunswick area. Monarch Ridge is on WarrenviUe go south on Mount Bethel Road Road in Green Brook, just minutes (which becomes WarrenviUe Road) from Interstates 76 and 287 andabout 3.9 miles to Monarch Ridge Route 22. From Route 22, exit at on the right WarrenviUe Road and go north to The sales office is open daily Monarch Ridge on the left. From from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. For more inRoute 78, take Exit 36 formation, call 752-7979.

WESTFIELD

CRANFORD Not only a great houM buta vacation at home as well with inbound pool, 4 b n , 2 5 bath*, porch, etc. (W-5678) $214,900. CIH90WM-7777.

Immaculate 3/4 brs, 2.5 baths, new designer kit. Andenon windows, alarm sys. ingrourtd pool w/cabana. (WF-5836). $278,900. Call 906*547777.

LiUILDERS OWN • 1%8

EASY LIVING

CLARK

GARWOOD

Lg ground entry split, dining area 'alcove" w.bay windows, C*c. 2 car gar. sprinklers-the works. (WF-5727). (249,900. Call 908-654-7777.

Immaculate ranch is just across from Unami Park featuring LR w/ FPL, updated bath, 2 brs, rec rm, att gar & more. (WF-5570). $164,900. Call 9O&-654-7777.

BUY A LIFESTYLE

OfSO-j-D TO DELIGHT

Ev-i

Members of Coldwell Banker Schlott'i Wutflild office at the company's recent conference In San Francisco Include; Barbara Devlin, Tom Blanco, Marilyn Kelly, Reva Berger, Mary McEnemey, Bob Becker, Kay Gragnano, Lucille Roll, Hye-Young Choi, Karleen Bums, Ruth Tata, Maureen Paaserlnl, Margaret Magulre, Carol Lyons, Madeline Sollacclo, Fran Perla, Bob Devlin, George Ford, Jackie Conover, Elvira Ardrey and John DeMarco.

CRANFORD

CRANFORD

3 br colonial w/magnificent tarn rm w/sJiderstodeck & patio. mm kit, 11/2 baths, fpl & att gar. (W-5645). $219,000. Call 906^54-7777

Ctr hall col w/corrtemp feeling, beautiful deep, well shrubbed yd on view from window wall of eat in kit. (WF-5427). $319,900. Call 908-654-7777.

For Mortgage inlo call 201-490-8100

Westfield office earns honor The Westfield office of Coldwell Banker Schlott Realtors, 209 Central Ave., took home the top honor from the company's recent International Business Conference in SanFrancisco, earning the No. 1 ranking among Coldwell Banker's 2,400 offices in North America for the second time in five years, The Westfield office has been No. 1 in the New York tri-state region every year since itwas opened more than 10 years ago, and still earned the region's "most improved" office award last year. .. B K Westfield office.al§q won.the. NoU pffice. ranked No. 5 in 1093 and No. 2 in 1994. K

fi'u"tlnF p.iyncnlv .irt' tot 3C yt.ii icnvi "' f:'fM"ip .T-H ,it>out Lowe Dovvnp.i^mcnt

• For Insurance info call 201-605-1555

f,'o"ttiiv PaymenlvOther Opticns

Westfield Office

654-7777

Ified buyers, based tfljon a 20% dewjpayment and a conventtaral 30year fixed rate loart at S.875% wtlh 3 points, W J l 7 1 7 6 \ A M r M 0 W t o H 3 ^ Iron $253,931to$625^00, tie monthly payments are to (M^ b ^ta^^a2rj%dQwnpayn^andcal-

cutatod at 7.25% tfh 3 points on a "Jumbo* 30-year fixed rate rnortga9BwtianA.Pfl.ol7565VAnei(arnpleol a $500,000 loan would mean 360 mortfily payrnerts of $3,411. Figures herein are approximate and do not indude property taxes, hazard nuance, or homeowners associate dues to a conrtxnnum ed are as of Jan. 2,1996, and subject to change. Not responsible tor typographical errors; wtifle intonation is belieyedaootirate, we request lhai the payments

Weichert WeSeUMore Because We Do Mart

I

A FortmNewipaptfi Supplement

RealEstate

May 8,9,10,1096 - 8

also participated In thtMS Walk- aff of RI/ltAX Advantafs in monthofMarch. mcc Committee ofthe Semsmt frthon April 21, rating m mthan WhitehouaerankilSthlnREMAX Sales astodrtCarelGartn won County Board of Realtors, and 1400 fcr l a Tha agamy also of New Jena/a Top SOlist tor the office top listing award Ifc holds membership in the Hunt* raised more than $5,000 fcr MDA highest dollar volume in the nine of her 12 yean in real estate don, Morris and Summit boards, month of March. Hii performance sales, Ms. Garth earned member- Sales associate Jvana Strata*? in 1995. * ** places him o w 780 RE/MAX as- ship in Weichert's Pretident'i won the office top sales award for aodatei throughout the stale. dub, honoring the top one percent March, Her sates in 1905 earned W e k i ^ Realtors'Weitfcld of• Mr. Baytoff has been of the company's sales torce. She her membership in the New Jer(fee finished first in sales and re- ate Chbg Uang, who specialises to the New Jersey As- is a member of Weichert's 200 sey State Million Dollar Oub and corded 135 percent increase in the n ofRealtors Million Dollar Sales Oub, 100 Marketed Quo, Wdcherfs Million Dollar Sales and number of listings taken through and Million Dollar Sales and Mar Marketed dubs. She has been listthe end of February, aocordinf to Somerset, Middlesex and Union OubforlttS. Mr. B a ^ , who Joined 1U5MAX keted Qubs. She won a 1995 * handselling homes for 10 years, statistics ideated by the Wtstfield November, specializes in the gkirriniarketlng award and is a member of the Somerset Board of Realtor* Ms. Garth serves in the Griev- County Board of Realtors. February's strong performance lifted Wekhert'i Westfieki office to MAX from Century 21 Realtors, *"• S o m e n e l » the top potition among ana bro- where she earned the Gold Associken, listing! taken in thefirsttwoate Award from 199140. She has months of 1996 were up more than been a consistent member of the one third, compared to the aame New Jersey Association of Realtors , ^ period a year ago, Manager Bab Million Dollar dub since 1989. oftneWetcnert, AJbanese said the strong sales Ms. Uang is a resident of Edi- ****** Bercontinued into March, with office nardsvilla office sales figures 35 percent above last ion. year's figures for the same time • • * garnered top period. Professional office located at 91 West Realtor associate Michael Bayt- honorsforthe Weichert's Westfield office is loEnd Ave, One of a kind building, Great cated at 185 Elm S t The phone location, two story Colonial, completely number is 654-7777. • • • remodeled, large lot, 8 offices, 2,500 Market your home w/guaranteed Members of ERA Suburban Resq. ft, of office space, full basement, advertising, signs, prof I support, alty Aijncy in Scotch Plains went walk up attic, maintenance free, central 0% commission* Flat fee < $850 to Overlook Hospital in Summit air, alarm system, paved, belgium April 15 and took a uHeartsaver blocked parking lot for 10 cars. JUST CFR Course." Sal Lamaatra, Don 9 Umastra, Ffeftl Umastra, Ariene MOVE IN! For Sale By Owner at Wttttg, Phyllis HarU and Joe $375,000. Pahimbo of X Palumbo & AsCall John at 231-1440 sociates, completed the course. 908-688-554? ERA Suburban Realty Agency for appointment

Prof«ffletial Building Few SaU By Own«r

SOMERVILLE

RIDICULOUS!

ICE

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[lack Stmc Resident

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Genterbridge II A Senior ( iiizcn Resident

Join Your Friends inthe Finest Senior Residence. This Award Winning Building is Perfect! 5fillcrest cJanagement

459 SHASTA D

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RealEstate

6-May 8,9,10,1996 £

A Forbes Newspapom SuppUmeht

ERA offers protection plans designed to cover both home buyers and sellers unexpected and costly home repair*. ERA Real Estate was the first real estate company to initiate home warranty plans in 1871 The ERA Buyer Protection Flan and Seller Protection Plan safeguard to the buyer or seller from unexpected expenses when covend mechanical items break down. The plans covar repairs or replacement of major components such as air conditioning, heating and electrical systems, interior plumbing, built-in appliances, water heaters and accessible duct work, the ERA home warranty plans provide coverage for the seller after the home is listed until the day of the sale, or for a maximum of 180 days, Die buyer is gen-

No home owner welcomes the cost and frustration of repairs on a faulty Aimace, a defective dishwasher or a leaky pipe. But for home buyers and sellers, the breakdown of a home's mechanical system or major appliance can be an even bigger headache. "An expensive home repair bill is a major concern for both new owners, who have already committed a great deal of money toward purchasing their home, and sellers, who are eager to reassure purchasers that they have a sound deal," said Joe Qonky, president of ERA Van Syckel Realty in Bound Brook. "Sellers also want to avoid major repair expenses while their home is on the market" In response to the need to offer relief

erally covered for a year after the date of the purchase on resale homes and, on a new home, the second through the fifth year of ownership, (first-year protection is generally provided through a builder's warranty, the extended new home plan in not available in some states.) Both plans are lutyect to a deductible per service call. Koines covered under the ERA Buyer and Seller Protection Flans are inspected to make sure the major components covered are in working order. Then if a breakdown occurs, the home owner makes a toll-free telephone call to ERA Real Estate, which contacts a service contractor in the home owner's area. ERA Real Estate handles about 13,000

calls monthly from home owners with repair questions. Since the home protection plans started in 1W2, more than $60 billion in residential properly h u been covered under the program and the company has paid more than $80 million in claims. "Ihe primary benefit provided by home warranty plans is peace of mind," said Mr. Gorsky, "Buyers are protected against repair expenses when they can least afford it - during the first year of home ownership - and sellers are protected at a time they'd rather not make major investments in the property." ERA Van Syckel Realty is a member of the ERA Real Estate Network, the ERA Real Estate Network is comprised of franchises of Electronic Realty Associates, LP.

TCM provides information on various mortgage types Why should you spend money to financial decision regarding a find out about mortgages before mortgage. talking or applying for a mortgage TCM, at 1-900-22*5817 (not a toll-free call), covers many of the with a lending institution? Fact: Lending institutions usu- facts you should be informed ally specialize in one or two of the about and the questions you most popular mortgages, but do should be asking. This 900 not specialize in all mortgages. phone number does not enTherefore, you need to have the dorse one lender or mortgage most information possible about all program over another, but of the most popular mortgages covers explanations of the available, and it should be unbi- most popular kinds of mortased. You are looking to make gages available today. what is probably the largest pur- TCM, has compiled this inchase of your life so far, and con- formation based on 12 years nected to this purchase you are re- of experience in the mortgage quired to also make an important business. Hie information

contained in the TCM tape will help to educate homebuyers so that when they sit down with a lending representative they will be better informed. Ihe information contained in

the TCM tape comes from the most frequently asked questions from first-time homebuyers to the buyer who has owned homes before. Also, a lot of the information deals with the questions that are

Congratulations, Faith Maricic

Burgdorff's #1 in Westfield!

Knauerannounces warehouse lease Joan HeUer, vice pnskfcnt of Knauer ReafyQorp of S o n * vilte, announced that Ron Fainting fohulttiad a warehouse at HUlsborough Business Campus, the pmtmnant buttnes&Andustrial park on Dene Court off Route 206 in Hillsboiough. Hillsborough Business Campus, a major facility in the region, has some 360,000 square feet irf bxhia1ziaVhigli4ech apace, plus amenities such as a popular health club, The Park is owned by Urken Associates, and the transaction was completed with Larkfin property manager Robert ten*. Row Painting, (bunded by Robert Ptara, is a we&*nown local company which handks both commercial and residential assignments. Ms. Heller, who is founder of ICHEW (Industrial Conunetciil a u e m o w U ^ i r i ^ o f the dramatic positive impact the smaller, metfunabed oompa* nies are having on the economy. While we lament the corporate carnage created by the we&knom publicized cutback, w must not forget the economy is really driven ty opportunities seized by the emerging growth companies rather than the tnditional industrial giants." Headed by Leonard Knmer, SOR, president, Knauer Realtycorp, now in its 20th year, is a fufrterwe Soraovflle^asedreal estate organization serving the needs of the New Jersey business community. The company y ^ f a * in office and indutiiiai real estate teasing and sakt, and property management and she selection. u V 1 ,\ .i

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not asked but should be asked. You can never have enough information when it comes to mortgages; the more you know the better your chances of securing the right mortgage for you.

Faith swept all the 1995 sales, listings, and production awards in closed units and closed dollar volume for Burgdorff s Westfield Office and she achieved the NJAR Million Dollar Sales Club for the ninth straight year (1987-95, Silver Level in '92). Now, she's breaking all her records for *96! Congratulations, Faith!

Faith Maricic

To put Faith's success to work for Winner of all six yearly award categories you, please call her 24-hour direct at Burgdorff s Westfield Office for 1995. dial line: 908-2334646

BURQdORjX REALTORS1

Westfield Office 600 North Ave. West Westfield, NJ 07090 908-233-0065

...Only 1.5 MilesTo Sea Girt or Spring Lake Beaches!! Admiral Farragut Estates WexfordChase Pine Beach Wexford Chase offers 29 custom built homes on 3/4 acre homesites. Priced from $347,000, These homes boast traditional living with

2-3 blocks to the river, beach andyacht club Exciting ttoniardfctiHres include:• 9' ceilings on first floor • Full high basements *Two cargarage • Central air andgas heat • Public utilities •Vaulted ceiling in MBR • Master Bath with garden tub, double sinks and glass shower, • Formal dining room • 3/4 bedrooms • 2Vi baths • Convenient to Garden State Parkway

open floor plans and a contemporary flair. Offering: • 4-5 bedrooms • Vh-Vh Baths • Full high basements • 3 cargarages • Fireplaces • Vaulted ceilings • Incomparable location just 1.5 miles to beach

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209,900

$47,999

Models OpenS$t I Sun,US Siles Officeit 90W74-O0S3 or Mil* Office «%U4M2QQ

Models Open Sit. & Sun. 11*5 Or call office m26W221 for private showing

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Realtor Slnct) 1126

ERA ANN SCHULD REALTY 231 Route9,Bayvllto

li Prood To RtpftMfit

MEMBER MLS

MIDDLESEX COUNTY SOMERSET COUNTY PUINFIELD AREA

Jan MeCann

$154,900

twr mtj 5I54JN d* ba«a«bt« mcb tn bi y* bam!! J btfrwtt, Bvtaf r m tar* etl-Mdlcfctt, , Florida m « It Mboitaantf.

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908-752-0220 ITl \4 LiJ REALTOR*

648 STELTON ROAD PISCATAWAY, NJ 06654

$229,900 The Real Estate Agent PLscatoway; IF YOU WANT TO CHOOSE YOUR OWN INTERIOR

wUhCAKDO ATTITUDE. We can do itf.-Togcther Whether you are looking to sell yonr home - or purchase a hoae - why not put Jan to work for you!?! Call to Interview Jan today Sells Home§ Fa§t! 908-752-0220 Piscataway:

Piscatamy:

AND EXTEJUOi m e n lONStl! Urn c»U JIR l«Ur tt vkw (hi piHn far Ikm (• bt bulH Cdoniati ilkrini) •r 4 bfdrMMt, V htlhi, hnUy room It \mmni, with 2 CM- I i r i p . Wining ii $2I*,*0Q

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PiscatawQ):

$18900

A HOUSE TO CALL A HOME!! For SI«MM yw i n •w* thh tUt kiH CotMlal, arrtrlni 3 btfrMM, I11 M h , br|t KIK, dMig roon, I,R A Drt! firilttty biMwd b a n m l with tiurtwd 1 car pragt.

Vinalln your frntlr plmk on Ittli grfU dtdil! C I U J M Today!

$109,000 Middlesex:

T WHY** W«ri*»'t * b TwtOMM a* akt I tor UlHtVB • VMf ilWfkWai • I VMf^MSaV I

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$U9t000 Piscalaway:

Rfcmfy tQmUi taprict lo S!»,Wt - Th(* 3 bidrtM RjKk bat prtk *«w»x iB «v«r H - If y " « « l « w v i In coMdJOoi boaM lor I m l b u SI 4I.0M tUa ki i(!l Cad Jaa tor dftaUi Iritjl

$209,900

URGE FAMILY!'! Tbn caU lo wr Ibh S M m n 2" bMb Colonial - offmd al I2M,»0. Fcyw, LR, DR, fMntty m « , fufl Utmni mi 1 cir p " T CaH Sm Tod.yl

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A f o r t * N«mpap«rt Supptomont

flay 8,9,10,1996 HOVNANMN AT B K M H N B T K R I . 34JWrWlANI8OU)TOH8U,FRANCil, FOR 8W604I ON 01-1048 8Y K. MOVNANWAT9EOMN8TtrU 147 m*i LAN! BOLD TO 8HJ, JNQ H,( FOR $171,840 ON 014848 I Y K. HOV< NANIANAT8EOMM8TERI. 34 SPRUCE COURT BOLD TO DAOOOUANO, MARQARCT, K M $118,800 ON 01-3898 BY STEVENS, JOSEPH 1 . 1 MARY A »7 TAN8Y COURT SOLD TO HTMIRAU), QREQO, FOR 888,009 ON 014848 BY HAS8nTTHOMA8EJH4KW8TIN. DUNEUEN 88 MAYFiLD ROAO SOU) TO VAMDERVM4 THIRD 8T. 8OLD TO BACHOftK, UET, JAMES, FOR 8103,800 ON 014848 I Y W I N I HUM A. FOfl 889,000 ON 12-27PETERSON, KRISTIN J. teWUNfffDNATLBK. ttFCLDSTONf ROAD SOU) TO DUN427 OUNILLEN AVE. SOLD TO PILATO, HAM, WILLIAM A 4 Kffltff 8,TOR8138,000 , TIMOTHY 6., FOR 1136,000 ON 01-11-96 8Y ON 014148 BY FREE4AND, JOHN. BATOR, VtlMA. M ASHLEY COURT 8OLD TO TROTTA, ALEXANDER A. 4 AUSON 8 , FOR 6128,000 ON EIMIOM 41 DOLORES DRIVE SOU) TO VW-01-284$ BY MAfFO, MAflCEUA A 128 WE8TVKW LANE SOLD TO LOVECtGUEARA, JOSEPH & MAfHENE FOR LAND, FREDERIC D. 4 ANITA I . . FOR 1174,600 ON 12*22-95 BY GRABBIS, DANIEL 8276,000 ON 024148 BY RUTKOWW, ROBM, I ANITA M. ERT 4 LAURA L. 52 KAREN PIACE 8OLD TO MAOIERA, 37 TEAL LANE SOLD TO SIANCH, A U N L, DOUQLAS FOR 1137,600 ON 122946 BY FOR 9186,900 ON 01-2848 BY H U S DEVEL DANQILO, DOROTHY, 1731 WATERFORD O W E 8OLD TO CO. 2 FOUR OAKS DRfVE SOLD TO VARMA, PROTACIO. FRANCI8CA M FOR 181,900 ON 8ANJAY V. 4 SANOYA 8 , FOR 917OJOQ ON 12-22-M BY WBF EDISON ASSOC. 60 TACT AVE. SOLD TO LANKJAN. KEVIN * 01-26-98 BY HH18 DEVEL CO. 29 HEATHERWOOD LANE SOLO TO FREEDONNA FOR $86,000 ON 1327-95 BY BAHL, LAND, JOHN A. 4 HARRIET J., FOR 8188,900 8U6HASH4SA8HI. 2 ELMWOOD TERRACE SOLD TO ALON- BY HILLS DEVEL CO. 8 ARTILLERY PARK ROAD SOLD TO 80, HERBERT FOR 1165,000 ON 12-27-95 BY MATARANTE, RICHARD A, FOR $170,250 ON FRANKUN, EDWARD (CAROLYN. 14 8HVERLAXE AVE. SOLD TO VALENTIN, 014848 BY HILLS DEVEL CO. 16 ARTILLERY PARK ROAD SOLD TO VICTOR M. I QENOVEVA FOR 1118,000 ON 01-04-96 BY SULLIVAN, THOMAS M. 4 MARI- CRANLEY, PATRICIA A , FOR $172,980 ON 01-3148 BY HILLS DEVEL CO. ANN.

RANALD C. BROWN

MIDDLESEX COUNIY

HIGHLAND PARK 703 8. FIRST AVE. BOLD TO KULA, MILTON I fHYLUS FOR f 115,000 ON 12-2846 BY MORRttON, MARKS. 436 GRAHAM ST. SOLD TO LEI6OW1TZ, SETH ft LAURA FOR 1146,000 ON 12-26-96 BY MEYER, ANGELA N. 1508 CHERRY ST. SOLD TO KAMARA, MUSA FOR |110,000 ON 12-2646 BY KUBIN, JEANE, 308 N. THIRD AVE. SOLD TO ESTES, ELIZABETH C. FOR $173,000 ON 12-22-96 BY PANCZA, MARGARET R. 209 DONALDSON ST. SOLD TO GERSHENSON, MICHAEL FOR $210,000 ON 01-17-96 BY ZAMO8T, BENJAMIN I EDITH. 233 8. 10TH AVE. SOLD TO YOUNG, LLOYD 4 CYNTHIA, FOR 8113,000 ON 01-12•BBYPALFlLOtS,

UNION COUNTY

CHANFORO 2 HEATHERMEAOE PLACE SOLD TO WVNO, RALPH, FOR $150,000 ON 03-29-98 ON WEIKE, DOROTHY M. 97 BENJAMIN ST. SOU) TO MYSUWEC, WtESlAW 4 HALINA, FOfl $150,000 ON 0327-98 BY STIEFEL, ALFRED. 11 MENDELL AVE. SOLD TO SAWYER, PATRICK J. 4 COLLEEN K, FOR $176,000 ON O 3 « 8 8 BY MILLER, HYMAN. . 9 O6A6E DRIVE SOLD TO LONEROAN, WILUAM C. 4 DEBRA L, FOR 9155,000 ON 03-2M6BYREHILLMMESP. 406 N. UNION AVE. SOLD TO COLLINS, PETER D. 4 CLAIRE FOR $273,000 ON 034898 BY TRIVEUJ, VINCENT M. 4 JOYCE. 24 W. LINCOLN AVE. SOLD TO WALSH, MARTIN FOR $216,000 ON 034746 BY CHACON, EDQARDO 4 ANGELA. , 204 E. LINCOLN PARK SOLD TO ODONNELL KEVIN FOR $74,500 ON 03-1396 BY ROW FIVE ASSOCIATES.

*

LOTS! LOTS! LOTS! MARTINSVILLE

$134,900

1.7 ACRES READY TO OOI

BRIDQEWATER

$299,700

MACREStCITYVTIUTIESI SKCTACtAARMMILUON HHLE VIEW! SEE THE IUN EVERY MOfMNNQI

$389700 $69,700 MARTINSVILLE H0MEANDPMFE8SI0NM.OmeER

BOUND BROOK

APPROVED I-FAMILYSITEI ALL CITY UTILITIES!

MARTINSVILLE

C-1 BUSINESS ZONE!

$119,900

2.78 ACRES. ALL CITY UTILITIES!

Gfttt opportunity for protMSloMl lo* catton! convonitnltoEiH #33 Ofl RT, #78, HI #22 and RT. #217. CALL FO*

BRANCHBURG 86 DELAWARE LANE SOU) TO MOORE, WILUAM H 4 MARY L. FOR 8143,000 ON 012848 BY CHIN, KIN 8 . 4 LAI Y. 25 ARAPAHO TRAIL SOLD TO ZHU, CHAOYINO 4 X E O., FOR 6183,000 ON 01-2348 BY SCHUESSLER, THERESA. 6 PRESTON DRIVE SOU) TO CAP*. OA DONNA, FOR 9118,000 ON 0 2 4 * 98BYQLOFF,JOANt 27 SUNSET ST. SOLD TO TOOLAN, THOMAS 0 . 4 QRETCHEN M., FOR $192,500 ON 014848 BY X * O , JUUA. 85 ROBBINS ROAD SOLD TO BOGADO, CESAR 4 BARBARA, FOR Ltndtr, $150,000 ON 024148 BY FLORA, ROBERT.

CENTRAL JERSEY MORTGAGE RATES

BMDGEWATER 2705 JOHNSON CIRCLE SOU) TO BARNETT, MARK A 4 ELAINE a FOR $172,000 ON 124846 BY WIUCNSKY, MARCA 800 SOLD TO TANQ, SOLOMON H. 4 PAULINE M. FOR 8316,500 ON 12-2795 BY ALEXIS, JOHN. 300 M<OWN ROAD SOLD TO PIZZO, KENNETH S., FOR 8279,000 ON 01-30-96 BY WIEDWALD, FREDERICK

a

290 MK1TOWN ROAD SOU) TO PIZZO, KENNETH 8., FOR $225,000 ON 01-3048 BY KAYE, LYNN. 2006 ACKMEN COURT SOLD TO TAYLOR, ROWLAND, FOR $158,000 ON 01-28-96 BY BRAY, ERIC P. 4 LORI W. 3002 VROOM DRIVE SOU) TO SULLIVAN, EDWARD M., FOR $135,000 ON 014146 BY DAY, ROBERTSON L 4 BENITA. 3303 ROBINSON COURT SOLD TO WEISS, CARL 4 SANDRA, FOR $114,000 ON 01-3046 BY VINGARA, JAMES S. 4 USA. 409 STRULL COURT SOLD TO FANWOOD 227 8. MARTINE AVE. SOLD TO COXSON, BEASTY, SHARON T., FOR $67,500 ON DARRYL 4 LINDA S. FOR $205,000 ON 0341- 014546 BY MORROW, JAMES J. 3401 FRENCH DRIVE SOLD TO 96 BY HOME OPPORTUNITIES INC. 188 PLEASANT AVE. SOLD TO VKSNOLA, SHEA, KEVIN T., FOR $129,900 ON 01DOMINIC R. 4 JOYCE A., FOR $163,000 ON 3146 BY SANDOW, DOUGLAS 4 03-1846 BY HOSOKAWA MICRON INTERNA- MEGAN TIONAL 174 CANDLEWICK LANE SOLD TO 125 WESTFIELD ROAD SOLD TO YOUNG, KRITZ, DAVID J., FOR $271,000 ON 01ROBERT 4 LUCINDA, FOR $195,000 ON 03- 24-96 BY BROWN, PEGGY C. 1848 BY SCHLOESSER, ROWLAND a 617 TALAMIN) ROAD SOLD TO BRAY, ERIC 4 LORI, FOR $250,000 ON 01-23-96 BY MOORE, WILLIAM H. 4 MARYL 221 LONGVIEW ROAD SOLD TO AUSDALL, GEORGE V., FOR $179,500 BEDMINSTER ON 01-3146 BY NOCH1MSON, DAVID 279 THISTLE LANE SOLD TO LUMPAY, MARCUS 4 KAREN L, FOR $237,324 ON 01- J. 40 HKMANO AVE. SOLD TO MAS30-98 BY K. HOVNANIAN AT BEDMINSTER II.

SOMERSET COUNTY

1034 Washington Valley Road, Box 68 MARTINSVILLE, NEW JERSEY 06836

APP 9OYRRXED|15YRRXED| OTHER FEE RATE PTS APR RATE PTIAPRRATE PTS APR

City, Phona

84t-Bt«200 r n ioo tvitkai tm 7 akoo 2.TI 7« A Ada Fod'l Sav Bh.Wdbrdg Tnohp m-m-nm 990 r.aa 100 n o7.711.00 .iai.M7.aac GapNoJ Fart QoiPi BafnaraawWi BOB* i.oo i a i 7.701000.10 t,n a.oo 7. CafNaf Fodoral Savlnga, Trenton B M ~ 97i 7.aa 100121 7.SO 100 7.00).18 100 147 a HI-

7.78100107 M S 100

J l 1,00 7.71 C 7.13125 7.711 U 126) 140 A

Comataloo Mortgago Sarvion m-m-uu »s l.n 100 n o FHt 8av*r»ga Bank 81A, Edlaon 9sa-m-4m09o|uoo.ooi9o 7.7S 0.00 7.70|7.1l 1 0 0 7.88} C H/P H/P N/P Flnt Union Mortgago Corp 97SP.O0 1.09 2.19 Fraadorn Mortgaga Corp. aaokaa las laskaa loo r h WP W Nr* 8M-84f-484f S7SW.M 0.00 14117.09 O.00 7.07 7.09 0.00 7.01 H Hudson City Savings Bank i W 100127 A Ivy Mortgaga Corp 7.19100 Ktnhjwod Financial Stivicta M f - I M - M M 1S0I9.19 1.00120 7.09 1.00 7.70N/P N/P H/P Mafon Bank FSB 809-897-8081 99017.00 100 l i t 7.50 2.00 7.a9| .75 0.007.7*0 Natwast Homo Mortgago 8M-IM-8781 375|7.75 100 8.07] .15 100 7.70 .90 9.00 N/P A Now Contury Mtgo, E. Bnmowick 880-880-4980970 19 1.90 1291 1.60 7.081 so too exaa A Paapack-Gladstono Bank WP H/P .SO 0.00 7.50 .SO 0.00 7.40 0 Souroo Ona Mtgo Svcs.Crantofd i H - m - « M 7 900 90100 7.00 109100 7.40 1 8 1 0 0 1 2 4 L Sovoraign Bank-Now Joreoy IM HI 75 100 110 .12 100 7.07 .SO 100 7.S2 E UnXad National Bank, PklnfioW 8N-4M-tt88 400 19 100 14S .50 100 100 .50 2 00184 A Valloy National Bank, Wayno I M - U I - 4 I M 450 83 0.00 170 .19 0.00 129 .50 0.00 190 D W.F.8. Mortgago, Warrtn I M - I S 4 - I M 4 0 15 0.00 12S! r.7S0.OQ7.7S ISO 0.00 180 B World Savings Bank I U m I T M 17s .55 0.00 1901 N/P N/P 1.90 1.25 7.50 G (A)1 Yr Arm |B)50 Yr Jum (C)S/1 Aim (0)30 Yr BrwttWy (E)30 Yr Modvat* Ine (F)7/1 Arm (G)COR Arm (H)10/1 Arm (DV3 Jum (J)»0 Yr homt prog (K)FTMB;wbtet»nt (L)5 Yr B«J (M)3/1 Arm (N)Eq Urtt (0)FTHB,30 Yr ( P ) t * * n . l i t d FHA (0)15 Yr Jumbo (R)3/1 Jumbo (a)includM tpptttttl I cr«Jit t«p (b)1Mtpp W 3 y r W . (e)pta raf at ek»ing (d)7S day lock {a)kta tott down (l)appto*rtf at eloaing (g)$17S cradt at eroaing APCFEE-uigNlunlyhomM AW-cortaet (andartto calciMadAfinalPvoar^gaRaaN MWmum 48-80 day m a lock tprtt«^ Wormrfon thoJd contact Coopmir* Morlgigi Wocrmioo @ (201) 7e2-e313.ForMarmrikmonotwp(odueBili«wM,otMk4Gliit Ittlidfttdry.C^nhMHIwvlmconownl^ao^^ C.MinurnMr omiHlom. Ratal«M«w«twMbytMl*«)«t0fllytaYi-3,1»& N/P-NotprovkWhyimHuiwi

m TfXM.

*



RealEstate

A Forbes Newspapers Supplement

May 8,9,10,1996 - 9

BY VANUEW, HELEN B, $98 AMWEU ROAD SOLD TO BAYCT, $8 BY DMNCEK20, ANTHONY A JEANMNE. ROBERT A DARLENE, FOR $173,000 ON 1290 HOME ST. SOLD TO MAXEUX, MARIE CARL R. JR. A JESSICA I , FOR 1189,800 ON $0 MAIN ST. SOLD TO ZEHRA ASSOC WC, 15-95 BY STRAVINSKAS. JOSEPH A JO M. A. A ENIDE, FOR 1128,000 ON 01-31-96 BY 01-3048 BY HAWWNS, MARION W. 99 KIRBY AVE SOLO TO ROONEY, MATFOR $696,000 ON 0125-98 DY BOUND202 BEEKMAN LANE SOLD TO DUFFY, BROOK 92 ASSOC. NIEMAN, DONATO & ROBERTA A, THEW A GEORQETTE, FOR $184,000 ON 01169 PHILUP8 ROAD SOLD TO RIVERA, VI- PAUL G. A KAREN 6, FOR 1196,000 ON 03- 179 CLINTON ST. SOLD TO YUMKJUANO, 24 96 BY BAYONA, RUQEN A UNDA 8. CENTE A SON1A N,, FOR 1118,000 ON 01-30- 02-98 BY SCASSERA. ROBERT V. A JOL- JOSE J , FOR $172,000 ON 01-2948 BY 169 FAIRVIEW AVE, SOLD TO MCCONANTA. 98 BY LMNGSTON, OAVDI EVELYN P, NELL, KEVIN P., FOR $155,000 ON 01 2996 8RNKA. WI11AM A. JR A CHERYL B. 489 AMWEU ROAD SOLD TO JANNUZZI, 154 RODNEY AVE. SOLD TO TON, DAVC BYMEDERO.MARTA. 8,, FOR 1129000 ON 014*48 BY COLE, LOWS JR., FOR $180,000 ON 01-31-9$ BY 196 DAVENPORT ST. SOLD TO MILLER, (ConNmadlrompigiS) HOWARD F. DOUGLAS J , FOR $90,000 ON 0144-98 BY $173,000 ON 0148488Y PAftSI, JOHN 0 * 12 PERSON OWE SOLD TO 8ZET0, AN- 9344 BUOMMQDALE DRIVE SOLO TO ROONEY, MATTHEW E.8R. 6 CASTLCTON AVE. SOU) TO THOMAS, KATHLEEN H. BRIAN D. A MAUREEN H., FOR 1138,000 ON DREW, FOR $209,000 ON 0 1 4 M 8 BY M l WASYIAK, ALEXANDER, FOR $133,000 ON 14 W. CUFF 8T SOLD TO NATl RED 10 CLAIRE DRIVE SOLD TO MNYO, JO- 01-31-98 BY CELO, EDUAROO M A JOVENIA IAZZO. VINCENT J, 1M545BYCAS8 < PHUPJ. CROSS AMERICAN, FOR $390,000 ON 01-26SEPH, FOR 1262,900 ON Q i t t * BY fclT- 8. 19 REASON DRIVE SOLD TO PARR&LA, 246 Z9DN ROAD BOLD TO PJCCVUTO, $6 BY KNAUER, LEONARD A DOR! C. ICORPUTQ. MICHAfL K * JANET M., FORJ $180,000 ON 9 JOHNSON ROAD SOLD TO MCCRANN, 1011 SUNSET DNVE 8OU) TO 6HEMA, PATRICK A MARK, FOR SittJQO ON 014$- 014148 BY SWMAGUA, STEPHEN A TtiA JONATHAN. fOA $183,000 ON Ot-K-98 BY 98 BY PAN08, THOMAS H. A DOORA f, L 98 LONGACRE COURT BOLD TO 13 BOULDER LANE SOU) TO FAflRAOE, 11N EVERQRGEN 0WVE SOU) TO MANO- BRIAN W. A PATRtOAM, FOR 1178,000ON LAFLEUR, DENNIS M., FOR 1100,000 ON 01lAMONA, THOMAS, K M SS9MQ9 ON 0t- 014048 BY GOMES, ARNOLD A JOANNE, M 4 S BY HAKTMAN, OOUQLAS T. A SYLW 71 CHEMMM00O DRW BOLD TO EL- M. w * IY BWOY, mm i t a m m * A. NACCASH, ATAA A KATHLEEN 8., FOR $ EVERGREEN COURT SOLD TO PATH80S NEWMANS LAMB t O U ) TO HAMNO. 1124,000 ON 01-29*8 BY QAFFI, JOHN A DO, VWCENT A CHRISTINA, FOR] $262,100 RICHARD A. I DEBfM A., FOfl $117,600 ON ON 024248 BY SENDERS, CHARLES R. A SUHAIR 01-K-99 BY WTX ANTHONY ICM0Y. 153 PICADUY PLACE SOLD TO COMBS, SUSAN R, FMNKUN ADRCNNE O , FOR $117,000 ON WORMLEY, MANVUE 2$ PEAR TREE LANE SOLD TO WOWLE3, JOHN 8. A GLORIA. 12 N. FIFTH AVE. SOLO TO RUDMCN, SHARON FOR $108,700 ON 1 M M 8 BY 174 JORDANS CMCLE SOU) TO 8MCTH, MARK I NANCY, FOR 1158,500 ON 01414$ BROTMAN, DAW) N. I CHERYL E. GLORIA C , FOR $123100 ON 014S49 BY BOLD TO ALUN, WAYNE F. A CAROL S. 9 CAITUN COURT SOU) TO MO8CHETTO, ZISA, DENNIS J. A MAUREEN E. 165 8. SEVENTH AVE. SOLD TO 8CHUQARY « JQANN FOR SN,O00 ON 1 2 - 0 7 * 6 BOLTON COURT BOLD TO BEKETA, RKX ELIZABETH. FOR $63,000 ON 02424$ BY BLONDER, JOSEPH IOLQA M. IVAN, FOR $78,000 ON 024848 BY JOHANBY ZLLKOW8N, STANLEY. 1M UNDSEY COURT SOLO TO KESSUR. SEN, MICHAEL A (JENNIFER. 811 BOE8B. AVE. BOLD TO SOHL, UNOA, JONATHAN B FOR 811M0O ON 1 M M S BY FOR $3,000 ON 01-3048 BY REMBELLES, SAMAREL, JACQUES M. 10 TOPAZ DRTVC SOLO TO TWOKFO. 483 NEW CENTER ROAD SOLD TO DANIEL KATHLEEN R. FOR S138.00O ON 1 M M 5 BY THOMPSON. KENNETH C. A ISABEL B FOR 29 VALERIE DRIVE SOLD TO NOVCKY, DERWTTZ, GREGORY A. A IMCHELE A. $194,500 ON 1 M 8 4 5 BY DAMES, THEOD- DOLORES, FOR $97,600 ON 012S48 BY KOKOSiNSKLJOHNAANrTA. Just reduced! Completely renovated Stone Colonial Cape. This «0 CHAMftAIN WAY SOLD TO BAOQA, ORE JR. MUKESH, FOR $191,000 ON 01-36-M BY beauty offers 3 bedrooms, sun room, cac plus more! All on over an 23 ASPEN OMVE BOLD TO COREL, ALEXRAPOTAN DELBAQNO, DANIEL I BARBARA. ANDER A MARINA FOR $179,000 ON 1249acre treed lot with beautiful gardens. Don't miss this one! Call today 702 NEW YORK AVE. SOLD TO VBCAF*83 COLUMBUS DRIVE SOLD TO MER- 95 BY WEISS.AVI A. A DEBRA. for your personal lour.. BDM4S42 CHANT, ABBAS V FOR 1137,000 ON 01 -23- 2309 JAMESTOWN COMMON SOLD TO ELLO, VINCENT, FOR $200,000 ON 01-2848 BY BARMERI, ANTHONY A ROSE. NEWTON, JOHN R. A JUUANNE FOR 96BYWHTTFIELD,TREVAJ. I^^TBWI 9H s^^P^if f 9jM nn^sTW^WI n i V p 12 TAYLOR DRIVE SOLO TO CURDN, WIL- $108,000 ON 1221-96 BY MCKNIGHT, ROBROCKY H4LL LIAM A LORfN, FOR $71,000 ON 0 1 - 3 0 * ERT J. A BRENDA P, 101 KNOLL WAY SOLD TO CARMODV, B Y f U P RENTALS 514 ANDRIA AVE., NO, 189 SOLD TO ELIZABETH, FOR $166,000 ON 01-314$ BY 122 TOPAZ DRIVE SOLD TO LEUNQ, SUE BARANOWSta, MARY A., FOR $57,000 ON MAY, GRAHAMS. Y., FOR H58000 ON 01-31-98 BY BURAC, H. 0201-96 BY S1MSBURY, ASSOC. 10 CRANBROOK AVE. SOLD TO WOJCCCROBERT S . I RHONDA L SOUTH BOUND BROOK 129 BENNINGTON PARKWAY SOU) TO HOWSN, HENRY JR., FOR $185,000 ON 0172 CATHERINE ST. $ ^ H H DEY, D A V C I LAURA FOR f 129,000 ON 01- 25-96 BY OEVTTO, ALEXANDER E. A JANJE I t 1605 REGENTS COURT BOLD TO ON- GOLD TO ROSALE8, 31*6 BY BENSON, KURDS 8 LJNM. FOR 18 DENHERDER DRIVE SOLD TO GUER- DRUSH, KEITH 8. USA, FOR 995,000 ON 02- IGNACIO, CK>, THOMAS, FOR 1142.000 ON 0 1 - 2 3 * 05-96 BY MCDONNELL, JAMES A. $187,000 ON 01-89-

CALI.COI.DWKI.I.BANKKH S( III.OTT.HKALTOHS

FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP

$269,900

BREATHTAKING AZALEA GARDENS

JCMSW000 O w 100 OfRoM In HitoopoHten

Muiphy Realty

Diftancesco Realty Affiliated

Would you like tolVWll over the competitor!? Come speak with John Clinedinst and learn how you can be a GIANT in real estate. Please call for a confidential interview to make your move to the Booth Agency, Inc,

andtheUISOTDOlLJl producing real estate network.

Your local Realtor with the International connections. Sooth Scotch Plains

$629,900 10 Brand Nev Homes

Custom built all brick executive home Four bedroom colonials on new cutat end of quiet cul-de-sac. de-sac. From $219,900

Builders $950,000 South PltinfieM

$199,500

Four bedrooms, 2 full baths family room. Possible extra lot.

Potential 5 lot subdisvison in prime Warren Township location. Owner will finance or consider joint venture

Murphy DDtancesco Realty Affiliated (908)889-0200

JOHN M. CLINEDINST, Broker of Record

j

•? f ; K •{'.'*>

$

,-'' ? T

*•

'•. * ' ? •

A Forbes Newspapers Supplement

10 " M a y 8,9,10,1996

THE FORBES REAL ESTATE si \<\

s m i i ksi i \iiin

\ | ( ) \ ( OI \ HOURS Monday- Friday 8:00am-5:00pm Reach Over 300,000 Readers Advertise In Forbes Classified

IT W0RK9!

HILLSBOROUGH

Builders, Dtvtloptn, Whrte Twp., M eubdlv- 1210 • Haunt NF lit) •bit) icrit 1 Mi icrt

OfhrAn ! BEDROOM APTS.* IOAIAIIOT WATUHl1 ABOIT LARGER AfTS,

GARDEN APTSe 1 » Memr St., Somerville, NJ * 908.725-2909

i

a 12 Md.Lease 1st 4 Mos. $5S0.l L*st«M0i$691,or$7O7. FOR NEW TENANTS ONLY BaMwL-Fri 8-5,Sit &S«n, 10-3 9000 REAL tSUTE •*•'

MIO-Hemee Under S1M.0W M M • Heniet Foi Sale MJO-Ferme •040-Unify M M - W8ttfffQtlt rrOIMny M70< Condominium! M M • Twmhoutet ftOM-Muftl-Famlry S1M-Lota and Acreage 1110'Out at Area HM-Wanted to Buy §130-Mortgages and Financing 9140- Mite Rtal Estate

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertised In this newspaper li sub* |ect to the Federal Fair Housing Act oi 196B which makes It Illegal to advertise any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex or national origin, or i n Intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any ad* vertlsing tor real eittte which is In violation of the law. Our readers art Informed thai all dwellings advertised in thit newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.

$150,000

w Prioi ind Tht Conwmtr

PISCATAWAY- 2 BR.RANCH, GREAT LOCATION, 125,9000,CALL 703 660 9440. PISCATAWAY By owner. 3 bdr. Ranch. Eat In kitchen, living room, 1 bath, rafinlshed hardwood floors, basement, corwlenent to transportation, shopping, schools, new paint m and out, lot 75 x 100. Quiet neighborhood, near playground. Call 908-463-7736

M20 Homesfor$ * AFFORDABLE, MODULAR, CUSTOM HOMES- ERIC Attoc. offers high quality customlied hornet on your lot or ours. (M»46» BEDMINSTER- Horst lovers paradise, 3 bdr. 3.5 bth. Brick Ranch, InLaw suite, office, great room, barn 0 stalls, extras galore. 52 miles bridaf trail. $574,000. 781-0474

C R A N F O R D - Open House Sun. 14pm or call for apt. Charming Cul-desac, 4 BR Colonial, 2tf baths, Ig. bright modem kit. full DR, LR w/lplc, FR, Rec. Rm. Screened porch, CAC, park-like setting, Brooksldt Sen. D i t t . By O w n e r . $340,000. 11 Woodshole Rd. (off Orchard) 90B272-4418

Cal 908*722-3000 to Admrtiseln FabetCbstHndBtdion^ 9020 Homos for Safe MIDDLESEX BORO- By owner I m m t c u l a t o , 4BDRM, 2 1.SBTH, C/H Colonial, EIK, FAM RM, FORMAL DR, LV RM, W/ FP, DECK, oversized MBR suite, with 2 W/V CLt, HO/WD/FU, CAC, 3 car g a r . park like grounds fam n«igh, many e x t r a s , mutt s t t l $229,900469-2341

FRANKUN •UILDER'S MODEL Huge 4100 tq.ft Center Hall Col, 2 yrs. old, former model home. Loaded w/extras I upgrades. Central vac, Sec. system, 2-zone C/A I Heat. 4/5 BRs, 2 5 BAs, sep. addition, could be used as prof, office w/ Twsp. approval. Close to Easton Ave. & Rt. 297. Onty$32t,M0.

MCDONALD REALTORS MS-S4S-7f77

PitCATAWAY BUIIOCRS NOME 5BR Custom Col. built by builder lor s i l l I II showtl Loaded w/txtras: special ctblnttry, bulfMn bookcases, J-zon* htat, loeattd In prttltglous Rlvtr Rd. t r e t . Only ORAM tftCV PARK Mint cofld.3BR Ranch w/ garage, fenced yard, (Itchen appliances Incl. New Dithwiahtr. Absolutely Immac. Move In cond. $1M,IOO. COLONIAL CuMe>tac location, 4BR, 2.5BA, walk to Rutgers Campus. Ovtrslzt lot. Owner willing to sacrifice at $118,000,

McDonald Realtors 008445.7677

Adi in Classified

M70 • VtcaiM PJtnttU

To Get Rttporttt.

HOftMMIw MM BRIDGEWATER- From the expansive deck of this custom Redwood contemporary set high on top of the mtn, Gourmet kitchen, master bdrm. suite, full fin. basement & much more. Ofi ered at $740,000. Call Tracee Schaefer RE/MAX Preferred Professionals, Realtors 665^)700 Ext. 34

feOMMDII

)MVKSI t) t

9010

BRIDGEWATER Complaints of discriminaOPEN HOUSE tion In housing on the Sat ft Sun 12-5pm basis of race, color, 3 Staats Court 1 1.5yr. creed, ancestry, marital Brick col., 4brm, 2 1.5 status, sex or handicap should be made to New bins, 2 story foyer, (p., large custom patio, walk Jersey Division on Civil V State St., *0BB18

Phone (609)292-4605.

UwOMm rRMNCT Of

Oversized Luxurious Garden Apartments •FREE Heat 1 Cooking Gas • Substantial Playground • Largest Swim Club in Area at Nominal Fee 908-874-6644 or 359-7180

rlMMS UfMOf

XOnt), 0VMW HHdOUt)

SO.PLAINFIELD- 4BR Split Uyed. .2 full -11

5174,900.908-769-5503.

lUtWYORLlAII I Your house, make your T payments, do raptirs, | close quickly, any area, VmiLOWOOD C M S T any price, any condition. Elagant Octanfront

9020 Homes for Safe SO.PLAINFIELD- By owntr. Cape 4 bdr. 1 Bth. cac, Call $132,900. 666-7B76 SOMERSET CTY. • HIGH CLEAR ACRES Witrta3BRChalflUalh. calling, open floor plan, garage, bsmt. Astonish* Ing value $205,000. MtxD.Shumtn Raalty Inc. •0t>7S3>2713

9130

WE PAY CASH-(or sailer-financtd mortqiges, trust deeds, land contracts, & other debt In8lrumtnti-906~322-9252

BARGAIN HUNTING? FIND IT IN FORBES CLASSIFIEDS!

condo, BR, LR, DR, Kit. Sunroom/BR. d t c k . Newly furlthed. AC, pools, tennis. Sacurlty, Jacuzzi, children's playgrounds & other ammare t W 908-194-8M6 W I L D W O O D - Yaar "Round Triplex. 3 Blocks Boardwalk and Proposed Casino. INCOME 120,0001 SALE $08,0001 Excellent Incraasa,, 302-737-1440

1070 RmltsU* CRAMF0RD2br.condo, first fir unit, 2 •try compltx brick, on rtver.Priv. qurtt walk to train. 70frOB6» $89,900 S O M E R S E T - Quiltbrook by owner 2br condo, 1bth, w/d, frlg.,min. to rouit 2B7, $89,000 B73-0583.

TOIMnOUMS FRANKUN WHY RENT? Imrnac. 2BR TH, located In Ouallbrook. A Must Seat Owner willing to assist with doting cost to qualified buyer.

J'jOSWOOO

ADIRONDACK MOUNTAIN M O P E R T I E S Hugt tttaction. Lakefront, rlvarfront homts and lots. Log cabins, larmhoutes, hunting campi, acrtaga. Call for frH 40 paga brochure. FRIEDMAN REALTY 1-518494-2409 GOVT FORECLOSED Homat for ptnnitt on $ 1 , Delinquent Tax, Rtpo't. Your araa. Toll Frtt (1) B00-BS8-977B Ext. H-5274 for current listings GOVERNMENT FORECLOSED HOMES- for pennies on $1. Delinquent Tax, Repro's,

fell

FWC. Rid IRS.

9240

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908-526-W59 DIRECTIONS: Take your best route to the Somerville Circle. As you approach the circle, bear right onto Route 28 North. Go 1 mile on Route 28, make a left onto Vandeveer Road. Go 9/10 of a mile and make aright onto Walters Brook Road to the Tamaron Woods Sales Office.

MiW JERSEY FUN 61)101: NEWSPAPM S'JPh.EMENT WEXK OF MAY,':, IMG

STATEWIDE SUPPLEMENT T0147 MEMBER NEWSPAPERS OF THE NEW JERSEY PRESS ASSOCIATION

WEEK OF SUNDAY, MAY 5,1996

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NtW JlfUHBY PUN QUIO6 NEW8PAPER SUPPLEMENT WEEK OP MAY 5,1996

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JERSEY

CONTENTS ChrtotiM Todd WhHmtn

Governor

SKY

Qualberto Medina, Esq. C.PA Commissioner

Department of Commerce and Economic Development

DILAWAR RIVIR

Linda Mysllwy Conlin Director N.J. Division of Travels Tourism

CN-826 Trenton, I<9 0662)

TIR

TIC CITY RIOION

16

Canoeing 5 Balloon Festivals 6 Ballooning 7 Museums & Historic Sites 7 Olympic Torch 8 Wineries 8 Theaters 10 Parks & Forests 12 Amusement Parks & Piers 13 Cruises 17 Pro Baseball 18 B&Bs 19 Environmental Centers 19 New jersey Road Scholar 21 Beaches 22 Ecotourism 23 Tourist Information 27

r

flus Calendar or Summer Events

14-15

ADVERTISER'S INDEX 24th St MoM 21 M H e * t of WMwood Motels 22 Anwtetn Wl*i Powwow 7 AngtKrftfw$M84B 23 AquiBNcn float MoM 22 ArrrtdaBy-Tht-SN 21 Anas Motor Im-Uiid fleacti Resort ,23 BalHarbourOceanfrontHotot 21 Bdty's Grand Casino Retort 17 Billy's P i * Place Casino flwort 16 Bay Head Gables 25 Baybeny Motel & Ramekin 21 Bed & Breakfast Innkeepers Assoc 25 Bedford ton., 23 Bebnar Seafood Festival 25 BetmarTourtem 25 Biplane Wwnture Tours ..27 Bird of Paradise 21 Bran Bed 23 Brkjantine Beach 16 Caesara Atlantic City Hotel Casino 19 CampTaytorCampground 7 Cape May Accomrrodattoro & Attractions 23 Cape May County Dinner Cruise 21 Cape May County Tourism 23 Cape May Whale Watch & Research Center 23 Cape May-Lewes Ferry 23 Cape Reservation Service 23 Capt Mey's 8&B Inn 23 Chalfonte Hotel 23 Cliveden Inn B&BS Cottage 23

Dekay Aviation 6 Mango Motel 21 13 Maware River Family Campground 5 Matanzzo Farms 11 Desert Sand Motor tan/Health Ctub..»23 Medieval Times 18 OukeofWIodsor 23 Megabyte Slots 23 El Coronado Motor km 22 Mid-Atlantic Centar tor the Arts 6 Remington Business Asaoc 5 Mines, Metal & Men 27 FleurdeU Resort Motel 21 MonmouthPark Racetrack The Mooring 23 Qrten State Wine Growers 8 GtnoeftrvtdCaste&DtnosaurPvfc 6 Morris County Parks 7 13 Good Time TOOT 12 NJ Agricultural Society 13 Grand Hotels 22 NJ Cable TV Network (CTN) 12 GreetterWUdwoodTourtsm 20 NJ Campground Owners Assoc NJ Cardinals Pro Baseball 8 HadteroackMeadowlands 2 Development Commission 11 NJ Division of Travel & Tourism Henry Sawyer h n 23 NJ Farmers Direct Marketing Assoc....13 13 Hlateah Resort Motel 21 NJ Farms 28 Historic Chester Village 8 NJ Festival of BaHoonlng 16 Historic Cold Spring Village 23 NJ Fresh Seafood Festival NJ Hot Rod Association 21 Hoboken Baseball Day/City 11 ofHoboken 10 NJ Press Association 4 Hoboken Grapevine 9 NJ Renaissance Festival Holiday inn/Toms River 26 NJ Rockin Rollers Pro Roller Hockey ...11 24 Imperial 500 -. 21 NJ State Aquarium 14-15 inn at 22 Jackson B&B 23 NJTransit Keansburg Amusement Park. 26 NJ's Famous Family Fun Festivals 12 King's Road Vineyard B NY Waterway Sightseeing Cruises 10 23 Kymer's Camping Resort 5 Ocean City Merchants 27 lake Hopateong Business Assoc 7 Ocean County Tourism 21 Leltri Hall 23 Ocean Holiday Motor Inn Ocean Place Hilton 27 Liberty Collectibles Expo 9 12 Liberty Science Center 10 One Hour Moto Photo 5 Lotus Motor Inn 21 Panther Lake Camping Resort 21 Magic of Alexandria Balloon Festival 5

WC0 24 Patricia's Guest House 23 Perry Street inn 23 Pine Creek Miniature Golf 7 Poor Richard's Inn 23 Powhatan Renape Nation 24 Prime Hospitality Corporatton/AnrtflrtSuites 13 The Puffin 23 Queen Victoria BAB Inn 23 Queen's Hotel 23 RegesOceanfront Resort 22 Rio Motel 22 River Lady Cruises 27 Romancing the Wind Charter Cruim.26 Royal Canadian Motel 22 Royal Hawaiian 21 Scandinavian Fest 8 Sea Breeze Motel 23 Sea Holly Inn BAB 23 Seaside Heights 28 Ship Inn 6 Shipwreck Island/Shipwreck Dunes... .22 Six Flags Great Adventure 13 Somerset County Public Information .....6 Spirit Cruises 9 Story Book land 18 Suga/ioaf Art Fair 5 Summer Sands Motel 22 Surf Comber Motel 21 Surf Song Motet 22 Sussex County Agricultural Development 13

Sussex County Farm 4 Horse Show 6 Take Your Pet Along.... 13 Terhune Orchards 13 Editorial Director Tewksbury Balloon Adventures 5 David Marzlale, The Abbey Bed & Breakfast 23 NJ Division of Travel Thorn and the Rose, 23 &Tourlsm Top Notch Craft Shows 6 Triptobrook Family Section Designer Camping Resort 5 Judy Megaro, TropWortd Casino The Record and Entertainment Resort 17 of Hackensack Trump Taj Mahal Casino Resort 19 Trump's Castle Casino Resort 18 Adverting Coordinators: United Way of Sussex Co. George White Bike Classic 5 and Amy Lear, USGA/Gotf House 6 NJ Press Association/NJ Victorian Rose 23 Newspaper Network Village of Waterloo 7 Warren County Heritage Festival 6 The NJ Press Association Water's Edge Ocean Resort 22 extends appreciation to Waterloo Antiques Fair 7 everyone at The Record Waterloo Arts & Crafts Festival S of Hackensack Involved West Milford Township 12 with the design and Wetlands Institute 23 production of the Whistling Swan Inn 6 1996 NJ Fun Guide. White Dove Cottage B&B inn 23 Wlidwood Accommodations & Attractions 20-22 COVER P H O T d Windward House B&B 23 The Casino Pier Windward Motet 22 at Seaside Heights Woodieigh House 23 Yankee Clipper Resort Motor Inn 21

CREDITS

The NJ Fun Quid* is sponsored by the NJ Division of Travel & Tourism in cooperation with the NJ Press Association. Participating newspapers: 147 Total paid circulation: 3,033,033.' For advertising information, contact NJPA, 840 Bear Tavern Road, Suite 305, West Trenton, NJ 06628-1019, (609) 406-0600; FAX (609) 406-0399. For editorial information, contact NJDTT, 20 W. State Start, CN 826, Trenton, NJ 086254628. (609) 292-2470; FAX (609) 633-7418.

PARTICIPATING NEWSPAPERS The NJFun Guide is a special statewide newspaper supplement distributed by the following NJ Press Association members: Dally newspapers: The Star-Ledger, Newark; Asbury Park Press; The Record, Hackensack; The Press of Atlantic City; The Couriar-Post, Cherry Hill; The Times, Trenton; The Home News & Tribune, East Brunswick; The Daily Record, Parsippany; The Trentonian, Trenton; Jersey Journal, Jersey City; The Courier-News, Bridgewater; Burlington County Times, Willingbora; North Jersey Herald & News, Passaic; Gloucester County Times, Woodbury; New Jersey Herald, Newton; The Daily Journal, Vinetand; Ocean County's Observer, Toms River; Today's Sunbeam, Salem; Bridgeton Evening News; The Express-Times, (NJ circ.), Easton, PA.. Group weekly newspapers: American Publishing, Ocean City; Forbes Newspapers, Somerville; Greater Media Newspapers, East Brunswick; Hudson Reporter Associates, Hoboken; Hunterdon Co. Democrat, Flemington' Intercounty Newspapers, Mt, Laurel; North Jersey Newspapers, Paramus; Orechio Publications, Nutley; Princeton Packet Publications, Princeton; Recorder Publishing, Bemardsviile; Timesr-Beacon Newspapers, Manahawkin; Worrali Community Newspapers, Union. Independent weekly newspapers: Aim Community News, Newfoundland; Bayonne Community News; The Central Record, Medford; Franktin Township Sentinel; The Gazette, Mt Holly; The Gazette-Leader, No. Wildwood; The Herald Times, Rio Grande; The Metrowest Jewish News, Whippany; Middletown Courier; The Retrospect, Collingswood; The SandPaper, Surf City; Sun Bulletin (Central), Palisades Park; Town Topics, Princeton; Two River Times, Red Bank. •

^v JlWiev PUN QUIDE

••

IUM.EMENT WEEK OF MAY >. 1WI

A WORLD OF FUNIN NEW JERSEYS RUSTICEMPIRE

Aflsherman uses one of the numerous outstanding fishing spots in the rural Skyiands Region.

de open spaces. Hills dotted with farms and woods. Tiny picturesque villages that contain echoes of days gone by. You probably think this sounds like New England, or maybe upstate New York, But it'snot. It'sNew Jerseys Skyiands region, an expanse of land in northwestern New

V

Jersey that encompasses Sussex, Morris, Warren, Huntcrdon, and Somerset counties. There's plenty to do in this rustic empire of lakes, mountains, farms and historic sites. Sussex County offers a multitude of travel Ideas. Take a self-guided tour of beautiful Waterloo Village in Stanhope, a restored village that was first settled in the 1790s and later gained commercial importance. Throughout the year, the village hosts music festivals and special events. Walk through the underground mine at the Sterling Hill Mining Museum inOgdensburg, Although much of New Jersey played a critical role inthe American Revolution, the SkyUnds Region was an invaluable resource in fueling our other revolution, the Industrial Revolution, with its abundance of mines, metals, and men. The regions elements were harnessed for industrial development, but the terrain was left unspoiled for future generations to enjoy. Another illustrative stop Is the Franklin Mineral Museum in franklin Township, where locally mined fluorescent minerals are of particular interest. If you like animals, you'll have to stop in at Space Farm Zoo and Museum in Sussex. Or, if you're a shopaholic, visit Okie Lafayette Village in Lafayette, the Sussex County's shopping hotspot. For sheer, breathtaking beaut)', go to High Point State Park, the states highest point. On a clear day, you can sec for 80 miles! Or splash down at Action Park in Vemon, the largest selfparticipation theme park in the world! In Morris County, you can enjoy the four-season water wonderland of lake Hopatcong. Or you can tour the exhibits in history, nature, science, and art atthe highly acclaimed Morris Museum in Morristown. This spring and summer the museum is presenting special exhibitions by New Jersey artists and New Jersey high school students as well as exhibitions on horse shows and African flags. Also this year the Morris County Park Commission Is celebrating its 40th anniversary with special events throughout the year. If you're a history buff, you can wander through the Morristown National Historic Park where you can sec first-hand how Revolutionary War soldiers lived as you tour the authentic log huts at Jockey Hollow, While at the park, take a step back in time at the Ford Mansion, General George Washington's headquarters. You can

also visit Historic Speedwell, where Alfred Vail and Samuel F H Morse publicly demonstrated the electromagnetic telegraph In 1838. Scenic Warren County is another fine travel experience. In Oxford, visit the historic Shippen Manor Museum and the Oxford Furnace, the original blast furnacc built in 1741. The children will love the land of Make Believe, a theme park in Hope, which this year has added a TiltA-Whiri to the dozens ofridesand attractions it offers. Or, take a walking tour of the Moravian Village of Hope, which was founded circa 1769. Pick your own fruits and vegetables and sample wine at Matarazzo Farms and the adjacent Four Sisters Winery in nearby Victorian Belvidere. Other Warren Count)' activities include tubing, fishing, hiking, and birdwatching at the magnificent Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area. It's America's 10th most visited national park! Or, follow the Winery Trail through the countryside. You'll rind at least eight different wineries or vineyards in the region, many that offer tours, tastings, and retail sales of their products. Somerset County offers the hilly splendor of New Jersey horse country. The United States Equestrian Team isheadquarters in Gladstone, where many exciting competitions take place every summer. Golfing buffs won't want to miss the United States Golf Association Golf House Museum in Far Hills. You'can sec the club that astronaut Alan Shepherd used on the moon, as well as fine rotating and interactive exhibits. In Somcrville, you can admire exquisite gardens under glass at Duke Gardens and visit the U.S. Bicycling Hall of Fame to see memorabilia of early binding and Hall of Fame inductees. Somerville is also the site of the annual Tour of Somerville bicycle race (May 2"), one of the top spots on the national bicycle racing tour. Just blocks away, you can tour the Old Dutch Parsonage/Wallace House, the original home of Jacob Harden, who was the founder of Queen's College, now Rutgers University. Or, if you would rather spend the day exploring nature, you can canoe, fish, picnic, or hike at the Delaware and Raritan CanaJ State Park. Check out the schedule at the Garden State Exhibition and Convention Center in Somerset for trade shows, exhibits, and special events. For a fascinating journey back to the days of knights and chivalry, attend the

New Jersey Renaissance Festival from May 25 to June 23 inSomerset It's a recreated Renaissance village, complete with food, spectacles, and costumes of the period. Want additional choices? Go west, young men and women West to Hunterdon County. Youcan board the historic Black River and Western Railroad in Rlngocs for a scenic ride to Flemington, Once there, you can shop until you drop at Liberty Village Factory Outlets and the fine stores downtown, many ofwhich are outlet stores. Stop by the Court House where the Lindbergh baby kidnapping trial took place. Just a short drive away is the quaint town of Clinton, home to wonderful historical and art museums housed in restored gristmills. Clinton is also a perfect place for people who love the outdoors - Spruce Run State Park features some ofthe area's best canoeing, camping, swimming, andfishing. You can also explore the Delaware River towns of Milford (home ofThe Ship Inn, New Jersey's first brew pub), Frenchtown, Stockton, and Lambertville, all famous for their antique shops, art galleries, and restaurants. Near MUford, you can check out the VoUendam Windmill and Museum - the windmill is6Wect high with Ml feet-long sail arms. Do you long for the beauty of nature and the thrill of both outdoor and indoor activities? Then you should visit Skyiands. You will find a year-round schedule of balloon festivals, agricultural fairs, winter carnivals, harvest festivals, arts and crafts fairs, and other activities. Stay over night and choose from Bed and Breakfast Inns and other fine accomodations sprinkled throughout the region. Andthe Skyiands is an area where first-time campers and recreational vehicles are welcome at parks and private campgrounds. To make your trip planning easier, consult the New Jersey Division of Travel and Tourism's New Jersey Travel Guide. To request a copy, call 1^00-JERSEY-7, ext. 6121. For Skyiands Region information, call I*80(MSKYUND or stop in at their office in the Gate House at Waterloo Village. For more information on Morris County, stop in at the Historic Morris Visitors Center at 14 Elm Street inMorristown or call (201) 993-1194. For Skyiands campground information call l-80(KX>CAMP-l

The 8th Annual

New Jersey

Renaissance'Festival

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WEEKENDS, MAY 25 - JUNE 23 11 AM - 6 PM • OPEN MEMORIAL DAY EXIT 6 OFF 1-287 • DAVIDSON AVE, • SOMERSET, NJ

(908) 271-1119 $10 Adults • $7.50 Senior Citizens • $5 Children • Tots Free

\~"~MihThi$~Ad; \Buy one adult ticket, | Get next ticket Half-Price!

W W J M N Y FUN QUOf N W M M W B l U f PLIMINT WEEK W MAV 1 , 1 M I

Up the Creek With a Paddle ew Jcneytofilledwith scenic rivers, lakes, and screams that meander their way throughout the state Pack a picnic and discover the beauty of nature right in your own backyard! Below is a listing of canoe rental outfitters and the rivers they service.

N

Adunt Cinoo Rontolt, Inc. 1005 Atoion Rotd, Vinoentown (609)268-0189 MutHc$,B*tto Al t t i m ' i Canot & Boat Rentale 2626 West Weymouth floid, Newfield (609)692-6440

Mk AMkooondo Cojnporound 1460 WhltotvHb Raid, Toms River

(906)349^079 Tomtffaar

Arts Canot font* Ctdar Crwk Camporound 10S2Rout«9, BayvTlle (906)269*1413

(MarCmk

ARTS & CRAFTS rr n

MuNfe flsfifo, Wading.

naafl canaaa S Hampton DowRSt Newton (201)679-1516 DeJaWt MQMR

1MRt5O,M»yilindlno tMty6464M0 R.02, Box 107, Eog Harbor (609)966-2205/(600)446-0953 Bitito, MUfto, Wring, Oawago

BeWaaton Pteejurt Boat Co. City Park, Bridgaton (609)451-6667 Recewty end Sunset U t o Canat Sida Boat A Kayak nantal 1710 Delaware Avanua, N. WlWwood (609)522-7676 Coder Craak Campground Canoaand Kayak Rantaia 1052Rt.9,Btyvia (906)269-1413 dart's Canoe ftertei 201 Hanover Stnat, Pemberton $09)894^448 fWKvCH

Dataware FeVsr Family Campground R. 46, Box 142, Delaware (80S) 475-4517 Mwara Qrigaatown Canoa Rantala 1076 Canat Rd., QtiQgatown (908)359-5870 Diawam I Rattan Canal Hacka Canoe Rotate* 100 Mill Strait, Mt. Holly

$09)267-0116 Rancocet

Oawgo

Ocean County Parka and Raoreatlon Wells Mill County Park. Waretown (609) 971-3085 WaUiMUILaka PeredleeLeke

wrlnrlB

1748 Route 88, Brick (908)458-5777 Matadaconk Kayak King Rantala P.O. Box 171, New Gretas

(609)296-8002 Lafte Omgo, Wading Bay Laka Bhanandoan Boat nantata lake Shtnandoah County Park lakawood(906)363-9676 LtktShvwdoth

LakaiEnd Marina Mt.ArllnatonBtvd.Unding (201)396-5705 LlktHOfXtCOOQ

Lanapa Park Macraatton Cantar Box 57, Park Road, Mays landing

(609)625-2021 Qmt* Egg Harbor Lou'aTubaa

90 Qrandvlaw Avenue, Edison (906) 549-3964/(908) 252-3593 3107 Route 563, Box 45, Chttsworth (609)726-1380/(600)621-1380 Oswgo, Wading MuMcaMvarBoatBailn R.D.2, flout* 542, Grwntwik, Egg Harbor (609) 965-2120 or 965-BOAT

Campground P.O. Box 46, Route 206, Hammonton (609)561-7095

Canoen enjoy one of New Jersey's many fine waterways,

Paradise i no-A-UN Canoa Rantal laka Road, Attlon, Vlncentown (609)268-9831/1236 PNM Barfana canoa and Kayak Rental Route 563, Box 27, Chatsworth (609)726-1515,(800)732-0793 Oswgo, Wading Ptnaland Canoai^ 28 Whiteaville Road, Route 527, Jackson (908) 364-0389/(800) 281 -0383 Uppar Toms ft/vw Princeton Canoa Rantal 467 Alexander Road (on the Canal), Princeton

(609)452-2403 Oe/eWare and Raritan Canal TAWRantal Box 1796, R.D.r Columbia

(908)475-4608 Delaware

Turkay Bwamp Park 66 Nomoco Road, Freehold (906)462-7286 Turkey Swamp Park Lakt Turning Baaln Canoe Rental Alexander Road and West Drive (on the canal), Princeton (609)452-2403 Dalawam and Raritan Canal Triple T Canoes, Inc. 1034 Locust Road, Beachwood

(908)349-9520 CadarCmk Wading Pine* Campground P.O. Box 43, Chatsworth (609) 726-1313 Wading Winding River Campground R.D. 2, Box 246, Mays Landing (609) 625-3191 Egg Harbor, Lake Leoape

MAY 4-. S 5EPI

TEWKSBIRY BALLOON ADVENTIRES

Up, Up k Away in Hunterdon, Inc., Presents...

RIGHTS M H Y 6 PM Itlioon Fort located OWwick

(908) 439-3320 BALLOON FESTIVAL WE'RE ...WHERE THE MAGIC IS!

• 2Pools/Uke A Family Activities AFith/Golf/Hike •Tennii/Boating A Nearby Attnctions A And More!

200

FUKAltlStSft CntiDBi|Krs AJ0S

Haj 17, II, 111996 58 Honey Run Rd, P.O. Box 70 Historic Hope, NJ 07844-0070 908-459-4079

, EXIT 4

ThftCouritrNtws

75-100 hot air balloons soar above the rolling hills of rural Hunterdon County at Alexandria Field Airport in Pittstown, New Jersey. Don't miss this opportunity to inflate your spirit with the most exciting summer event on the east coast, winner of Trie Governor's Travel k Tourism award for Best Event. • August 2,3 k 4: Mark this weekend on your calendar now! • For free brochures and reduced rate tickets, CALL 90S-735-0870 • a i l 1-800-43MAAA for weekend packages • 90*638-5735 to scheduleballoon rides The only place in the tri-state area to see the Disney and Bell Atlantic NYNEX Mobile phone shape balloons this summer. Featuring/'Eddie Returns" John Cafferty & The Beaver Brown Band in concert. The Master Choice Magic stagesee an airplane disappear. Santore Brothers Fireworks and Agway Balloon Glow. Enjoy the Borders Boob k Music Hang-Out-Hangar just for kids, among 100 other displays,

For discount admioiofl coupons aH

•00-210^9900 bdora May 10.

Sprint Faff Foliage Sprint BikeClassic Form CALL 2013817722 The tour with a choice j g t 25,50 or 100 mite ty

A l l AREAS FEATURE TRAILER AND CABIN RENTALS CHOICE TENT AND TRAILER SITES SWIMMING • FISHING • BOATING I RECREATION I CABLE TV

MOUNTAINS

LAKE

QlympkSiuHeated Pool

PANTHER LAKE

| Hot Tub

A Very. Special Place,

CAMPING RESORT

I Ttnnis Courts

M Sandy Beaches

| Miniature Golf

• Hot Tub

1 (km RoomlBall Fields

• Tennis CourtslShffkboard

| Activities Pavillion

• Miniature Golf

, • • • • •

You'll fed Victorian rftcaure, sophisticated /actory ouHets, wmd shops, gafleries & $M restaurants.

ii an Come and enjoy.

i

i«£«

Victorian Dtyi .Vlntaie Steam Tratai SummarM • l^Reinlniton Fair Holiday Town Celebration * Craft Fair

Cailfor niEE Visitor1! guide (908) 2844118 or write Flmingim Business AHOciatioi, 0, P.O. Box 564, Flemington, NJ 08822.

KYMER'S CAMPING RESORT 1-NMM-22C7 or (201) I75-3U7 0 Kfam Rl, BruKMUt, NJ O7I2C

MStortlSnackBar M Boat Rentals

1400-S43-20M or (201) 347-4440

RIVER • Boat Launch • GameRoom • Store • New Swimming Pool B Volleyball M Basketball • Mtnature Golf • RaflffubeiCanoe Trips

DELAWARE RIVER FAMILY CAMPGROUND 1-M0-S434271 Of (MW) 47S4S17 l a 142. Ddman,NJ 07133

• " .

• » ' .

NtW JERSEY PUN OUIDE NEWSPAPER SUPPLEMENT WEEK OF MAY 8 , 1 t t t

Festivals ~ fun for the Whole Family

T

he sight of brightly colored balloons floating skyward on a warm summer's morning or evening. Art, craft, and food stands. Music and merriment. There's nothing like aballoon festival to wake up the dog days of summer with fun for the whole family. And New Jersey's Skylands Region has two of the best — the Quick Chck New jersey Festival of Ballooning and The Magic of Alexandria Balloon Festival. The Quick Chck festival, which attracted more than 135,000 spectators last year, will mark its 14th year July 26-28 at Solberg Airport in Rcadlngton. This festival is the largest summertime festival in North America, More than 125 sport and special shaped balloons will be featured, including such favorites as the Energizer Bunny, the Allied Van lines Truck, the Giant Purple Dragon, the spectacular American Eagle, the Polar Bear, and the Famous Footwear Sneaker. The festival will feature five balloon ascensions (Friday at 6:30 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday at 6:30 a,m. and 6:30 p.m.) and offers a wide variety of other events. There will be twice daily old-time airshows on Saturday and Sunday featuring New Jersey's own Six of Diamonds, female wingwalkers and sky-diving Elvises. On Saturday night, the festival will feature the East

Coast's biggest balloon glow. Music lovers can enjoy a jazz concert on Saturday night or rock concerts Friday evening and Sunday afternoon. Other activities will include a Family Fun Stage featuring the Bennington Marionettes and the Looney Tunes, astory-telling festival, arts and cratfts displays, New Jersey's largest pancake breakfast, a Friday evening fireworks extravaganza, an old-time car show, a circus, a petting zoo, a Blue Sky Club for VIP launchside viewing, and even a baby-changing station.For ticket information, call (201) 882-5464, The next weekend, Aug. 2-4, The Magic of Alexandria will present its theme of Magic and Illusion at Alexandria Field Airport in Pittstown. This festival is a true family affair. Event Director linda Fritsche Castner and her three siblings inherited the airport from their parents - the festival is held on property owned by the family since the mid-lSOOs. Castners father, William Fritsche, opened the airport more than 50 years ago. The festival, which attracted 60,000 people last year, will feature evening mass ascensions of 80 to 100 hot air balloons, continuous stage, entertainment, conceits, fireworks displays, sports and adventure activities, a juried craft fair and spectacular nighttime balloon glows. Among the featured balloons will be Bell Atlantic Nynex Mobile's 16-story high offering shaped like a cellular flip phone. For tickets, call (908)735-0870.

M and Breakfast

how Ir

e Mil* north of Chtittr d mill off! 40) ttwrU* 4 Anftfitof

9 0 8 'M>2 r>(XMi

SlonAcyw, AV O7«74

(SOW 347-6369

ncn$tk*(

The Giant

Purple Dragon is among special shaped balloons featured in the Quick Cbek Newjersey Festival of Ballooning in Readington.

SUSSEX COUNTY FARM & HORSE SHOW

C$*t

For a free guide to "Things to Do in Somerset County" send a letter-size SASEto: Tourism Guide P.O. Box 3000 Somerville.NJ 08876-1262

rience the magic of floating over the New Jersey . in a colorful hot air balloon. Join usfora spectacular

CHAMPAGNE FLIGHT

THE SHIP INN Milford,NJ

,»tke experience of a lifetime!

-FA.A. -#1 for safety • #1 for fun! DEKAYAVIATION Balloon Adventures

908-996-7760

In same Hunttrdon County, 10 mins.fromRemington, NJ and Ntw Hope, PA

• Freshly brewed, cask conditioned ales •Traditional English fare • 14 British beers & hard cider on tap • Great single malts Weekend entertainment • Brewhouse tours

Open Year Round • Admission Free Hours: 9am - 5pm, Monday thru Friday 10am- 4pm Weekends

Sat,Aii9.10 .,. Jteuid Union of Soul* Fwwowts • DiMoDmy • MUMOO • CAJW H O W I 6 LIVESTOCK SHOWS • TUcroahJOi AQHA HOUSE SHOW • OSCA* INB Rotor • CHAJMV^WOOO$CUIPTUM



Off Rt 206 North, Plains Rotd, Augusta, H I

For Information Call (201) 9484540

t S g ^

A selection of golf apparel, gifts, books and collectibles

Exit 33 off 1-78 or Mt. Airy Rd. Exit off 287 liberty Corner Rd. (Rte 512) Far Hills, NJ Locad3mksN
Mon v Aus. 6 . • • . 1 % Riy Cynn AllTriebOiSateMoyd. V&\M/C Accepted HicSvAiig.7 ....SawyerIrown M.,Aus.9 iry«n WhHc and Rick Ttavino

que Expenanci Thats Somtthing More than a Typical Historic Site - Visit Them All HUNTERDON COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM 56 Main Street, Clinton, NJ (908) 7354101 MACCULLOCH HALL HISTORICAL MUSEUM 45 Macculloch Avenue, Morristown, NJ (201) 538-2404 SHIPPEN MANOR/OXFORD FURNACE «! 8 Behrfdere Avenue, Oxford, NJ 07863 (908) 4M4381 STERUNG HILL MINING MUSEUM

GOLF HOUSE

buse

ENTERTAINMENT AREA

;

S|Hu.il r\!iil)ili«Mi tluoU'Jt l>t(*mhn (,<>lj

I h e fi/vrf/i's/

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historic exhibits, Shippen Manor tours period crafters, antique car show and entertainment for children of all ages plus much much more 7 r , and ifs all free ^ For information call (908) 4534381 ^ m Manor. 8 Belvidere Avarnia Oxford. NJ 07i

MtW JMttY m flUttt NiWIEAHW SUPHIMtNT WEtK Of MAY 6, U N

Up,Up and Away!

«O0) ttt-MOO

i t you like to Ay In a beautiful balloon? A glider? A parachute? AW-planc? Take to the skies this season all over the state!

P.O.Box196,Biptiitown (906) 996-7760 Hot-tirbttloonrkim

MvMfluft MNoonlno IACAS

Box906,Ntptur* (900)5314668

*

406 Airport toad, WtWown 6)730-9223 tchod, charters, nnttft,

Dltoovtf Mvwitivt 2SOr*QonAvanu«, Mount

laum (609)235-7195

ti

Air tpoiU*x1hot4r tuition hdtt

tO Hfrt* PtaM, Pltc«taw«y (906)752-1116

Bttirtlmvn Airport 36LMnbirtRoad,6taintown (906)3624311

U**n Mountain

inAugutt

Soonfc gHd* ttim and fr*fruc-

MpdfM A V M M W V Tcuri, LHi OkJBridfli Airport, Mitiwm (906)44^1300 Oqtn-cockpttbipitmtoun, tfghttf pilot ridtt, Mrobfltfci 320 RtdUon Raid, Southampton

(906)369-2600

Famlnadilt

»i%3

OW BridM Airport, Er>gl«Mown (906)996-7760

won ow* ra U H N f i wwmm

Gap Road, Bodmirwtor 15 U 93531 (80) AlR/(906) 439-3531 (800) H o H * baton rite Oarfftt FMojM Cantar ANaira Airport, Rt. 34,

Ifcydlwl P.O.Box64,Ptttatown (908)735-8119

256WarttviNiAoadl OM

j 466-3369 Mrbttoonridm

P.aBox31 ( Rt.31, Suasax (201)702-7000

Have M 57 Old BaMdara Road, Phlilipabura (WO60-TO-FLY Hot-wbtHoontiyhts Haart'tDa^rtlailoon 20AHanStraat
RD2,Box54,PlttJtown (906)996-2195 Hot-ilrbtioonfkkiind intnjetion

(906)768-7616 BtHoonmntttt

auaaai Akport, Inc. 53 Rout* 639, WtntaoaTownthip

P.O. Box 2116, Flamiraton (600) 337-RIOE/(908) 788-5415

U01)7u2-9719/8757337/875-0783

H4b*kid

Tawtiatourylaloon Ml r l M n

P.O. Box 7679, Btoomabury (906) 479-4674 Hot-irbtikmMm

29 Old Wick Road,

Rt. 530, BayvMa, BarkatayTowmhlp (908)341-2200 Rainbow Ixpraas P.O. BOKC, Rocky Hill

UNrallflM Aircraft CanUr Routa 527 and Fanday Avanua, Jackion (906)363-9888 Right Imons

(908)439-3320 t4r btHoon rWw, tir sports

WATERLOO

Year 'Round Recreation

LAKE HOPATCONG, MJ kit Ihow

j3?rurci;iM: Clowns, Facepainters, Balloon creations and much more! Bring a picnic lunch and enjoy family run and activities on the lawn afrretinghuysen Arboretum, Morris Township, brought to you by Satan of Morrtatowa, l-3pm. Garden State Concert Band sponsored by Friendi of Frelin|Buyjea Arboretum, 3-5pm. 1

H ^ V ^P ^P^P^P^B a^P^^^K^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^D^^BJ^v

Get out your bobbie socks and penny loafers for a 50's Day at Schooley's Mtn County Park, Washington Twp. Bill Turner and Blue Smoke will be rockin' around the clock from 3- 5pm. Sponsored by MCI ComamBicatioai,

4fl ••

T

1

Open Mid-Apnl

FREE

Map/Diractory (201)683-1909

l i k i Hopttcong Btnin«» AuoctMtoA SOI Rt, 15 to., Lk» Hopttcong, NJ 07MI

lawire Water Gai MjtiflnarRtcrMtion A'ru Ottob*

> Swimminf * PropiM > Hiking • Dump SUtwns • Hot Showtrs »VidMArcada • Planwd Actives • BMtRonUtt • Oft-irtiRintil Triers • Pump-Out Strvici • Snunil Sitw

15 ML Pl«»siit Rd. Celiimba. NJ 07S32

(908)496-4333 ^^1-800-545-9662

aad SEPT. 28*29 WATBtbOOCONCOrrFIEU)

ATtSLSMuitDlcitpei'taiaa^'klfllilOifcm

MflTOEXn 25, STANHOPE, M

mmmmusm

Flappers and gangsters - vintage cars on display, free birch beer land ragtime music will bring back the roaring 20's at Silas Icondict County Park, Kinnelon from 2 -5pm. This day of music and cntertainmenL sponsored by J.B. Hiniutr * Co. . Filled wilh summer activity ideas, send a S.A.S.E. to: , P.O. Box 1295, Morristown, NJ. 07962-1295.

If

^r

Miniature golf. Huge family fan. Let's play 'the other course, too!

It looks like a real golf' course!

ATlmtoRmtmbtr Tour an authentic American canal settlement Guides fc artisans k i d you through New Jersey's past Zander to Indian Island and sec the re-created Lcnap

•.Watch out for the rapids!

Look at the, swans by the waterfall!

Shop at Smith's General Store or the Indian Museum Shop

.Can we have my birthday party here ?

Have lunch at the Pavilionor Towpath Tavern

TH£ JERSEY JAZZFEST AT WATERLOO The East Coast Jazz Event of the Year! June 7-9,1996 More Than 60 Hours of Fabulous Jazz! Call the NJ Jan Society !NFOUNE , 8Q0O03-6557 or ORDERLINE « MOTM-JASS for a complete irvformation packet or to order tickets!

The Village of Waterloo is located w Stanhope, NJ at exit 25 off 1-80 & open Wednesday-Sunday; 10am to 6pm. Visit us on the Internet at www.waterloovillage.org! BRING THIS AD & RECEIVE $1 OFF ONE ADULT ADMISSION! (Docs not apply to tSl tpedal evesu, please call in idvince.)

Please call for our FREE Calendar of Events -

(201) 347-0900

Let's get a pizza in the, clubhouse! Mil

NJ

roe

Two 18-hole courses in a country club setting. It's not just for kids! A charming clubhouse serving food and beverages. The perfect setting for families, parties and company outings. AWAI».WINNIN«

PINE CREEK MINIATURE GOLF Rt. 31, Witt Amwtli, NJ • (609] 466-3803

2-Putt!

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NIW JERSEY FUN GUIDE NEW8PAPER SUPPLEMENT WEEK OF MAY 5 , 1 * 6

Garden Slate Wine New Jersey Wines: Growers Association

A Taste of the Garden State

A

Jmw 22-23, 1 2 M M - 5 p m hosted by Oeam ftafee Winery, N

J

ADMISSION:! I O.WPM PERSON

AH|MI

growing segment of New jersey agriculture is enjoyed by the bottle in vintages produced by New Jersey vintners. Fourteen wineries amid vast regions of farmland have helped New Jersey earn its nickname: the Garden State. New Jersey wineries currently produce about 180,000 gallons of wine per year which places the state among the top 15 wine-producing states in the nation, Each year the Garden State Wine Growers Association sponsors group festivals to celebrate the wine-making tradition with the public by offering a variety of fine wines, For updates on festivals, tastings, wine releases, and more, call the New Jersey Wine line at the New Jersey Department of Agriculture at (800) 5244)043.

10-11, Umm-tpm

hated tyFar SwsWwy, mm.NJ Growers Assmotian ADMGBCN:$IOJOOKB2I

$

8*tomtar 14-15, 1 2 M M - S p n hostedtyWaterto Vilcjp, Stonhppe, NJ : $10.00 PER PERSON

if

New Jersey Wineries: y 269 Route 627, Mllford (908)995-7800

fihjoy wine tastings, ^ wine cellar tours, and live music at all of the above events.

267A Hayes Mill Road, Atco (609)766-6565

24 North Vienna Avenue, Qermanla (609)965-1548/(201)778-1494

Toflwaano wNMiy 225 White Hone Pike, Hammonton (800)666-WINE

Antwafl VaNay Vlneyart 80 Old York Road, Rlngoes (908) 788-5852

TamunaVineyarda Cemetery Road, P.O. Box 247, Mope (908)459-5878

9 Rocktown Road, P.O. Box 104, Rlngoes (908) 786-0400

SytvMrinfM

BaNc Wintry Route 40, Box 6623, Mays Landing (609)625-2166 Ctpe May Winery *riVlneyiNf 709 Townbank Road, Cape May (609)884-1169

• • « • * ; / • . • ' • • • : * . • • •

<&i

Olympic to Come

Cream Mdge Vtotyarda and Champaajna CeMavs Route 539, P.O. Box 96, Cream Ridge (908)259-9797

^'U:

Four HetsfB wintry at Metarauo Farm Route 519, R.R. 3, Box 256, Betvidere (908)475-3671

jtheo«t>enswc

.

twrf torn yean the tordi ii Hi on Nowl L

j'a Road Vineyard Route 579, P.O. Box 360, Aabury (908)4794479 64 Harilngen Road, Belle Mead (908)359-6633 Poor Wonard a Winery 220 Ridge Road, Frenchtown (908)996-6460 Wde of New Jeraey/Tamutu Vtneyaroa 118Rt.130,Bordentown (800)362-0309 Ftenautt Wtneiy 72 N. Bremen Avenue, Egg Harbor City (609)965-2111

at«:l5p.ttjuoe!l ( coontnatedbrtlieUaiMd

d to Mude tmtmm

•oicWjeareri w i indude fomet mmmmta ©jrme pmK. Batde Monument down! wVow Sttfct, down to Mwnani|tnarwiy^^

8t«e and •arreamteti After the expeded toooaa the 1mm Utkn

KING'S ROAD

Discount coupons available it participating wineries. For further information contact: RJM Marketing (908)4754460

TnnMbyHmiliorGntili. ChUdm'tThMlri«ArtilCnte * CnWwii Oof* HoinwiQ CnviCtM • EiMn u h wA pta* groundi,

TOIRISM ADVERTISERS Call theNJ Press Association to place your ad in the next New Jersey Fun Guide

UPC-8IH ANIMATtD T-KIX. AND MOMI

A SmSrg&ibord of Fun Samitw, lAmmkmf—ii nMeafcei all alaj •

FeJfcJ)«c«t| •

(609) 406-0600

VLEAfiTofVAlU

Newjersey

10AM p

MATA tmOBKIA STATE Mm *

Fat '96 is easy to find. |mt follow the t i m to Waterloo Village from 1-80 Exil 25. Aduhs$8 * KMiFaEE For bnehwe & }2off coMinn, wrth SanFetl, RO »1 • Box 50, OnMknn PA 1U25 Info: («W) 5424150' f AXIHOl TSMOii

loundtifo

New Jersey's Largest Producer of Chardonnay, Riesling, and Pinot Noirl Located in A 200 Year Old Dairy Barn in Beautiful Hunterdon County, We Offer... A- AWARD WINNING WINES * ftp Sunny Retail Shop # Wine by the Glass •* *• Light Fare • Picnic Area •* *• Facilities for Group Functions «e\ *• Gift Baskets • Private Labeling

Have you tried our wine in the BLUEBOTTLE?? 1-800479-6479 Open WML through Sun. 12-Spm Ask about upcoming events!

RL 579 it HI 6U, Prttatmg, NJ (3 nilci from exit 11 of 1-79)

NEW JERSEY CARDINALS Professional Baseball at Skylands Park • Group Rates • Group Picnics Skybox Suites per game rentals

Class A Affiliate of the St. Louis Cardinals

Game Times: Mon.-Fri. 7:10 p.m., Sat. 5:00 p.m., Sun 1-00 p m

estervil ane MUIIU

| I |

ALWAYS SOMETHING NEW

~")1 r (j !

TICKETS: Box $8:00 • Reserved $5.50 • Gen. Adm. $3.00 1-80 exit 34 B • Routes 206 & 15 • Augusta • Sussex County

(201) 579-7500

PUN

NIWftPAHR IUPPLEMEMT WEEK O f MAY (L jlflM

CITY PULSE AND SUBURBAN COMFORT tt you looking for excitement? Do you seek the hustle and bustle of city life with the comfort of suburban life? Then the Gateway Region is the place for you. This area - comprised of Hudson, Bergen, Essex, Middlesex, Passaic, and Union Counties is located in New Jersey's Northeastern corner, in close proximity to New York City but with a distinct Garden State flavor. Its all here. The shops and restaurants of urban locales such as Hobokcn and Jersey City, world class retail center* such as The Mall at Short Hills and designer discount outlets along the suburban highways. And the historic destinations such as Raterson's Great Falls and the Statue of liberty, our nation's gateway from which this region got its name. If you're into science, The Gateway Region boasts one of the nation's finest science museums, the liberty Science Center in Jersey City, The center truly makes science come alive, with four impressive floors that house hundreds ofpermanent and routing interactive exhibits and presentations. And art lovers will want to visit the Jersey City Museum which has an extensive collection of 19th- and 20th-century paintings and historical objects. Nearby, you can relive the glorious history of immigration to the United States and learn about the people who helped build this nation by visiting the famous Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, easily accessible by ferry from historic Liberty State Park, also in Jersey City. You can get a unique blend of science and history in The Gateway Region by visiting the home and office of Americas greatest inventor, Thomas A. Edison, at what is now the Edison National Historic Site in West Orange. It houses the laboratories md workshops where Edison developed the motion picture camera, phonograph, and more than half of his 1,093 U.S.-

patented inventions. Many of Edison's original inventions are on display, such as the tinfoil phonograph of 1877 and early electric lights. A showing of Edison's early movies is a highlight of the tour. Continue on to Glenmont, Edison's palatial 19th-century, 23-room estate. The red-brick and wood mansion is an impressive example of opulent Victorian style, and most of its original furnishings are still in place. If you're looking for something for the youngsters, an educational and fun excursion is the New Jersey Children's Museum in Paramus, which has plenty of interactive exhibits. If air flight is more your interest, don't miss the Aviation Hall of Fame and Museum at Teterboro Airport in Teterboro. Another fascinating stop is the world-renowned Newark Museum, which boasts the largest Tibetan collection in the Western Hemisphere, as well as a planetarium and the recently restored Ballantine House, Victoriana at its finest. If American history doesn't go backforenough for you, you can take a trip all the way back to 1093 AD. as you attend a performance at Medieval Times Dinner & Tournament in lyadhorst. It's a recreated medieval feast, complete with all of the attendant pageantry, horsemanship, swordplay and sorcery It even features an authentic jousting tournament, In these days of increasing concern about our environment, is the Meadowlands Environmental Center and Trash Museum, also in Lyndhurst, is dedicated to enhancing public understanding and appreciation of environmental issues. The internationally acclaimed

The liberty Science Center in Jersey City is among the nation's finest science museums.

museum offers interactive displays designed to educate visitors on environmental concerns, along with guided nature walks and canoe trips. Discover the region's rich Revolutionary War history and nature by taking a scenic drive to one of the state's hidden jewels, the New Jersey Botanical Gardens at Skylands, located in Ringwood State Park. From the delicate shades ofa tiny wildflower to the vibrant color of mass annual plantings, the Botanical Gardens is it place of beauty. Ringwood Manor Is the original home of Robert Ersklne, surveyor general of the Continental Army. For an example of classic architecture, visit The Hermitage in Ho-Ho-Kus, a house dating back to the 18th century that has been designated a National Historic Landmark. This Gothic Revival home features steep, gabled roofs, diamond-paned bay windows, elaborately carved "gingerbread" trim, and wide verandas epitomizing the romantic Victorian era. If you like to shop around, you're in store for a treat, The Gateway Region is home to many fine malls and the famous Secaucus Outlets. With more than 125 stores, the giant outlet center is located in the heart of the Meadowlands and offers designers' and major manufacturers products at discount prices. And remember, there's no sales tax on clothing in New Jersey. Theater lovers will enjoy a first-rate performance at the critically acclaimed Paper Mill Playhouse in Miilburn. New Brunswick, known for its theatrical community, Is home to the George Street Playhouse ^

Htor FMI up t»H» wUnuH

Hoboken's Best! •lUftaurantt • Nightlife •Local Sc«n# 'Shops and moral

Call (201) 222-1212

^-Introducing theDCWSpirit of New Jersey. SHE'S THE NEWEST, MOST BEAUTIFUL LUNCH AND DINNER CRUISE SHIP ON NEW YORK HARBOR. HER SLEEK HULL GLJDES ACROSS THE WATER LIKE A BROADWAY DANCER. HER LUXURIOUS DECKS ARE READY TO PAMPER YOU WITH WONDERFUL DINING, UVE ' >A* SHOWS, A FABULOUS 5KYUNE VIEW AND HOURS OF CAREFREE DANCING. SHE CRUISES OUT OF BOTH SIDES f M M T ( D 1 1 I ( C ( OF THE HUDSON, BUT HER HEART - AND HER NAME - BELONG TO NEW JERSEY. CALL FOR TICKETS TODAY! jonftMf wjjmt SHMUM} fin.

WHffAmW ASTAltUAKES.

10

NEW JERSEY FUN QUIDE NEWSPAPER SUPPLEMENT WEEK OF MAY 8, 1*M

G A T E W A Y / FIOM PREVIOUS PAGI and Crossroads Theater, one of the premier African-American theater companies In the nation. The Park Performing Arts Center of Union City offers America's oldest running Passion Play and select musical entertainment Another nightlife option is dinner and a New Jersey/New York Harbor cruise aboard the Spirit of New Jersey. For the sports fanatic in the family, the Meadowlands Sports Complex in Bast Rutherford offers football, basketball, hockey and horse racing. The

Wednesday

^^

June 19,1996

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BaiebtllCelebritJei

*. A |% f

Ail-day Celebration Noon to 8 PM

^MrWjjK

Street Fair All Day

^SHaasr ^aaWl V F ^ T v Mcfnonbilia Displtyi

Re-enactment Game

in Full Costume

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Little League Game*

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Arts & Grafts Di«pltys

W^Jw a\

Baicbil Filraj 6 PM Baseball Itade

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Sidewalk d i e . & Food Vendors

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Call 420-2207 For Information

Washington Street Between 1st &14th Streets

1 1 SOth Anniursar* of H.iscball

June 1*), 1')*)(» 1

Cruise NY,h, Right Way. with NY Waterway!

State is a Haven

These cruise ships are among the many vessels that show tourists the sights from the waters of the Gatetvay Region.

for Theaters

complex includes Giants Stadium, home of the Giants and Jets of the National Football League; the Continental Airlines Arena, the home of the National Basketball Association's New Jersey Nets; and the National Hockey League's Stanley Cup Champion New Jersey Devils; and the Meadowlands Racetrack, the home of racing and fine dining. From February through December on Thursdays and Saturdays, you can shop at the Meadowlands Marketplace, a huge outdoor flea market located at Giants Stadium. If you arc traveling on a group tour, you enjoy a behindthe-scenes look at the entire complex. Tennis fans should make a note of the 19th annual A&P Tennis Classic (July 16 • Aug. 21) at the Crossroads Corporate Center in Mahwah. Ail the top stars are expected at the event, which will Include a women's tournament and a men's exhibition to benefit the late Arthur Ashes Safe Passage Foundation. Fine dining is available throughout the Gateway Region. Excellent restaurants are located in all of the regions counties. But particular favorites include Newark, known for its Portuguese cuisine, and Hoboken, where Italian food and fresh baked Italian bread are local specialties. And don't miss a visit to the new Hoboken Brewery for a taste of Its many microbrews. There's so much to see and do in the Gateway Region that you'll want to come back frequently. To make your trip planning easier, consult the New Jersey Division of Travetand Tourism's New Jersey Travel Guide. To request a copy, call 180OJERSEY-7, cxt. 6121 or call the Gateway Region Tourism Council for more information at (201) 641-7632.

Or, see all the best sights of New York City from one of NY Waterway's 90-Minutc Harbor Cruises. Our informative guides will reveai the excitement of NYC without taking up your entire afternoon.

Country Qata Players 114 Greenwich Street, Belvidere (908)859-4611

I played with

bugs and didn't get yelled at."

For the international visitor, try one of NY Waterway's NEB'Specialty Language Cruises offered in Japanese. Portuguese. French. Spanish. German or Italian. Call Q:Pr &

1-800-533-3779

Tryourothrr wattrfhmt uttwaams tnhuri Luiding Restaurant. Sptrito Gri/i. and Port Impin:' Driving Range atdMinimnGolf. rftk-

Wuiivwl Tm
(908)249-5581

Handicapped accessible The East Lynne Company* The Cape May Institute, Cape May (609)884-7117 Elaine's Dinner Theater 513 Lafayette Street, Cape May (609)884-4358 Elizabeth Playhouaa 1100 East Jersey Street, Elizabeth Handicapped accessible Evergreen Dinner Playhouse 90 Route 46, Mountain Lakes (201)335-3676 Handicapped accessible The Growing Stage* Williamson Building, Main Street, Chester (908) 879-4946 First Avenue Playhouse 123 First Avenue, Atlantic Highlands (908)291-7552

Cmises Depart from Pier 78 at West 38th Street and 12th Avenue. Manhattan.

*K\iutl i> aptvperiy

Creative Theatre 102 Witherapoon St., Princeton (609)924-3489 Crossroads Theatre Company* 17 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick

(908)355-0077

Fm ferry transfers fwm Parr Impvrud. hew Jersey provided for this low.

w

AN ChMdren't Theater 1180 Route 46 West Parslppany (201)335-5326 American Stage Company* Falrlelgh Dickinson University 892 River Road, Teanack (201)692-7720 Handicapped accessible ArtaPowerlnc,* 52PassatcSt. Ridgewood (201)652-0100 Brundaoje Pani Playnouaa CarreH Road, Randolph (201)989-7092 Handicapped accessible Cape May •OoeanCnyKWe 1 Playhouee 1048 Washington St., Cape May (609)884-5404 Circle Players Circle Playhouse 416 Victoria Avenue, Piscataway (908)968-7555

New tickets are now available for Kykuit Cruises beginning in April! Visit one of the most spectacular homes in the United States, the Rockefeller family home and gardens in Pocantico Hills, on NY Waterway's Kykuit Cruise.

ffiheater-loven canfindan I impressive array of pfofesX sional, coflununity, open-air, and dinner theaters throughout the state, listed below is a sampling of theaters where you can enjoy musicals, dramas, comedies, world premiers, and more. If you would like more Information on NewJersey's professional theaters, contact the New Jersey Theatre Group, the association of professional not-for-profit theatres of New Jersey, at (201) 59MI189.

imf

ft mmntmnej and opo.ihit hr t'u' Ktn-keletler Bmthm Fund.

fen

Forum Theater Group* 314 Main Street, Metuchen (908)548-0582 Handicapped accessible Foundation Theatre*

NY WATERWAY SIOHTSECINQ CRUISES

Burlington County College, Pemberton (609)894-2138 Handicapped accessible

Franklin Villagers Bam Theater 475 Demott Lane, Somerset (908)873-2710

Liberty Science Center More than 250 hands-on science exhibits and the incredible Kodak OMNI THEATER. Exit146 NJ. Turnpike, Jersey City, N.J. Call 201-200-1000 tor the nitty-gritty. What same=Jun.

George Street Playhouse* 9 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick (908)246-7717 Handicapped accessible Hunterdon Hills Playhouse Dinner Theater Route 173 W, Hampton (800) HHP-7313 Handicapped accessible Linden Summer Playhouse P.O. Box 304, Linden (908) 862-0772. PAGEUP

^1'-^ ^ '

' : "'£'

NEW JIM8EY FUN QUIOE NEWSFAPEVI SUPPLEMENT WEEK OF MAY 6, 1896

ft

Enwonment Center

y

Cowwce i Dtv«wof TnmdMd JfUcf ; ...

Ac Hurt dhtfit lourim fatta**

Showlime at Paper Mill Playhouse in Millburn. T H E A T E R S / FROM PREVIOUS PAGE MoCartar I t e a t r t Cantar forttM 91 ^ , Princeton (609)663-6000 Handicapped accessible MM HM Pwynouee Front A Montoomeiy Streets. Trenton •3038 WewJereey Stwkeepeaft Fetthel Drew University Bowne Theatre Madison (201)408-3278 Handicapped accessible OfflroadBtreetTherier 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopeweil

(609)466-2766 Paper MW Ptoyhouee* Brookside Drive, Mlilburn (201) 376-4343 Handicapped accessible Pax Amfcus CaeUe TMater Lake Shore Drive, Budd Lake (201)691-2100 Handicapped accessible Perona Farms Luncheon Theater 350 Andover-Sparta Road (Route 517) Andover (800)762-6569 Handicapped accessible Playa-m-the-Par* Roosevelt Amphitheater Roosevelt Park, Edison (908)548-2865 Handicapped accessible Playwrights Theater of New Jersey* 33 Green Village Road Madison (201)514-1787/1940 Princeton Repertory Company* 17HulfishSt. Princeton

(609)921-3682 Red Oak Music Theatre* 66 Abe Vorhees Drive (Old Squan Plaza) Manasquan (908)367-1515 Somerset Valley Players 689 Amweli Road (Route 514) Neahanic Station (90S) 369-7469 Handicapped accessible South Jersey Reflional Theater* Gateway Playhouse Bay Avenue, Somers Point (609)653-0553 Handicapped accessible

H K scries ii hosudbf wtaV

SunHajht Theafre Beach & Engleaide Avanuea Beach Haven (609)482-9477

.-..., In the heart of an urban wet^bub ne/bf €, //^ Center offers program for schools and families dealing nth meadowlands ecology, wildlife and other environmental issues; a .museum with interactive displays; (f walking trails; and a Museum I Store. Courtyard and glass-enclosed gazebo available for rental Call for hours: (201)4604300

Theater at RutQera Rutgers Arts Center George Street and Route 18 New Brunswick (908)932-7511 Montcliir State College, Upper Montdair (201)655-5112 Handicapped accessible Weshinatofi Cioeaino Opan^M Tneeter Washington Crossing State Park 355 Washington Crossing-Pennington Road, Titusvllle (609) 737-0623 WeetfleKJ Connnunlty Players 1000 North Avenue West, Westfield (908)232-9568

WE HOTTEST SPORT NOT ON 10.

pv

twodayi a weekooWlXW, New

'ndd

Pro Roller Hockey at tie Meadodands

nocnsoi tnflc report, and Ttamhf and Frtday atft#pm, ipfOffam

'DtnolM • prdviiioflil ttiMtiF

Experience the Magic ofthe Knight Come to Medieval Times. Inside oui magnificent castle you II least on a delicious four course dinner Then, in your honor, brave knights on norsebock compete at breathtaking speeds in darmg feats of skill and jousting. Cheer them on to victory as they fight to the finish! Medieval Times is the perfect place to celebrate special occasions Group rotes ore available.

RESERVATIONS: 201-933-2220 OR 800-828-2945

It's Pro Roller Hockey at the Continental Airlines Arena and it's totally cool without any ice. It's the New Jersey Rockin Rollers third season and it's fun for the whole family. Chills, thrills, excitement and entertainment and the best seats in the house. With season tickets you pay less and scream and cheer more!

Spring Lake Community Theater Third and Madison Avenue Spring Lake (908)449-4530

ADULTS SAVE $10 KIDS (12 ft UNDER) SAVE $5 ON SUNDAY THRU FRIDAY SHOWS.

Stageworks/Summit* 42 Norwood A m , Summit (908)273-9383 Handicapped accessible

PRESEVTTHIS COrPOX ATTHE BOX OrTICE limit 14 people per coupon. Noi valid with or for gift oertificaies. May not be combined wit) any other discount offer Valid only ai Lwdhunt c&tie and expires I Zffljh. NJ K

Call 201-507-1303 today!

NEW JERSEY T O T A L Lr C O O L

Stony Hill Players Inc.

P.O. Box 621, New Providence (908) 665-1376 Summerfun Theater, Inc.* 6 Lloyd Road (201)256-0576 Handicapped accessible

W I T H O U T

A TRACE

O f I C E

Umes, 149 Polito Ave. Lyndhurst, \J «E£PA1KI>C. Rte3 to 17So One mile west of Giants Stadium.

Call the New lersey Press Association for a free brouchure about newspaper networking services that simplify the process of working with multiple newspapers. Questions about distributing a press release, or placing statewide advertising? Ask us about the New}er$ey Newspaper Network (NjNN). Call (609) 406-0600.

11

II

NIW JERSEY FUN GUIDE NEWSPAPER SUPPLEMENT WEEK Of MAY 8,

Discover New Jersey's State Parks and Fbrests iscover the scenic wonders of New Jersey's spectacular state parks and forests! Pack I picnic and hike through miles of pristine woodlands and gentle mountains or follow A trail along a babbling brook. Canoe down gentle streams or white water raft on a lolling river! Drop a line for the catch of the day or gallop through on horseback. Hitch a (em and

D

sleep under the Mars. For a complete description of all New Jersey state parks and forests, call the Division of Parks and Forestry at (609) 292-27V7 or (800) 84H>420. For the New Jersey Campground Owners Association Campground Directory, call (800) 24IAMP NJ A t o m 8 Hewitt State Forest Warwick Turnpike, Hewitt (201)853-4462

p 180 Staphw'iPwk Road Hacktttftown (906)852-3790 •Wntyan LMmmiuav

P.O. Box 167, Broidwiy Bimtflit Ughi (609)494-2016 Walkway* a n handlcapptd accttstoto Forsst P.O. Box 118, State Road New Grwtnt {609)296-1114 Partially handicapped accessible

AHaIre Mate Park P.O. Box 220, Route 524, Farmlngdale (908)938-2371 Handicapped accessible

BUS Day Trips k Multi-Day Bus Tours Bum depart from 1! Bnmwki ft Latawod "GOOD TIME TOURS" call for brochure (908)251-6690

BtNtpWn SUrtt FofMt P.O. Box 550, County Route 550, Woodbine (609)661-2404 Partially handicapped accessible BuN'a Island 8ectlofi/Dc4awift I Rarttan Canal Start* N i t 2185 Daniel Bray Highway, Stockton (609)397-2949 Cape May Point Stats Park Box 107, Cape May Point (609)864-2159 Handicapped accessible Chew—quaka State Part Gordon Road, Old Bridge (906)566-2161 Handicapped accessible

Crtto, Art, food, KMi ActfvrttM, All Day tnttfttlMttnttt C*» Trw Atfrnrtltlrtfl Allline* Inc. For Mo* Info (Ml) HS-MSI

/Ith this coupon receive $3 off { [the regular price of developing & { tinting one roll of color print film. J at wIM Hi oflm often Club rntmtxn nolvt 3 Jl of* 110% diic In lltii of ngulir bmHto, f.

ONE HOUR

MOTOPHOTO I n KJ H i m ,totIttitlm n i Whin P m i infcr f [Mikir O N HMf or ull (Ml) 4M-NO RJ96 9

WMItSTriiB STltttr f MR

My 11, IwUNlON CENTER STREET FA* Jim 2. SunSOMERVUE STREET FAIR * UL CMNFOW's 125th TOWN FEST Junn.lun.fURlTAN STREET FAR iL SUMMT STREET FAIR Aug II, SwREMMOTON SUMMERFEST 5»ptU*RE0 BANK STRKT FAIR Sip H, SH WDOeWOOO COUNTRY FAIR Od I, Sun. SOMEIWLLE FALL FUN FEST Octn, Sun ENOLfWOOO STREET FAIR b JunRARITAM AUTUMN FKT1VAL

.

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Go Campiny 1 America! j

mm A oanxBKCA minum

^jy ewJersey's Great Outdoors Gocamping 6x)m the Skyland Mountains, along the Delaware Water Gap* to the Pinclands in the southern interior, to the white sandy beaches of the Atlantic Ocean including sites dose to New York City and Philadelphia. For t FREE tow W , Ouyirumd udKVPvkG*ikt ndutai RV dukn nd emper't favorite pUoei to vint, call or write

1-800-2-CAMP-NJ (800)222-6765 ,NJ Ot2IO

nuad Ownco Ana • 29 Coob BMdi ltd •

WSISNOFBHHIf... THffff510TS TO Sff JDOIfmsr/WIFOID...

NORTHERN NEW JERSEYS FOUR SEASON FUN SPOT 5/11

Disc Golf Tournaments at Brown'a Point-1 JulyU, Aug. 10, StfX. I , Oct 19, Mm. 23,1 D K . M Wormil Obc Col • E«ry Sun. it 10:00 ua. A Brwm'i Pi

•CrtMWOdlrtt'

Fort Mott Stats Part RD. #3, Box 543 Hamsonville Road, Salem (609)935-3216 Hecklebamey State Park 119 Hacklebamey Road, Long Valley (908)879-5677

Greenwood Lakefwtl Power Boat Races-

K U l O i Novice Water Ski Tournament-Brown's Part

__..._,

v"

•' FrUbcb GoJfing Hiking

Sponw«lby^Gr»w«dLil»Wil»S«CW^/-"^^

HAnback Riding.

3rd Annual Town Cycle Challenge • Modrr^rtife, Ra'fce M ^ H WaBong. Wind WMtbrookPk-Sports, by NOR8A ^ NM1 Oft^oftf 0icycl* lan^p./ Surfing, Sailing. Rying,

7/13HI W.M. Museum Doubles Tennis Toyriwrnent (IWnDHi7no&21) R //

| v Pgjieking. Waiar Skiing, 1 Sapping or srnijy

'

^^ .enjoying nature at its Best COHIEMSfntSf

.

> • / /

(all (or direttiom & information* West Milford Chamber ol Commerw 201-728-3150

Sloatsburg Road, Ringwood (201)9627031 PaHtades Interstate Park Off Exit 2, Palisades Interstate Parkway, Alpine (201)768-1360 Psrvtn State Perk Box 374, RD 1, Route 540, Elmer (609)358-8616 Penn State Forest cA3 Bass River, P.O. Box 118, State Road, New Gretna (609)296-1114 Princeton Battlefield State Park Mercer Street, Princeton (609)737-0623 Prospertown Lake c/o Monmouth Battlefield Highway 33, Manalapan (908)462-9616 Ramapo Mountain State Forest c/o Ringwood State Park Sloatsburg Road, Ringwood (201)962-7031 Rancocas State Park Westampton Township (609)726-1191

Hopatcoofl State Park P.O.BoxM-519 Lakeside Boulevard, Landing (201)398-7010

Ringwood Manor c/o Ringwood State Park P.O. Box 1304 Sloatsburg Road, Ringwood (201)962-7031 First floor handicapped accessible

Island Beach State Part Route 35, Seaside Park (908) 793-0506 Handicapped accessible, surf chairs

Ringwood State Park P.O.Box 1304 Sloatsburg Road, Ringwood (201)962-7031

Jenny Jump State Forest Box 150, State Park Road, Hope (908)459-4366

Round Valley Recreation Area Box 45D, Lebanon/Stanton Road Lebanon (908)236-6355 Beach area handicapped accessible

KKtatlnny Valley State Park c/o Swartswood State Park P.O. Box 123, East Shore Drive Swartswood (201) 786-6445 Lebanon State Forest P.O. Box 215, Route 72 New Lisbon (609)726-1191 Liberty State Park Morris Pesin Drive, Jersey City (201)915-3400 Long Pond Ironworks State Park c/o Ringwood State Park P.O. Box 130H, Ringwood (201) 962-7031

1113 4th Annual West Miltord Museum Ttnnii Toumamanl'

7/7

Delaware A Rarrtan Canal State Part 643 Canal Road, Somerset (908)873-3050 Partially handicapped accessible

High Point State Park 1480 State Route 23, Sussex (201)875-4800 Partially handicapped accessible

Camping

iNtwJc

Cofsont M a t State Part Ocean Drive, Route 619 Ocean City (609)861-2404 Surf chairs by advanced notice

Bird watchers ctt^a^c in one of the many outdoor pastimes available in Sew Jersey's state parks.

Monmouth Battlefield State Part RD 1. Highway 33 West, Manalapan (908) 452-9616 M i Mitchtell Overlook State Park Scenic Drive. Atlantic Highlands (908) 842-4000 Norvln Green Forest c/o Ringwood State Park P.O. Box 1304

Sheperd Lake Section, Ringwood State Park Box 1304, Sloatsburg Road, Ringwood (201)962-6526 Skylands Section, Ringwood State Park Box 1304, Sloatsburg Road, Ringwood (201)962-7031 Stephens State Park 800 Willow Grove St., Hackettstown (908)852-3790 Spruce Run State Park 1 Van Syckels Road, Clinton (908) 638-8572 Stokes State Forest 1 Coursen Road, Route 206 N Branchville (201)948-3820 Partially handicapped accessible Swartswood State Park East Shore Drive (County Route 619), Swartswood

(201)383-5230 Partially handicapped accessible Voorhees State Park RD 2, Box 80. Route 513 Glen Gardner (201)628-6969 Washington Crossing State Park 355 Washington Crossing-Pennington Road, Trtusville (609) 737-0623 Partially handicapped accessible Washington Rock State Park 16 Rock Road, West Greenbrook (908)915-3400 Wawayanda State Park Warwick Turnpike Upper Greenwood Lake (201)853-4462 Handicapped Accessible Wharton State Forest RD 4, Route 542, Hammonton (609)561-0024 Worthington State Forest HC C2, Box 2, Old Mine Road Columbia (908)841-9575

NEW JERSEY FUN GUIDE NEWSPAPER SUPPLEMENT WEEK OP MAY 5,19M

State'sAmusement Parks and Piers Offer Something for Everyone!

F

Authentic hanorCfeftad exhibits of oMMtn^i

320 W. 7th StfHt, BMch Hivin

25th Street and the Boardwalk, Wildwood

Adult and Wddfc ridta, arcadt, gems, tnltrtrin-

(609)522-3900

Hidfs, games. Ntofcel't Midway Pter 3500 Boardwalk, Wildwood (609)522-9124 Kiddie tides, Dracula's Castle, more. Pteywoo lOh Street and Boardwalk, Ocean City

QMUtn't M w d Plymouth Placa batwaan 7tti and 8th Streets, Ocean City

Rkbs, games, miniature golf. I b Flags Oraat Adventure Theme P t f k t Safari Route 537, Jackson (908)928-1821 America's laigaat theme patk and drive-through safari.

flth Slraat and Boardwalk, Ocaan City (609)399-7062 ano garnet.

1080 N. Bot/dwtk t SMtidi HaJQhh

P.O. Sox 69, Route 23, NorthHamburg (201)827-1617 StofyiaHing, fours, farm, zoo, plays.

US Highway 22, Scotch P W m

906)233-0675

'Ihrilis at FbtRs Great Adventwv Iheme Park & Safari in Jackson, left, and rides and games at Wildwood are among amusements for all ages,

(609)399-4751

(609)399-0463 OMan's Mm Wonderland water tide* and miniature golf.

T h t t e t t a f c , Atlantic City 0 | O

?

m rWTf nBprW I f l W I

(609)492*4000

(908)830-1591 Rkhs, attractions, games

atom, and attractions.

:

Rt 31 South, Washington {900*69*6666

rom hewtovtr-heeli rolkrcoaMrr* and rociTy-go-rounds to wet and wikl watersides ... the suit offers amusements for Boardwalk A Farregut Avenw, Seaside Part

Adwn ran BoxWf Route 94, McAte (201)827-2000

Virginia Avenue and The Boardwalk, Atlantic City

(609)345-4093

flttai, mfctofurt gotf, arcade, 496 Rt 202 South, Flemington (BOA 762-4022 JMooW railroad and dolt mmaum, crafts, shows

SharfnanAvaoui and Tha Boardwalk, 8aaaidt

JanaJnaon'a Boardwalk and Parkway, Point Pleasant Beach

1793-6064 C « i n o ft* and Water Worfct 800 Ocaan Terrace. Seaside Heights (908) 793-6495/6501 Rides, wafer par*, arcades, snd attractions.

(908)899-0569 Home ofJmkinson's Baach and Boardwalk Amusement Center and Jenklnson 's Aquarium.

CankraJAreada Hamilton and The Boardwalk, Seaside Heights (908)793-0131 Oamenton lake Amuaement Part 144 Berlin Road, Clementon (609)783-0263 Family them park Muring roHercoasters, kiddie Mas, high diva show, and SptashWortd wafer rides, FatytataForeat 145 Oak Ridge Road, Oak Ridge (201)697-5656

Keefletourg Afnuaament Park 275 Beachway, Keansburg

Routes 40 & 322, Black Horse Pike Cardiff (609)641-7847 Family amusement and theme park, rides, more. Tomahawk Lake Water Park Tomahawk Trail, Sparta (201)398-7777 Thundering Sort Water Slide Taylor and Bay Avenues, Beach Haven

(908)495-1400 Rides, games, fishing pm.

(609)492-0869 Water rides.

Land of Make Believe Route 80, Exit 12, Route 611, Hope

(906)459-5100 Stab's largest pre-teer\ water and amusement park; rides, attractions, mom. Mariner's Landing Scheiienger Ave. and the Boardwalk, Wildwood

(609)522-3900

TropWorid-TboN Pier Boardwalk and Brighton Avenue, Atlantic City (609)340-4444 Indoor amusement park.

(201)347-8900 Pony rides, stagecoach rides, panning for gold, performances. Wonderland Pier 6th Street and The Boardwalk, Ocean City (609)399-7082

Wild West City 50 Lackawanna Drive, Byram Twp,

Bides, water park.

TAKE YOUR PET ALONG 1001 fUmtotoywith your pet by HeithtrM. Wilton Ma, P.O. h i M, Omitt, hi tf«M

So Past So Close!

(MS)S79-73<4 Wrt p f t - hitf'Jtm.miWUQtmlp* trav«(

Agriculture Keeps New Jersey Green

i

unt

ol agriculture I N Saattk County To MriH • MSImdwii, ntum tto coupon «flh ywr M M wd iddritt to:

Six Flagr

5TMW0

Great Adventure* Theme Park & Safari

\} "SEEDS Of PEACE" '4 i NATTVl AMERICAN INDIAN POWWOW

330 Cold Soii Road

k Tw %nv Endrtimrt C o w

EXIT 7A-NJ TURNPIKE EXIT 98 • GARDEN STATE PARKWAY

Hnl7tk.l9tk

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Btuebcmet Raspberries Peaches Apples Pumpkins Flowers Rt 206 S, * milestar.Prmrtr ^^SS

THE "RETURN TO BKAVER CREEr NATIVE AMERICAN INDIAN POWWOW a/ Mutants/) Fsms, Btbnden, W i

J

908) 475-367U3

IT'S Primt Tiinc you pn a great vacation value' ft? value packages at top brand name holds arc showcased

Six Flags Great Adventure Theme Park and Six Flags Wild Safari Animal ParLBig theme park family fun that's close to home, Thrill to the world's greatest rides, experience nine themed lands of adventure and journey through the largest drive-thru safari outside of Africa!

in a beautiful 28-page color brochure,

PRODUCE available now a you- local farm market KJOs of markets located throughout the state.

For Six Fl$g* Information Calf (90$) 9&-1921

Icaiunnji getaway-, from New England lo Us \ ^ a v ^lartint' n S5'V. F£nj*»' y the comforts ot kadi.^;;n, Crov.nc Pla/a. Honda) Inn, Raiiacla. AmersSuik's Shcratui! Ikward Johnson or Mamott oJi ai .subitantiai

Opens may II! LETHAL WEAPON WATER STUN1 S P E C T A C U L A R

Opens in June! •

savings.

Buy direct from the farmer for QUALITY & FRESHNESS. Call for a directory oi markets near you

HEW JERSEY FARMERS' DIRECT ( g f l MARKETWG ASSOCIATION

It

292-8853

Call today for \our free bimhure!

1-800-44-PRIME

l-:Dl-8(S2-7«2 Prime Hospitality Corp. P.O. Box 2700, fairfield, N J. 07007-2700

WHATA

&*•*••

m « FUN GUIDE mmm SUPPLEMENT WEEK OF MAY I m

May

17-18

20-21

21

SflthAnnualNationalftwMiMtakM

TOUT W NflNfnN Nkl HMI

vflnWvVr *

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Annual Pint Crttk Modt) RMKOHIrl Diy

(908)747-1076 3142

in M jersey! M tk state's scenic mmtolns%to . t y v Mtin% sea, in bhtork tillagesad urkn tm, w p *\ ami wU events can k enjoyedtyat Md bek) is just a \J m\pi ojannual mm bappeninp in New Jersey, Stop in at on ofktote'se#t hrhtlnjomtion Centmpramp sixmnti) whk ofmts, listinf hundreds ojwnts to enjoy fm nm timu^h September, ord MJERBl

flluulilt

nMfNN

WallTownship (908) 958-5524

SugirloafaSidAnnvil Spring Sonwvtt Craftt Fnttvil Garden State Exhibition Canter, (800)210-9900 18 3rd Annual MantaiMb Spring Arts Fair

18 Fort Monmouth Armed ForcM Day Fort Monmouth, Highway 35,

18-19 (908)453-4381

18-19

(609)652-0001

n

Bergen County Outdoor Art Show and Concert Van Saun County Park, Paramus (201)646-2780

Stanhope (201)347-0900

1-2

Ocean City Ftower Show

2 Denvllle Rotary Street Festival Broadway, Denvile (201)426-0333 i Ethnic Festivals Garden State Arts Center, Holmdel

6-8/29 * Movies Under theStars (201)217-4077

15

'

_ . IWJ , _, 11th Annual African-American

SilverLakePark, Belmar

Famil Fe5tival

East Brunswick (908)254-6365

*

5-11

27 'Night In Venice" Boat Parade end Bay Celebration

East Brunswick (908) 257-8658 5-19 Bridg BasebillTournament

%

25-27 Annual Spring Juried American Indian Arts Rankokus Indtai Reservation, W< (609)261-4747

13th Annual Decoy and WoodcarversShow Batsto Village, Batsto (609)561-3262

25-6/23

15 Exit 6 off Interstate 2B7, "'"'to1 S f f l f f i o / l f c W w f e injuni,

Ernlen Physick Estate, Cape May

^ Baseball Day Celebration Washington Street, Hudson Street, Stevens Park, Hoboken (201)420-2207 ^ A 16

MeadOMiands Fair j Giants Stadium, Eas; Rjtherford

M

Strawberry Festival Israel Crane House, Montclaij (201)744-1796

fit. 46, Knowlton Township

23-25 Sussex Air Show'{6 Sussex Airport, Sussex (201)875-0783

24-25 i Annual Indian Powwow ind Western Festival NJVasaPark.BuddLake

(908)370-5299

25

Pro/AfflVoiey1)allToiir(iai|«it ds ^

(800)319-3379

{908)506-9449

Mlts Crustacean Hermit Crab Beauty Contest and Crab Races

7

(609)525-9300

Rl

New Jersey State Fair South Jersey Expo Center,

n

8-12 Sandy Koufax World Series

Crab Race A Seafood Festival

27-9/2 Ftemington Fair Remington Fairgrounds, Flemirgton (908) 782-2413

31-9/2 (201)547-5730

Lincroft (906)224-3379 Trenton Market Days -18th Century Fair Mill Hill Part, Trenton (609)396-1776

20-7/7

M i n d JerseyFreih Festival QIampietro Park, (609)794-4005

(201)529-0464

/orstoioiio/0||Tn/)icleMin$l)oii!|iiiirt('«('^ 1 <'H%teteli, L Music-ln-the-Park 10th Annual New Jersey Seafood Fe5tiva,

Along the Delaware Illver

Quick Chek New Jersey Festival of Ballooning

8 MawareBayDay

7th Annual New Jtrsty Fresh Seafood Festival Gardner's Basm, Atlantic City (609)347-4368 (FISH FUN)

Knowttwi Wv*rf«t

4

(609)936-1500

6-?

23-24 TkeMh id k ikmei at k Mkml

23-28 Monmouth County Fair

jtakrtiMvMlA\

18-19

»27) «i | ig

RenaMfflyigg Harbor (609)965-2111

OprsFestivil of !le* Jersey Uwrenceville Sc

(609)785-2060

ClemvaterFettfvil Fort Hancock, Sandy Hook

njttafl Ftattval and Craft Snow

SomenPoint

1525-9300

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21

7-9

Downtown, Trenton (609)695-7107

1MB

SL Aim i Italian Street Fttttvd 7th and Jefferson Streets, Hoboken (201)659-1116

24-30 DwpRltiLPQACIaHie

JmyJiaatWaMo

Wantvllle (609)665-6211

(908)532-7832

WiAnenaalAppelFarmArtiaeid fl IMcFtttoil #Appel Farm Arts and Music Center, (800)394-8478

20-26

f

June

(509) 259-9797

20-23

CinemaSW'sTravellng FllmFeatlval

2-4

Festival of Champions HarmRon Farni, Glads:one 19031234-1251

(908)530-2782

Festival Alexandria Field Airport, Pittstown

9-10 35th Annual Long Beach Island UfeguardToumament

Third Ai New Jer

(609)365-3300

September

15-8/21

22-23

Sussex County Farm and Horse Show Sussex County Fairgrounds, Augusta

StrictiyArt (201)825-9100

13-17

Warren County Farmers1 Fair Fairgrounds, Harmony Township (908)475-6505

IS

18-8/10 SummerfunTheatre

Convention Center, Atlantic City 11

1347-5427

i i

(609)344-8536

Scandinavian Fast'96 The Village of ^ (201)347-0900 2 13th Annual Victorian Fain Riverfront and Bridgeton (609)451-9208

m

7,ii

NIW JtRfi&Y PUN GUIDE NEWSPAPER SUPPLEMENT WEEK OK MAY S, 1 « H

&S/JVO GAMBLING AND So MUCH MORE

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lashing colored lights, spinning wheels, tolling dice, turning cards. Its the thrill ofnon-stop casino gambling, replete with its restaurants, bars, floor shows, and other related entertainment. That's what comes to most visitors' minds when they think of Atlantic City. Butthere's so much more to this traditional vacation paradise and its surrounding area. Whether it be boardwalk amusement*, the solitude of the ocean or the pleasures of inland attractions, the Greater Atlantic City Region, which consists of Atlantic County, truly has something for everyone. You can play just about any kind of game of chance at the casinos of Atlantic City's casinos, the East Coast's gaining capital. And the casinos offer other amenities as well: Outstanding restaurants tofitany budget, topflight nightclubs featuring nationally known entertainers, major boxing attractions. The casinos offer the best and brightest innight life. Of course, white you're enjoying all the gaming action, you'll need someplace to stay. Again, Atlantic City has a flavor to suit every taste. From luxury hotels to budget motels you can be sure to find accommodations that will meet your needs andfityour budget, These properties offer a variety of amenities — from a world-class spa to an indoor amusement park to championship bowling lanes. They are designed with your comfort in mind. And when you need a break from the gaming tables, the list of potential activities boggles the mind. If you're spending the day with the kids, we have a lineup of fun that will keep them entertained and amused. You can zip around in a goeart or play miniature golf at the TW Sports Family Fun Complex, just off Route 40 In Egg Harbor Township. Smaller children will love Story Book Land, also on Route 40 in Cardiff, It's a magical place where popular children's stories come to life. Of course, children of all ages will enjoy the region's miles of clean beaches and boardwalks. And you'll love Lucy — Lucy the Elephant, that is. Lucy, a 90-ton National Historic Landmark built in 1881, resides just off the beach In Margate. Lucy is a local legend. Built by a real-estate developer, the elephant's original purpose was to serve asa vantage point to show off the southern end of Ahsecon Island to potential land buyers. It has been, among other things, a tavern and a

library since then. Remodeled in the 1970s, it's now a museum open to visitors. Are you a golfer? If so, you can hit the links! The Greater Atlantic City Region is loaded with golf courses. Marriott's Seaview Resort, Blue Heron Pines Golf Club (voted one of the nations top public golf courses), and Greate Bay Country Club (a stop on the LPGA Tour each June) are just three of the area's outstanding golf courses. The making of fine wine and champagne is a fascinating process. And you can find out all about it at the Renault Winery in Egg Harbor City, one of the country's oldest wineries. Afterward, you might want to visit the nearby Towne of Historic Smithville and the Village Greene. A stagecoach stop in years gone by, Smithville now features more than a hundred boutiques, antique shops, and eateries. Still haven't dropped from shopping? Head for a mall. The Greater Atlantic City Region has three major shopping malls: the Shore Mall, Hamilton Mall and the Shops on Ocean One. There are plenty of concert and show options in addition to the fine casino presentations. For example, you can enjoy a concert at the Stockton Performing Arts Center in Pomona. During the school year, Stockton -presents a wide range of popular theater performances and musicians, ranging from Bobby McFerrin to Judy Collins. Another excellent option is the acclaimed South Jersey Regional Theater on Bay Avenue in Somers Point. After the show, you can take a walk down Bay Avenue toward the Ocean City Bridge. You'll discover a mix of eateries and nightspots along the refurbished bayfront, including Anchorage, Hatteras Coastal Cuisine, and the Waterfront. You'll also find some of the best New England clam chowder along the Jersey Shore at The Clam Bar, a favorite place among locals and visitors alike. Would you rather be on the water? Book yourself on a party-boat fishing trip or a nature sightseeing cruise.

Summer's so close You can taste it

'Ihe bright lights of Atlantic City's casinos beckon, You'll find many opportunities to do so on ANecon Island (home to Atlantic City and to the south, the towns ofVentnor, Margate, and longport). Or if you'd like to observe the Sport of Kings, ipend the evening cheering on your favorite hones at the Atlantic City Race Course in McKec City, not far from the Hamilton Mai). Hie Greater Atlantic City Region plays host to an increasing number of fantastic festivals and special events year round, including the New Jersey Fresh Seafood Festival Oune 8-9), Beach Fest '96 Oune 21-23) festivals to the world-famous Miss America Pageant in September. Culture lovers wont be left out of the fun cither. For art enthusiasts, history buffs and nature lovers, there arc plenty of possibilities. They include the Florence Valore Miller Art Center and the Atlantic City Historical Museum, both at Garden Pier on Atlantic City's boardwalk, the Noyes Museum in Oceanvilk, known for its special exhibits and outstanding collection of decoys, and the lush 22,000-acrc Edwin B. Forsythe Wildlife Refuge. It is one of the area's outstanding sitesforbirdwatching and it includes trails for cars and hikers. Another fascinating stop is the Marine Mammal Stranding Center and Sea life Museum In Brigantine, a unique rehabilitation facility devoted to rescuing stranded and injured dolphins, porpoises, seals, and sea turtles, then returning them to their natural habitat. Or if you just need some quiet time, there are miles and miles of boardwalk to stroll. More than 50 million visitors come to the Greater Atlantic City Region each year. As you can see, they are not disappointed. To make your trip planning easier, consult the New Jersey Division of Travel and Tourism's New Jersey Travel Guide. To request a copy, call 130OJERSEY-7, ext. 6121. Or call the Atlantic City Convention & Visitors Authority at (609) 348-7100.

NJ Fresh Seafood Festival June 8 & 9

Where Winning Is In Full Bloom!

Sensational Seafood served seaside Historic Gardner's Basin Atlantic City Call (609) FISH FUN (347-4386)

Watch your winnings flourish at our tables and slots.

W

Enjoy the feel of the green and the power of the pull as you play Blackjack, Craps, Champagne Slots, Pyramid Slots and more.

Catch the Spirit of New Jersey's Best Kept Secret!

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Call: 1-800-847-5198

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NEW JERSEY FUN GUIDE NEWSPAPER SUPPLEMENT WEEK OF MAY 5,1M6

Cruising on a Summer's Afternoon

622*3994 Cinfri SbMt md the Bay, Bucr) Hftvm

m 482-0202

nothing quite like I standing on the deck of an X authentic paddicwheeler on a beautiful summer day while the fresh sea air breezes over you. And you can get a great sense of freedom while sighting whales and dolphins from a charter boat. Want some romance? Try a moonlit ferry ride ona serene bay? Up and down the Atlantic Coast, in quiet back bays and rivers and on the picturesque Intracoastal Waterway, there are cruises offering everything from Broadway-style enter tainmem and delicious meals to narrated nature and historic tours, Tn# Atlantic Stir Kammermtn't Martnt, Atlantic City (609)348-8418 AtMfltlf Boom's Dtep S M Fishing Centtr 800 Ashley Avenue, BrWto (908)528-6620/5014

Wmhwatchlng, birdwatching crvlm BWrWflWMO

6006 Park Boulevard at Cardinal Road WlWwood Crest

WHdwood Marina at Rio Grande and theBay.Wildwood (609)522-1919 Nttun cru/set through harbors, canals,

Back bay crulm, crvlm to Atlantic City I k t i m r i took mm Af/lta QrMt b e * » Fartey Marina, Atlantic City (609)492-0333

Atlantic City coastline CTU/MS CaptMay-LewtaFeny Terminat Building, Cape May (609)886-9699 Auto/pa$senger ferry, moonlight sightseeing and ttmrn cruises Cape May DtnnerCnitst Cape May Canal, Cape May (609)898-0999/(800)942-9373 Dolphin watching, seafood buffet Cape May Whale Watch and Route 109 and Wilson Drive, Cape May (609)898-0055 Nature, dolphin, whale andbirdwatching cruim C t p t May Whale Wrtchcr Miss Chris Marina 2nd and Wilson Drive, Cape May (800)786-5445

OUta Queen, Captain linn's 6006 Park Boulevard at Cardinal Road, Wlldwood Crest (609)522-3934 Whak and dolphin witching, slghtming crulm wpreee Navigation 2 First Avenue, Atlantic Highlands (800)BOATRID€ Whih watching crums MagleMlttCnjIeM Atlantic Highlarxjs Marina, Atlantic Highlands (908)462-4887 Coastal and inland waterway cruises Herrah'aSaHe Harrahs's Casino Marina, Atlantic City (609)441-5000

Cnjlsas of bay and Inland waterways Mlea Atlantic CHy Jetbott Excureione Farley State Marina, Atlantic City (609)348-0800 Narrated fours of back bays, antotalnmnt

UQrn

BamegatUght Yacht Bash, Bameoat light (609) 494-2094/(800) 325-3EAS Whato watching, slghtsaalng cru/ses NY Waterway Penning Road, Weehawken (800)53-FERRY Sighting cmlm onNawYork Harbor North I t * and Evening Star 9th and Pilen Streets, Ocean City

(609)399-7588 Marine mamma/ m/ironnmtal cruises Ocaan Dleoovary Center P.O. Box 1165, WlWwood (800)942-5373 Ocaan and mtrint lift cruises Princeta Cruiea Une« Inc. 42nd Street and Bay, Sea Isle City (609)263-1633 Dolphin witching cruises Rwar Bade Broadway Basin 47 Broadway, Point Pleasant Beach (908)692-3377/528-6620

Intrtcoastil Waterway cruises River Lady 1 Robbins Parkway, Toms River (908)349-8664

Whale and dolphin watching, archltoc* tural and historical cruises Circle Urn Statue of Liberty Ferry, Inc. Liberty State Park, Jersey City (201)435-9499 Cruises around Manhattan, Liberty State Park, Ellis Island, Statue ofUberty

1?

Historical, family, special theme cruises on Tom River, Bamegat Say Wvef Queen

Bogan's Brlelle Basin 800 Ashley & Htalns Avenues, Briallet (908)892-3377/528-6620

Manaaquan River cruises Mndy Hook Laoy Atlantic Highlands Harbor, Atlantic Highlands (908)291-4354

Shrewsbury River cruises

SHverfcuUetSpaedboat and Dolphin Watch Wlldwood Marina Rio Grande Avenue and Bay, Wlldwood (809)522-6060

Dolphin watching and sightseeing cruises Spirit Cruises '* 1500 Harbor Boulevard, Weehawken (201)867-5518 Luncheon and dinner cruises in Sew

York Harbor Yankee Schooner

Ocean Highway Docks Cape May/Wildwood Crest $09)884-1919 Dolphin sightings, historical narrative

ome True!

$

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Enter once a day at the Promotions Booth. Prize drawings are every Thursday, April 18 through June 27,1996 at 8:00 p.m. The $250,000 Grand Prize drawing is July 4 at 2:00 p.m., Independence Day. (what a coincidence).

MNICUSSKT4KIM back to the 5G's when be-bopptn' & doo-woppin1 was«slick as a l* p^CSn uO lTrv ll*C I M U J I V VJI a^Hia^p^W vfl^^k^Wflf ^ H IP^v l^^^i •P^ff^^ewy

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If your name Is drawn. and you're present at our Thursday weekly drawings!

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NIWJIB8EY FUN GUIDE NEWSPAPER SUPPLEMENT WKK OF MAY 5,

Pro Baseball is Alive and Well in New Jersey

the Philadelphia Phillies. The Thunder's home games are . played at Mercer County's Waterfront Park, a 6,30O*cat stadium that overlooks the Delaware River in Trenton, just south of the State Capitol. Games can be heard ew Jersey, once a hot spot on WTTM 920 AM in Mercer and for professional baseball, Burlington counties as well as in was without pro ball for three decades until 1994 when the Lower Bucks County and Northeast Trenton Thunder began play in the Philadelphia in Pennsylvania. For more information on team merstate capital and the New Jersey chandise, ticket prices, and a comCardinals took the field in the Sussex County community of Augusta. plete schedule, call (609) 394-TEAM. The return of Jersey baseball was One of the highlights of this a big success: the new teams drew year's Waterfront Park season will thousands of fans seeking a closer, be the Class AA All-Star Game on more affordable alternative to the July 8. Another highlight will be a Major Leagues. The 1996 season tribute dinner on July 3 honoring promises to be an exciting year for the late Jackie Robinson 50 years both clubs. after he took the field in Jersey City and broke baseballs "color line" by The Trenton Thunder is the Class AA affiliate of the Boston Red becoming the first African American to play in "organized Sox in the Eastern League, which baseball" In the 20th Century. includes teams affiliated with the The New Jersey Cardinals, a Class A New York Mcts and Yankees and

N

Fun For The Entire Family! Admiulon Include*: All Attractions & Unlimited Rides • OPEN March Through December

Fleaae Call For Horn: (609) 641-7847 live Animals • Picnic Area • Snack Bars • Souvenir Shop NEW FOR 1996-Cf.mMWQTON THAR

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EACH PAID ADMISSION1

Routes 40 ft 322 • Black Hone Pike, Cardiff, 1U 10 MOM WMtof Atlantic City • 60M41-7847

farm club of the St. Louli Cardinals, compete in the New York-Penn League, which includes Yankee and Met affiliates as well. The Cardinals, as well as some college teams, are playing in beautiful Skylands Park, a 4,200-seat stadium that includes 10 luxury Sky Boxes. The park contains the first ever authorized Minor League Baseball Museum, indoor batting cages, sports video parlor, retail sporting goods outlets, fitness club, and more. The ball park itself features a barbecue/picnic area, hUech scoreboard, state-of-the-art message center, and more, The St. Louis Cardinals originated baseballs "form system" in the 1930s and traditionally have had one of the finest Minor League systems in baseball. For a complete schedule of New Jersey Cardinal games, ticket prices, and more information, call (201) 579-7500.

Minutes Away from Atlantic City Expressway and Garden State Parkway

Here's An Entertaining Suggestion

DICK CLARK'S GOLDEN AGE OF TELEVISION "A DAZZLING TRIBUTE TO 50 YEARS OF MUSICAL VARIETY TV"

Now Through July 25 Showtimes: Monday - Thursday: 3:30 & 7:30 pm Saturday: 7:30 & 10:30 pm • Sunday: 6 & 9 pm King's Court Showroom Tickets: Sunday - Thursday $12.50 Saturday & Holiday weekends $15.00 FOR TICKETS, CALL TICKETMASTER

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.

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.-••,

Bed & Breakfasts Offer aReal Change ofPace

offer peace, relaxation, and the per soittl touches that come when an inn is small enough that the innkeeper knows his guests by name. New Jersey has at least 76 of these establishments, according to f you're looking to make that the Bed & Breakfast Innkeepers vacation or get-away a real Assn. of New Jersey. The range in departure from the pressureprice from about $75 a night to packed 9-to5 world, you might want to consider accommodations about $260 asnight, depending on the accommodations. For examat a Bed & Breakfast Inn. Bed & Breakfasts combine hospi- ple, some rooms have shared baths tality, ambiance, and fine dining to and some have private baths, some mate a truly unique lodging experi- have televisions, VCRs, and even Jacuzzis. Some establishments offer ence. Normally housed in classic buffets, some have sit-down break- , structures and located in picturesque settings, Bed & Breakfasts fasts at specified tunes, and some offer continental breakfasts. "We have something for everybody's budget," says Association President Cathy Dey. The most important piece of advice Dey gives potential guests Is to talk to the innkeeper ahead of time — ask about the accommodations, ask about the food, tell the innkeeper if you have any special needs. The association holds an annual open house tour of New Jersey Bed & Breakfasts. The $ 15-per ticket event will be held on Nov. 3, with the proceeds going to the New Jersey Coalition for Battered Women. For further information, call Victoria House in Spring Lake BBIANJ at (908) 4494535 or P.O. is among the state's inviting Box 108 Spring Lake, 07762 or visit Bed & Breakfast inns. website at www.bbianj.com.

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NEW JEKtEV FUN QUIM NEWSPAPER SUPPLEMENT WEEK OF MAY S. 1MM

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ean rwm about what fluke* meiHH ccntat to expand your appreciation of the Male's nfttur-

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C « n * r ( l l?0 Cattus Wind Brvd.TwniWm,

Stirling Pait, 190 Lord SWto| i-.^i

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(201)4604300;

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DON RICKLES With Special Guest

DENISE CLEMENTE May 24-26 *

Friday at 9 p.m. • Saturday at 8 p.m. Sunday at 8 & 11p.m. Xanadu Tickets: $40

With our Secret slot 5onus triene's slots to win. Tnis May and June, when you hit the jaclcpot, we'll hit you with a rub-off card that rewards you with an additiona 5-20% or a treat gft! Just play any slot machine up to $2 and you could rub-off up to $2,?0Oon

top of uour laclcpot! Tnisbie bonus oirer is available on

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For tickets, stop by the Trump Taj Mahal Box Office, or call TicketMaster at 1-800-736-1420.

numXr^wML

A T L A N T I C

CITY

AN rTT ENTBtTAINMFVI COMPANY

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Stcnt S U Bonw pr«T«ion tvilUbl* during May and Jurw IBM, Sunday « . „ ftrough Friday
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SHORE WITH FLAVOR he Victorian splendor of Cape May, The family fun of the Wildwoods. The solemn beauty of the Delaware Bay.New Jersey's Southern Short Region — comprised of Cape May and Cumberland counties — offers a shore destination with itsown distinct flavor and character. Cape May County, known asthe Jersey Ope, offers a different take on the Shore, with a character that contains echoes of day* gone by. Northern Cape May County features the well-known family resort of Ocean City. Its a fabulous place for kids of all ages, whether you ride the waves on a bellyboard or wavemnner, or pedal a surrey cart down one

Cap* May WbakWatcb & Research Center is among the naturv attractions in New Jersey's Southern Short Region.

the Atlantis, a concrete World War I vessel that sank just off the beach. The Cape May Bird Observatory, a prime stop on the great southern migration route, features hundreds of varieties of blnk Hie city of Cape May is a National Historic landmark dry filled with outstanding examples of Victorian architecture, While intown, you can stop

Bivalve, settled in on the Maurice River Then you can head on up to Fortescue, where you can watch ftshing of the finest boardwalks in the country. Ocean City has at the Mid-Atlantic Onter for the Arts and arrange to take a tour of the Emkn Physick Estate. Or, fleets unload their catch. plenty of festivals and contents, such events as Farther up the winding river, you can arrangefora you can hop aboard a trolley for a tour of the Miss Crustacean Hermit Crab Contest, the walking tour of Greenwich with the Cumberland town. There are special events planned Doo-Dah Parade, and the Night In Venice Boat County Historical Society. The Colonial river port was throughout the year, Including wonderful Parade. You can visit the historic Music Pier on Victorian and Christmas celebrations. the site of New Jersey's own tea puty, a prelude to the the Ocean City boardwalk, home to a variety of History buffs will want to wander Revolutionary War. Since then, not much hat changed concerts and special events all year long. In sumthrough Historic Cold Spring Village, a in this quiet little town. Main Street is still catted Ye mer on the boardwalk, amusement rides and beautiful South Jersey farm village from the Create Street, and many of the homes that line it were miniature golf courses come alive and there's a 19th century. Meanwhile, the adventurers built in the 1700s. Ten minutes e m of Greenwich is game of chance for everyone Fitness enthusiasts In your group may want to take to the high Bridgeton, which boasu the states largest historic will find that the 2 l/Mnile boardwalk is an ideal seas for a ftshing cruise. district and the nation's first municipal 100. place to rick a bike or go jogging. Or you can always go back to Sunset Further inland, you will find MilrviUc, the home of Further down along the Shore, you'll rind Beach, a strand named for — what else — Wheaion Village, a cultural arts center dedicated to the another famous family resort, The Wildwoods. the stunning view? it offers at sunset. While history of American glassmaking and traditional and This five-mile loan barrier island — composed of many jersey Shore beachcombers get up contemporary crafts and folk art. The village is home to Wildwood and surrounding communities — is a early to marvel at a sunrise over the Atlantic the Museum of American Glass, the largest museum virtual treasure trove of sites and summer ActiviOcean, there ait ver>' few places on the East devoted specifically to American glass. You can watch ties. From volleyball and marbles tournaments to Coast where one can enjoy a sunset over a modern-day glassbiowers as they finish the transformaa kite festival and model aircraft events, from large body of water. Yet on Sunset Beach, tion of sand into glass. While you're there, you can even water parks to miniature golf courses to the hislocated on the western tip of the Cape, fashion a glass paperweight for yourself. toric lighthouse at Hereford Inlet, The magnificent sunsets over the Delaware Bay Wildwoods have it all. And don t forget the auto Throughout the Southern Shore Region you will find are a daily occurrence. shows and the parades — officials claim the Cape May Point excellent shopping in quaint shops, fine dining to fit For a change of pace, you can visit the island Is the "most pardingest community" in the Lighthouse at the any budget and picturesque bed and break&sts as well tranquil Stone Harbor area. Enjov a back-to as other tvpes of lodging. country, southern tip of nature stroll through the exquisite gardens If you want to relax, there s the sun and sand L -^ The Southern Shore Region's unique character and of nearby Learning's Run, one of the finest of The Wildwtxxls free beaches. UTien the sun attractions make it an excellent destination any time of gardens on the East Coast, Also right there is the year goes down, you can enjov the excitement of The 1 the Wetlands Institute, a unique nature center set amid Wildwoods legendary night clubs, whkh feature every To make your trip planning easier, consult the New l a 6,000*crt wildlife refuge, learn about coastal ecology Jersey Division of Travel and Tourism. To request a period ofmusic from the l MOs to the 1990s. And as you walk on trails through the wetlands. Visit the there is always the sheer run of the island's historic copy, call l^OO-JERSEY-'. ext 6121. Or call the Cape Cape May Counn- Park and Zoo, 1.100 acres that will boardwalk with its imaging array of amusement piers. May County Chamber of Commerce at (609) 465-7181, rival any big-city zoo you've ever seen. At the southern tip of Q p c May County you'll find the Greater Wildwixxt Tourism Development Authority But there's more to this region than Ope May To Ope May Point. There you can get back to nature as at i800) W-BY-SEA. and the Ocean City Welcome and you enjoy a breathtaking view ofNew Jersey's wetlands the northwest is the rustic charm of Cumberland County. Iniormation Center at (800) BEACH-NJ. Or call the You can discover an authentic nautical ambiance bv Hridgeton-Cumberland County Tourism Center at from the Cape May Point lighthouse. You can take a (609)^1-9208. walk along Sunset Beach and check out the remains of visiting the old fishing towns of Mauricetown and

16 Our 1996 MAY

9-12 East Coast Boirdwalk National Auto Show 18-19 Pirates Weekend with Captain Ktdd 24-27 Wildwood International Kite Festival JUNE

mot

t*ti t\m

1*800«WW*BY«SEA § S i > EXT. 224

An Island Beadi Resort

14-16 Mummers Brigade Weekend 14-16 Wildwoods Fifties Fest/Frying Elvis SEPTEMBER

19-22 Boardwalk Classic Car Show

SPECIAL EVENTS 19-22 Irish f i d Festival 21

Seafarer's Celebration

26-29 Thunder on the Beach Monster Truck Competition 27-29 Stringband Weekend 27*29 OktoberfestByThe-Sea Celebration 9/29-10/5 Western Week OCTOBER

11-14 Discover the Wildwoods Columbus Day Weekend Celebration

NIW JfHMY FUN QUIDE NIVWAMR WJWLEMENT WEEK OP MAY S, 1tM

hiftdbook, the focal point of the proState Wants to gram, quickly educates visitors about the many vacation destinations located Make You a Scholar within a five to ten-mile radius of exits ma|or roadways in New Jersey — aRoad Scholar! onBrieffivedescriptions including direction*, s you drive along the (iarden States highways in search of summer fun, you can become a scholar — a Road Scholar The New Jersey Department of Commerce's Division ofTravel and Tourism runs the innovative 'New Jersey Road Scholar* program Sponsored by Getty Petroleum Corp and AAA Clubs of New Jersey, the program was created in 1993 to reinforce the efficiency of the Garden Mitt's roadways and the accessibility and diversity of the state's attractions A 5frpage New Jersey Road Scholar

A

addresses, and phone numbers of cultural, historical, and entertainment attraction* off the New Jersey Turnpike, the (iarden State Parkway, the Atlantic City Fxprcwway, Interstate HO, and Interstate ?8 are easily referenced in the free guide And the latest version of the Road Scholar Handbook ha« been expanded and enhanced to include an array of additional attractions and five suggest ed Garden State driving tours. "With the help of the New Jersey Road Scholar Handbook, many people are now coming to realize and appreciate that our network of roadways

I 4th East toast Boardwalk National Car Show Sept 19.22,1996 Boardwalk car display Featuring Customs, Street Rods, Classics, Antiques •Vendors • Crafters •Amusements and much more,.. • $5,000 in Grand prizes • $22,000 in Giveaways

May 9-12,1996 Boardwalk car display Featuring Customs, Street Rods, Classics, Antiques •Vendors • Crafters •Amusements and much more... • $5,000 in Grand prizes* $22,000 in Giveaways Win

• . , • . • "

. , * • •

:

' i y * j j ^ - '



^



^

2nd Thunder on The Beach Monster Truck Race Sept 27-29,1996 WINNER! BEST EVENT IS* Top] 6 moniter trucks in the world! Bigfoot,, Gnvedigger, Equalizer and many more. •Truck Show & Shine • Monster truck rides • Vendors • Amusements •Crafters and more...

nnris. N . J . ! \ n ; i

It.uk.iiHJ < > \ | ?

makes It easy to experience the states maK'f attraction* as well ai our many hidden treasures/ said Linda Mysllwy Conlin, director of the Division of Travel and Tourism "Were excited to join with AAA and (ietty to provide this comprehensive guide that make* sight seeing fun and easy for everyone." Gmlln added Using casy-to-read symbols, the New Jersey Road Scholar handbook also provides reference to the more than 200 (ietty Service Stations. 21 AAA Clubs, and numerous travel plazas conveniently located throughout the sutc More than 1.2 million New Jersey Road Scholar handbooks have been distributed since the program s inception The books are available at Tourist Welcome Centers, (ietty Service Stations, and AAA Clubs of New Jersey.

II

Sborebirds, Horseshoe Crabs Coming Soon I l t h e ifcam of the Ddiwait Hay Their arrival from V / t o o t h America coincides with the nesting of horseshoe cnbt TVy i n t o here nearly starving, gorge themselves on the bonethoe crab e m , and thenflynon Mop to .mil To WJUKM thii wotkWunou* phenomenon, plan a weekend 6 h b ^ | J with weekend mtunltti; Nortwry i Landing and Reeds beach, Or registerforeither the Cape May Bint Observatory's Cape Mir Sprtm WcftorndflHiy m\\ or one oftomid-wfek, u t w M c d field trip in iMtMiy Cal (609) mv }6 lor MOM Womurtofl on CMBO tttif M Detowwe Biy' brochufe by wrltini to: H)OMttoft of FWt GMK, ft W i t t * , Bnrlnafcrrrl ma Non§i»e ^ 08625; (609) 292-940U,

Thunder on The

Sand

Motorcross Race October 12-13,1996 Motor cross racing on The Powerboat Race Beach Sat & October 5 & 6,1996 Sun, Qualifying •HydroPlane Powerboat races Friday 9am till dark Racing • Vendors •Food • Crafts • Vendors • Seafood Festival Amusements • Raffles and • Crafters much much more.,..

IKII'l

' • . - . • " • .

Directly on the Beach... YMU #1 locttioaforthe Tko4er Stria nation •Full service ocanfiont retott hoteli •Full 2 & 3 Room Suites with Full Kitcheni •Spacioui Ooeanfront Southern Expwure •SundetWmate Beach Accea • Hated OJympic Size PDOI*3 teptnte Children1! Pbdf*Oceanfn)nt Ratatuaor'Stace of the An Video Arcade" * Gift Shop Ac much more

609-521-6655 or W0-W74425

GdlorumteftrsfiillcoUrhtchurt&MUichfdiiJt:

Atkuak & Wisteria Avt, WUdwood Crtst

b l i

On The Beach at Stanton M., Wildwood Crest

609-522-3343

•1/2 block to beach* Eff.A Suites Spedalmng in Weekend Getaways!

Uanqo *

titFree

mbOu to beach A boardwalk Heated pool, A/C, Heat, fefng. m rooms, BBQ Grills. Game Room Mid- Wftk Sftdsb toy i *&> - Saa. • Than.

On tk Beach et OrthitMaid, Wildwood CmtCALL FOR BROCHURE & RATES

For reservations and information call; 609-522-3414

ARMADA By-Thc-Sea 6503 Ocean Avenue Wildwood Crest, NJ

Directly on The Ocean!

p (tdoffofodte™

209 ESpicer Avenue, Wildwood •609-522-2067

Featuring Special Family Packages, Spring A Fall Getaways Full Servkt Octonfront Resort * Elevators • Restaurant on premiies • Heated Pool • Sauna & Jacuzzi

newly rtnovittd 2 * 3 n o n efflden t ft ocean frnl motel raonu

P.O.Box 1165, Wildwood

$Wm*kAi\99M

333E26ASwet,NortiWikJwood

6095225628

Ask about our Spring
CALL FOR OUR GETAWAY SPECIALS

6105 Ocean Avenue, Wildwood Crest

Ibiock to DMCJI ft boanwaw

Special Weekend Packages AvaMfe

4O0 AtlanUc A M , Wikhraod

Call:

y - t o o W v t Hcat'BBQ

609-522-0123 C

T!5^r$TzM234 j

•KUdk Pwl • 2 RB Sttto «; Efl

Ask about our Sprint* Fall

IMPERIAL 500 Adjaeert to the beach in WQdwood CnK!

Where Friendi and FamUIn meet. $

mem

6601 Atlantic Avc.Wildwood Cret, NJ

1-8OO-522-1255 • (609)522^063

OCEAN HOLIDAY

••%.-.

DIRECTLY OS THE BEACH!

Family Motel Within walking dtiunce to Bovdwilk Beautifully appointed Efficiency Suites & Motel Rooms

Specializing in all types of group functions, including weddings! .RESERVATIONS REQUIRED,

Raort Mrtor Ian

609-522-6300.800.522-6300

For FREE brochure call: 1-800-399-3001

SURF COMBER MOTEL Resort Mote) ON THE BEACH at Sweetbriar Road

6900 Ocean Avenue, Wildwood Qttt, NJ NEWLY KEMODFMD FAMILY MOtEL OCEANFRONT & OCEANVIEW Efficiency Suites k Motel Roomi Family Packages! Special Weekend A Weekday Spring A Fall Gttawayi Some Non-imoking Roomi Social Director In-wuob • Group Toun

. 609-523-8989 . I

24018QrfAw,WildfoodNJ 06260

•k.

Ftaturing Family Packaget. Romantic Retrtats, Midwctk Etcaptt and Spring A Fall Getaways

6501 Ocean Ave., Wildwood Crest, SJ Call: 609-729-2900 • 800-321.OCEAHJ VI Block to the Beach Botnhnlk

y

PARANS ud Ptclurtt tvaikbU DfitECTLY ON THE BEACH 405 E Denver Avt., WUdwood Cmt

CALL- 609-729-5000

1

NIW JIA8IY FUN QUIDS NWWMKA 8UPHEMINT WfEK OF MAY S, 1IM

Timeto Hit the Beach!

l e y H M d - (908) 899-2424 Baach, accommodation, turfing, tcubt diving, ratting, tannis MyihortWtUrfrootNrti{908)842-4000 S • w c h H t v t n - (609) 492-0111 6MC/>, accommodations, tmuaamants, scuba diving, baach buggy parmits, baach fin parmits, tannis, bathhousas

ew Jewry boasts 127 mile* of clean, white sand beaches that offer something for both wtiteriovere and landlubbers' What ait you waiting lor...surf s up and its time to hit (he beach! But before you got call ahead for infor- B t i e h H i v t f t C r M t - (609) 361-1200 mation on beach and/or parking fees Baach, accommodations, surfing

N

ANMhurtt- (908) 531 -2700 Batch, boardwalk, scute diving, fnnts

accommodations, surfing M M n H t v c n wanBatch, boardwalk, accommodations, (609)361-1200 ajnutamants, tannis, bathhousas Baach, accommodations, surfing AtentkClty (609) 348-7100 • M e n Htrm T * n o t - (609) 361-1200 Batch, boardwalk, casinos, surfing, 6 A accommodit/ons, sorting accommodations, tannis, bathhousas - (908) 681 -2900/1176 i -(600) 967-3936 B M C A boardwalk, surfing, scuba Batch, boardwalk, accommodations, diving, rafting, tannit, bathhouaas, amaamantt, surfing, rafting, tarmls, paracouna Hirf tithing, sport tithing •wtofey Towmhlp - (908) 269-4456 Baach, accommodations (908)602-4510/4508 Irttflty tMOlt - (908) 776-2994/2999 Batch, boardwalk, surfing, BMCH, boardwalk, accommodations, accommodations, rtttirn turfing, scuba diving, picnicking • f f i w g i t - (609) 494-7211 I r a n t t M O h - (609)361-1200 Batch, accommodations Baach, accommodations, turfing l i m t g a t Light -(609) 494-9196 Batch, surfing, scuba diving, tannis, trick TowntNp - (908) 262-1000 Baach, accommodations, picnicking picnicking

1-(908)775*7676

o

(609)361-1200 8MCH,

-(609)286-7600 nodttiont, sur BNCA grafting, baach buggy parmits, tannit Brighton lM0»t-(609) 361-1200 Baach, accommodations, surfing Capa Mfy -(609) 884-5508^562 Baach, boardwalk, accommodations, surfing, tannis Gorton's Inlat State to* (609)861-2404 Baach, sun4 chairs OM(-(908) 631-1454 Batch, surfing, ratting, tannis, bathhousas Youngsters enjoy the water at one of New Jersey's spectacular beaches, Dovw TmmoNp - (908) 341-1000 Baach, bay baach, accommodations picnicking, tannis Ukawood- (908) 363-0012 HarvoyCodm -(809)494-2843 Laka baach, accommodations, tannis, Monttartun- (609) 597-1000 Baach, turfing, tannis picnicking Say batch, accommodatont HioMtndi- (908) 872-1224 LtvaHttU- (908) 793-7477 ,-(908)223-0544 Rivar baach, tannis Baach, boardwalk, accommodations, Baach, boardwalk, accommodate™, surfing, tannis H o * f i * - ( 6 0 9 ) 361-1200 surfing, tcuba dMng, ratting, tannis Baach, accommodations L o n g l M O h - (609) 361-1200 ,-(609)622-0424/2370 Baach, accommodations, surfing IMnQ M l w WIW ram ~ Batch, accommodations, tuttingLong •ranch -(908) 222-0400 (906)793-0506 mtrktt tram rating, lannis BMCT), surtru, icubi diving in raatnct- Baach, boardwalk, accommodations, (DovtrTwp.)surfing, tcubt (toting, picnicking, tannis ad arm, raiting, baach tin parmits, (908)349-0220 baach buggy parmits, picnicking, Ungport -(609)823-2731 saybtacn bathhoum, handtcappad ramps and Baach, turfing-mstrictad anas, North •tten-(809)361-1200 whaaiad baach chairs ntting, tannis, accommodations fltacn, accommodation MtndHttghto- (908) 270-6415 Lovstedioa- (609) 361-1200 Bay batch, accommodations Swell, accommodations, surfing (609)361-1200 KMMbMrg- (908) 787-0215 Lowor Townahip - (609) 886-2005 fitacfl, aocommodaHont Baach, boardwalk, amusamants PAGE 26 • Bay Baach, accommodations,

An Oceanfront Motel

Family Specials FOR INFO & FREE 0X0R BROCHURE

Cal 1-80O50-SHORE

405 E. Syracuse Ave, V^ildwood Crest,NJ 08260/

4**'

Motel

Dlfict Oeianfront lullti WHdwood CrMt, Niw Jtruy

LuiuryTaoni wtth Rrfrig. Color TV. ft Air Coad Hated Pool Etev. L u p OcetnfrootSun Deck. Off Succt Putint Near til AdMtkt

For Everything Under the Sun in Beachfront Perfection!

dward Fimly Rid* I SNdt Piekagt Junt 7 • 21 • 5 Nights • $418. inc. Waltr Park I Bdwlk. P u a i t Butttroup I Batch WILDWOOD CREST, NJ 01280

Across from Buch & Boardwalk KIDS m r FHK • LAKE HWTM POOll In-season SPECIALS with 1 night FREE FREE CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST

609*522-9440

(5200 Ocean Avenue Wiidwood, NJ06260 1 Evtrylkmt you utdfor a gnat motion

(ffibnaao

Motor Inn

• 110 Phis, Luxury Motel Rooms and Two Room Efficiency Suites • Oceanfront Sun Deck • Heated Pools • Poolsidejacittii • Social Director • Restaurant • Sauna • Gift Shop • High Tech Game Room • Free Movies, Newspapers, FaxService and More!

Uihu'-Piuicii Spiiw; k Ftill l\utii;^\

6O9

522-222O

In-Season Family SptcitU CMnlryLooud

NttriDactivUa.l^hlk.tohdwlk. Deluxe Kim Sire Bc
CALL 1-800-95-ROYAL 3300 Atlanta Ave. WildwoodJU 0S26O

BRAND N E W * 1993 AA Heart of Wilduood Owfcrt M S n DKL OMbob ha±,

l
\ l

'IS.

hdulg$ k Th$ Grind Stykl

THE GRAND HOTELS

rf 55 UNIT LUXURY MOTEL K)0 a from Budt I Boardwaft Lunrioui 2 ROOHV M Effl^MV SuttM «/Oc«an Vl»« Dick, M KN. WWcrcwiv, 2 Cotof/Cabft TVi I ft! OvMf AfMfNlt.

Early I late Season

Resort & Convention Centers WEEKEND SPECIALS WILDWOOD CREST For FREE Brochure I Call 1-800-497-4353 CAPE MAY 18th I Oeaan Aw. ^ A

The Largest & Only Full Facility Hotels South of Atlantic City. TOLL FREE Dial: 800*257-8550

Oc0tnfront/Op$n AH Y$$r

Call l-WK)-227-5:«)2'or l-WW-72()-io()l!

NORTH WILDWOOD, 9UM2M

Uolti CtntWly loc»t«d «cro«f from Btach A Boardwftlk H0tCdWi,C*f!»*Opjl*P, < 3otf, GSM ftom, A/C i Ptoatt

1«O95221 1-eOO-9OO-8876

On the Hcaih.ii«Si)l \il.mtu \ \ i . iv-pi Id UiMwiuli n-\t \ | n s :

Oceanfront Resort

k BEACHFRONTTOWrrXUXURY MOTEL ONE OF WILDWOOD CREST'S FINEST jgjticriif ftrtol * Fall Sp+citb: CALL OM block from the bdwlk. Ov$r 100 room, $11$., 2$ 3 room $pt$, 2 glttt $f$v$tor$, rattaurtnt, gama room, 2 haatad poolt, Jacuzzi at pocltida, and MUCH MORB

Shipwreck Island

at PaikpUc* Entertainment Center $liQOfiGollBAw 7pn-18/36holes ^^)OOPriHdHiA MOW! UUwod, MI 609/522-3300

LiaW W ,—.. ..,,^7^ I J

Write or O i l NOW! Aqu* Beach R e n t Dept HP, On The Beach at 5501Oocta Am, Wildwood Crat, Now Jeney 08260

TOLL FREE 1-800^7-4776 OR 609-522-«07

Shipwreck Dunes 0ft theBay * Spruce & Marvtad Aw. North WUwood, NJ 609/52^9500

Nestled a the World* Knot k Safet Bathing Bach lad Minutes from the Historical China of Cipe Miy, K I AM Booms v^mdom oomafoat bakookt. Urae Heated Pool, Kiddie Pool k Whirlpool Spt. Poolsidc Cafe. 2 Elcv. and Much, Much Mont Ftus Kidi SUy FREE! A Full Variety of Packer* A Group Tours Offered For Informition, RtHrvntioni or FREE Brochure Write or C*U

609-729-9300

On the B u d it 9201 Atlantic Avuut WiMwori Cwt, H) OMW

TOURISM ADVERTISERS Call the NJ Press Association to place your ad in the next New Jersey Fun Guide (609) 406-0600

For your Free copy of: New Jersey Cultural and Hbioric Guide Can 1-800-JERSEY-7 ext.6121

*£***;', .

••

-

-

#

:

NEW J€M€Y FUN GUIDE NEWIWPEH WWJMENT WEEK OF MAY I. t I M

Ecotourism a Win-win Venture

Wetland* Institute Silt Mirth Safeis, and more!

B*4 ari Bntsrfatt

art Motel Suit**

• Moof n d ftudoor fod ml Sundtdi •

DESERT SAND

y-Kotouriwn - the use of w\ tourism u an means to help X J l o c a l communiUet protect the environment — Is one of the fittest growing lectors of the tourism Industry In the United States. In New Jersey, the Division of Travel and Tourism is working to promote ecotourism asa means of stimultfJng the tourism Industry and, at the same time, conserving our valuable national resources.

i Facfcaftfl E»Ttun ft Ckri UHIt-FIUT FREE BIOCIUW

Foryour Free copy of: New jersey Spring/Summer Calendar of Events

Call I-8OO-JERSE\7 ext. 6121

The key to successful development and promotion of ecotourism is the establishment of a close working relationship between various governmental and private organizations which have the goals of preserving our environment and stimulating our economy, For example, It is working with the New Jersey Division of Palis and Forestry on several projects, Including an ccotourism fiunitiiriza tion tour for travel writers. The Division ofTravel and Tourism Is also highlighting eco-

HMTOWC

tourism In all of Its promotional materials and activities. And the Division plans to organize workshops to teach local communities how to preserve and protect their natural resources while reaping the greatest posslhle economic benefit from promoting ccotourism It Is often said that policymakers have to choose between the economy and the environment, But ecotmirism truly represents a win-win situation for a community because it stimulates the economy while simultaneously protecting the environment,

TOUR VICTORIAN CAPE MAY • Emlen Phyilck Estaft Home Mittcum 4 Cape Miy Ufhthoute

SPRING

• Historic District Trolley Toun • Ecoiofy Tours

and a Year-round Calendar of Special Events Indudlr*: Cape May Musk Festival (May 19 •June 30) Victorian Week (Oet 11-20) Christmas In Cape May (December)

Am Cmtory Outdoor Working craftsmen, mtanrant, ice-cream parlor, bakery country sion, crafts, train A carriage rides,

I-IOO-2 75-4271 for M m a 4 « MM-AttaKk CMMr fortto Am .0. IOK 140, Cat* Miy, NJ 01104

(600) 808-2300 720 Route 9 Cape May, W0O04

A Resort ForAll Seasons! Welcome to historic Cape Miy, a tworl for all jca«ms. There is no "best" time to THE HENRY SAWYER INS visit, but an auortment of different timei. 722 Columbia Avenue - (800) 449-S667 Suito, Jacuzzi, A/C, On-i p Restored 1177 B k 81 in Historic District The quieter times of spring tnd fill are All pvt. btihi, Romantic Cetawiyi Ekjint tnd Welcoming, many unemtits Nil BfMtftfU. AftmoMTtt, Aadqm ttn^tuNi brand by birders, families and senior Inn at 22 Jackson (B A B) 202 Ocean St. Cape May, («•*) W4-77W travelers. Ar utcrauing number of accommodations, restaurants and shops S « tor I raft Full Cttor * m Cape May, NJ 08204 are open year'round. In October, Cape 800452-8177 Whimaical yet ronwmic • I k 2 BR Suita May reveb in its Victorian heritage during "Victorian Week," identified as UithHaU one of the "Top 100" eventi in North 22 Ocean St. Cape May, NJ 08204 America. Christmas in Cape May has (609)884-1934 All prime baths become positively "Dicketuain." Anbquca, Gourma Breakfuu, Ocean Viewi Victorian houses decked out In seasonal AJr CoodtUoniox MONTREAL 1W finery, strolling carolers, theater and IwocaTYiptooe Beach Avenue, Cape May • 800-525-7011 musical events, fpeciaJ tours day and * E-MAILnight. Considering Cape May'j GeoierofBistoricDbtrkt MONTREAL) NO art own superlative natural beauty, itj centuries of INotifrootbebodi The Mooring history and current efforts to preserve the 801 Stockton Avenue heritage of the past, it is no wonder that Cape May, NJ 08204 today "sojourning* in Cape May has (609)884-5425 become so popular! For additional information and a calendar of events, call Patricia's Guest House 609-8S4-5508. 735 Washington Street, Cape May 884-9211 Editorialcourtesyof' Donald fttiifer Lovely Apti. • Convenient Location

Capt. Mey's B&B Inn

Do what you've always d o n e - o r never tried. Bean environmentalist, a gourmet, an historian, a sportsman, a beachlover and more. Cape May Gouityts the natural environment for refreshing your memories. Come gather them »together. CAR MAI COUMIH WW JUST

Ocean Oty • Sea We City • Avaton • Stone Harbor The WWwoods* Cape May For Information, call... 1-100-227*2297

mm HIKE « Ride the latest addition to the Cape May-Lewes Ferry fleet-the majestic MVTwinCapes-and enjoy the view of the Delaware Bay from ourtwo fully-enclosed passenger decks. Savor a gourmet meal in our 100-seat glass-enclosed restaurant with mezzanine lounge, or grab a snack at the Food Court featuring deli sandwiches, pizza, desserts and more. With our 71 Fare to Remember" package, you receive roundtrip foot passage, shoreside transportation in Lewes and coupons at shops, restaurants and historic attractionsforonly $1150. CAR MAY- After experiencing the luxury of the Twin ' Capes, save 20 to 70% off retail at the famous Delaware outlets. The Twin Capes and Lewes-two great ways to enjoy your day!

Atlas Motor Inifihland Biach Retort

Poor Richard's Inn

1035 Bnch Dr., CM 08204 / 800-642-3766

Wanna Sleep in the bed where Benjamin Franklin invented electricity? Call u» in Cape May, 609-884-3536, *»S5O-»35"

805 Stockton Avenue - (609) 8844158 Romantic Saince-M Pvt Batht-A/C-Suitef BIktoBodhOtnia Farting Full Break/at

32 Jackson Street • 609-884-2664 Victorian Guest Suites

Occanfronl.Rehirbigbed 1996, Pool. Rest/Bar, AC, Refrig, On-site parking BEDFORD ISS

103 OHM k m •

The Brass Bed

vJSttm

A Victorian Seaside Retreat. Ample Breakfast Afternoon Tea, Join us for a taste of yesterday! 719 Columbia Avenue • (609) 884-2302

Cape May WhaU Watch A Research Center RL 109 & Wilson Drive • («0») B U M Sailing daily April thru Dec.

Cape Reservation Service 800-729-7778- 609-884-3191

Ctttagt

Beautiful n m u k tmtet. Some air condition ng Private pariu loosed Historic gai-lit itneL <&* jar mud.

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NIW JEftBEY PUN GUIDE NEWSPAPER SUPPLEMENT WEEK Of MAYft,1 J H

A Wealth of History

and Beauty

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he majesty of the mighty Delaware River. The pristine beauty of the Pine Barrens. The historical echoes ofthe American Revolution. The Delaware River Region — which consists of Camden, Burlington, Mercer, Gloucester and Salem counties — offers a wealth of diversity to any vacationer or day-tripper

The northernmost county in this region is Mercer County, home of the State Capital of Trenton. It is steeped in history and tradition. Trenton features the 100-year-old New Jersey State Museum as well as the State House, the second-oldest capitol in continuous use. Trenton's impressive inventory of historic and cultural sites also includes the Trenton Battle Monument, the Old Barracks Museum (the only French and Indian War barracks still standing), the 1719 Trent House, the Trenton City Museum at Ellarslie, and the 1892 Kuscr Farm Mansion in nearby Hamilton. And for some of the best Italian cuisine in the area, Trenton's Chambersburg district offers a wide array of restaurants. In nearby Princeton, you can arrange for a walking tour of prestigious Princeton University with the Orange Key Guide Service, and marvel at the historic architecture of the buildings on campus grounds. Afterward, you can shop in the unique stores on Palmer Square, Nassau Street and Witherspoon Street. If you depart Princeton via Mercer Street, you will pass the historic Princeton Battlefield, the site of Washington's victory over the British in 1771 For more history, you can visit Washington Crossing State Park in Titusville, where Washington made his famous Christmas Day crossing in 1776. While there, you can visit the Swan collection of the American Revolution and the Ferry House in the park. Theater lovers attend a production at McCarter Theatre in Princeton, the 1994 Tony Award winner for best regional theater. Burlington County is New Jersey's largest county in

New Jersey State Aquarium in Camden.

land area, ranging from densely populated suburbs in the west to the sparsely populated Pine Barrens in the east. You can learn about New Jersey's Native American life at the Rankokus Indian Reservation and the American Indian Heritage Museum in Rancocas. You can imagine yourself as one of the rich industrialists of the mid- 1800s as you tour the extravagant Smlthville Mansion. A great restaurant stop here is the historic Robin's Nest, a bakery that turkens back to its beginnings in the Victorian era. Nearby you can tour the ancestral home of John Fitch, steamship Inventor of the late 1700s. Now known as Historic Whitebriar, Fitch's 200-year old house is a charming bed and breakfast inn that is open for tours. If you like the outdoors, you can have great run exploring the Pine Barrens, the largest tract of undisturbed wilderness east of the Mississippi River. Camp, fish, canoe, or horseback ride in this pristine International Biosphere Reserve. Camden County is South Jersey's gatewayto Philadelphia. But it boasts a wealth of attractions in its own right. The Campbell Museum in Camden features one of the world's most extensive collections of tureens, bowls, and utensils, dating from 500 B.C. to the present. For viewing a wide-ranging collection of creatures from the sea, the New Jersey State Aquarium features one of the nation's largest open-ocean tanks, and is home to many inhabitants of New Jersey's waters. Historic Haddonfield offers a variety of interesting shops and galleries in a colonial atmosphere. Or you can check out another point of liistorical interest: the . Barclay Farmstead Museum in Cherry Hill, a traditional Quaker farmstead built in 1684. And if you still haven't had enough shopping, there's the

tuu

Annual Sprmy

American Indian Arts Festival May 25,26, & 27 1996 a Uam-*pm

only ir.iMin to visit the Aquarium this sprint) Our other daily attractions otter lots of dally excitement Take our

Cherry Hill Mall. Families with children should not miss the Garden State Discovery Museum! And horseracing enthusiasts will want to go to the races at Garden State Park. For a flavor of the past, Gloucester County is an excellent destination. You can go antique shopping in MulUca Hill, settled in the early 1700s. You are sure to find special antiques, collectibles and crafts in shops along the villages famous "Antiques Row." In historic Swcdcsboro, you can enjoy a gourmet lunch at the 1771 Old Swedes Inn. There are plenty of historic stops in this areas, such as the 1703 Old Swedes Trinity Episcopal Church and the C.A. Nothnagk Log House in Gibbstown, which dates back to the early 1600s and is the oldest log cabin in the United States, Or, you can visit the Old Stone Village in Washington Township and the beautifully refurbished Red Bank Battlefield on the Delaware River. If you're looking for cultural activities, you can experience fine music, theater, and dance performances at Rowan College's Glassboro Center for the Arts. Salem County, the region's southernmost county, is as picturesque as it is historically significant. The town of Salem is home to a famous 500-year-old oak tree that marks the site of one of the earliest peace treaties between settlers and Native Americans. Nearby is a replica of one of the earliest Swedish settlements, dating back to the 1600s. And just up the road off Route 49 is Fort Mott State Park, East Point Lighthouse and Finn's Point National Cemetery, where soldiers from the War of 1812 and the Civil War lay it rest. For foot-stomping excitement, you can't beat the Cowtown Rodeo and Fair along Route 40 in Woodstown, Or, if you prefer, enjoy beautiful music at the Appel Farm Arts & Music Center in nearby Hmer. To make your trip planning easier, consult the New Jersey Division of Travel and Tourism's New Jersey Travel Guide. To request a copy, call 1300JERSEY-7, ext. 6121, Or call the Trenton Convention 8t Visitors Bureau at (609) 777-1771 and the Princeton Area Convention & Visitors Bureau at (609) 683-1760.

•"***

popular Oive Shows ot our outdoor Seal Show, I hey re eych .i crowd-pleaser lor all ages. 1

And then thru s Ocean Base Atlantic. II s GUI interactive exhibit that takes you on a

The East Coast's LARGEST Juried Am festival! Over 156 artists & enteruinen ft 50 tribal nations! Watch skilled musiciins, demonstration ft dinars! See live wolves, buffalo, ft an litigator wrestler! Learn about American Indian tndkkms from Wbdom Keeper*! Purchase authentic Indiin art, jewelry, pottery, cuitine ft MOKK S1 00 O^F A r i u l l A D M I S S I O N v-vith t h r . AP

Powhatan Renape Nation Rankokus Indian Reservation f7 A*to PO Box 225 a Rancocas, NJ 08073 O (609)261-4747

simulated foumey into the brightly-i olored woild beneath the waves Finally, fo' pure n>l f njtinn why nol |ust let our rainbow ol vivid < oiuis work their calminq magic

Ride the Hi-Speedline. The Best Alternate Route! PATCO isiihe safe, convenient and affordable way to go to Philadelphia or get around South Jersey. ' Worn or School •Shopping •Sports Everts 0

C o u p o n

E x p i r e s

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i S ^ F S * * Museums •SgMSMina • Movies & Shows •Concerts •Restaurants

When you have to get there ontine, take FKRXX

T^OZHK^RH

Cal (609) 772-6900 or #5j> 922^600 for fan and

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mmt PUN OUtOC N M W M R SUPPLEMENT WEEK OF MAY ft, 1H6

YEAR-ROUND FUN IS A SHORE THING

Lifeguards keep a watchful eye at

nice Springsteen immortalized it in song. Celebrities and Presidents visited it. It is one of America's oldest vacation spots and it's still going strong, The Jersey Shore. The Shore Region, which consists of Ocean and Monmouth counties, combines the fun of sand and surf, the excitement of the boardwalk and nightlife and a variety of historical attractions to make an outstanding year-round destination. In southern Ocean County, you'll find the popular vacation ipot of Long Beach Island, a 20milc stretch offering serenity or activity, depending on where you visit. You can rent a seaside castle or summer cottage, all within walking distance of the water. Atits northern tip is Bamegat Lighthouse State Park, home of the 172-foot tall "Old Barney," the states tallest lighthouse. At its southern end, Beach Haven offers an amusement center, water park, live theater, a Victorian museum, boutique shopping centers and more. The area offers fishing and water sports of all types. Across the bay in Tuckerton is the Bamegat Bay Decoy and fiaymen's Museum, which isdevoted to preserving the traditions and heritage of New Jersey's baymen. In Waretown, you will find the Pinelands Cultural Society Albert Music Hall at the Frederic Priff School. It is the only group dedicated to preserving the music of the famed Pinelands. To learn more about the Pinelands, visit the Wells Mills County Park Nature Center. Traveling north, you will pass the unique Popcorn Zoo, operated by the Humane Society. It is a home for abused and unwanted wildlife. The county's second largest inland amusement center is in Bayville In Toms River, you can visit the Toms River Seaport Maritime museum, which preserves the county's nautical heritage. A river boat paddle wheeler offers scenic and historical tours of the area. The Robert J. Novins Planetarium and Ocean County Fine Arts Center are both found onthe campus of Ocean County College. To learn about the wetlands, visit the Cattus Island County Park and take one of the free boat rides. Central Ocean County is home to oceanfront Seaside Heights, which offers a run-packed boardwalk with amusement rides, an outstanding water park and New Jersey's only beach skyride, Step back in time by riding the antique wooden carousel Nearby Lavallette and Seaside Park are wind surfing Mecca*. Island Beach State Park, on the north side of Bamegat Inlet, is one of the few remaining natural dune beaches in the Northeast. The northern county seashore is Point Pleasant Beach, with its colorful array of boardwalk amusements, restaurants, an aquarium and the states only beach train ride. Enjoy free entertainment every Sunday through

Thursday, or hop aboard a boat to try your hand at fishing, dolphin watching or sightseeing. Neighboring Bay Head is a quaint seaside village with lovely inns, art galleries and boutiques. But visitors do not live by the sea alone. Inland, just off M 95 in Jackson, is Six Flags Great Adventure Theme Park and Wild Safari Animal Park, the largest drivethrough safari outside Africa. This years newest attractions are Skull Mountain (a towering Indoor roller coaster) and the explosive stunt spectacular, Lethal Weapon. Also new this year are tours of the nearby Ukehurst Naval Air Engineering Station arranged by the county Parks and Recreation Department. The station is the site of the 1937 explosion of the German dirigible The Hindenburg and plays a leading role today in Aircraft Platform Interface. As you move north into Monmouth County, you'll find the shore towns of Belmar, home of one of the finest seafood festivals around (June 8-9), Spring Lake, the location of many stately homes and fine bed-andbreakfast inns, and Sea Girt, home to an historic brick Victorian lighthouse where you'll find artifacts and historical displays. Continuing northward, you'll find Asbury Park and Ocean Grove. Asbury Park is a rock music Mecca that gave birth to the sounds of Bruce Springsteen and Southsidc Johnny. Its Victorian neighbor is Ocean Grove, where time has taken a vacation. Founded in 1869 as a Methodist camp meeting ground, the tiny town is today a quiet family retreat featuring the Great Auditorium and its many musicales, bed-and-breakfast inns, hotels, tent houses, and quaint sidewalk cafes. Red Bank is gentrifying community, where small shops and restaurants arc flourishing, as arc fairs and festivals, such as the three-day Riverfest jazz festival in June. It is also the home of the Count Basic Theater, a fine concert venue named for the jazz great. For a trip back into time, visit Allaire State Park, home of Allaire Village, an authentic 18th-century restored bog-iron town. Children will enjoy riding the Pine Creek Railroad History of a different kind is alive in Holmdel, where families can experience farm life of the 1800s at Longstreet Farm. Holmdel is also home to the Garden State Arts Center, which features outdoor concerts, ethnic festivals, and dance and opera events throughout the summer. For fun at a decidedly faster pace, Monmouth Park

Bay Head Gables OvcriootdngtheOctan ftwt AccwnmodiBons tor the most discerning guests A M m 200 Mam Awnw, Bay Head. HJ 06742

Come home to the sweet dreams tit romance of a bed & breakfast...the perfect. relaxing getaway!

Newjersey mxtALjmENdAsmEmxB. *

alon% New Jersey's shoreline. Racetrack is nearby in Occanport. It features premier thoroughbred horseracing action from May 2S to Sept. 2, Including key races and giveaway days. In Northern Monmouth County, you'll find the Bayshore Region, home to several cozy communities that arc rejuvenating their boardwalk amusements. One such town is Keansburg, which has added Runaway Rapids, a state-of-the-art watcrpark, to its amusement area. The northern tip of the Monmouth County shore consists of the beautiful Gateway National Recreation Area, home of historic Fort Hancock, fabulous beaches, and the Sandy Hook Lighthouse — the oldest continuously operating beacon in the United States. Across the bay Is yet another famous lighthouse, the Twin lights of Navcsink, site of the first ship-to-shorc radio broadcast. To the south is Long Branch and Seven Presidents Oceanfront Park, which commemorates the visits of presidents to the area and the death of President James A. Garfleld in Long Branch in 1H81 But there's more to Monmouth County than the shore; it has many inland treasures too. Visitors to Freehold can walk in the footsteps of Molly Pitcher at Monmouth Battlefield State Park. Molly, whose real name was Mary Ludwig Hays McCauley, earned her nickname on a steamy June day in 1778 when assisting artillerymen in battle at Monmouth by bringing them drinking water in a pitcher. Each June, the battle is recnacted. While you're in Freehold, you can also see Bruce Springsteen's childhood home. Nearby, Freehold Raceway features the best in trotters and pacers. And for scenery, you'll want to drive along the western edge of the region where picturesque horse farms abound, Go antiquing in Allentown, visit Cream Ridge Winery or pick your own fruits and vegetables. As you can plainly see, the Shore Region hosts an array of attractions — from fireworks to concerts to canoe races to historic reenactments. And all of it is close to miles of dean beaches and beautiful boardwalks that invite you to jog, cycle, stroll, or just sit an enjoy the beauty of a sunrise. To make your trip planning easier, consult the New Jersey Division of Travel and Tourism's New Jersey Travel Guide. To request a copy, call 1-800-JERSEY-7, ext. 6121. For Monmouth County information, call (800) 523-2587. For Ocean County information, call (800) ENJOY-33.

NEW JERSEY

Experience why Belmar was named as the Number One tourist destination in Monmouth County!

ft-Ofcm • 6Wpm:

Special Events Such As:

m6(Ocean Av*;908461-00057; FRE Admission!

• The Belmar Seafood Festival - June 8th & 9th • Sand Castle Contest - July 10th • AVP Professional Volleyball Tournament - August 16th & 17th For a full color brochure with more information on all the fantastic events happening at the Shore in '96 send this coupon to;

BELMAR TOURISM POBOXA Belmar NJ 07719 or Call (908) 681-0005

Arts A Crafts

Send today for your HEW, FREE 1996 color directory of Hew Jersey's 75 Ftaett B * B«. Bed & Breakfast Innkeepers Association of New Jersey, inc. P.O. Box 108F • Spring UKe, NJ 07762 908449-3535

beaches

THE TENTH ANNUAL

BEtrJVIAR

STATE

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SEAFOOD FESTIVAL IN BELMAR ABelnwTomsm DeveloprrfintCommission Special Event

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NEW J i M g V FUN GUIDE NEWSPAPER SUPPLEMENT WEEK OF MAY 8 , 1 H 6

I

Seasid

BEACHES/FIOM PAGE 22

buggy pttmits, Hnnit, bsihhous$i

IfOfwl WHOWOOQ •

OoMfiQato- (906) 269-3166 Bay tmch, boardwalk, tarmis OcMnQrov*-

(609)522-1407/(800) WWBYSEA Betc/i, boardwalk, accommodations, amusamants, tennis, bathhouses Ooean Baton (Dover Twp.)-

(908)349-0220

Accommodations Ocean City-(800) BEACHNJ Beach, boardwalk, accommodations, amusements, surfing, rafting, beach

(908)774-4738^75-0035 Baach, boardwalk, accommodations, tennis y (908) 793-3890 Beach, boardwalk, accommodations PuhalaFirfc- (609) 361-1200 Baach, accommodations

I*UI\ A II S.M1 ( MAIM I K

familyfun &sun resort

S24.50

Call 1-800-SEA-SHOR(E)hrMn«tiM

Many NJ Locations Beacbgom enjoy the sun and sand of the Jersey Shore.

Family Fun Days Wtdntidayi ft TharHiiyi

(908)899-2424

Frae Buchti both diyt

Batch, boardwalk, accommodations, amusamants, surfing, scuba diving, picnicking, bathhouses Sandy Hook-(908) 872-0115 Baach, surfing in restricted anas, rtfting, picnicking

R VAN

[Fun 'n Games]

S M l r f g h t - (908) 842-0099 Beach, accommodations, picnicking

6ET YOUR TICKET TO

(908) 449-9335/9433 Beach, boardwalk, accommodations, surfing, rafting, tannis SMQM-

S M W t C K y - (609) 263-8687 Beach, boardwalk, accommodations, amusamants, surfing, rafting at designated beaches, tennis UeaMe Height! - (908) 793-1510 Beach, boardwalk, accommodations, amusements, surfing, scuba diving, tennis, bathhouses

out Coupon W ' " " * ' .

Join the fun as we celebrate the excitement of the 1996 Olympic Summer Games. We're proud to be the Official Hotel Sponsor. Like the Olympians, our team is committed to being the best. If you can't be in Atlanta, get to the Jersey Shore!

The Best Located Hotel at the Shore

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We're minutes from Ocean Beaches and Boardwalks Giant Water Slide Six Flags Great Adventure PLUS, we have theonly Indoor/Outdoor Pool in Ocean County (fun even if it rains!). All rooms have a mini-fridge, some with microwaves - perfect for your family! KIDS EAT, STAY & PLAY FREE Call for our Free Brochure (908) 2444000

290 Highway 37 East, Toms River, NJ

1-«OO-8OS'4I>UN • (90S) 4W-1400

KEANSBURG AMUSEMENT PARK'S NEW ADDITION OPENS IN MA/1996

Features Include: Kiddie Lagoon Speed Slides Rope Swins Shot Gun Slides Family Fun Run ... these are just a drop in the bucket DONT FORGET ABOUT OUR EXISTING ATTRACTIONS • Over 30 kiddle rides • 18 thrill rides • 25001 fishing pier • Great food and games • Fireworks every Wednesday • Tuesday is "Kiddie Day" • Friday is "Family Day" •FREE BEACH

Park

Your Favorite Place For Family Fun!

Directions: GSP t o Exit #117, ttt. #36 E. 4 Miles to Keansbmg S.V.---

S*Mkfc Part -(908) 793-0234 Beach, boardwalk, accommodations, amusements, surfing, scuba diving, rafting, tennis, bathhouses Stvtn P n t M t n t i Octanfront Park(908)229-0924 Beach, pavilion, playgrounds, fit-court, surfing and jet skiing in restricted anas Ship Bottom -(609) 494-2171 Beach, accommodations, surfing Spray fetch-(609) 494-7606 Beach, accommodations Spring Laka- (908) 449-0577 Beach, boardwalk, accommodations, rafting Ston* Harbor-(609) 368-5102 Beach, accommodations, surfing, rafting, tennis Strathnwa- (609) 628-2011 Beach, accommodations, rafting, surfing, tennis Surf City -(609) 494-3064 Beach, accommodations, surfing in desginated areas, rafting in designated amas, tannis Toms River-(908)341-1000 Bay beach, picnicking, tennis, bathhouses Union Beach -(908)264-2277 Bay beach Upper Township - (609) 628-4343 Beach, accommodations, scuba diving, rafting, tennis Ventnor-(609) 823-7904 Beach, boardwalk, surfing-restricted areas, rafting, tennis WiWwood(609) 522-1407/(800) WWBYSEA Beach, boardwalk, accommodations, amusements, tennis, bathhouses WiWwoodCrwt(609J 522-14071(800) WWBYSEA Beach, accommodations, surfing, tennis

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JERSEY PUN GUIDE NEWSPAPER SUPPLEMENT WEEK OF MAY 5,1M6

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vant phone numbers. The information is designed to be user-friendly and traveler-friendly and Is part of the Division's efforts to serve itsclients, according to Travel and Tourism Director Linda Mysliwy Conlin.

Traveland Tourism

Information Hits the Internet

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Fun • Atytont I W f l *Advtnturi

he New Jersey Commerce Department's Division of Tn and Tourism now has Travel handy information on the state's The Travel and Tourism Website tourism attractions, destinations address is http://www.state.nj.us and events on the Internet. As of March, the Divisions information has been part of the State of 10th Annual New Jersey Sandcastle Contest New Jersey Home Page It Includes listings of cultural and historic sites, Join us July 10th at Belmar Beach. For information, call Alicia Baker at outdoor activities, a calendar of events andother data, along with 20iS39O3OQf ext 20S pictures, descriptive text and rele-

\One Rabbins Parkway " M M River, NJ 01753

| |

For your Free copy of: Celebrate Pinelands Month

Sijfbtming amtAmbmta

(•W) 444 • I10O

New Jersey Outdoor Guide Call 14OO-JERSEY7 ext 6121

This October

For more information, call Pinelands Preservation Alliance at 6098948000

DISCOVER OCEAN COUNTY, NJ l%%*

V

•Miles of Beautiful Beaches and Bays •Boartfwalk Famffy FunlHistoric S&Bs •Who Forests for CamplngfCanoeing •Six flags Great AoVen/ure •Concerts, TheatersA Art Galleries Long Itoch Wand * t a 000-292-6372 n. Pbotont Arao 9O6-W9-2424 Ktr. ..9O8-J49-0220

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the Fun! Jtart with ouyabulous%anfront setting where each ; i vknioi the spirkfog Atlantic Add our Kids Camp wlh supervised programs offering stimulating and acitivt activities for your children. Enjoy our luxurious spa, heated indoor and outdoor pools, whirlpools and saunas, tennis courts, elegant restaurants and lounge.

The beach isjust the start Ready for a great finish? Thoroughbred racing, May 25 through September 2. Gates open 11:30 a m , first race 1 p.m.

Summertime is family time at the Ocean Place Hilton Resort and Spa, so call our Vacation Station Hotline today.

One Ocean Boulevard • Long tail. New Jersey

908-5714000 •AvaBabteSui.-TtHufs. Three-night stay 4 advance payment required. Tw stay available at $129 per roonvper night Weekend mtas higher. Some res apply. KWs mu« stay in same room. KMs Camp, Spa & Tennis fees aftfltional.

Here's your ticket to thefast, fun times at one of theJersey Shore's hottest attractions, Monmouth ParkRacetrack. Come cool your afternoon, picnic in the shade, and let your hair fly today. J I

Sundays and holidays are Family Days with FREE pony rides, downs and face painting. Coupon valid for five racing only. Mondays and Thursdays, simulcast racing only. Just take Exit 105 on the Garden State Pkwy. in Oceanport, NJ. • For more info, call 1-908-222-5100 • Dining reservations 1-9O8-229-210O • Group Sales 1-908-571-5544 • Seniors 55+ HALF PRICE admission every day Children 12 and under admitted fltS • Grandstand $1.50; Clubhouse $4 • General parking$1 The Holiday Inn at Tinton Falls is Monmouth Park's host hotel. For reservations, call 1-800-2-JERSEY.

V^ tF *l^fc» JM-+..-V ••ie*™^J

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NEW JERSEY FUN (WIDE NEVWAttR SUPPLEMENT WEEK Of MAV 8,11

*

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Wti'K OF M



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• I

• Over 125 Brightly Colored Balloons Ascending Morning and Evening (6:30 sum. and 6:30 p.m.) • Special Shape Balloons including the Spectacular American Eagle, Giant Purple Dragon, United Van Lines Truck, Famous Footwear Sneaker, Planter's Peanut, Ray-0-Vac Battery, and Early Times Bottle. • Friday Evening | g Rock Concert • Saturday Night ^ j ^ Jazz Concert • Sunday 105.5 WDHA Concert Corey Stevens and the Texas Flood

• TWce Daily Old Time A i i ^ w i i t h \ f o m a f l U ^ • New Jersey Monthly Storytelling Tent • Saturday Morning "Rise and Praise" Ascension with the Reverend David I Demola • Saturday Night Konica Balloon Glow • 100 Arts & Crafts Exhibits • PruCare Family Fun Center including Looney Tunes0, Circus, Petting Farm, Bennington Marionettes, and much more!

J1"

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FOR TICKETS CALL 201-882-5464 1>

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9 - There are a few of

Transplant gives new life to krdney patient. See page A-B. To subscribe, call (800) 300-9321 a The^festfield Record Thursday. May 9,1996 Super fa i...

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