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St. Mary Cathedral K-5 grade Elementary Teacher / St. Helen Catholic School St. Helen Catholic School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida has an opening for a K-5 grade Elementary School teacher. The candidate must be professional, dedicated, creative, experienced, and Christ-centered. The candidate should be familiar with STREAM curriculum and supportive and respectful of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church. Our ideal candidate would utilize differentiated instruction, be knowledgeable about ELL students, incorporate technology, have excellent classroom management skills, and work cooperatively as a team member.

Qualifications: Required: Bachelor's Degree in Education. Florida Teacher Certification is required, temporary or professional. Must be supportive and respectful of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church; experience in Roman Catholic environment preferred. Excellent presentation skills with skill in use of instructional technologies. Excellent classroom management skills. Must have knowledge of basic tenets of Catholic Church. Excellent oral and written English-language communication skills, including clear speaking voice. Good spelling and grammar required. Proficiency in MS Outlook, Word, and Excel, PowerPoint is a plus. Must have a professional demeanor. To apply: Send cover letter, resume, supporting documentation and 3 letters of reference to Mrs. Annettte Buscemi, Principal via email:

[email protected]

Subject line should read: K-5 grade Elementary Teacher St. Helen Catholic School. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

High School Health Teacher - Archbishop Edward McCarthy High School Archbishop Edward McCarthy High School located in Southwest Ranches, Florida is looking to hire a qualified and experienced educator for High School Health Teacher. This teacher will be expected to plan, organize and implement an appropriate instructional program for High School Health. This candidate performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision and tenets of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami.

Qualifications: Required: Bachelor’s Degree in Health, specifically Health or related field with experience in teaching at a high school level. Florida DOE Teaching Certification or Certified Eligible in Health grades 9-12. ADOM Catechist Certification preferred. Knowledge and skill in use of instructional technology, including iPads, in the classroom Must have knowledge of tenets of Catholic Church. Must be fully committed, supportive and respectful of the mission, teachings and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church. Excellent oral and written English -language communication skills, including clear speaking voice. Excellent presentation skills. Must have good classroom management and demonstrated ability to engage students. Must have a professional demeanor. To apply: Please send cover letter, copy of certification, and resume to:

[email protected]

NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

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PLEASE CLICK ON AVAILABLE LANGUAGE ON THE RIGHT OF THE PAGE, TO READ THE BULLETIN Pastoral Bulletin, Volume 20, Issue 8

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May 14, 2014 Pastoral Bulletin, Volume 20, Issue 4

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April 9, 2014 Pastoral Bulletin, Volume 20, Issue 3

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March 12, 2014 Pastoral Bulletin, Volume 20, Issue 2

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February 12, 2014 Pastoral Bulletin, Volume 20, Issue 1

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January 15, 2014

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ect Life State Conference Prayer Vigils Project Rachel Upcoming Events

31st Annual State Respect Life Conference October 20 & 21, 2017 - Bonaventure Convention Center

Every seven years, the Annual Respect Life State Conference comes to the Archdiocese of Miami. This year’s theme “For the Least of Them” was chosen to inspire, educate and equip the faithful so that we may heed the call of Christ to serve and protect the most vulnerable among us with a loving heart.

As put forth in the Pastoral Plan for Prolife Activities of the US Conference of Catholic Bishops: In our present social context, marked by a dramatic struggle between the ‘culture of life’ and the ‘culture of death’, there is need to develop a deep critical sense, capable of discerning true values and authentic needs. It is our hope and expectation that in focusing on the need to respect and protect the lives of the innocent unborn and those who are disabled, ill, or dying, we will help to deepen respect for the life of every human being. This pastoral plan calls upon all the resources of the Church its people, services, and institutions to pursue this effort with renewed energy and commitment... Download Conference Brochure

Keynote speakers: Dr. Alveda C. King,Director, Civil Rights for the Unborn, Priests For Life Dr. Anthony Levatino, M.D., Former Texas Abortion Provider

Panel of experts: Donna Gardner, M.S., Executive Dir. Magdalene’s Joy Rev. Alfred Cioffi, STHD, Ph.D., Senior Fellow, National Catholic Bioethics Center Rev. Jordi Rivero, Respect Life Director 1992-2007 Michael Sheedy, Exec. Dir. Executive Director, Florida Catholic Conference Ingrid Delgado, Assoc. for Social Concerns/Respect Life, Florida Catholic Conference Dr. Sandra Rodríguez Dávila, Geriatric Psychiatrist, Catholic Medical Association Dr. Grazie Pozo Christie, Senior Advisor, The Catholic Association Sandi LeBel, Education Coordinator, Respect Life Ministry Carmen Santamaría, Co-Author, “The Infertility Companion for Catholics”

Special participation of: Archbishop Thomas Wenski Bishop Felipe de Jesús Estévez, Diocese of St. Augustine, Episcopal Moderator SPLCC Bishop Peter Baldacchino, Archdiocese of Miami The Marian Center Bell Choir

Registration: Early registration $ 90.00 After October 1st $100.00 (Includes all Saturday meals and Banquet). Please download and return this

Registration Form with a check made payable to Respect Life Ministry to:

Respect Life Ministry Attn: 2017 Conference 4747 Hollywood Blvd. Suite # 103 Hollywood, FL 33021 To pay via credit card, please register online at:

CLICK HERE

Conference site: Bonaventure Resort & Spa Conference Center 250 Racquet Club Road Weston, FL 33326 Phone: 800-327-8090 Room Rate: $125/night + tax. Room rate available 3 days pre and post, with availability. Cut-off date: 9-29-2017 or when sold out The resort fee has been WAIVED for our group. Room rate includes: internet access in guest rooms, self-parking, and 24-hour use of Fitness Center. CONTACT INFO (954) 981-2922 [email protected]… www.respectlifemiami.org

Book through this website to make, modify or cancel room reservations:

CLICK HERE

Please, help us share the good news with everyone you know! Thank you for heeding the call.

Type the shortcut: www.miamiarch.org/respectlife on your browser to come back to this page on the web site.

The link below will go on the top bar of the web site. I would like to be able to shorten the words. The word "Entities" will not fit in mobile version... One option is to have a full list in the desktop/tablet verison, and a shortened version for mobiles. Images icons, maybe? Parishes | Schools | Priests | Entities

ral Info Non Parochial Collections Tamper Evident Bags ADOM Financial Report Here is the financial report for the Archdiocese of Miami for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2016, and 2015. The report can be seen in PDF format by clicking here.

The Archdiocese of Miami is home to over half a million Catholics in Miami-Dade, Broward and Monroe Counties. Mass is celebrated in a dozen languages. We have 109 parishes and missions, including the National Shrine of Our Lady of Charity; and 62 schools, including 13 high schools and one virtual school. The archdiocese is led by Archbishop Thomas Wenski.

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Picture: Archdiocese Archive Agustin A. Román (Retired)

When he was appointed auxiliary bishop of the Archdiocese of Miami in 1979, the Most Reverend Agustín Román became the first Cuban in 200 years to be appointed bishop in the United States. Bishop Román came to South Florida after being expelled from Cuba by Fidel Castro's regime. He and 132 other Cuban priests, including Bishop Eduardo Boza Masvidal (deceased former auxiliary bishop in Venezuela) were aboard the Spanish ship "Covadonga" when it sailed from Havana on Sept. 17, 1961. Bishop Román ministered in Chile for four years before coming to Miami in 1966, where he became identified, almost immediately, with the Shrine of Our Lady of Charity. His exhortations to fellow exiles to donate "kilos prietos" (tarnished pennies -- what little they could afford in those early days) over a sevenyear period raised enough to pay for the construction of the Shrine on Biscayne Bay. Dedicated to Cuba's patroness, it has become a beacon for exiles from many nations, luring thousands of worshippers each year. After retirement, Bishop Román remained active at the Shrine, where he greeted visitors, taught catechesis, responded to letters from fellow Cuban exiles, answered the phone and heard confessions until the last day of his life. He is fluent in Latin, English, and French, and holds advanced degrees in theology and human resources. He served on the U.S. Bishops' Committee for Hispanic Affairs, and was a member of the Committee on Migration and Tourism. Prior to becoming a bishop, he worked as a hospital chaplain (1968-1973); director of the Spanish-speaking Cursillo Movement (1978-1979); spiritual director of the Charismatic Movement (1977-1979); member of the committee on Popular Piety; and episcopal vicar for the Spanish-speaking people of the Archdiocese (1976 – 1984). The son of humble Cuban peasants, Bishop Román has never forgotten his roots. His ministry in South Florida has been marked by humility, tenacity and unceasing devotion to his work. He tends to speak in parables, using stories full of everyday symbolism to illustrate his point. Yet in his quiet, unassuming way, he gets things done. At no time was this more evident than in December, 1986, when Cuban detainees rioted in federal prisons in Atlanta and Oakdale, LA, to protest their indefinite incarceration and probable deportation to Cuba. Seeking a mediator for their negotiations with federal agents, the prisoners called on Bishop Román, who had been corresponding with many of them or their families since their arrival on the 1980 Mariel boatlift. His role in ending the crisis without loss of blood earned him recognition as ABC News' Person of the Week, "a man of compassion, gentility and commitment... a man with a strong personality and humble spirit." When the press began calling him a hero, Bishop Roman responded with characteristic humility: "A bishop, a priest, is a servant, not a hero."

Biography Auxiliary Bishop Agustín A. Román Biography Of The Most Reverend Agustín Román (13:20) Spanish Version May 25, 2004

Born/Died: May 5, 1928, San Antonio de los Banos, Havana, Cuba April 11, 2012, Miami, Florida

Ordained: To the priesthood, July 5,1959, for the Diocese of Matanzas, Cuba Titular Bishop of Sertei and Auxiliary to the Archbishop of Miami, March 24,1979

Education: Philosophy: St. Albert the Great Seminary, Matanzas, Cuba Theology: Seminary for Foreign Missions, Montreal, Canada Master's in Religious Studies, Barry College (now university), Miami, Florida Master's in Human Resources, Biscayne College (now St. Thomas University), Opa-Locka, Florida

Priestly Ministry: Diocese of Matanzas, Cuba, 1959 - 1961: Pastor of Coliseo-Lagunillas and Pedro Betancourt parishes, and spiritual director of Catholic Youth Expelled from Cuba, September 17,1961, along with 132 fellow priests and Bishop Eduardo Boza Masvidal Diocese of Temuco, Chile, 1962 - 1966: Spiritual director and professor of the Institute of Humanities; pastor of Holy Spirit Parish, in Temuco; spiritual director of Cursillo

Archdiocese of Miami, 1966 to present: He served as Vicar General, Consultor, member of the Archbishop's Executive Council, as well as Vicar for Hispanics from 1976 to 2003 From 1979 to 1997, he served as Executive Director of the Ministry of Pastoral Service, which includes: Hispanic movements; ministry to Haitians, Blacks and other cultural groups; ministry to families, youth, young adults, the sick, the handicapped, farmworkers, prisoners, and Respect Life He served as director, Ministry of Persons, which includes priests, religious and laity, from 1997 to 2003 Director, Our Lady of Charity Shrine, since 1967; rector emeritus since 2003

Type the shortcut: /roman on your browser to come back to this page on the web site.

e Pontifical Mission Societies Mission Cooperative Plan Amor en Accion CONTACT INFO Mission Coordinator

Monica Lauzurique P.O. Box 141523 Coral Gables, FL 33114 305-762-1226 305-762-1249 [email protected] www.amorenaccion.com

*Not administered by the Archdiocese of Miami Amor en Acción is a Catholic lay missionary community of the Archdiocese of Miami, involved in short term missions and long term projects that respond to urgent needs, currently in Dominican Republic and Haiti.

Mission Amor en Acción works to build bridges of solidarity with communities abroad suffering poverty and oppression. We work across boundaries to share the Gospel through short-term mission travel and long term projects that respond to urgent needs. For more information on this ministry visit the website.

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Week of May 11, 2011 Saturday, May 14 Running Time - 6:29

Thursday, May 12 Running Time - 6:10

Mensaje Cuatro

Mensaje Dos

Click to download May 14th radio conversation.

Click to download May 12th radio conversation.

Friday, May 13 Running Time - 6:51

Wednesday, May 11 Running Time - 5:27

Mensaje Tres

Mensaje Uno

Click to download May 13th radio conversation.

Click to download May 11th radio conversation.

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Week of August 30, 2013 Friday, August 30th

Thursday, August 29th

Click to download August 30th radio conversation.



Wendnesday, August 28th

Click to download August 29th radio conversation.

Tuesday, August 27th



Click to download August 28th radio conversation.

Monday, August 26th

Click to download August 27th radio conversation.



Click to download August 26th radio conversation.

Archbishop Statements Columns Let's Talk Blog Building the City of God

Picture: Archbishop Emeritus of Miami John Clement Favalora

Archbishop Emeritus of Miami John Clement Favalora was born December 5, 1935 in New Orleans, Louisiana. He studied for the priesthood atSt. Joseph Seminary in St. Benedict, Louisiana; Notre Dame Seminary in New Orleans; and the ordained on December 20, 1961. After returning to his home diocese of New Orleans, he obtained certification as a secondary school teacher from Xavier University in New Orleans. Subsequently he attended Orleans.

Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome, Italy, where he was

Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C., and obtained a Master in Education degree from Tulane University in New

He worked as a pastor, high school principal, director of vocations, and rector-president of Notre Dame Seminary until his appointment as bishop of the Diocese of Alexandria, Louisiana, on June 24, 1986. On March 7, 1989, he was appointed third bishop of the Diocese of St. Petersburg on Florida's west coast. On November 3, 1994 he was appointed to succeed retiring Archbishop Edward A. McCarthy, becoming the third Archbishop of Miami. Archbishop Favalora was installed on December 20, 1994, at St. Mary's Cathedral in Miami, by the apostolic pronuncio, Archbishop Agostino Cacciavillan. On April 20, 2010, Archbishop John C. Favalora announced his retirement as the archbishop of Miami. That same day, Pope Benedict XVI named as his successor Bishop Thomas Wenski of the Diocese of Orlando. On June 1, 2010, Archbishop Wenski was installed at Miami's fourth archbishop.



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bishop's Office Chancellors' Office CONTACT INFO Priest Secretary to the Archbishop

Father Richard Vigoa [email protected] Executive Assistant to the Archbishop

Sr. Karla M. Icaza, SCTJM [email protected] Office of the Archbishop

9401 Biscayne Boulevard Miami Shores, FL 33138 305-757-6241 305-757-3947

DOCUMENTS Obtaining papal blessings Obtaining tickets to papal events Papal audience for newlyweds Ordering Papal Portraits Archbishop's Portrait Information

ARCHDIOCESAN OFFICIALS Presbyteral Council Deans

The coat of arms of Archbishop Wenski as Archbishop of Miami is a combination of his personal one with that of the archdiocese.

As chief shepherd of the Catholic Church in South Florida, Archbishop Thomas Wenski is responsible for the pastoral care of more than 1 million Catholics worshiping in 105 parish communities and over 34,000 students learning in 62 Catholic schools in the archdiocese. The Office of the Archbishop has canonical and legal responsibilities associated with the administration of the Archdiocese. These are carried out at the Pastoral Center, which is located in Miami Shores. The Archbishop heads the Executive Office of the Pastoral Center and is assisted by the Chancellor for Administration, Chancellor for Canonical Affairs and the Vicar General. Priest Secretary to the Archbishop

Father Richard Vigoa [email protected]

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Picture: Archdiocese Archive Archbishop Thomas Wenski

Archbishop Wenski, born in West Palm Beach on October 18, 1950 grew up in Lake Worth, Florida where he attended Catholic school at his home parish, Sacred Heart. He studied at St. John Vianney Minor Seminary in Miami and later at St. Vincent de Paul Major Seminary in Boynton Beach and was ordained a priest of the Archdiocese of Miami on May 15, 1976. He earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Philosophy (1972), and Master of Divinity (1975), from the Boynton Beach Seminary and in 1993 a Master of Arts in Sociology from Fordham University in New York. He has also taken summer courses at the Catholic University of Lublin (Poland). He served three years as associate pastor of Corpus Christi Church, a mainly Hispanic parish in Miami. In 1979, after briefly ministering in Haiti, he was assigned to the newly established Haitian Apostolate of the Archdiocese. He was associate director and then director of the Pierre Toussaint Haitian Catholic Center in Miami from that time to his appointment as a Bishop in 1997. The Pierre Toussaint Haitian Catholic Center in addition to providing for the pastoral and spiritual needs of the Haitian communities of South Florida also provided numerous social, educational and legal services to newly arrived Haitian immigrants. He also served concurrently as pastor of three Haitian mission parishes in the Archdiocese-Notre-Dame d'Haiti in Miami, Divine Mercy in Fort Lauderdale, and St. Joseph in Pompano Beach. Through the 1980's he also conducted a circuit-riding ministry that led him to help establish Haitian Catholic communities from Homestead in the south to Fort Pierce to the north, Immokalee to the West and Fort Lauderdale to the east. In the early 1980's his outreach to Haitians also extended to Wachula, Winter Haven, and Ruskin on Florida's west coast. He celebrated the weekly Mass in English for shut-ins at the Miami's local ABC affiliate from 1992-1997. He directed the Archdiocese of Miami Ministry to Non-Hispanic Ethnic Groups. In January 1996, the then Father Wenski was appointed the Archdiocese Director of Catholic Charities, one of the largest Catholic social service agencies in the United States. In this capacity he helped forge a collaborative relationship with Caritas Cuba, the social service arm of the Catholic Church in Cuba. Since early 1996 he has traveled to Cuba on many occasions on behalf of the Church. In late 1996, he spearheaded a relief operation that delivered over 150,000 pounds of food to Caritas Cuba for distribution to people left homeless by hurricane Lily. This was the first time that Cubans in Miami participated in a humanitarian relief effort directed to Cuba. In subsequent years, similar relief efforts were also directed to Haiti, the Dominican Republic, and the countries of Central America and Colombia. Appointed auxiliary Bishop of Miami on June 24, 1997, he was ordained to the episcopacy on September 3, 1997 along with Bishop Gilberto Fernandez in the Miami Arena. Besides his duties in the Archdiocese of Miami, where he served on numerous boards including Catholic Hospice, Catholic Charities, Catholic Charities Legal Services, and St. Thomas University, and later as Coadjutor Bishop and Ordinary of Orlando, he also served as chair of CLINIC (Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc.) (1998-2001), chair of the United States Catholic Conference of Bishops' Committee on Migration (2001-2004); and chair of the conference's Committee on International Policy (2004-2008) and currently he continues as a consultant to the Committee on Migration, and a member of the Conference's Secretariat for the Church in Latin America , the committee for International Justice and Peace, and CLINIC (Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc.). On behalf of his work on these committees, he has traveled to the Congo and the Great Lakes region of Africa, the Caribbean, and Central and South America as well as to Israel and the West Bank (Palestinian Authority). He also served on a number of community and civic organizations, including Miami-Dade County's Homeless Trust, the Coordinating Council of Broward and in 2001, Governor Bush appointed him to the Florida Council on Homelessness as well as the Governor's Task Force on Haiti in 2004. He is currently the Episcopal Moderator for Catholic Health Services for the Florida Catholic Conference. Pope John Paul II appointed Bishop Wenski as coadjutor bishop of the Diocese of Orlando on July 1, 2003. Bishop Wenski assumed the role of the fourth bishop of the Diocese of Orlando on November 13, 2004. In October 2007, Bishop Wenski was selected to serve on the Board of Directors of The Florida Specialty Crop Foundation, a non-profit public charity that responds to challenges that confront specialty crop producers and their stakeholders. In March 2009, Bishop Wenski joined the Catholic Leadership Institute's national advisory board for their 'Good Leaders, Good Shepherds' program. In June 2009, Bishop Wenski was elected to a four-year term on the Board of Trustees of The Catholic University of America. On April 20, 2010, Pope Benedict XVI appointed him the fourth Archbishop of Miami and Metropolitan of the Province of Miami (which includes the seven dioceses of the State of Florida). On June 1, 2010, Bishop Thomas Wenski was installed as Archbishop of Miami in a beautiful Mass at the Cathedral of St. Mary. Click here to view the Mass. In addition to English, Archbishop Wenski speaks Haitian Creole and Spanish fluently and preaches and celebrates Mass regularly in both languages. He learned Spanish while still a seminarian and worked with various Spanish speaking groups including Cubans, Puerto Ricans and Mexicans during his seminary training and early years as a priest. He also has a limited knowledge of Polish, the language of his immigrant father and Polish American mother. His parents moved to Florida from Detroit, Michigan shortly after their wedding in 1947. They are both deceased. He has one sister, who lives in Lake Worth. He is the only Florida native serving as a bishop in the state. The archbishop's episcopal motto is "Omnia Omnibus", which means "all things to all men". The scriptural text is taken from St. Paul's letter to the Corinthians, "I have become all things to all men, to save at least some." (9:22)

The Archdiocesan News Widget is a free application you can post on your parish or school website that updates automatically every time a new story or statement is posted.

‘God of surprises’ leads six to permanent diaconate Three of the newly ordained were

Click on any of the links below to see examples of the Archdiocesan News Widget : St. Mary Magdalen Church St. Joseph Church St. Agnes Church Our Lady of the Lakes Church San Isidro Catholic Church To add the Archdiocesan News Widget to your web page embed the following code in your web site:

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Picture: Archdiocese Archive Felipe Estévez

Bishop Estévez was born February 5, 1946 in Havana, Cuba and arrived in the United States on a Pedro Pan flight as a teenager. He was ordained in 1970 and has done extensive studies in Spiritual Theology, earning a doctorate from Gregorian University in Rome. He is fluent in English, Spanish, French and Italian. From 2001 to 2003, Bishop Estévez served as spiritual director of Saint Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary in Boynton Beach, where he had served as rector from 1980 to 1986. He was pastor of Saint Agatha Parish in Miami for 14 years, while also directing the Campus Ministry at Florida International University. Appointed Auxiliary Bishop on November 21, 2003, and ordained January 7, 2004, he oversees the archdiocese's Ministry of Pastoral Services including family life, youth, campus, prison and Respect Life ministries, as well as all the apostolic movements. In 2010, under the leadership of Archbishop Thomas Wenski Bishop Estévez was appointed Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Miami.He remained in that position until assuming his new role as Bishop of the Diocese of St. Augustine on June 2, 2011. Explanation of the coat of arms of Auxiliary Bishop Felipe de Jesús Estévez:

Jesus Christ is the source and purpose of the episcopal ministry, which participates in his selfless love for the Church (Eph 5:25). The eternal Son is sent by the invisible Father to reveal that he loves us to the end (in finem dilexit eos, Jn 13:1). In this coat of arms, two hands come from above in majestic verticality, to express the gratuity of this mission by the Father which is the central fact of Christian revelation. These hands also express what is most familiar in our gestures of communication. The image echoes the prayer: "When we were lost and could not find the way to you, you loved us more than ever; Jesus … gave himself into our hands" (Mass of Reconciliation I) The Word became flesh (Jn 1:14). The hands express the utterly humble condescension of his divine love: "He emptied himself … coming in human likeness … becoming obedient to death on the cross" (Phil 2:7-8). The wounds in Jesus' hands express his saving death for our salvation. These wounds are a saving place for all sinners, a place of rich mercy for all. Contemplating this mystery, Ignatius of Loyola exclaimed: "In your wounds hide me." Jesus' wounds are glorious because they, too, participate in the resurrection of the Lord of glory. Showing forth his wounds, the Risen Lord invites the unbelieving apostle to "put your finger here and see my hands…. Do not be unbelieving, but believe" (Jn 20:27) In his hands he holds the earthly gifts of wheat and grapes in honor of the Creator of heaven and earth. The image also affirms the goodness of the fruits of the earth and of the work of those who till the soil. The inspiration for this comes from an ancient document called the Didache (or "Teaching of the Apostles", ch. 10): "You created all things to the glory of your name and gave men the satisfaction of food and drink for their enjoyment so that they give you thanks. But to us you gave spiritual food and drink and eternal life by your Servant." The Eucharist is thus seen as the sacrificial banquet: "In this gift, Jesus Christ gave the Church the perennial actualization of the paschal mystery … which is included, anticipated and concentrated forever in the Eucharistic gift" (John Paul II, Ecclesia de Eucharistia, 5) The dove represents the efficacious activity of the Holy Spirit in the work of our sanctification. As St. Ephrem the Syrian states: "He called bread his living body, he filled it with himself and with his Spirit" (Homily 4 for Holy Week). The Spirit is the true source of renewal and transformation of the world. The light blue color which serves as backdrop seeks to honor Mary, the Mother of the Lord. Her fiat ("Let it be done to me according to your word," Lk. 1:38) made possible the incarnation of the Son, and her prayerful and unique presence in the paschal mystery enables us to call her the woman Eucharistic. The cross is a replica of the Great Cross which towers over Mission Nombre de Dios in St. Augustine as a reminder of the humble beginnings of Christianity in this new land in 1565. The cross links the episcopal story of Bishop Estevez to the antecedents of evangelization in Florida, in which the church in Cuba played such a vital role.

Biography Auxiliary Bishop Felipe J. Estévez, S.T.D. Bishop Estevez (7:34) June 24, 2004

Born: February 5, 1946, Havana, Cuba Second of three children (two boys and a girl) of Adriano and Estrella Estevez; most of the family lives in St. Petersburg, Florida.

Ordained: To the priesthood, May 30, 1970, Fort Wayne, Indiana, for the Diocese of Matanzas, Cuba Incardinated into the Archdiocese of Miami, February 9, 1979 Appointed Auxiliary Bishop of the Archdiocese of Miami, November 21, 2003 Consecrated to the episcopacy January 7, 2004 in Miami, Florida Appointed Bishop of St. Augustine, Florida, April 27, 2011 Installation as Bishop of St. Augustine, Florida, June 2, 2011

Education: Montreal University, Montreal, Canada (1970), Licentiate in Theology Barry University, Miami Shores, Florida (1977), Master in Arts Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome, Italy (1980), Doctorate in Sacred Theology Additional courses at: The Warren H. Deem Institute for Theological Education Management (1982); University of Creighton (seminar for spiritual directors, 2001); Institute for the Study of Human Sexuality, Chicago (2001); St. Luke Institute (psycho-sexual integration workshop, 2002) Fluent in Spanish, English, French and Italian

Priestly Ministry: Associate pastor, Guascoran Parish, Honduras (1970-71) Faculty member, St. Joseph Seminary, Honduras (1971-72) Faculty, Our Lady of Suyapa Seminary, Honduras (1972-75) Faculty, St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary, Boynton Beach, Florida (1975-77) President/Rector, St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary, Boynton Beach, Florida (1980-86) Campus minister, Florida International University, Miami, Florida (1987-2001) Pastor, St. Agatha Church, Miami, Florida (1987-2001) Dean of Spiritual Formation, St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary, Boynton Beach, Florida (2001-03)

Memberships / Organizations: Federation of Spiritual Directors (2001-03) Catholic Theological Society of America (1980-1990) Academy of Catholic Hispanic Theologians of the United States (1989-present) Operation Pedro Pan, Inc., founding member (1960-present) National Responsible for USA Jesus Caritas Fraternities (2002-05) HIS BLOG ARCHIVE 4/18/2011

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May this blog 'connect' us as the 'body of Christ'

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The Brooklyn-born son of first-generation Irish immigrants, Msgr. Reynolds is marking his 80th birthday (Jan. 18, 1925), his 55th year in the priesthood (ordained June 3, 1950 for the Archdiocese of Brooklyn) and his 25th year as pastor of St. Henry, a parish of 1,300, as he puts it, “chronologically-gifted” families. After the vigil Mass on Saturday nights, Msgr. Reynolds is better-known as the singing and joke-telling emcee of Henry’s Hideaway, a 987-member private club which he describes as “a pastoral experiment to create community.” Msgr. Reynolds came to south Florida in 1966 on the advice of doctors who said it would alleviate his bouts with pleurisy. He holds master’s degrees in psychological counselling and religious education and was named a monsignor in 1997.



Nicknames:

“Baby, baby” for his trademark line; “gangplank Jim” for his frequent sailings on cruise ships; “God’s little bookie,” a moniker he shares with his two long-time secretaries, because “they help me make reservations for our exciting shows.” What he did before becoming a priest:

He was an usher at Ebbett’s Field when the Brooklyn Dodgers played there. He sold lamps at Abraham and Strauss, worked in the machine shop at Sperry Gyroscope Co. and worked for a division of the Shell Oil Company in the RCA building in New York. As a seminarian, during summer vacations, he was a lecturer on the Gray Line sightseeing buses in New York City –“uptown in the morning, downtown in the afternoon, Chinatown at night.” He also worked for the Martin Travel Co. in the Empire State Building, escorting tours to Canada.

Msgr. James Reynolds performs 28 Saturdays a year at Henry’s Hideaway, his parish’s private club and “pastoral experiment.” His view of life matches that of Mame on Broadway: “Life is a banquet and most darned fools are starving themselves to death… St. Peter might say to us, ‘Did you enjoy the party?’ There’s no dress rehearsal. This is it. You only go around once.”

When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

At age 19 or 20: “I was impressed by the joy that priests seemingly possessed.” Seeing the movie “Going My Way” with Bing Crosby clinched it, as did his work as a tour guide. “In leading people to exciting locations on earth, I thought I might be able someday to escort people to heaven and manage perhaps to get in through a side door myself.”

His description of the ideal priest:

“I could sum it up in one word: kindness.” What the seminary did not prepare him for:

“Having a cocktail lounge.” His greatest accomplishment:

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

“Creating Henry’s Hideaway, which has become so popular for people of all faiths.”

“Certainly not show business—I’d starve.”

‘I might be able someday to escort people to heaven and manage perhaps to get in through a side door myself.’

Henry’s Hideaway:

“I save them up and then sail away as a chaplain on a cruise ship.”

Founded with Archbishop Emeritus Edward A. McCarthy’s blessing in 1984, the club, located in St. Henry’s parish hall, has a liquor license and books 28 Big Band, Las Vegas and Broadway-style acts each year. He has never had any problems: “People seem to be aware that this is a very wholesome, high class, elegant establishment.”

His love of the stage:

Hobbies:

“I always admired entertainers… They can get before an audience and touch the hearts and minds of people of all faiths and all races.”

Travelling: He leads two parish trips a year, one to Las Vegas and the other to Hawaii or Europe. He also serves as a chaplain on two cruises a year and takes his parishioners to local theatres to see Broadway shows.

What he does on his days off:

Where he learned to dance the cha cha and the mambo:

“Misspent youth—spent with a lot of misses.”

Person he most admires:

A priestly stereotype that he feels should be discarded:

“My good friend, Father ‘Happy’ Hoyer because of his cheerful service to his parish…”

“That a priest is above the rest of the people or better than the rest of humanity.”

Thing he most fears:

“Growing old and being on the shelf.” Favorite priestly assignment:

“Here at the family of St. Henry. I’m hoping it will never end.”

His legacy:

He jokes that when he was pastor of St. James in North Miami in the 1970s he increased the number of women religious in the parish school by building a swimming pool. “I worry what St. Peter will say to me: All you did in south Florida was build swimming pools and cocktail lounges.”

Greatest disappointment:

“Not taking advantage of the opportunity to learn to play the piano.” Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

“As a young priest, having to count the collection. As an old priest, receiving negative rather than constructive criticism.”

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Born April 1, 1959, in Kerala, the most Catholic state of India, he is the fifth of seven children. Ordained Dec. 23, 1979, he came to the United States in 1990 and worked at St. Agnes Parish in downtown Brooklyn, N.Y. The cold winter did not suit him, however, so a priest friend invited him to come to South Florida. Since 1991, he has served at St. Coleman Parish in Pompano, St. Maximilian Kolbe in Pembroke Pines, St. John Neumann in Kendall and St. Catherine of Siena in Miami. On July 1, 2002, he was named pastor of the newly-created Blessed John XXIII Parish in Miramar.

When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

His description of the ideal priest:

"In the third grade or fourth grade, when I was an altar boy in church." His uncle is a priest. "I think that kind of inspired me." At the time, however, he wanted to join the Salesians. "They had these youth centers and kids playing soccer all the time. That's what I thought. At that age, I was more interested in sports." His uncle vetoed the idea and told him to become a diocesan priest. "God has a way of making things work out. I ended up being a missionary here, which is nice."

"Very compassionate, understanding, listening to the people's problems, praying with them and for them. And I'm not there yet. I'm still working on it." Sign on his desk:

"Be patient. God isn't finished with me yet." Priestly stereotype that should be discarded:

"We need to bring the human side of priests out to the people more. I wouldn't want to stand on a pedestal."

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

"I think I would be a teacher. I like being with children, probably middle school." Favorite TV series:

"I like comedies. I still watch Seinfeld whenever I get a chance. It's about nothing, they say, but it's interesting." Last book read:

"The DaVinci Code," a thriller in a church setting. "Fiction, of course. There is no fact to it." Father Joseph Kottayil, left, and Father James McCreanor, of Sacred Heart Church in Homestead, with two that did not get away. "I kept the picture to prove that I really caught one," Father Kottayil said.

Hobbies:

"I like to travel. I like to see places. I like to enjoy God's creation."

His harshest critic: Favorite part of being a priest:

"Me. I think I'm hard on myself sometimes."

"Going into the CCD classes and meeting children in the classrooms and talking to them."

When he feels he has failed:

"When I do not connect with others, my fellow human beings."

"There are many times in life, when you feel concerned and worried and a little bit weak in your faith, the faith of your people inspires you."

What the seminary did not prepare him for:

"The administration part of being a pastor is kind of left out. Being a pastor is sometimes being a CEO. But I guess your kindness and compassion take care of it."

Has it been difficult to start a parish?

His greatest accomplishment:

"No. Not really. Because I met so many nice people here. They're the ones who build the parish. They make the parish here every Sunday."

"I haven't gotten there yet. I'm still working on it, I think." Person he most admires:

Gandhi: "My parents had seen him. But he inspired me because he was a non-violent person. He was influenced a lot by Jesus Christ (and his Sermon on the Mount). His doctrine was an all-inclusive doctrine, the poor as well as the rich."

On last year's sex abuse scandal:

"As priests, all of us were not having good days (back then). But I started meeting people and they picked up my faith. That's the most amazing part of being a priest - faith supplies. There are many times in life, when you feel concerned and worried and a little weak in your faith, the faith of your people inspires you. That, I experienced last year in the parish."

Thing he most fears:

"The day I won't be able to be a part of the community, part of a family of God. I fear that because I like being in the community now."

Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

"You feel like you are so limited. Many things you find are beyond your control. You feel powerless."

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Born Oct. 18, 1950, in West Palm Beach, Archbishop Wenski is the son of first- and second-generation Polish immigrants. He attended Sacred Heart School in Lake Worth and in ninth grade entered what was then the high school seminary of St. John Vianney. He continued his studies at St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary in Boynton Beach and was ordained for the Archdiocese of Miami on May 15, 1976. He was named auxiliary bishop of Miami in 1997; coadjutor Bishop of Orlando in 2003; and will assume his duties as Archbishop of Miami and Metropolitan of the Province of Florida on June 1, 2010.



Born in a storm:

“His birth took place “during the middle of Hurricane King. When I was growing up in Lake Worth my mother would talk about how difficult it was to get to St. Mary’s Hospital in West Palm because of the rain, wind and downed power lines.”” When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

Sometime during the third grade “I began telling people that I wanted to be a priest.” Person or event that triggered his vocation:

Bishop Wenski, shown here leading the "Bike with the Bishop" fundraising run in Orlando in 2009, says “a motorcycle ride helps clear the ‘cobwebs’ from the mind.”

“I am not sure, but one memory I have is when I was in the second grade my parents took me to the wake of our pastor, the priest who baptized me, Msgr. James Cann. (His nephew is Father Carl Morrison, a Miami priest). ... I still remember vividly seeing him laid out in the casket in church and what impressed me was the fact that he was dressed in his vestments as if he were about to celebrate Mass. ‘A priest forever…’”

Favorite TV series:

“When I get the time to watch TV, I like ‘House." Last book read:

“It’s hard to say – since I’ve always had a hard time imagining me doing anything else. Nothing else ever held the allure or the excitement that priesthood offered me.”

"What Your Money Means - And How to Use It Well” by Frank J. Hanna. “Not that I have any money to speak of, but Hanna writes from the conviction of his Catholic faith about how he and other persons of influence and affluence can avoid the dangers of wealth and in fact use it as a school of virtue."

Favorite priestly assignment:

Favorite type of music:

“Perhaps the one I did the longest. I spent 18 years as a parish priest among the Haitian communities of south Florida. ‘Favorite’ doesn’t mean it was necessarily the easiest but it afforded me the opportunity to work among the poor and disenfranchised and to be in a sense ‘a missionary priest’ in my own backyard.”

“On the CD player in my car, I have a disk of Polish folk songs, one of Haitian ‘Kompa,’ one of Cuban salsa and one of Gregorian chant.”

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

His greatest disappointment:

“That I haven’t learned to speak Polish well; I’ve tried but it’s a very hard language to master.”

‘Nothing else ever held the allure or the excitement that priesthood offered me.’

His greatest joy:

“To pass on the priesthood of Jesus Christ through the laying on of my hands when I ordain someone a priest.”

Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

His greatest accomplishment:

“When John the Baptist introduced his disciples to Jesus he said, ‘He must increase and I must decrease.’ I think that’s always been for us the challenge - to get out of the Lord’s way so that our failings, our idiosyncrasies, our own ego does not distract our people from encountering Jesus in and through our ministry.”

“That despite my shortcomings and human weakness I was ordained a priest 34 years ago.” His harshest critic:

“Probably that person who wrote the last angry letter to me - today, many people are angry and frustrated and it’s amazing how vehemently and often uncharitably people will disagree with something I say in my capacity as a bishop and teacher of the faith.”

His description of the ideal priest:

“The ideal Christian, priest and bishop I have encountered has been John Paul II. He was a man happy in his own skin, proud of his ethnic and cultural identity as a son of the Polish nation, and totally given over to Christ.” What he does on his day off:

“A lot of times, since I am so busy on my days ‘on,’ I just like to chill and do nothing; but, if I have the time and the weather is good, a motorcycle ride helps clear the ‘cobwebs’ from the mind. It’s exhilarating and, believe it or not, relaxing.”

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Born Nov. 19, 1961, in Chicago, Father Vega moved with his family to Manatí, Puerto Rico, at the age of 11. He entered St. John Vianney College Seminary after graduating from high school, and was ordained for the Archdiocese of Miami on May 27, 1989, in Manatí. Archbishop Edward McCarthy granted him special permission to be ordained there, and Auxiliary Bishop Agustin Roman flew in to ordain him surrounded by family, friends and nearly the entire town. Among his assignments, he served as pastor of St. Martin de Porres Parish in Leisure City from July 2001 to October 2010, when he was appointed pastor of St. Bernard.

Favorite movie: "Any of the Harry Potter movies (and) I like sci-fi!"

When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

"I have a vivid memory of being in second grade and telling my mother that I wanted to be a priest. It was a feeling that never left me. When I was 16 years old I went on my first youth retreat/ encounter. That did it for me; it propelled me to follow my vocation."

Favorite TV series:

"Stargate" Favorite type of music:

Person or event that triggered his vocation:

Latin and pop

"My mom. … She was a servant to others; she was always charitable and kind. She was a great example to me and my What he collects? five siblings. She always took us to church, fed the hungry, "I don't collect anything really, but I do have lots of books, donated her time and money to those in need and never DVDs and CDs." said no. She was always willing to help." Person he most admires: Person most surprised by his vocation:

"My high school math teacher, Mr. Cruz. He gave me the "My friends. In high school I was a very good student (4.0 confidence to come out of my shell. He encouraged me and GPA) and they thought I was going to be an architect or an taught me to speak in public. He used to let me get in front engineer. When I told them I wanted to become a priest of the class and teach a lesson. It really helped me grow up and I was going to enter the seminary, they didn't and be responsible." understand why I would leave everything to become a priest." His greatest disappointment: "Living far away from my family (they are all in Puerto Rico) and not being able to see them often or be there for them when they need me."

What the seminary did not prepare him for:

"I think I was in the seminary during a great time. We had wonderful world-renowned theologians come and speak to us. I learned so much. If I have to say something I would His greatest joy: say the administration — how to run a parish. I have had to "To share Christ with others." learn that on my own through time and by experience." His greatest accomplishment:

"To teach the people of God. I like to use my homilies as teaching moments and have the people feel and understand the liturgy."

'I like to be around people, to talk and to share with others.'

His harshest critic:

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

"I would have been a math teacher. I enjoyed and was very "People who don't know you and then turn around and judge or criticize you. I tend to come off as very quiet at good at calculus and algebra." first. I'm shy and it takes time for me to open up to people but once I do, I give of myself completely." The most difficult aspect of being a priest: "Having had to live by myself. When I was a parochial vicar at a parish, I lived with other priests and it was nice to Thing he most fears: have someone to speak with, eat dinner with or just watch "To be alone. I like to be around people, to talk and to share with others." TV with. As a pastor I have had to live twice by myself." His description of the ideal priest:

"He would be humble, compassionate and would show people how Christ lived through his actions." What he does on his day off:

"Sleep in! I like to visit other priests, friends. Go out to eat, watch a movie or go for a walk in the mall."

Father Carlos Vega is shown here visiting Madrid during a trip to Spain in July 2010. While he was there, the Spanish national soccer team won the World Cup.

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Born in Havana, Cuba, July 14, 1953, Father Jiménez entered the Seminary San Carlos and San Ambrosio in Havana in September 1974. He was ordained for the Salesian congregation Jan. 24, 1982, in the parish of San Juan Bosco, Havana, and named director of the marriage ministry for the Diocese of Cienfuegos-Santa Clara. He obtained a licentiate in theology from the Pontifical Salesian University in Rome in December 1987. From 1987 to 1990, he completed a master's degree in catechetical theology at the Pontifical University of Salamanca, Spain. He returned to Cuba and was assigned to San Juan Bosco Parish in Santiago, where he was in charge of youth ministry and religious education. He also served as prison chaplain in Boniato, Cuba. He arrived in Miami July 5, 1992, “almost at the same time as the destruction of Hurricane Andrew” and began the process of incardination as a diocesan priest. He obtained incardination in 1999 and became an American citizen the same year. In 2000, he graduated from St. Thomas University, Miami Gardens, with a master’s degree in marriage and family therapy. He has served as director of the Family Enrichment Center since 2004.

Greatest disappointment: “I came to this ministry full of dreams and I would like to be able to do more things, such as domestic violence prevention, classes for effective parenting, etc. But so far they're not getting done.”

What he did before becoming a priest:

He studied at a business school in Cuba and worked as a bookkeeper. Current responsibilities:

He celebrates weekend Masses at St. Martin de Porres Parish in Leisure City and is spiritual director of the Christian Family Movement. As director of the Family Enrichment Center, he oversees English-language marriage preparation programs, works with the ministry to divorced and separated, Pre-Cana II (for couples entering second marriages), ministry to widows and widowers and parents who have lost children, natural family planning classes and other services to families. The Family Enrichment Center also coordinates talks in the parishes regarding the annulment process and marriage convalidations, and hosts an annual Mass for couples marking wedding anniversaries.

Greatest joy:

“Being able to mark 25 years in the priesthood. I feel very happy, at peace and with a great sense of gratitude toward God, my parents and my spiritual advisors.” His greatest accomplishment:

“To have learned English and be able to communicate and celebrate the sacraments in English.” What he collects:

“I like boats. For me, the ocean evokes freedom, movement, departures. Boats remind me that life is a continual journey.”

"I feel very happy, at peace and with a great sense of gratitude." Vocation moment:

After completing the required military service in 1969 or 1970, he attended a Mass marking the end of a vocations awareness day at a church in Santa Clara. “The priest who was leading the day told us that Cuba's young people needed to step up and say 'yes' to God to be priests. He told us that without priests there is no Eucharist, and without Eucharist there is no church because there is no community. Right then and there I went to the sacristy and offered to be a priest.” He was 17 at the time. The priest suggested that he wait until finishing high school. “I started receiving spiritual direction and served as a catechist while going to school. During my second year in high school, I felt the call to be a priest more profoundly. I accompanied a priest to the escuelas de campo (where teenagers are sent for mandatory service in Cuba's farmlands) and I decided to enter the seminary when I was 21.”

A recently ordained Father Eduardo Jiménez teaches catechism to children at Nuestra Señora del Carmen Parish in Santa Clara, Cuba. In 2006, he presided at the wedding of one of the girls in the photo.

Priestly stereotype that should be discarded:

“That of a moralist, intransigent, dominating, imposing priest who reflects a pyramidal church rather than a communitarian one.” Thing he most fears:

“Not being faithful to Christ.” What he does on his days off:

“I have Prince, my Sheltie dog. I live with my uncle, my sister, my brother-in-law and my nephew, and I enjoy time with my family. I shop for groceries, take clothes to the dry cleaners and do other chores around the house.”

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Born April 11, 1963, in Lima, Peru, Father Rodriguez De La Viuda was the second of four children. He attended the Universidad de San Martin de Porres in Lima, where he earned a bachelor's degree in business administration. He worked for a hotel in that city, then moved to Florida 25 years ago. In 1994, he finally acted on longtime spiritual leanings and entered St. John Vianney College Seminary in Miami.He then earned a master's degree in divinity at St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary in Boynton Beach and was ordained for the Archdiocese of Miami on May 12, 2001. Before coming to Our Lady Queen of Martyrs in June 2011, he served at St. Rose of Lima in Miami Shores and Good Shepherd in Kendall Lakes. He is also archdiocesan chaplain to the Hermandad del Señor de los Milagros, a Peruvian-based devotional group that has branches in South Florida.



You were in hotel management before becoming a priest. Why did you switch?

"I didn't consider it a switch. I'm still in hospitality. The essence of hospitality is service. As an ordained priest, I continue practicing hospitality by bringing Christ to others. Hospitality is no longer a business to me but a mission." Person or event that triggered his vocation:

"One event that opened my eyes was when I was still in Peru. I decided to join a young adult group that helped Father Jorge Rodriguez De La Viuda poses at one of the faceted glass windows at Our Lady Queen of Martyrs Church, Fort Lauderdale. Vincentian priests who were evangelizing rural areas in the mountains. I thought you needed to be an accountant or Favorite movie: lawyer or businessman to be important in the life of people. 'The Mission,' the movie and the soundtrack. When it came That experience opened my eyes to see that the ministry of out, I was going on mission work. It made me appreciate a priest is basic to the life of communities." the work the Church has done throughout the years. And the music was awesome." Did it feel strange to enter seminary when you were almost 30?

Something most people don't know about him:

"Not when I entered. A lot of guys were in my situation, entering the priesthood as a second career. There was a flight attendant, an accountant and a teacher. They'd worked in the secular world and decided later in life to follow the steps of the priesthood."

"A lot of people don't realize it because my name is very Spanish, but I am also Chinese, on my mother's side. I was raised in a mostly Chinese environment. In Peru, they called me 'El Chino.' But here, people perceive me mostly as Latino." Favorite type of music:

'I'm still in hospitality. The essence of hospitality is service.' Did your business training help you as a priest?

"I'm very eclectic. When I'm in the office, I listen to classical. I'm also into Celtic and Peruvian music. But I'm not musically inclined. My brothers play every instrument. I only play guitar."

"It gave me a lot of tools to be a good administrator. I learned to deal with people one to one."

A treasured possession:

"I have a pyx (a small container to bring Communion to the homebound) that was given to me by Pope Benedict XVI when he was Cardinal Ratzinger. I was visiting Rome, and he learned that I was from Peru. He used to travel a lot to Ecuador and Peru, so we conversed about the Church and Latin America."

Was it a shock to come to America and see the difference in the society?

"My first impression was that people who were Catholic were more involved than people in my home country, maybe because we're not the majority here. I especially saw lay people proudly participate in the life of a parish. I never saw that in Peru. There, it's more cultural than actual personal devotion. Now, throughout the years, that continues, but I've also been exposed to the secularism that prevails all over the world. People are very critical of many things, including the Church. "

Most memorable spiritual experience:

"I was working in a mission in Peru and went to a very poor village. I saw the people as suffering people. But they gave us so much love and joy by allowing us to be with them. They became the missionaries to us. We were overwhelmed. It made us better Christians."

Hardest part of being a priest:

"What really breaks my heart is when I see people in parishes criticizing the Church. Of course we are allowed to critique constructively. But many people criticize for the sake of criticism."

His greatest accomplishment:

"When I finally opted to enter the seminary. I was discerning for many, many years. When I finally said 'This is enough,' and took the plunge, I was very happy that I did it. If I hadn't, I would be still doing fine, but always wondering what if."

Priestly stereotype that should be discarded:

"Most of what you see in movies and soap operas, especially for Latinos. In most telenovelas, the priest is always a dummy, self-centered. And in American movies, he's usually celebrating a wedding or funeral and he's clueless."

His greatest joy:

"As a priest, it is when I see people either coming back to God, or when I see children who have been formed by their parents in the faith and have an awareness of God."

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Born Oct. 2, 1967, in Tulia, Texas, Father Garza is the oldest of four children. His great-greatgrandparents were cattle ranchers from southern Spain who settled in that area of the U.S. when it was part of Mexico. His parents moved to Clewiston when he was young and he graduated from Clewiston High School before entering St. John Vianney Seminary. He was ordained for the Archdiocese of Miami on May 11, 1996, and served at St. Mary Star of the Sea in Key West before being sent to Rome to obtain a licentiate in missiology from the Gregorian University. He worked with Catholic Charities and as pastor of San Isidro Parish in Pompano Beach before being named archdiocesan vocations director in January 2009.

What he did before becoming a priest:

He worked as a bank teller while pursuing a degree in architecture. He ultimately received a two-year degree in drafting. When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

Even though his family was religious and attended Mass faithfully, the thought never entered his mind. "I wanted to be married, have a lot of kids and be an architect." Then a friend from the youth group at San Isidro Parish insisted he Whenever he travels to the mission in Colombia, Father Garza takes a attend a vocations retreat in Conyers, Ga. "I didn't know day to go paragliding off a 9,000-foot mountain. He took up the sport what a vocation was. … I went to the retreat just to get him three years ago. "I feel freedom." Here he poses with his paragliding instructor/partner, a young man known by his nickname, "La off my back." By the last day, "I decided, I've heard so Garza" (the heron). A video of Father Garza paragliding can be seen much, I like this. So why not try it out?" He began the at old.miamiarch.org. discernment process and entered the seminary at age 20. Priestly stereotype that should be discarded: "They told me, at any point, you can leave. You don't "That they're perfectly holy." commit until you reach ordination. That was a sense of relief for me. I had nothing to lose. I said to myself, 'I'll What he does on his days off: give it a chance.'" "Drive to Key West, have lunch and come back." He also spends much of his vacation time helping out at a mission "They told me, at any point, you can in the suburbs of Medellin, Colombia. "Most of what I do leave. … That was a sense of relief for is the financial part of it," raising funds in the U.S. to build me. I had nothing to lose." a church there. Favorite movie:

Person most surprised by his vocation:

"The Mission."

"My father was adamantly against me being a priest" and did not speak to him for a year after he announced his decision. In part, his father feared the priesthood would take him too far from his family; in part, his objections were rooted in the anti-clericalism that exists in the Mexican culture. "We don't like priests but we go to Mass." Father Garza's vocation "healed a lot of my family's misconceptions about the priests and the nuns" and his father "eventually became my greatest support and my best friend." Ironically, Father Garza has remained geographically closer to his dad, who died in 2000, than any of the other children, who moved to other states. His dad is buried at Our Lady of Mercy Cemetery in Miami. When he visits there, Father Garza likes to remind him, "Here I am again; your only son who's here."

Last book read:

"Road to Cana" by Anne Rice. Favorite type of music:

"I love to dance so I like the cumbia." What he collects:

Nativity scenes. Right now he has about 30, including one from Africa. "I never buy any. They've all been given to me and that's how I started collecting them." Hobby:

"Trying to do anything I can for the mission in Colombia."

What the seminary did not prepare him for:

Person he most admires:

Parish administration: "A parish is almost like a business. You have to run it. You have to make decisions and if you're not prepared, you're going to make bad decisions."

His greatest joy:

"My mom and dad."

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

Baptizing and celebrating the sacraments for his nephews and nieces.

"I probably would have pursued architecture. I still read and I have my drafting table. I still draw."

Thing he most fears:

"Judging others." The most difficult aspect of being a priest: Regrets:

"Dealing with the fact that you can't please everybody."

None, not even on not marrying or having children. Among his parishioners and friends, "I have tons of His description of the ideal priest: "A priest who loves and forgives as Christ does; who does children and brothers and sisters. … It's a mystery that you can't understand unless you're a priest and you allow not judge." yourself to live that mystery."

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Born June 24, 1945, in Cork, Ireland, Father Murphy is one of seven children. He entered St. John’s Seminary in Waterford, Ireland, right after high school as a “freelance seminarian,” unattached to a diocese. He chose Miami because“ it was a new diocese. I wanted a diocese where I had the opportunity to exercise leadership at a young age.” He was ordained in Waterford on June 7, 1970 and arrived in Miami in September. Before becoming pastor of Our Lady of the Lakes in 1996, he served as pastor of St. Patrick in Miami Beach and before that as director of youth ministry for the archdiocese.



What he did before becoming a priest:

At age 6: “My uncle was ordained then. He was a Columban missionary” who, along with two dozen others, was being sent to the Philippines and Korea. Young James and his family were at the docks seeing them off. “I can remember them sailing away. We were waving my sister’s diaper, which was nice and big. I heard 25 people say ‘Goodbye, James’ from that ship. It was literally impossible for the voices to travel that far. But that’s what I heard. I made up my mind at that time that I was going to follow them.” Father James Murphy, seen here among his pots and pans, loves to cook. He hosts a Thanksgiving meal every year for people from his parish who would otherwise have to celebrate the holiday alone.

His arrival in Miami:

“I had never set foot in the United States before.” He remembers being surprised because “it rains warm water here. I found that quite extraordinary.”

Favorite TV series:

“I just watch sports and news so I couldn’t tell you what else is on."

‘ I love to do funerals more than anything else. ’

Favorite type of music:

“When it comes to music, I’m all over the world” from classical to new age to opera to folk. “I like the folk music of just about all the world.”

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

“I’d probably be in business.” His dad was a businessman as well as both of his grandfathers. “It’s kind of in my blood. I wouldn’t have a problem being the CEO of Publix.”

What he collects:

Music CDs; he has about 1,000. Person he most admires:

What the seminary did not prepare him for:

“Dealing with the pain in people’s lives.”

“Single mothers who struggle to raise children on their own.”

Favorite priestly assignment:

His greatest disappointment:

“I love to do funerals more than anything else. I think at funerals there’s a reality that’s not present at other times. Mourners are going to listen to the Scriptures with a lot more intensity than people do on a Sunday. There’s a hunger for God’s word present at a funeral that you don’t see anywhere else.”

“I don’t know if anything qualifies. … The reform of Vatican II that threatens to be overturned, that kind of bothers me. I saw the Church going in a good direction, a positive direction, and I worry whether it will stay in that direction.” His greatest accomplishment:

On funerals:

“Being able to speak in public. Shy is not even the word.”

“I immerse myself in the pain. I grow from that. I’d like to think I’ve been preparing for my mother’s death for a long time. … I treat that casket and that family as if it were my mother.”

Thing he most fears:“

The most difficult aspect of being a priest:

Regrets:

“I don’t have any fears. What I have difficulty in dealing with is when people question my motivation.”

“Unrealistic expectations on the part of just about everybody, from the bishop down to the people.”

“If I had the wisdom 20 years ago that I have now.”

His description of the ideal priest:

"A priest that can overcome that human element (such as crying babies and ringing cell phones) and still celebrate each sacrament with joy.”

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Born Aug. 9, 1941 in Jamaica Plain, N.Y., he moved to Miami in 1949 and grew up in Holy Family Parish, North Miami. He attended Archbishop Curley High School and entered the seminary during his senior year. Ordained in 1968, he served as the founding director of the archdiocesan Office of Worship from 1978 to 1984. He has spent 24 of his 35 years as a priest at St. Louis Parish in Pinecrest, including the last 21 years as pastor. "I think I'm this close to marrying one of the kids I baptized here." He also serves as dean of the South Dade Deanery.

When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

Probably around the fifth grade: "You'd be serving at Mass and there was just something very special about all that." He would also lock up the church and set out the vestments for the next morning. "The priests that I knew trusted me. ...I learned how to drive in the church truck when I was 12 years old because Msgr. (Rowan) Rastatter let me drive the truck around the parking lot. ...He was my hero."

"When things happen that you can't have any control over and you don't have all the glib answers. Or you can't wave the wand and make it all better. I learned long ago that I'm not the Messiah. We only had one of those."

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

"I haven't the vaguest idea. There isn't anything else that I ever think about being. ... I could just as easily be bagging groceries at Publix." Why he never wanted to be a missionary:

"I wanted to be a priest and Holy Family would do just fine. To this day I get nervous going to Broward County." Father Fetscher kayaking on the Great Lakes during a recent vacation.

What he does on his days off:

"Take a deep breath. I'll go and spend the day with a friend. Go to a movie. Get off by myself and read.

His description of the ideal priest:

Hobbies:

"To be all things to all people. ... Jesus certainly poured himself out for people. That's the standard by which we measure ourselves."

"I've played at tennis. To say that I was a tennis player would dishonour the sport."

Favourite type of music:

Peggy Lee, Louis Armstrong, Leonard Bernstein

"I learned long ago that I'm not the Messiah. We only had one of those."

What he collects:

"Everything" but especially books: "I had this idea that if I owned the book and it sat in the shelf, somehow, by sheer osmosis, whatever was in it would stay in my head."

Best memory:

"The morning we went up to celebrate Mass with the Holy Father." He was one of the 38 priests studying at the North American College in Rome who gathered in the pope's private chapel on Nov. 30, 1989, at 6:30a.m. When it came time for the homily, the pope simply said, "'Today we let Jesus speak.' And he sat down. We all reflected on the Gospel for seven minutes."

On his personality:

"You're looking at a guy who voted for Barry Goldwater and George McGovern. Think about that." Favourite priestly assignment:

"The one I'm in."

Greatest frustration:

Person he most admires:

"Not being able to do all the things people would like me to do."

Auxiliary Bishop Agustin Román: "I'm continually amazed at his capacity for charity, gentleness and kindness. If I could have a tenth of it, I would be a happy man."

Greatest joy:

"The people who are here with me at St. Louis. I pray to God I never abuse that trust."

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Born Dec. 5, 1960, in Sliema, Malta, Bishop Baldacchino is the second oldest of four children three boys and a girl born to Leonilda (known as Hilda) and Rinaldo (known as Rene) Baldacchino. When he was 13, his family joined the Neocatechumenal Way. He studied at St. Francis School in Msida and Mount Carmel College in Santa Venera, Malta, then studied science and chemistry at the University of Malta. He entered the Redemptoris Mater Archdiocesan Missionary Seminary in Newark, N.J., in 1990, obtaining a bachelor's in theology, and a master's in divinity from Seton Hall University. On May 25, 1996, he was ordained a priest for the Archdiocese of Newark and assigned as parochial vicar to Our Lady of Mount Carmel in Ridgewood, N.J. In 1999, he was named chancellor of Our Lady of Divine Providence Mission in Turks and Caicos Islands, a missio sui iuris (independent mission) for which the Archbishop of Newark is responsible. He became pastor of Our Lady of Divine Providence Church in Providenciales in 2002, and in 2009 was named a Chaplain to His Holiness, with the honorary title of monsignor. Pope Francis appointed him auxiliary bishop of Miami Feb. 20, 2014.



What he did before becoming a priest:

He worked for nine years as a technical manager for Canada Dry in Malta. "I was a workaholic 36 hours straight work without going home." When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

After attending World Youth Day in Santiago de Compostela, Spain, in 1989. Person or event that triggered his vocation:

"The World Youth Day in Santiago de Compostela in 1989. The words of John Paul II in his homily, 'Do not be afraid to be holy,' opened a new perspective to life for me."

Peter Baldacchino, front, gets ready to kick a soccer ball while playing with his siblings, from left, John, Paula and Robert, in their native Malta.

What the seminary did not prepare him for:

Press conferences. His hobbies:

"I always enjoy a good fishing trip." Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

"Comforting someone who has lost a loved one; when no words can fill that void and we can only offer to be present and share their suffering."

'The words of John Paul II in his homily, "Do not be afraid to be holy," opened a new perspective to life for me.'

Newly ordained Father Peter Baldacchino is seen here with his parents Leonilda (known as Hilda) and Rinaldo (known as Rene).

His greatest accomplishment:

His description of the ideal priest:

"To be an instrument in God's hand in establishing a Catholic presence in the Turks and Caicos Islands."

"Does not exist." Favorite movie:

His greatest joy:

"Preferisco Il Paradiso" based on the life of St. Philip Neri.

"The day of my ordination to the priesthood."

Favorite sport:

His greatest disappointment:

Soccer.

"That my father's health prohibits him from attending my consecration (as bishop)."

Last book read:

"Jesus of Nazareth: The Infancy Narratives" by Pope Benedict XVI.

His greatest fear:

"Myself."

What he does on his day off:

"Day off is only a term." Person he most admires:

"Blessed Pope John Paul II, because he changed my life and was instrumental in my calling to the priesthood."

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'Jet-set' producer Father Oswaldo Agudelo, 54, comes to the priesthood after a jet-setting life as a public relations executive for Lufthansa, and later an Emmy-winning executive producer for Telemundo Internacional.

A native of El Carmen de Atrato in Colombia and the second of three siblings — his older brother will be ordained next year for the Diocese of Brooklyn — Father Agudelo studied art in Barcelona, Spain, and mass communications in his native Colombia. He is a certified expert on Old Masters paintings and even owned an art gallery in Coral Gables. He also is an expert on the conflict in the Middle East, a region he has visited countless times. He settled in Miami 21 years ago and began attending Little Flower Church in Coral Gables.



“I was a Catholic ‘light’,” he said. “I went to Mass because of the obligation.” In the meantime, he lived a “very agitated social life,” indulging a taste for nightlife, travel and luxury cars. That changed in 2005, when Telemundo shut down its Miami-based, 24-hour news operation. He took a job with Univision in Sacramento, California, but the city bored him. One morning, on his day off, he took a walk around the neighborhood and wound up in a Catholic cemetery. Sitting in one of the mausoleums, he told himself, “I’m going to pray an Our Father for each of these souls.” Photographer: TOM TRACY | FC Archbishop Thomas Wenski lays hands on Oswaldo Agudelo, ordaining him to the archdiocesan priesthood.

Suddenly, he felt a hand on his shoulder. It was the groundskeeper. The cemetery was closing. He had sat down to pray at 10 a.m. and it was 7 p.m. “But I liked it,” he recalled, so he kept coming back and spending hours in prayer.

And neither are his parents back in Colombia. When he told them he was entering the seminary, they confessed they had been praying two to three hours a day for him to leave his jet-set life behind.

Within months he had quit his job, returned to Miami, and practically “ locked myself up,” praying for as many as 12 or 13 hours a day. He took the 2 to 3 a.m. adoration slot at St. Raymond Church in Miami, where his companion was often the pastor at the time, Father Jordi Rivero.

“What everyone in the world considers success, they saw as taking me away from God,” Father Agudelo said. “People say, ‘What a life!’ But it really was, ‘What a fall!’ I would not change any of it for what I’m doing now.”

One night he got up the courage to ask: “Father, is it very hard to be a priest?” To which Father Rivero replied: “You’re ready. Go to the vocations office.” “I’ve never in my whole life been happier than I am now,” Father Agudelo said.

He has been assigned to Lakes.

Our Lady of the Lakes, Miami

Watch his video interview here:

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‘Prodigal son’ Father Luis Pavon, who turns 36 May 20, is that rarest of breeds: a Miami native, born at Mercy Hospital, a graduate of St. Michael the Archangel School and Christopher Columbus High School. The second of four siblings, he recalls growing up in a “faith environment,” even though that did not include regular attendance at Sunday Mass.

After earning a degree in English from FIU, he worked at a marketing firm and other “odd, English-related jobs.” He also “abandoned” himself to the world. He didn’t question his faith. He didn’t search for truth. He just became convinced that “it was impossible to live like Christ has called us.”



But “the world is an unfaithful lover,” he said. “It doesn’t treat the ones who give into her very well.” At 25, prompted by the death of Pope John Paul II, he made a radical return to the Church. He decided to become a monk and spent three months at a Trappist monastery in Conyers, Georgia. “I thought I was going to shut myself away from the world to do penance for my sins.” When that didn’t work out, he began attending Mass at St. Augustine Church and Catholic Student Center in Coral Gables. Soon, he was leading the young adult group and serving as sacristan. He continued to discern the call to priesthood, and sensed the Lord assuaging his fears, letting him know that “this time it will be different.” His story, he said, is biblical. “The prodigal son returns and knows who he really is.” He hopes that experience will make him a better priest, one more open to people’s need for God’s mercy.

Photographer: TOM TRACY | FC Archbishop Thomas Wenski lays hands on Luis Pavon, ordaining him to the archdiocesan priesthood.

“I have an intimate knowledge of sin and an intimate knowledge of the hunger for God,” he said. “I think I understand why that hunger (exists) in others. And the banquet that’s been offered to me, I would invite them to share it.”

Father Pavon has been assigned to Our Lady of Guadalupe in Doral.

Watch his video interview here:

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Seeking signs Father Luis Flores, Jr., 41, admits his was a late vocation. A native of Lima, Peru, and the eldest of three brothers, his family moved to the U.S. in 1983. After a one-year stint in Miami, they moved to Washington, D.C., where his father found work in government radio. Upon returning to Miami in 1996, Luis began working as a project manager for a security systems company. His mother kept after him to stay close to the church, and he joined Our Lady of Lourdes Parish in Kendall, “but I wasn’t getting anything out of it.”

Then he went on an Emmaus retreat. “That’s when this life of service kind of began to attract me,” he recalled. “I asked God for signs.”



The biggest came through his parents. He remembers his mother’s reaction when he told her, “I think the Lord is calling me.” She lowered her head, said “thanks be to God” and whispered, “Now I understand.” When he asked her what that meant, she replied: “Something in my heart told me about a month ago to pray that one of my three sons be consecrated to the Lord.” “That’s when I looked up and said, ‘God, that was a good one,’” Father Flores said. The same thing happened when he told his dad. “I had a dream” that you were already a priest, his dad told him. “That was like a two-by-four in the back of my head, from God,” Father Flores says now. He also understands that he had to walk away from his own plans and desires to answer the call to priesthood. “My understanding of marriage was different than the understanding of marriage that God had for me. God wanted me to have an even greater wife — the Church. He wanted me not to have two children, but many children of all types, of all races,” Father Flores said.

Photographer: TOM TRACY | FC Archbishop Thomas Wenski lays hands on Luis Flores, ordaining him to the archdiocesan priesthood.

He has been assigned to Little Flower in Coral Gables.

Watch his video interview here:

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‘Power seller’ Father Edgar “Gary” De Los Santos, 54, was born in Zamboanga City, Philippines, the youngest of six children. He has a degree in business administration and came to the U.S. in 1991 to work as an investment banker. Settling in Miami Shores, he joined St. Rose of Lima Parish, where he first assumed the duties of sacristan and eventually worked as parish manager.

An adventurous and competitive soul, he took evening culinary classes at Johnson & Wales University in North Miami and opened his own catering company. He’s run the Tough Mudder and 17 half marathons, ranked as a “power seller” on eBay, won a key lime pie-eating contest in Key West and a Honda Element from a local radio station, and even applied to compete on the Food Network’s “Chopped.”



“You won’t catch me watching TV,” he said. “Twenty years from now I can say my life is colorful. I have a lot of stories to tell.” He began discerning a vocation to priesthood in 2009. The trigger came one night as he was closing the church after a wedding. Alone in the dark, he was walking back to the sacristy when he looked at the crucifix on the altar. “It was the only thing lit. And then suddenly I said, what if you become a priest?” He had completely forgotten that, as a child, he used to play at being a priest, using the white cardboard under the lid of a Nescafe jar as the host.

Photographer: TOM TRACY | FC Archbishop Thomas Wenski lays hands on Edgardo "Gary" De Los Santos, ordaining him to the archdiocesan priesthood.

“I want challenges,” Father De Los Santos said, and fate has obliged. He left everything behind to enter the seminary, where he was always the oldest of the men. His mother and one sister died during his first three years of study.

Father De Los Santos has been assigned to St. Gregory in Plantation.

“Challenges are still coming, and God is helping me a lot,” he said. “God was with me all those years and will always be with me.”

Watch his video interview here:

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Science and faith Father Alex Rivera, 29, was born in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, but grew up in Miami. The oldest of four siblings, he graduated from Our Lady of the Lakes School in Miami Lakes and St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Fort Lauderdale. His family —Peruvian mom, Puerto Rican dad — have always been involved in the Church, and the thought of priesthood occurred to him at first in middle school.

But he also felt called to medicine, and got a full academic scholarship to Duke University in North Carolina. His first year there, “I really started feeling very strongly that desire to priesthood.” His thought: “There are plenty of people who want to be doctors but I haven’t met any who want to be priests.”



He spoke with his pastor about it, the late Father James Murphy of Our Lady of the Lakes. Father Murphy suggested he finish his bachelor’s degree and then consider the seminary. So he returned to Miami and earned his bachelor’s degree in biology from FIU while getting more involved in his parish. He finds it ironic that his stint at Duke convinced him of his vocation.

“I had to go back to where I was born, to North Carolina, to realize what the Lord wanted,” he said. “There was a lot of worry before. Am I doing the right thing? But when I said yes, there was such peace.” He noted that Father Murphy offered “very good advice” in suggesting he continue his studies in biology. Along with everything French, it remains a passion in his life. He sees no dichotomy between science and faith.

Photographer: TOM TRACY | FC Archbishop Thomas Wenski lays hands on Alexander Rivera, ordaining him to the archdiocesan priesthood.

“Contemplating nature and creation is like watching the mind of God at work. That can be prayer,” Father Rivera said.

He has been assigned to Epiphany in Miami.

Watch his video interview here:

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For the deaf Father Mathew Thomas, who turned 49 May 9, is a native of Kerala, India, who studied economics at Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam, India. One of six children whose oldest brother is deceased, he has many priest friends and comes from a family with “a lot of nuns.” One cousin works with the Missionaries of Charity in Libya, another is stationed in Austria, and two more serve in India.

He taught statistics and world economics before discerning a vocation to the priesthood. After thinking about it for three or four years, he entered the seminary in Bangalore, India, in 2002. A motorbike accident made him miss four years of study and left him with a slight limp. It also modified his vocation, to one focused on service to the disabled.



That’s what brought him to the U.S. three years ago, after finishing his master of divinity degree at Christ University in Bangalore. He joined a fledgling religious community, the Dominican Missionaries for the Deaf and Disabled, and has spent the last three years learning American Sign Language and perfecting his English, in Texas, New York and Missouri. He also served at Schott Communities in Cooper City. “It is really hard for me to come to America,” Father Thomas said. None of his family could come from India for his ordination. But he looks forward to hearing confessions and celebrating Mass in sign language. Many deaf people are joining Protestant congregations in Palm Beach County, he said, “because we don’t have any Catholic priests here” to serve them. His ordination should change that.

Photographer: TOM TRACY | FC Archbishop Thomas Wenski lays hands on Mathew Padickal Thomas, ordaining him to the archdiocesan priesthood.

Father Thomas has been assigned to St. Paul the Apostle, Lighthouse Point.

Watch his video interview here:

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‘The forgotten one’ Father James Arriola, 28, was born in a U.S. military base in Japan, the third of seven children who range in age from 33 to 10. His family is from Guam, and they moved back there when his father retired from the U.S. Navy. James was 4. He admits he felt a little lost after graduating from high school.



“I had ideas to get married, ideas to get a career. But nothing concrete.” Although he had joined a Neocatechumenal Way community at 13, “there wasn’t an inclination to the priesthood.” Then he attended a retreat, and at the closing Mass, the priest preached: “If you feel a call, don’t be afraid. And what do you have to lose? I was thinking about my life and I thought, I have nothing to lose. Why don’t I try it?” Father Arriola recalled. Neither the eldest nor the baby in his family, he said he often felt like “the forgotten one.” But now he realizes God “brought me to that point to show me that he loves me.” And once he experienced that love, “he showed me that this vocation is for me.” He entered Blessed San Diego Luis de San Vitores Catholic Theological Institute for Oceania, which is affiliated with the Lateran University in Rome. When the Neocatechumenal Way’s Redemptoris Mater Seminary opened in Miami in 2011, he was chosen as one of its first 12 seminarians.

“I always felt called to go out to the missions and experience other places,” Father Arriola said. About his vocation, he added: “It’s God showing his love for me so hopefully I can show his love to the world.”

Photographer: TOM TRACY | FC Archbishop Thomas Wenski lays hands on James Arriola, ordaining him to the archdiocesan priesthood.

He has been assigned to St. Katharine Drexel in Weston.

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‘Running to God’ At 59, Father Joseph Maalouf is the oldest of this year’s ordination class. He brings a lot of experience to the ministry. Ordained a permanent deacon for the archdiocese, the Lebanon-born, former body shop owner and manager speaks Arabic, French, English and Spanish, which he learned in Miami after arriving here in 1983. He also was married for 21 years and has two adult daughters.



“I was 11 years old when I first felt the calling,” he said. “I decided to do other things.” But the calling never left. “God’s been calling for a long time. In my human weakness, I didn’t want to give him more.” After obtaining an annulment in 1999, he became very involved in his parish, St. John Neumann in Miami. His pastor, Msgr. Pablo Navarro, kept asking him, “What are you waiting for?”

“I was afraid,” Father Maalouf said. “Am I running away from the world? Am I going to hide in the Church? If that’s the case, I didn’t want to do it.” After “a long prayer,” he realized, “I was not doing things to run away from the world. Actually, I was running to God.” He entered the diaconate program in 2005. But within six months of his deaconate ordination in December 2010, the call to priesthood manifested itself. He remembers the exact Photographer: TOM TRACY | FC moment. He was assisting as a deacon at a funeral Mass Archbishop Thomas Wenski lays hands on Joseph Maalouf, when “I felt my heart exploding with joy… I realized it ordaining him to the archdiocesan priesthood. was a calling to the priesthood. I was called to be there He hopes to use his experience to help couples and consecrating.” teenagers especially. “Because I know what they’re going Instead of studying in South Florida, he was sent to what is through. Been there, done that. Not only with myself but known as a “second vocation” seminary, the Pope St. John with my children.” XXIII National Seminary in Weston, Massachusetts. The Father Maalouf has been assigned to All Saints in Sunrise. past five years, away from family, friends and his parish community have not been easy, but “all of my fears, all of my doubts, God took care of them.”

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Pandebono: good bread Father Juan Carlos Salazar, 41, came to the U.S. at age 25 from his native Antioquia, Colombia. The second oldest and only boy among four siblings, he had a degree in business administration and worked for his family's business in Colombia, which caused him to travel frequently to New York and Los Angeles.



“That’s how I was attracted to try new horizons, new life, the American dream,” he said. But his degree was worthless once he settled here, so he began working at a warehouse for $5.15 an hour — at first cleaning up, then keeping track of inventory, and eventually combining duties as a courier with bookkeeping tasks. He had a girlfriend, and attended Our Lady of Lourdes Church in Kendall. That’s when “God’s dream” began substituting for his own.

“I thought it was crazy that the Lord would be calling me,” he recalled. But one day, while praying before the Blessed Sacrament, he said “yes. If that’s what you want for me, open the doors. And (God) began to open the doors.” Too quickly, it seemed. He met with the archdiocesan vocations director at the time, Father Manny Alvarez, now pastor at Immaculate Conception in Hialeah, and was informed that he would have to study for nine years, primarily philosophy and English. “I ran out,” he said, thinking, “This isn’t for me.”

Photographer: TOM TRACY | FC Archbishop Thomas Wenski lays hands on Juan Carlos Salazar, ordaining him to the archdiocesan priesthood.

But God kept opening doors. “You discern a vocation little by little. It’s a process also of falling in love, of getting to know yourself,” Father Salazar said.

By that time, he had changed jobs. Now he worked for his family’s bakery, making “pandebono” — a Colombian cheese bread whose name literally translates as “good bread.” A thought occurred to him: “I’m making this bread, and the Lord is calling me to priesthood. It’s another bread I’m going to be kneading.”

He has been assigned to St. Thomas the Apostle in Miami.

He met again with the archdiocesan vocations director, this time Msgr. Roberto Garza, now rector of St. John Vianney College Seminary in Miami. “You’re ready,” Msgr. Garza told him. Still, at every step in the process — filling out the application, undergoing the psychological evaluation — he kept thinking, “I’m going to prove that this isn’t for me.”

Watch his video interview here: Get to know your new priests: J…

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Born Aug. 11, 1920, in Cobh, County Cork, Ireland, Father Stack was a Presentation Brother for 35 years, beginning in 1939. He taught in, established and administered Catholic high schools in Ireland, Grenada, Barbados, Trinidad and Tobago, and St. Lucia. Later in life, he discerned "a second vocation" and entered the seminary in 1970. He was ordained a priest June 24, 1973, for the Diocese of St. Lucia, West Indies. He came to the Archdiocese of Miami in 1978 and has served at Sacred Heart and St. Luke in Lake Worth, Holy Family in North Miami, St. John Neumann in Miami, Nativity in Hollywood, St. Ambrose in Deerfield Beach, Our Lady of the Lakes in Miami Lakes, and St. David in Davie. Since December 1997, he has served at St. Mark in Southwest Ranches from where he will retire at the end of August, after turning 90. Father Stack died Dec. 15, 2010, in his native Ireland.

When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

"All my life I was around the brothers (Congregation of Presentation Brothers). All through school they influenced me so I eventually decided to join them. I was blessed with a second vocation. I guess you can say I went to the other side of the street. It really was Vatican Council II that influenced me to become a priest because of its effects on religious communities." Person most surprised by his vocation:

"My family was most surprised when I became a brother first and not a priest. They always knew I would become a priest." Father Mannix Stack had the privilege of a one-on-one meeting with Pope John Paul II in May 2000, during the celebration of the Jubilee for Priests and the pope's 80th birthday. Father Stack was one of 12 priests turning 80 that year who were selected to have lunch with the pope.

What the seminary did not prepare him for:

"Being a good preacher. I've always been told my Irish accent is too strong and I speak very fast."

Favorite type of music:

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

Classical, but really anything other than jazz.

"I always liked engineering. I liked to design. Not that I could draw very well, but I liked it."

What he collects:

"At St. Mark I began a coin collection as a way to raise funds for the parish. I now have coins from all over the world and they are valued at quite a bit."

Favorite priestly assignment:

"I've been equally happy at every assignment but I really enjoyed teaching CCD, hearing reconciliation and being available to the people. I was at the airport in London once and a woman asked me to hear her confession after another Person he most admires: "I have met so many saintly brothers and priests over the woman asked me to bless her baby." years. (Miami Auxiliary Bishop) John Noonan stands out as a great person." The most difficult aspect of being a priest:

The challenge to holiness.

His greatest disappointment:

"I never got the chance to learn how to play a musical instrument."

'A priest isn't a superman; he's fully human with ups and downs.'

His greatest joy:

"My family. I'm the third of 12 children. We were poor but His description of the ideal priest: religious and very blessed. I didn't realize it at the time, but "Simplicity and availability. I chose as my motto, 'He must my parents had a great love between them." increase, I must decrease.' I honestly believe that and have tried to live it." His greatest accomplishment: "I have managed to keep breathing!" A priestly stereotype that he feels should be discarded:

"A priest isn't a superman; he's fully human with ups and downs."

His harshest critic:

"Myself. I always wanted to be better."

What he does on his day off:

Thing he most fears:

"Up until a few years ago (before Hurricane Katrina) I used to play tennis and golf, but now I enjoy listening to music and reading."

"I don't fear dying. I fear becoming a burden on other people." Regrets:

Favorite movie:

"Not being holier."

"Life of Don Bosco" (1936). Favorite TV series:

"I'm not into TV; I listen to music over the TV now and really only watch sports." Last book read:

"I prefer religious newspapers and magazines. I read Our Sunday Visitor."

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Born Oct. 2, 1950, in Havana, Cuba, he came to the United States in 1960 and attended Corpus Christi and St. John Bosco parishes in Miami. Ordained May 14, 1977, he served at St. Mary Cathedral, worked with farmworkers in Immokalee, and served as campus minister at the University of Miami and Florida International University before pursuing art degrees at FIU and the University of Florida. He died in a fire in his home on Sept. 14, 2004.

The priest as an artist:

"I was always the kid who was doing the posters for everybody. But I didn't take (art) seriously until I was a priest. ... It came out of a need to pray and to mature in my spirituality. Art has been an integral part of my maturing." What he did before becoming a priest:

He entered the seminary in ninth grade: "It was a different time. I would not recommend that for anybody right now." Who was surprised by his vocation:

Everybody: "People are surprised now." Doubts about choosing the priesthood:

"All along. Doubts never cease. Doubts are part of life. I don't consider doubts to be the opposite of faith. Doubts are part of faith. The opposite of faith is fear." Priests who inspire him:

The late Father Daniel Sanchez of Corpus Christi, the first Cuban exile to be ordained a priest in the archdiocese; and Msgr. William Dever, pastor of St. Helen in Fort Lauderdale, where Father Sardiñas served before going to the University of Florida.

Father Sardiñas and his "Michelangelo moment" - the chapel at St. Thomas University. He designed the stained glass windows, the statues, the altar, the pulpit and the baptismal font.

Most satisfying aspect of the priesthood:

"The unique, irreplaceable relationship with people in your parish. When people call you 'father' that, to me, is not a title. That's a relationship."

What he does on his days off:

"I hang out at my art studio, or take my dog to the dog park, or I go to the beach and have dinner with friends."

Priestly stereotype that should be discarded:

"That (priests) have to be superhuman. ... I'm flawed just like everybody else."

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

An architect or a veterinarian: "I love animals."

Favourite musical artists:

Greatest disappointment:

Mozart, U2, Sting and Celia Cruz: "I'm a hybrid."

"My disappointments have been mostly with myself, by not appreciating at times how blessed I've been."

Person, other than Christ, that he most admires:

St. Francis of Assisi: "He was God's unique work of art. There was no one like him before him and no one like him after him."

"Doubts are part of faith. The opposite of faith is fear."

Favourite visual artists: Greatest joy:

Michelangelo, Raphael, El Greco, Caravaggio, Van Gogh, "The two places where I'm most at home, where I'm lost in Matisse, Rothko, Wilfredo Lam time, are when I celebrate the Eucharist and when I'm in my art studio." Thing he most fears: "Not pleasing God by fully utilizing my God-given talents. Selling God short."

Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

"The public side of it. Being constantly under scrutiny. I'm a very private person. People look at what color shirt you're wearing, what kind of car you're driving, what haircut you have. ... And today, with the shortage of priests, simply overwork."

His greatest accomplishment:

Designing all the liturgical appointments for St. Thomas University's new chapel - stained glass windows, statues, Stations of the Cross, altar, pulpit and baptismal font. "My Michelangelo moment... This is the accomplishment where both the priest and the artist have come together."

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Born Dec. 5, 1960, in Sliema, Malta, Bishop Baldacchino is the second oldest of four children three boys and a girl born to Leonilda (known as Hilda) and Rinaldo (known as Rene) Baldacchino. When he was 13, his family joined the Neocatechumenal Way. He studied at St. Francis School in Msida and Mount Carmel College in Santa Venera, Malta, then studied science and chemistry at the University of Malta. He entered the Redemptoris Mater Archdiocesan Missionary Seminary in Newark, N.J., in 1990, obtaining a bachelor’s in theology, and a master’s in divinity from Seton Hall University. On May 25, 1996, he was ordained a priest for the Archdiocese of Newark and assigned as parochial vicar to Our Lady of Mount Carmel in Ridgewood, N.J. In 1999, he was named chancellor of Our Lady of Divine Providence Mission in Turks and Caicos Islands, a missio sui iuris (independent mission) for which the Archbishop of Newark is responsible. He became pastor of Our Lady of Divine Providence Church in Providenciales in 2002, and in 2009 was named a Chaplain to His Holiness, with the honorary title of monsignor. Pope Francis appointed him auxiliary bishop of Miami Feb. 20, 2014.



What he did before becoming a priest:

He worked for nine years as a technical manager for Canada Dry in Malta. “I was a workaholic 36 hours straight work without going home.” When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

After attending World Youth Day in Santiago de Compostela, Spain, in 1989. Person or event that triggered his vocation:

“The World Youth Day in Santiago de Compostela in 1989. The words of John Paul II in his homily, ‘Do not be afraid to be holy,’ opened a new perspective to life for me.” What the seminary did not prepare him for:

Press conferences. His hobbies:

Peter Baldacchino, front, gets ready to kick a soccer ball while playing with his siblings, from left, John, Paula and Robert, in their native Malta.

“I always enjoy a good fishing trip.” Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

“Comforting someone who has lost a loved one; when no words can fill that void and we can only offer to be present and share their suffering.”

‘The words of John Paul II in his homily, “Do not be afraid to be holy,” opened a new perspective to life for me.’ His description of the ideal priest:

“Does not exist.” Favorite movie:

“Preferisco Il Paradiso” based on the life of St. Philip Neri. Favorite sport:

Soccer.

Newly ordained Father Peter Baldacchino is seen here with his parents Leonilda (known as Hilda) and Rinaldo (known as Rene).

Last book read:

His greatest accomplishment:

“Jesus of Nazareth: The Infancy Narratives” by Pope Benedict XVI.

“To be an instrument in God’s hand in establishing a Catholic presence in the Turks and Caicos Islands.”

What he does on his day off:

His greatest joy:

“Day off is only a term.”

“The day of my ordination to the priesthood.”

Person he most admires:

His greatest disappointment:

“Blessed Pope John Paul II, because he changed my life and was instrumental in my calling to the priesthood.”

“That my father’s health prohibits him from attending my consecration (as bishop).” His greatest fear:

“Myself.”

Born Dec. 22, 1966, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Father Hernandez considers himself a "Cuban-Rican" because he grew up on the island but his parents and grandparents are from Cuba. The middle of five children - two older brothers, two younger sisters - he studied in Passionist schools before entering the seminary in Miami in 1987. Ordained in 1994, he served at Epiphany Parish in South Miami and Sts. Peter and Paul, Miami before becoming the first Hispanic pastor of the historic St. Mary Star of the Sea Parish in 2002. It is the third oldest parish in Florida.

Favorite type of music: For listening: Soft Spainsh melodies by artists such as José Luis Perales; for dancing: "If there's salsa or merengue I will dance, because the music gets into me."

On studying for the priesthood:

"When I was a kid I was not much attracted to studies. I said to the Lord when I graduated from high school, the shorter the career, the better. Like always, the Lord has a good sense of humor. So he said, 'Oh, yeah, you're going to study eight years for the priesthood.'"

Collections:

He owns 60 Nativity sets. "I love Christmas time and I love nativities. I'm the one who sets up the nativity at my church."

Why the priesthood:

"I wanted to serve people. Really, the life of the priest did not interest me. What attracted me was the service that the priest does for the community." Seminary life:

"It was my first time away from home and I was learning English. God wanted me to stay, because it was a terrible year, difficult to adjust." Good advice from a fellow priest:

"You cannot live better than your parishioners." - Father Juan Lopez, pastor, Sts. Peter and Paul Parish, Miami. Good advice from a fellow priest:

"You cannot live better than your parishioners." - Father Juan Lopez, pastor, Sts. Peter and Paul Parish, Miami. What he does on his days off:

Father Hernandez, who describes himself as "a social person," celebrates his birthday with former parishioners from Sts. Peter and Paul Parish in Miami, Luis Acosta and his wife, Kirsy. He celebrated their wedding and baptized their children.

"I go to Miami and eat with friends. Favorite TV series:

"Friends" (he has a collection of episodes) and "The Golden Girls": "I learned English watching 'Golden Girls.'"

Hobbies:

"Eating - you can see that. For three years I used to cook on Sundays in the major seminary. I don't have time now." He also likes antique shops. "I just look. I don't have the money to buy."

How he makes decisions:

"I always go to the tabernacle and pray to the Lord." Persons he most admires:

"I probably would have finished accounting and be in business - maybe selling, like my father."

"My parents and grandparents - they were people who were not rich but they were so centered in what they had to do in life that they gave me a model to follow."

Greatest frustration:

Biggest fear:

"Some of our regulations are a little strict for our people. But it's part of our faith. It's part of our tradition. And you have to follow them."

"Not death, but suffering a long illness, a heart problem, or cancer. As a priest, you don't have anyone.If that happens to me, who's going to take care of me?"

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

Upcoming challenge:

"I don't want someone to leave the church because of me."

"My heart is calling me to do it - start a mission church in Stock Island. There are a lot of Hispanic and Haitian people over there. Even though they come to the big church, they don't feel part of the big church. I feel the responsibility and the need - if they can't come to me, I have to go to them."

Difficult moment:

During the height of the priestly sexual abuse crisis in 2002: "Do I need to be in this? I can be an active parishioner like my father is. I don't need to be labeled as one of them." Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

"To always make sure that what you do, you do it right ... I don't want someone to leave the church because of me."

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Born June 22, 1969, in León, Nicaragua, Father Paguaga is the oldest of four children. He arrived in the United States Dec. 1, 1989, after a one-month, $2,000 journey from Guatemala. He worked in the construction industry, at fast-food restaurants and washing dishes before entering the seminary in 1991. He was ordained a priest for the Miami Archdiocese in May 2000, and served at Our Lady of the Lakes in Miami Lakes before being assigned to Little Flower last summer.



Why he came to the United States:

“To come, work, save, help my family and go back after six or seven years." His father had died in 1984, and the family had moved to Guatemala, partly due to the political troubles in Nicaragua. The family's pharmacy had been looted; their grandfather had been kidnapped.” What he did before becoming a priest:

“He was one of the first cooks at the McDonald's on S.W. 87th Avenue and 24th Street in Miami. He also worked at Burger King and as a busboy at the Radisson Hotel. At one point, he held three jobs simultaneously. "I'm very proud of it. If you want to work, you will find work. If you want to get ahead, you can get ahead."”

Gardening enthusiast Father Paguaga with some student helpers from St. Teresa School in Coral Gables.

Favorite type of music:

When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

Country music, 99.9 KISS FM

“He first asked his mother for permission to enter the seminary at 6. At 14, he attended a charismatic retreat for young people. "I remember saying, 'This is what I really want to be.'" His father's response: "Over my dead body." He tried to enter the seminary in Guatemala but his mother asked him to wait. After coming to Miami, "I knew I didn't want to stay (in the United States) to make money but to serve the people. I saw the need here. An immigrant can best understand an immigrant."

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

He was studying civil engineering at the University of Guatemala. "The thing is, I don't see myself doing something else other than being a priest. This is what I love. Sometimes I feel guilty that I get paid for what I do." Priestly stereotype that should be discarded:

"Sometimes people don't see us as human beings with the same needs and feelings as others. We come from a family. We sat for many years in the pews where people sit and listened to the liturgy. We're real. We weren't born wearing vestments."

‘It's almost like God brought me here...’ What he does on his days off:

"I like to go to the beach. I like to go to the gym. I spend a lot of time working in the garden. It puts my mind at ease."

Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

Transfers: "You get to love your people, you devote yourself to them, and then you have to move."

Favorite movie:

"The Lion King."

Greatest disappointment:

"The Golden Girls", "Touched by an Angel" and the Discovery Channel.

"That my father didn't see me ordained because, actually, he would have been extremely happy with me. My father was never able to see his son fully realized as the man he wanted to be."

God's plan:

Person he most admires:

"It's almost like God brought me here and opened the doors because in less than two years I was in the seminary. It couldn't have been more clear that God wanted me to be here."

"My mother - her faith and trust in God, her simplicity, her sense of humor. She has never complained to God or anybody else for all the things that she has been through in her life."

Favorite TV series:

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Born in El Salvador on Sept. 5, 1974, Father Alfaro was educated by the Marist Brothers there until 11th grade, when he moved to South Florida. He graduated from Miami Beach Senior High in 1992, got a bachelor’s degree in psychology from FIU in 1997 and entered St. John Vianney Seminary in Miami that same year. He went on to St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary in Boynton Beach, where he obtained a Master in Divinity, and was ordained for the Archdiocese of Miami on May 10, 2003. He served at St. John Neumann Parish in Miami until he was sent for higher studies in Rome. He obtained a licentiate in Church history from the Pontifical Gregorian University in 2009 and taught at St. Vincent de Paul Seminary until June 2013, when he was appointed administrator of Blessed Trinity.



What he did before becoming a priest:

“During my college years I had a part-time job as a bank teller at then-NationsBank. I was also very involved in the youth group and the youth choir in my home parish (St. Joseph, Miami Beach).” When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

“I started considering the possibility of becoming a priest when I was around 20 years old.” Person or event that triggered his vocation:

“I did a retreat that changed my life when I was 16, but I did not consider the priesthood at that time. Then when I was in college, a new priest came to my home parish. He inspired my vocation. Although he never spoke to me about the vocation to the priesthood, he showed me with his example how fulfilling the life of a priest could be. I then began to ask God if he could be calling me to this lifestyle.”

Father Jose Alfaro, far right, is seen here during a visit to Disney World with his family.

Last book read:

“The Infancy Narratives” by Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI Favorite type of music:

Country, classical and Christian pop.

Person/persons most surprised by his vocation:

Person he most admires:

“Because I was so involved in Church at the time, I think the decision to enter seminary surprised very few people.”

“I greatly admire the example that Pope Francis is giving the whole Church. He is preaching and teaching not only through words, but especially through his own actions. It’s been thrilling to see him and to listen carefully to all the speeches he gave in Rio de Janeiro during World Youth Day. His simplicity, humility, sincerity and zeal (are) inspiring a lot of people to come back to the faith.”

What the seminary did not prepare him for:

“It’s impossible to learn everything in the seminary. It certainly did not prepare me to be a seminary formator something I did for four years.”

His greatest disappointment:

‘I greatly admire the example that Pope Francis is giving the whole Church.’

“My own flaws and sinfulness.” His greatest joy:

“Celebrating the sacraments, particularly the Eucharist and reconciliation.”

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

“Perhaps I’d be a psychologist or a teacher.”

Thing he most fears:

The most difficult aspect of being a priest:

“To give scandal.”

“Having to deal with administration, handbooks, financial concerns, managing staff, paperwork, etc.”

Regrets:

“None. I could not see my life being any happier or more fulfilled than doing what I’m doing.”

His description of the ideal priest:

“The ideal priest is someone who is a man of deep communion with the Lord. His prayer leads him to action in ministry and vice versa. Someone who makes himself available to the people of God and tries to respond to their needs as he walks the journey of faith together with them.” A priestly stereotype that he feels should be discarded:

“That a priest is above the rest of the people or better than the rest of humanity.” What he does on his day off:

“Rest, watch a good movie, read and/or visit my family and friends.” Favorite movie:

Frank Capra’s “It’s a Wonderful Life.” Favorite TV series:

“24.”

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Born Nov. 11, 1960, in Havana, Cuba, Father Alvarez came to Miami with his parents and older sister in 1967. He grew up in St. John Bosco Parish, Little Havana, and entered the seminary at age 36. He was ordained for the Archdiocese of Miami on May 10, 2003. Before joining the seminary staff in September, 2004, he served as associate pastor of St. Brendan Parish in Westchester. He also hosts the Spanish and English language television programs produced by the archdiocese which air on Cable-TAP in Miami-Dade County.



What he did before becoming a priest:

He earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in theatre and spent a decade as an actor and director,doing theater, television commercials and films: “Blink-and-you’ll-missme kind of things.” He then spent 15 years as a teacher and coach at his alma maters, Sts. Peter and Paul School and La Salle High School in Miami. When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

“When I had matured enough … I dated enough that I could have married. I thought about it a couple of times. But I thought the lifestyle was too restricted. … I always felt that I needed to be freer to engage in ministry. I would have driven my wife nuts.”

Father Alvarez, a “sports junkie,” takes in Marlins games whenever he can.

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

Priestly stereotype that should be discarded:

“The same thing I was doing before, teaching and “That a priest is a certain way. The best thing we bring to coaching. I loved it. It wasn’t like I became a priest because the priesthood is who we are, and we’re all so different.” I was miserable doing what I was doing before. I just felt called to do this.” Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

“Shattering some of these very limited notions of what a priest is.”

Who was most surprised by his vocation:

“Myself. It’s funny, not too many people were surprised. … At one time I had a girlfriend who would say to me, ‘Stop talking to me with that priest’s voice of yours.’”

On the “Drama and Ministry” course he devised and teaches to seminarians:

“Drama and ministry are both centered on conflict. By studying drama, we become more attuned to the conflicts that we address in ministry.”

What the seminary did not prepare him for:

“I haven’t been too surprised by anything I’ve seen in ministry. I spent 10 years in the entertainment industry and worked with coaches. I was ready for anything.”

What he does on his days off:

“I’m a huge sports fan, so on my days off, if the Marlins are playing, I’m at the stadium.”

‘I admire Jesus, the way he lived, the fact that he was a regular guy, a people’s man. He found joy and life in the little things and helped people discover that. ’

Favorite TV series:

“I watch ESPN. … I’m a sports junkie.” Favorite type of music:

“I’m probably the only Cuban who listens to American folk and blue grass.”

Favorite priestly assignment:

“They’re all good. As long as you give me people, I’m happy.”

Person he most admires:

“Hanging out with Jesus; hanging out with people; enjoying the little things of life. That’s what it’s about.”

“Jesus. I admire Jesus, the way he lived, the fact that he was a regular guy, a people’s man. He found joy and life in the little things and helped people discover that.”

His description of the ideal priest:

Thing he most fears:

“You need to be a regular guy. … What gives credibility to the faith is not what you do but how you relate to people. Jesus changed history not so much because of what he did but because of the way he related to the people who came to him. He showed them that within every ordinary event, the extraordinary was hidden there. That’s my whole spirituality, finding the extraordinary in the ordinary.”

“At the end of my life, not being as giving as I perhaps could have been. But Jesus is very merciful and he can be at peace with that, so I don’t lose too much sleep over it. I’ll bank on his mercy.”

Greatest joy:

Hobbies:

“Watching sports, music, movies. I love to travel. I love to eat.” Regrets:

None. “All the ladies come hug me, kiss me, and I send them home with somebody else. How could I have any regrets? I have the best of all worlds.”

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Born in Cuba in 1957, Father Corces grew up in Miami and was ordained for the archdiocese in 1988. As vocations director, he is responsible for recruiting and screening candidates to the priesthood. He also helps out at Prince of Peace Church in Miami, teaches lay ministry courses and has been involved with the HIV/AIDS ministry.



When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

Thing he most fears: "I fear being old, sick and helpless, because I see it every day."

"I tried going into the seminary right after high school and it didn't work. I was too young, too immature." Years later, he began questioning his choice again: "During a New Year's Eve party in which I was having the best time, I stopped and looked around and said, is this what I want? And the answer was very clear. No. That is not for me."

What he did before becoming a priest: Worked in a bank's accounting department for 7 years: "I hated it."

Later still, during a visit to the missions in Honduras, he realized his call was to the priesthood:

"Coming in contact with the dirt poor people made me want to make a difference. The priesthood came up as the way to make a difference. Of course, there are other ways. But that was my way, the gift being offered to me." His description of the ideal priest:

"First of all, a human being filled with love for life and God and deep faith that, in and though that broken humanity, God blesses the world. You have to be filled with life, definitely.":

Father Pedro Corces indulges in his favorite pastime: browsing in bookstores & reading.

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

"A teacher or a pilot. I love to tach and I love planes."

"Finding myself without answers and therefore dealing with the frustration of being powerless before cerain situations. Having to accept that I do not have all the answers."

"I am successful when I know that the person has been touched by the spirit of Christ - when I have facilitated that encounter. You see the fruits. You see the change. Those are moments of sucess."

What he does on his days off:

Loves going to the movies and spending time in bookstores: "I'm a bookworm. And when the weather is nice I go to the beach. I love the ocean." His harshest critic:

Greatest disappointment:

"Myself and the Gospel."

"9/11. Disappointment at our own humanity, that we are capable of doing something like that."

His greatest accomplishment:

"I am successful when I know that the person has been touched by the spirit of Christ - when I have facilitated that "9/11. I was so angry in the morning, and by the afternoon, encounter. You see the fruits. You see the change. Those I saw how human beings are capable of the highest, heroic are moments of success." choices." Greatest joy:

Person he most admires:

Gandhi. "I think he was an incredible man who was able to free a country without shooting a gun."

Born May 6, 1964, in Levittown, New York, his family moved to Jensen Beach when he was 8. He attended public schools and St. Martin de Porres Parish, and was studying at Indian River Community College when he decided to enter the seminary. Since his ordination, May 11, 1991, he has served as priest-secretary to both Archbishop Emeritus Edward McCarthy and Archbishop John C. Favalora, and as associate pastor at Epiphany Parish in South Miami and Immaculate Conception in Hialeah. He is currently studying fulltime at Florida International University, working toward a degree in exceptional student education with a specialization in autism.

Life as a university student: "I started thinking about it when I was in eighth grade. "It's neat not to have any sort of favoritism toward me. Throughout high school it was an idea that kept coming Because sometimes priests are treated with favoritism. It's back to me. Sometimes yes, sometimes no, but it definitely nice to know that the grade I'm getting is because I'm kept coming back. While there were many things that I working as hard as everybody else Being at the university could do and do well, this was the one thing where I felt I has helped me to see the importance of being a person, not could give the best I had to give and be the most fulfilled." just a persona. It's important for priests to be persons with their people. Jesus said, 'I know my sheep and mine know me.' Underline the 'mine know me' part because sometimes What he would be doing if he had not become a priest: we forget that. The sheep also need to know their His intended major in college was education. "It's very shepherd." interesting that, these many years later, the church has come to me and asked me to fulfill a need by studying special education. So it's come full circle. In a sense, I gave On dancing: that up to enter the seminary and now it has been given "When I first got to Immaculate, I had never seen a back to me." community that so loved to dance. I never danced. I was terrified of dancing my whole life. But in order to be part of this community, I took salsa lessons. It was exercise. It was Greatest disappointment: fun. And now I can dance with my community. They were "If you turn disappointments over to God, they don't all happily shocked. I'm still no good, but at least I'm not become great. So I don't worry about those." afraid anymore." When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

Greatest joy: On the priestly commitment:

"Sharing with people in the important moments of their lives, the joyful ones as well as the sorrowful ones."

"To be a good husband and wife, you have to be desperately in love with your spouse. The priest also must be desperately in love, passionately in love, with God and the priesthood. It is the same commitment. We're called to a spousal relationship with God. It needs to be that deep and that real and that passionate. If it's only about what you do, then it's work. It's just a job, it's not a life. Being a husband or a wife is not only about what you do, but who you are because of your relationship to this other person. For a priest, it has to be the same."

Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

"Being unable to meet the overwhelming needs that are being presented to you. Being unable to be in three places at once and wanting to meet those needs." Priestly stereotype that should be discarded:

"That priests are supposed to be angels in human form rather than human beings who walk with the community."

Thing he most fears:

"In a sense, I gave that up (a career in education) to enter the seminary and now it has been given back to me."

"Losing loving relationships. Becoming so busy that I loose touch with those loving relationships, with families and friends that keep me human, that keep me real." Person he most admires:

How others describe him:

"My father because he was a decent man who worked very "I've been told I have a raucous laugh." When he was at hard to provide for his family, to create a loving Epiphany, "it was a vocabulary word and the kids were not environment in his home, who was always willing to do getting it. So the teacher said, 'Father Michael has a things for other people without wanting recognition or raucous laugh.' And the kids got it." thanks."

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Born Aug. 9, 1941 in Jamaica Plain, N.Y., he moved to Miami in 1949 and grew up in Holy Family Parish, North Miami. He attended Archbishop Curley High School and entered the seminary during his senior year. Ordained in 1968, he served as the founding director of the archdiocesan Office of Worship from 1978 to 1984. He has spent 24 of his 35 years as a priest at St. Louis Parish in Pinecrest, including the last 21 years as pastor. "I think I'm this close to marrying one of the kids I baptized here." He also serves as dean of the South Dade Deanery.



When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

Probably around the fifth grade: "You'd be serving at Mass and there was just something very special about all that." He would also lock up the church and set out the vestments for the next morning. "The priests that I knew trusted me. I learned how to drive in the church truck when I was 12 years old because Msgr. (Rowan) Rastatter let me drive the truck around the parking lot. He was my hero." What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

"I haven't the vaguest idea. There isn't anything else that I ever think about being. I could just as easily be bagging groceries at Publix."

Father Fetscher kayaking on the Great Lakes during a recent vacation.

Most difficult aspect of being a priest: Why he never wanted to be a missionary:

"When things happen that you can't have any control over and you don't have all the glib answers. Or you can't wave the wand and make it all better. I learned long ago that I'm not the Messiah. We only had one of those."

"I wanted to be a priest and Holy Family would do just fine. To this day I get nervous going to Broward County." What he does on his days off:

"Take a deep breath. I'll go and spend the day with a friend. Go to a movie. Get off by myself and read.

His description of the ideal priest:

Hobbies:

"To be all things to all people. Jesus certainly poured himself out for people. That's the standard by which we measure ourselves."

"I've played at tennis. To say that I was a tennis player would dishonour the sport."

Favourite type of music:

Peggy Lee, Louis Armstrong, Leonard Bernstein

"I learned long ago that I'm not the Messiah. We only had one of those."

What he collects:

"Everything" but especially books: "I had this idea that if I owned the book and it sat in the shelf, somehow, by sheer osmosis, whatever was in it would stay in my head."

Best memory:

"The morning we went up to celebrate Mass with the Holy Father." He was one of the 38 priests studying at the North American College in Rome who gathered in the pope's private chapel on Nov. 30, 1989, at 6:30a.m. When it came time for the homily, the pope simply said, "'Today we let Jesus speak.' And he sat down. We all reflected on the Gospel for seven minutes."

On his personality:

"You're looking at a guy who voted for Barry Goldwater and George McGovern. Think about that." Favourite priestly assignment:

"The one I'm in."

Greatest frustration:

Person he most admires:

"Not being able to do all the things people would like me to do."

Auxiliary Bishop Agustin Román: "I'm continually amazed at his capacity for charity, gentleness and kindness. If I could have a tenth of it, I would be a happy man."

Greatest joy:

"The people who are here with me at St. Louis. I pray to God I never abuse that trust."

Born Oct. 31, 1956, in Santa Clara, Cuba, Msgr. Marin came to the United States with his family - parents and younger sister - at age 4. They settled in Chicago. He went to medical school in the Dominican Republic and completed his residency at the University of Miami, specializing in investigational cardiology. He was ordained for the Miami Archdiocese in 1989 and later obtained a canon law degree from The Catholic University of America. He served as chancellor from 1993 - 2003 and, in addition to his work as promoter of justice and judge on the metropolitan tribunal, as well as chaplain of the Catholic Physicians & Dentists Guild. Favourite priestly assignment: He felt the call in fifth grade at Our Lady of Mercy Our Lady of Guadalupe: "There's such a great community Catholic School in Chicago, where he was an altar server. that is constantly challenging me. I can place many of my He would have entered the high school seminary had it not gifts there at the service of this community." been for the advice of the school's new principal who suggested he attend a "prestigious" public high school Greatest disappointment: instead that focused on math and science. "The whole None. He sees them as "challenges, as moments of growth, background of my family being in medicine came back time to learn. The alternative would be to sit down and cry again and I went back to medicine. Priesthood was out of and I don't do that." the picture for those years." When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

Greatest joy: Vocation moment:

"Just being with people at the most important times of their life - the birth of a child, the death of a relative, their wedding day. Their whole life, you're involved with them."

In 1976, his first year of medical school, there was a huge explosion at a sugar mill in the Dominican Republic. "The 400 men who were burned kept asking for a priest. The only priest was away at a mission. It was very clear to me, seeing all of the doctors and the nurses and 123 men dying, that there was more need for priests than there was for doctors." He decided to quit medicine, but again was advised not to by the seminary rector, who told him "the best thing to do was to finish medical school because that would always be in the back of my mind. God would call me later." God did - in 1983 in New Orleans. "I was giving a keynote speech at a cardiologists' convention. These two gentlemen walked up to me and said, 'Are you a priest?' They were Jesuit physicians." They told him: "Your whole empathy for the patient almost speaks of you being a priest already."

Greatest challenge:

"To realize that you're not going to please everybody. I'm a pleaser. I like to keep people happy. You realize that not everybody is going to be happy." His harshest critic:

"My mother. She's very truthful." Hobbies:

He collects coins and stamps and is an avid reader, at least one book a month. "I've had three at a time going." He especially loves reading history books. Favourite type of music:

On making the final decision:

He likes all types, from Annie Lenox to Bach. He also has season tickets to the opera.

"I needed to prove to myself that I could be a good physician - New Orleans was that proof. It was the pinnacle of medicine. So next, I needed to prove that I could be a good priest."

People he most admires:

His parents, who sacrificed their own futures to give their children a future in a free land. His mother worked nights in order to be with her children during the day. "She would put us to bed and be there when we woke up. We didn't realize she was working all night. It was a great sacrifice that they made. They are always my heroes."

"It was very clear to me, seeing all of the doctors and the nurses and 123 men dying, that there was more need for priests than there was for doctors."

Current difficulties in the church:

"This isn't the worst of times. It isn't the best of times. But we'll get through it and go into another wonderful adventure with God."

Who was most surprised by his vocation:

"Some of my medical colleagues. They didn't understand it. But in the long run they have come asking for help at times and are glad that I'm there for them. The friendships have remained."

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Born in El Salvador on Sept. 5, 1974, Father Alfaro was educated by the Marist Brothers there until 11th grade, when he moved to South Florida. He graduated from Miami Beach Senior High in 1992, got a bachelor’s degree in psychology from FIU in 1997 and entered St. John Vianney Seminary in Miami that same year. He went on to St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary in Boynton Beach, where he obtained a Master in Divinity, and was ordained for the Archdiocese of Miami on May 10, 2003. He served at St. John Neumann Parish in Miami until he was sent for higher studies in Rome. He obtained a licentiate in Church history from the Pontifical Gregorian University in 2009 and taught at St. Vincent de Paul Seminary until June 2013, when he was appointed administrator of Blessed Trinity.



What he did before becoming a priest:

“During my college years I had a part-time job as a bank teller at then-NationsBank. I was also very involved in the youth group and the youth choir in my home parish (St. Joseph, Miami Beach).” When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

“I started considering the possibility of becoming a priest when I was around 20 years old.” Person or event that triggered his vocation:

“I did a retreat that changed my life when I was 16, but I did not consider the priesthood at that time. Then when I was in college, a new priest came to my home parish. He inspired my vocation. Although he never spoke to me about the vocation to the priesthood, he showed me with his example how fulfilling the life of a priest could be. I then began to ask God if he could be calling me to this lifestyle.”

Father Jose Alfaro, far right, is seen here during a visit to Disney World with his family.

Last book read:

“The Infancy Narratives” by Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI Favorite type of music:

Country, classical and Christian pop.

Person/persons most surprised by his vocation:

Person he most admires:

“Because I was so involved in Church at the time, I think the decision to enter seminary surprised very few people.”

“I greatly admire the example that Pope Francis is giving the whole Church. He is preaching and teaching not only through words, but especially through his own actions. It’s been thrilling to see him and to listen carefully to all the speeches he gave in Rio de Janeiro during World Youth Day. His simplicity, humility, sincerity and zeal (are) inspiring a lot of people to come back to the faith.”

What the seminary did not prepare him for:

“It’s impossible to learn everything in the seminary. It certainly did not prepare me to be a seminary formator something I did for four years.”

His greatest disappointment:

‘I greatly admire the example that Pope Francis is giving the whole Church.’

“My own flaws and sinfulness.” His greatest joy:

“Celebrating the sacraments, particularly the Eucharist and reconciliation.”

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

“Perhaps I’d be a psychologist or a teacher.”

Thing he most fears:

The most difficult aspect of being a priest:

“To give scandal.”

“Having to deal with administration, handbooks, financial concerns, managing staff, paperwork, etc.”

Regrets:

“None. I could not see my life being any happier or more fulfilled than doing what I’m doing.”

His description of the ideal priest:

“The ideal priest is someone who is a man of deep communion with the Lord. His prayer leads him to action in ministry and vice versa. Someone who makes himself available to the people of God and tries to respond to their needs as he walks the journey of faith together with them.” A priestly stereotype that he feels should be discarded:

“That a priest is above the rest of the people or better than the rest of humanity.” What he does on his day off:

“Rest, watch a good movie, read and/or visit my family and friends.” Favorite movie:

Frank Capra’s “It’s a Wonderful Life.” Favorite TV series:

“24.”

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Born Nov. 11, 1960, in Havana, Cuba, Father Alvarez came to Miami with his parents and older sister in 1967. He grew up in St. John Bosco Parish, Little Havana, and entered the seminary at age 36. He was ordained for the Archdiocese of Miami on May 10, 2003. Before joining the seminary staff in September, 2004, he served as associate pastor of St. Brendan Parish in Westchester. He also hosts the Spanish and English language television programs produced by the archdiocese which air on Cable-TAP in Miami-Dade County.



What he did before becoming a priest:

He earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in theatre and spent a decade as an actor and director,doing theater, television commercials and films: “Blink-and-you’ll-missme kind of things.” He then spent 15 years as a teacher and coach at his alma maters, Sts. Peter and Paul School and La Salle High School in Miami. When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

“When I had matured enough … I dated enough that I could have married. I thought about it a couple of times. But I thought the lifestyle was too restricted. … I always felt that I needed to be freer to engage in ministry. I would have driven my wife nuts.”

Father Alvarez, a “sports junkie,” takes in Marlins games whenever he can.

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

Priestly stereotype that should be discarded:

“The same thing I was doing before, teaching and “That a priest is a certain way. The best thing we bring to coaching. I loved it. It wasn’t like I became a priest because the priesthood is who we are, and we’re all so different.” I was miserable doing what I was doing before. I just felt called to do this.” Most difficult aspect of being a priest: “Shattering some of these very limited notions of what a priest is.”

Who was most surprised by his vocation:

“Myself. It’s funny, not too many people were surprised. … At one time I had a girlfriend who would say to me, ‘Stop talking to me with that priest’s voice of yours.’”

On the “Drama and Ministry” course he devised and teaches to seminarians:

“Drama and ministry are both centered on conflict. By studying drama, we become more attuned to the conflicts that we address in ministry.”

What the seminary did not prepare him for:

“I haven’t been too surprised by anything I’ve seen in ministry. I spent 10 years in the entertainment industry and worked with coaches. I was ready for anything.”

What he does on his days off:

“I’m a huge sports fan, so on my days off, if the Marlins are playing, I’m at the stadium.”

‘I admire Jesus, the way he lived, the fact that he was a regular guy, a people’s man. He found joy and life in the little things and helped people discover that. ’

Favorite TV series:

“I watch ESPN. … I’m a sports junkie.” Favorite type of music:

“I’m probably the only Cuban who listens to American folk and blue grass.”

Favorite priestly assignment:

“They’re all good. As long as you give me people, I’m happy.”

Person he most admires:

“Hanging out with Jesus; hanging out with people; enjoying the little things of life. That’s what it’s about.”

“Jesus. I admire Jesus, the way he lived, the fact that he was a regular guy, a people’s man. He found joy and life in the little things and helped people discover that.”

His description of the ideal priest:

Thing he most fears:

“You need to be a regular guy. … What gives credibility to the faith is not what you do but how you relate to people. Jesus changed history not so much because of what he did but because of the way he related to the people who came to him. He showed them that within every ordinary event, the extraordinary was hidden there. That’s my whole spirituality, finding the extraordinary in the ordinary.”

“At the end of my life, not being as giving as I perhaps could have been. But Jesus is very merciful and he can be at peace with that, so I don’t lose too much sleep over it. I’ll bank on his mercy.”

Greatest joy:

Hobbies:

“Watching sports, music, movies. I love to travel. I love to eat.” Regrets:

None. “All the ladies come hug me, kiss me, and I send them home with somebody else. How could I have any regrets? I have the best of all worlds.”

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Born Jan. 20, 1954, in Burundi, Africa, Father Biriruka entered the seminary of Bujumbura in 1974 and was ordained July 11, 1981, for the Diocese of Ngozi, Burundi. He obtained a degree in theology from the Urbaniana Pontifical University in Rome in 1985 and a licentiate in moral theology from St. Patrick’s College in Maynooth, Ireland, in 1991. He speaks Kirundi, his native tongue, French (one of Burundi’s official languages), English, Spanish, a little Swahili, and is learning Italian. He found refuge in the United States in 1995 after being blacklisted in his homeland for trying to stop the genocide between Tutsi and Hutu. He has served at Our Lady Queen of Heaven in North Lauderdale, Immaculate Conception in Hialeah, St. Maximilian Kolbe in Pembroke Pines, St. Kevin in Miami, and Epiphany in South Miami before being named pastor of Blessed John XXIII in June 2008.



When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

“I must have been either 11 or 12 years old.” Person or event that triggered his vocation:

“My aunt was instrumental. She spoke to me about it quite a bit. She must have seen something in me. There was also a missionary who after hearing my confession asked me if I would ever consider the priesthood.” Persons most surprised by his vocation:

Dressed in traditional African garb, Father Biriruka poses with former parishioners during an event at St. Kevin Parish a few years ago.

“No one. … My mother may have tried to tell me to consider a career in business to help support the family. My father died in 1973, only a year before I entered the Favorite movie: seminary. My mother was left caring for my four older “I don’t really watch movies, but I would like anything that sisters and two younger brothers.” has to do with Padre Pio or Blessed John XXIII. Occasionally I enjoy a good martial arts movie … as long What the seminary did not prepare him for: as it isn’t too violent.” “They could have done more to teach us how to run a parish, deal with the finances. I had to learn a lot on my Favorite TV series: own. Also, they did not prepare us enough on how to deal “I like the news. I watch CNN or BBC. I enjoy hearing with social situations. In my case, in Burundi we never about politics and then looking at it from the point of view discussed in the seminary the problems of the country and of theology.” how to deal with them as a priest.” Favorite type of music:

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

Gregorian chant.

“Either a businessman or a teacher. I felt a strong calling to teach during my high school years until my call to the priesthood became too strong to ignore.”

Person he most admires:

“John Paul II because of how he loved the people, how he taught us, how he dealt with problems and how he opened the doors of Jesus to the world.”

"Celibacy is difficult but beautiful."

His greatest disappointment: The most difficult aspect of being a priest:

“In my country, there have been horrible massacres and “Celibacy is difficult but beautiful. Obedience is also a genocides as in neighboring Rwanda. My greatest challenge. As priests we pledge our obedience to our disappointment has been not being able to stop them. I bishop. In Africa it was challenging to be obedient because have tried. I have written letters, made phone calls to so situations change so often.” many people both in the United States government and abroad and yet nothing has happened to stop these His description of the ideal priest: senseless killings.” “He would love God very deeply, love his people. … In loving your people you must live their joys and sufferings. His greatest joy: You must be part of it. A good priest must also be well “Serving the people of God in both good and bad times.” educated and know and teach the faith.” His greatest accomplishment: A priestly stereotype that he feels should be discarded:

“I was able to successfully build this church (Blessed John “Priests should avoid being put on pedestals. We should be XXIII in Miramar) and I think I have also earned partial brothers among brothers and sisters. If people saw us that credit, at least, for stopping the persecution of the Church way then maybe they would have a better understanding of in Burundi. I did that by speaking the truth, being vocal the priesthood and be willing to pray more for vocations and writing letters.” and their priests.” Thing he most fears:

“I don’t have fears; I consider them adventures.” Regrets:

“I have had struggles but I have no regrets.”

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Born April 12, 1951 in Miranda, a city in Burgos, Spain, he came to Miami in 1978 on a business venture: representing 40 Spanish publishers seeking to sell bilingual textbooks in the U.S. market. While living in St. Francis de Sales Parish on Miami Beach, he rekindled his vocation and was ordained for the Archdiocese of Miami on May 14, 1983.Since then, in addition to parish assignments, he has served in the vocations office, as archdiocesan director of youth ministry and as founding director of Radio Paz/Peace/Ke Poze.



His journey to the priesthood:

He entered the seminary in Madrid, Spain, at 17, and left at 21. "It was the early 1970s. We were revolutionaries. We went to live in the poor neighbourhoods of Madrid, in groups of five. (We) decided that we had to study theology among the people." Eventually, he left theological studies altogether. "I had a crisis of faith. I wanted to discover what it was to live life. I wanted to prove that I could be successful in business and be a normal person." What he did before becoming a priest:

He started his own business, transporting and delivering newspapers. Before that, in order to support himself as an "in-the-world" seminarian, he worked summers as a bellboy and waiter in Geneva, Switzerland. He also briefly drove a cab. "The tourists would get mad at me because I didn't know the streets of Madrid, and they thought I was cheating them."

As a young seminarian, Federico Capdepon helped Cuban refugees in Madrid. He also played guitar in a musical group he dubbed, "Los Brothers." The six seminarians would go around the countryside performing at dances for youth groups. "We only knew four songs."

Who was most surprised by his vocation:

"My father wasn't too thrilled. He wanted me to be an architect. Every time my mother thought about it, she would start to cry because she thought they were going to send me to Africa." Even after he came to Miami, "my mother thought I was converting Indians here in Florida."

A knock on the door:

By age 27, he had built a successful business, owned a large house in Madrid and "lived really well." One night, while he was getting ready to throw a party, an elderly couple knocked on his door, suitcases in hand. They needed a place to stay. He tried to shut the door on them "but it wouldn't close. It was like something was stuck. I remembered the Gospel passage, 'Whatever you do to the least of my brothers' I thought of my parents in the same situation." He relented, but warned the couple that it was only for one night. They stayed with him for two years. "I wanted to know nothing about God. When they came to my house and knocked on my door, they gave me back my vocation."

Greatest joy:

Serving as a link between the earth-bound, materialistic world and the transcendent, spiritual world. "The people see in (priests) a font of joy, of hope, of spirituality, of the possibility of a different world than the one in which we live." Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

"Not being able to resolve all the problems. We are asked to do a lot and we are not prepared for it. We are asked to be social workers, counsellors, administrators, great preachers, liturgists. Sometimes you just have to say, 'I don't know' and 'I can't do it.'"

"I had a crisis of faith.I wanted to prove that I could be successful in business and be a normal person."

His description of the ideal priest:

"A priest has to be a spiritual man, but not pie in the sky. He has to be happy, and able to convey that joy to people. He has to be capable of laughing with people when they need to laugh and crying with people when they need to cry. Basically, he has to like people."

Why he ultimately became a priest:

"I found out that money didn't bring me happiness. I was looking for something that would give meaning to my life. When I entered the seminary the first time, I thought I was missing something, and I didn't want to be a frustrated priest."

Priestly stereotype that should be discarded:

"The stuck-up, formal priests who have to be treated At his first assignment, the predominantly Cuban Sts. Peter differently, who are not part of the people, who are and Paul Parish in Miami, he strived to fit in. "I would unapproachable." invite myself to eat in (parishioners') homes," telling them that he loved "peccadillo" and black beans. After the first Favourite type of music: two weeks of eating that every night, he got up on the American country music. He also collects folkloric music pulpit again and said, "I would like to change the menu." from different countries. Being one with the people:

Person he most admires:

"Anyone who leaves behind their way of life to do something extraordinary for others."

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Born May 6, 1964, in Levittown, New York, his family moved to Jensen Beach when he was 8. He attended public schools and St. Martin de Porres Parish, and was studying at Indian River Community College when he decided to enter the seminary. Since his ordination, May 11, 1991, he has served as priest-secretary to both Archbishop Emeritus Edward McCarthy and Archbishop John C. Favalora, and as associate pastor at Epiphany Parish in South Miami and Immaculate Conception in Hialeah. He is currently studying fulltime at Florida International University, working toward a degree in exceptional student education with a specialization in autism.

When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

Life as a university student:

"I started thinking about it when I was in eighth grade. Throughout high school it was an idea that kept coming back to me. Sometimes yes, sometimes no, but it definitely kept coming back. ... While there were many things that I could do and do well, this was the one thing where I felt I could give the best I had to give and be the most fulfilled."

"It's neat not to have any sort of favoritism toward me. Because sometimes priests are treated with favoritism. It's nice to know that the grade I'm getting is because I'm working as hard as everybody else. ... Being at the university has helped me to see the importance of being a person, not just a persona. It's important for priests to be persons with their people. Jesus said, 'I know my sheep and mine know me.' Underline the 'mine know me' part because sometimes we forget that. The sheep also need to know their shepherd."

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

His intended major in college was education. "It's very interesting that, these many years later, the church has come to me and asked me to fulfill a need by studying special education. So it's come full circle. In a sense, I gave On dancing: that up to enter the seminary and now it has been given "When I first got to Immaculate, I had never seen a back to me." community that so loved to dance. I never danced. I was terrified of dancing my whole life. But in order to be part of this community, I took salsa lessons. It was exercise. It was Greatest disappointment: fun. And now I can dance with my community. They were "If you turn disappointments over to God, they don't all happily shocked. I'm still no good, but at least I'm not become great. So I don't worry about those." afraid anymore." Greatest joy: On the priestly commitment:

"Sharing with people in the important moments of their lives, the joyful ones as well as the sorrowful ones."

"To be a good husband and wife, you have to be desperately in love with your spouse. The priest also must be desperately in love, passionately in love, with God and the priesthood. It is the same commitment. We're called to a spousal relationship with God. It needs to be that deep and that real and that passionate. If it's only about what you do, then it's work. It's just a job, it's not a life. Being a husband or a wife is not only about what you do, but who you are because of your relationship to this other person. For a priest, it has to be the same."

Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

"Being unable to meet the overwhelming needs that are being presented to you. Being unable to be in three places at once and wanting to meet those needs." Priestly stereotype that should be discarded:

"That priests are supposed to be angels in human form rather than human beings who walk with the community."

Thing he most fears:

"In a sense, I gave that up (a career in education) to enter the seminary and now it has been given back to me."

"Losing loving relationships. Becoming so busy that I loose touch with those loving relationships, with families and friends that keep me human, that keep me real." Person he most admires:

How others describe him:

"My father because he was a decent man who worked very "I've been told I have a raucous laugh." When he was at hard to provide for his family, to create a loving Epiphany, "it was a vocabulary word and the kids were not environment in his home, who was always willing to do getting it. So the teacher said, 'Father Michael has a things for other people without wanting recognition or raucous laugh.' And the kids got it." thanks."

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Born Jan. 21, 1954, in Moron, Cuba, Msgr. Castañeda came to South Florida with his family and graduated from Miami Springs Senior High. He attended Miami Dade College and Florida International University, graduating with a bachelor's degree in elementary education and a minor in special education. In 1982, he entered St. John Vianney College Seminary in Miami and continued his studies for the priesthood at St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary in Boynton Beach. He was ordained May 16, 1987, for the Archdiocese of Miami. Among his assignments since then, he has served as pastor of Our Lady of Perpetual Help Parish in Carol City and rector of the National Shrine of Our Lady of Charity in Miami. He became pastor of St. John the Apostle in 2010 and also serves as director of Opus Caritatis, a ministry to the homeless, the elderly and people with substance abuse problems.

Favorite movie: "The Mission."

What he did before becoming a priest:

"I began working when I was 15, went to college and became an elementary school teacher for the public school system in Miami-Dade County."

Favorite TV series:

"When I have a little bit of time I like to watch the show on A&E 'Intervention.' It is about a method or strategy used to help drug addicts recognize their problem and begin the process of recovery."

When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

"At age 19 I thought of becoming a Franciscan brother. The call to become a priest was not in the beginning, it developed slowly under spiritual guidance. I didn't begin the seminary until I was 28 years old."

Last book read:

"Jesus and the Jewish Roots of the Eucharist" by Brant Pitre.

Person or event that triggered his vocation:

"After I read the life of St. Thomas de Celano (one of the first followers of St. Francis of Assisi) and reading about the radical decision to leave everything behind and follow the Lord. Being involved in parish ministry fueled my desire to serve the Church."

Favorite type of music:

"I like music in general but my favorite is classical guitar and Bach's organ concertos." What he collects?

Person most surprised by his vocation:

"Nothing in particular, but throughout the years I have kept various editions and translations of the Bible as my own way of interest in sacred Scripture."

"My family at first because they didn't understand; also the principal at the school where I taught. I remember she said, 'I have goose bumps,' when I told her I was going into religious life."

Person he most admires:

Blessed Teresa of Kolkata. "I admire her convictions, her courage and her poverty."

What the seminary did not prepare him for:

"I would have benefited from learning more about the fundamentals of the biblical languages and Latin since we are committed to read, study, preach and teach the sacred Scripture as part of our way of life."

His greatest disappointment:

"When I see people abandon the practice of the sacraments or when marriages break and families are broken apart." His greatest joy:

'I do thank God for calling me and using me as his instrument in spite of my unworthiness.'

"To celebrate the Eucharist with my parents on their 60th wedding anniversary (which took place Sept. 10 of this year.) It is a joy and a special grace for my family." His greatest accomplishment:

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

"I normally don't look at my life from that perspective, but I do thank God for calling me and using me as his instrument in spite of my unworthiness."

"Teaching elementary school and special education. I was very happy doing that!" Favorite priestly assignment:

Thing he most fears:

"Serving the poor in the inner city and serving the Virgin Mary."

"I try to live without fear because it tends to paralyze some aspects of my life. My apprehension is to not want to contradict myself and the ministry/ mission that I am called to."

The most difficult aspect of being a priest:

"This question reminds me of John 15:20: 'No slave is greater than his master, if they persecute me they will also persecute you.' The hatred and persecution that Jesus suffered is also our own suffering as priests." A priestly stereotype that he feels should be discarded:

"People think that in order for a priest to be truly happy he needs to be married, and that simply isn't true."

A 3-year-old Msgr. Oscar Castañeda is pictured here dressed as a cowboy in his native Moron, Cuba.

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Born Aug. 1, 1953, in Georgetown, British Guiana (now Guyana), Father Chan-A-Sue’s name is actually an anagram. His great-grandfather was named Asue Chen, but when he immigrated to Guyana, he rendered it Chan-A-Sue. Father Chan-A-Sue first went into an accounting career. He earned a diploma from Liverpool Polytechnic in Liverpool, England, then joined the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales. He worked for auditing companies in London, Georgetown and Miami before answering the call to the priesthood. He earned a degree in philosophy at St. John Vianney College Seminary in Miami, and a master’s degree in divinity at St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary in Boynton Beach. He was ordained for the Archdiocese of Miami on May 13, 2000. Before coming to St. Bartholomew in October 2010, Father Chan-A-Sue served at St. Maurice in Dania Beach, Holy Family in North Miami, Blessed Trinity in Miami Springs and St. Andrew in Coral Springs.



Why did you leave a secular career to become a priest?

“When I went to college, I volunteered to lead rosary at lunch. A priest told my mother I should be a priest. I thought that was strange. In Miami, I got involved at St. Agatha and became friends with Father (now Bishop Felipe) Estevez. People kept saying I should become a priest. I decided I’d go to seminary; if I didn’t like it, I’d leave. But when I got there, it just felt right.” Person/persons most surprised by your vocation:

“My family. My mother asked if I had to do it. I partied a lot. I wasn’t wild and crazy, but I danced a lot. I had a funloving life.” Did the priesthood make you give up fun?

“I have fun in different ways. I like lively Masses. I’m always bobbing with the music.”

‘ I like lively Masses. I’m always bobbing with the music.’

Father Chan-A-Sue is pictured here in Kew Gardens, London, in wintertime, around 1980.

Favorite priestly assignment:

Something most people don’t know about you:

“Everywhere. The culture is so egoistic that if we’re unhappy, (we think) it’s because of the people around us. Happiness comes from making the best of the surroundings.”

“I always look at the theological aspects of movies. ‘Snow White’ is about power and innocence. The mirror sees the soul. The reflection is not the physical but the inner (self). And a kiss brings Snow White back to life. Love conquers death.”

How do you like to spend time off ?

“Sometimes I go with friends to movies or dinner. For restaurants, I always like to try something new. And I like gardening.”

Your harshest critic:

“‘Lincoln.’” He said, ‘Your compass may be true north, but you may have to go there by an indirect way.’ The lesson was that to get to a goal, you have to compromise.”

“In every parish, 10 percent are going to love you because you’re the priest; 10 percent won’t like you because you remind them of someone they don’t like; 40 percent will warm up to you; and the other 40 percent are just fulfilling their Sunday obligation. That’s the group you need to educate to become more active.”

Last book read:

Motto, or favorite Scripture verse:

“‘The Infancy Narratives of Jesus of Nazareth,’ by Pope Benedict XVI. He comes with insight, speculating into the minds of the Gospel characters.”

St. Augustine: “Christ has no body on earth but yours, no hands on earth but your hands, yours are the eyes through which he looks with compassion on the world, yours are the feet with which he chooses to go about doing good, for as he is the head, so you are the members, and we are all one in Christ Jesus.”

Other interests:

Football. The Hurricanes and the Dolphins. “I like to go to the games at Sun Life Stadium just down the road.” Person you most admire:

Person you most admire: “One is Nelson Mandela, for how he brought South Africa from the brink of civil war.” Your most memorable spiritual experience:

“My ordination. I was tired because I’d been doing a lot of work. When they put me on the floor, I was afraid I’d fall asleep. But just after Archbishop (Emeritus John C.) Favalora anointed my hands, I felt a peace come over me.”

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Born Feb. 14, 1961, in Limbé, Haiti, Father Charles studied to become an electrician and interior designer after graduating from high school in his homeland. But he always felt called to the priesthood. After studying almost three years at Iteso, the Jesuit university in Guadalajara, Mexico where he became fluent in Spanish), he entered St. John Vianney College Seminary in Miami in 1992, and was ordained for the archdiocese on May 8, 1999. He served at St. Mary Cathedral and Sacred Heart Parish in Homestead before being appointed administrator of Divine Mercy Mission in Fort Lauderdale in December 2004. The community has about 1,600 families, all of them of Haitian origin.



When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

When he was between 4 and 6 years old, he was impressed by the “extreme kindness” of Father Joseph Lepevedic, a priest who was very close to his family. “He gave the last rites to my grandmother and when he gave her the last rites he said, ‘Bye, and I will see you in heaven.’ A couple of days after my grandmother died, he died. … That is when I said I want to be somebody like that when I grow up.” What he did before becoming a priest:

“I made more money at interior design so that is what I did after high school.”

Because gardening is one of his hobbies, Father Robés Charles personally tends the garden at his parish, Divine Mercy Mission in Fort Lauderdale.

Who was most surprised by his vocation: Priestly stereotype that should be discarded:

“Nobody really. I ran into a friend that I have not seen in about five years, and she told me, ‘Everybody always knew that you wanted to be a priest.”

“Thinking that a priest is a perfect man of the world; that they have to be serious men, always wearing black and white. They should be thought of as simple people.”

Current responsibilities:

“Because this is a community that needs to be built up (physically and spiritually), I am involved with everything. I scrape, I mop, I do educational things.”

Favorite type of music:

What he does on his days off:

What he collects:

“I don’t have any. If I have spare time, I do garden work around the church.”

Manger scenes, different types of currency and stamps.

“Wow! It is so large. I love music, I love singing. The only music I really don’t like is blues.”

Person he most admires:

“Quo Vadis” (1951)

“My dad, Jolius Charles. He taught me that nothing is impossible.”

Vocation moment:

Thing he most fears:

Favorite movie:

People who put others down for no reason: “I don’t really “My whole life I have been very close to the church. Because of my situation with my family (I had) to postpone fear them. I just don’t like to be around them.” going to the seminary to become a priest. But (the idea) was always there.”

"Somebody who has his feet on the ground; being yourself and knowing yourself." What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

“A design consultant, a large-scale operation that would deal with all phases (of design).” Favorite priestly assignment:

“It is difficult to choose just one” but first on the list is the migrant ministry in Virginia, where he worked when he was a seminarian. “You had to be there to defend the people when they were being mistreated.” Greatest disappointment:

“The outlook you get in the seminary is completely different from what comes outside. Life outside is a big adjustment.”

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The son of a Cuban mother and Italian father, Father Alfred Cioffi was born in Havana, Cuba, Nov. 5, 1952, the older of two brothers. The family left Cuba in 1960 and lived in New Orleans and New York before moving to various countries in Central America. (His father worked for the airline Alitalia.) After high school, the young man came to Miami to study marine biology. In 1973, he received his undergraduate degree in biology from Florida International University but was not accepted for postgraduate work at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. After working at a fish farm, taking time off to care for his ailing mother and teaching at Miami's St. Brendan High School, he entered the seminary in 1980 and was ordained for the archdiocese on May 11, 1985. Father Cioffi served at Epiphany Parish in South Miami before being sent to Rome to obtain a doctorate in moral theology. Upon his return, he taught at St. Vincent de Paul Seminary in Boynton Beach and served five years as pastor of St. Kevin Parish in Miami before being sent to Purdue University in Indiana to obtain a doctorate in genetics. Because of Father Cioffi's expertise in this controversial field, the Archdiocese of Miami has "lent" him to the church at large.

Titles of his doctoral dissertations:

Greatest disappointment:

Moral theology: "The Fetus as Medical Patient: Moral Dilemmas in Prenatal Diagnosis From the Catholic Perspective." Genetics: "The Relationship Between the Structure and the Function of Chromosomes."

"The church abuse scandal." Favorite TV series:

"My best recommendation for TV is to shoot it before you throw it out the window. The happiest moment of my life was when I gave up TV. I'm addicted to TV, you see, so when I turn it on I can't turn it off."

What he did before becoming a priest:

After graduating from FIU, he got a job taking care of tropical aquarium fish at a fish farm on Sunset Drive in Miami. "It was a lot of fun. I would take care of the fish all Regrets: day. The weekends I would be sailing and diving and "All the sins of my life: being too wild, too young." dating and dancing – and I was getting paid for it." What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

Marine biologist.

"My best recommendation for TV is to shoot it before you throw it out the window." Vocation moment:

"I love nature. Through nature, I had a deeper relationship with God." As a teacher, he also "wanted to reach the teenagers at a deeper level, a more spiritual level; especially to try to help them not commit some of the mistakes that I had made when I was a teenager." Finally, taking care of his bedridden mother for more than a year "brought forth a generosity in my life." Until then, "I would have said 'I'll be a nun before I become a priest.' Those were the chances."

At home on the water: Would-be marine biologist Father Alfred Cioffi, center, during a diving trip with cousin-inlaw, Richard Jung, and his son, Ricky.

Wild days:

"I started smoking at 11." As a teenager in Central America, he and his friends would compete to see who could find a good wedding to crash and then be the first to get drunk. "It's by sheer miracle that I'm alive. … I have been the cause of my parents' sanctification."

Celibacy:

"That was a big sacrifice, and it is daily," although it has a practical advantage: "just being available for the people."

Thing he most fears:

Favorite sacrament:

Greatest joy:

What he does for fun:

What he collects:

Scuba diving and sailing.

Not much anymore, but "I used to collect coins, stamps, plants, animals, women, fossils. You name it."

"That the scandal is not over."

Confession, "because I've had to use it a lot. But seriously, Teaching. to think that people, total strangers, come to us with their conscience in their hands. They tell us things they don't tell Greatest accomplishment: their spouse. It's a very privileged moment that we have." "Convincing a mother not to have an abortion."

Favorite movies:

"It's a Wonderful Life" and "The Passion of the Christ."

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Born in Cuba in 1957, Father Corces grew up in Miami and was ordained for the archdiocese in 1988. As vocations director, he is responsible for recruiting and screening candidates to the priesthood. He also helps out at Prince of Peace Church in Miami, teaches lay ministry courses and has been involved with the HIV/AIDS ministry.

When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

Thing he most fears:

"I tried going into the seminary right after high school and it didn't work. I was too young, too immature." Years later, he began questioning his choice again: "During a New Year's Eve party in which I was having the best time, I stopped and looked around and said, is this what I want? And the answer was very clear. No. That is not for me."

"I fear being old, sick and helpless, because I see it every day." What he did before becoming a priest:

Worked in a bank's accounting department for 7 years: "I hated it."

Later still, during a visit to the missions in Honduras, he realized his call was to the priesthood:

"Coming in contact with the dirt poor people made me want to make a difference. The priesthood came up as the way to make a difference. Of course, there are other ways. But that was my way, the gift being offered to me." His description of the ideal priest:

"First of all, a human being filled with love for life and God and deep faith that, in and though that broken humanity, God blesses the world. You have to be filled with life, definitely."

Father Pedro Corces indulges in his favorite pastime: browsing in bookstores & reading.

Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

"Finding myself without answers and therefore dealing with the frustration of being powerless before cerain situations. Having to accept that I do not have all the answers."

"A teacher or a pilot. I love to tach and I love planes."

"I am successful when I know that the person has been touched by the spirit of Christ - when I have facilitated that encounter. You see the fruits. You see the change. Those are moments of sucess."

What he does on his days off:

Loves going to the movies and spending time in bookstores: "I'm a bookworm. And when the weather is nice I go to the beach. I love the ocean." His harshest critic:

Greatest disappointment:

"Myself and the Gospel."

"9/11. Disappointment at our own humanity, that we are capable of doing something like that."

His greatest accomplishment:

"I am successful when I know that the person has been touched by the spirit of Christ - when I have facilitated that "9/11. I was so angry in the morning, and by the afternoon, encounter. You see the fruits. You see the change. Those I saw how human beings are capable of the highest, heroic are moments of success." choices." Greatest joy:

Person he most admires:

Gandhi. "I think he was an incredible man who was able to free a country without shooting a gun."

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The oldest of three children, Father Davis was born in Hamilton, Ohio, Sept. 16, 1963. He entered the Pontifical College Josephinum in Columbus, Ohio, in 1981, studying for the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. A summer doing evangelization work in Mexico proved “dramatically impactful” and he decided to move to a “multilingual, multicultural part of the church in America” in order to do “cross-cultural ministry.” The fact that his grandparents lived in Dania Beach and his parents had a connection with Archbishop Edward McCarthy - his brother was their pastor - made Miami a logical choice. He moved here in 1985, spent a year studying theology at the North American College in Rome, then returned to St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary in Boynton Beach. He was ordained for the archdiocese in May 1990 and has been assigned to Archbishop Carroll High School since 2000. He also has helped out on weekends at Our Lady of Lourdes Parish in Miami since 1992.



Vocation moment:

An altar server since fourth grade, he attended a high school with a “very vibrant Catholic atmosphere.” One day, the librarian, a nun, asked him what he wanted to do with his life. His reply, “I'll probably be a teacher.” Her reply, “You're going to be a priest. I am going to pray for you every day so that you'll be a priest.” Another time, he was playing golf with the priest who was principal of the high school who told him, “You just might have what it takes to be a priest.” He gave up a full scholarship to the University of Dayton to enter the seminary at 17. “I went in willing to give it a try, one year at a time.” By senior year, “It was obvious this is what I wanted to do.”

Father Davis poses with Palestinian boys in Jericho during a trip to the Holy Land in June 2006. “What did Jesus look like when he was a little boy? I wanted to have a sense of this.”

Who was most surprised by his vocation:

“My father: He was a nonpracticing Catholic during all my growing up years.” After Father Davis was ordained, “he started going to church and is now a daily communicant.”

Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

“The Good Friday dimension of priesthood is heavy. Being on the front line and fighting the good fight on behalf of the church and furthering its mission. This is not Father Davis' personal agenda. This is the agenda of Christ and the church.We're constantly battling a lot of dark forces of evil and brokenness. Sometimes I feel like Obi Wan or Luke Skywalker with the light saber, battling the forces of evil.”

"Sometimes I feel like Obi Wan or Luke Skywalker with the light saber, battling the forces of evil." What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

On celibacy:

“I wanted to be a dentist, an astronaut for NASA, a pilot for Delta Airlines.” He also could have followed in his father's and grandfather's footsteps - both of them were local golf professionals - and joined the PGA.

“Good things are worth sacrificing for. There are causes that lead ordinary people to do extraordinary things. If heaven is the goal, then celibacy for the kingdom makes sense.”

Greatest disappointment:

His description of the ideal priest:

“I have not been able to be directly responsible for someone going into the seminary” even though he has worked hard at Archbishop Carroll High School to create “an environment where vocations are possible.”

“There is none. There were many different talents, temperaments and spiritual gifts among the apostles and they were all close to the Lord. I see ideal priests on every different front.”

Hobbies:

His harshest critic:

“I do love to travel. I've been to all 50 states and like to go to other countries. I find that a spiritual experience, to discover God in new places.”

“Myself. I demand hard work, integrity, professionalism and excellence of myself.” Thing he most fears:

Favorite movie:

“Being separated from the Lord. Not being with Christ. “I'm not a movie buff. I love “Star Wars” though. I have all That would be a frightful and hellacious destiny.” the DVDs.” His biggest challenge:

“To maintain the spiritual disposition of the priesthood in an otherwise secular job description. Most of what I do (as president and principal of a high school) does not require me to be a priest.”

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Born in Illinois in 1954, he grew up in Hialeah, entered the seminary at 15 and was ordained for the Archdiocese of Miami in 1983. He is founding pastor of two-year-old St. Katharine Drexel Parish in Weston, a growing community of more than 600 families, about 60 percent Hispanics from various countries in South America. Father Edwards learned to speak Spanish by "hanging out with the Cubans in Hialeah." He also taught himself Slavic during summer visits to his mother's family in Slovakia. Diagnosed with a brain tumor in 2005, Father Edwards died April 22, 2006.

His description of the ideal priest:

Most watched movie:

"Someone who prays and knows how to teach others to do "A Few Good Men" - he used it in his religion classes at that. Also, someone who is able to help people make the Columbus. connection between God's word and their life." Greatest joy:

"It's a repeat experience. When somebody comes and is able to express to me that my ministry has made a difference and enabled them to connect with God." Priestly stereotype that should be discarded:

"That the priest has a better or more direct connection with God than lay people do." Times he has failed as a priest:

"When I spoke too quickly, too harshly. Mostly cases of putting my foot in my mouth. Depending on the circumstances, you don't always get a second chance."

Father Paul Edwards puts his feelings on his bumpersticker.

When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

"I've never consistently wanted to be anything else. Ever since kindergarten, that's all I ever wanted to do and all I ever wanted to be."

What the seminary did not prepare him for:

"The seminary gives you a foundation of theological knowledge. But the priesthood is mostly on-the-job training."

Who was most surprised by his vocation:

"Nobody."

" It's a repeat experience. When somebody comes and is able to express to me that my ministry has made a difference and enabled them to connect with God."

Favorite priestly assignment:

Teaching at Columbus High School in Miami, which he did for five years in the mid-1980s. Greatest disappointment:

"When people get divorced. It's such an awful thing. It's so hurtful to them and to their families. It breaks the community of the church. It's almost never in their best interests. It's the single most painful thing that happens on a day to day basis."

Person, other than Christ, that he most admires:

"The late Msgr. Dominic Barry, my pastor as a kid at Immaculate Conception Parish in Hialeah. He was the epitome of a good pastor, an excellent image of what a good shepherd should be."

Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

Thing he most fears:

Finding time for a social life with lay people: "The time "Nothing. We're in God's hands. God holds us and sustains that most people are available is when I'm not. Even family us. There's no place we can go outside of God's celebrations such as Christmas or my mom's birthday providence. So I don't know that there's anything I fear." inevitably have to be tailored around my schedule." What he does on his days off:

What lay people teach him:

"I sleep late. I either go to the movies or watch videos. I catch my breath."

"Not to take myself too seriously."

Hobbies:

Wrestling and rugby. He used to coach wrestling at Columbus High School and play rugby on the weekends but he cannot do that anymore. "It works on a teacher's schedule. It doesn't work on a parish priest's."

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Born April 6, 1956 in Guantánamo, Cuba, Father Espino is the third of six brothers and sisters. He came to Miami in 1961 with a sister and older brother (now deceased) as part of the Pedro Pan program, which ultimately spirited more than 14,000 children out of Cuba. Father Espino lived with relatives in Brooklyn, N.Y., and Pennsylvania before being reunited with his parents on Valentine’s Day, 1966. That’s when I met my littlest sister, who was born two years after I left Cuba. The family moved near St. Benedict Parish in Hialeah, where he attended public schools. He entered the seminary in 1976 and was ordained a priest for the Archdiocese of Miami in 1983. He has served at Corpus Christi in Miami, Sacred Heart in Homestead, St. Ann in Naranja, St. Martin de Porres in Leisure City, Holy Family in North Miami and as archdiocesan director of Encuentros Juveniles and Youth Ministry. From 1999 to 2004, he returned to Guantánamo, Cuba, to work as a missionary. In addition to his duties at Holy Rosary, he currently serves as archdiocesan liaison to Caritas Cuba.



What he did before becoming a priest:

He worked part-time and during the summer delivering newspapers, cleaning up in a pizza parlor, pumping gas, bagging groceries and making deliveries. When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

About a year-and-a-half after graduating from high school, while studying pre-med at Miami Dade College. "I had a conversion experience.I saw the need for priests." What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

"I always wanted to be a doctor or in medicine." He still keeps up with topics in bioethics.

Father José Espino spent five years as a missionary in his native Guantánamo, working mostly with people who were uncharted. Here, he baptizes a young child.

His Greatest joy:

"Being able to be present to people in moments of need.You can make a difference in people’s lives."

What he collects:

Postcards from Guantánamo: "I discovered eBay." Most difficult aspect of being a priest: Person he most admires:

"Being open to the person that you have before you, being non-judgmental. We have a tendency to judge and to solve and give the correct answer right away. We just have to listen and walk with people."

For his example of perseverance: Charles de Foucauld, "a strange priest who founded a community that nobody joined." Today, that would be the Little Brothers of Jesus Caritas.De Foucauld is also the inspiration behind a priestly fraternity, Jesus Caritas, to which Father Espino belongs.

His description of the ideal priest:

"There’s no such thing as an ideal priest, in a sense. The ideal priest is the man who is able to be comfortable with himself, transparent before God and others, and be there for others."

Thing he most fears:

"Not responding to God’s will, and not con-fronting my fears." Thing he is grateful for:

"I turn out much better than I should have."

"God’s grace working. I turned out much better than I should have." Hobbies:

A priestly stereotype that should be discarded:

Cooking: "In Cuba I cooked for myself for 5 years. My grandfather used to cook and my dad cooked. It’s a way of relaxing."

"That priests are know-it-alls and solve-it-alls. Unfortunately, sometimes priests believe that." His harshest critic:

On going to Cuba:

"Myself."

When he arrived, the newly-created Diocese of Guantánamo had five priests and two parishes. In five years, it grew to nine parishes and 12 priests and was on the verge of ordaining its first diocesan priest.

Who was most surprised by his vocation:

"My brothers and sisters - they know me. You’re never a prophet in your own home." One girlfriend told him his decision was "a waste of brains."

"The work of the priest is the work of the priest wherever you go. You build up community."

What the seminary did not prepare him for:

"The burden of the bills and the building fund and this whole reality that takes energy away from pastoral work."

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Bishop Estévez was born Feb. 5, 1946, in Havana. "The liturgical calendar used then had as the saint of the day Felipe de Jesus," so that is his given name. He is the second of three children (two boys and a girl) who grew up in the area of Pedro Betancourt, in the province of Matanzas. In July 1961, the future bishop arrived in Miami as one of more than 14,000 unaccompanied children smuggled out of Cuba through the Pedro Pan program. A month later, he was relocated to St. Vincent Villa Orphanage in Fort Wayne, Ind., where he lived while attending Central Catholic High School. His brother joined him six months later, and they were reunited with his parents and sister a year after that. The future bishop attended seminaries in Montreal and was ordained May 30, 1970, in Fort Wayne for his home Diocese of Matanzas. Having been refused permission to return, he went to Honduras, where he served as a parish priest and member of the faculty in two seminaries. In 1975, he joined the faculty at St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary in Boynton Beach. After obtaining a doctorate in theology from the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome in 1980, he was named president/rector of St. Vincent de Paul, where he remained until 1986. In 1987, he was appointed pastor of St. Agatha Parish in Miami and director of campus ministry at nearby Florida International University. In 2001, he returned to St. Vincent de Paul as dean of spiritual formation, and in November 2003 was appointed auxiliary bishop of Miami. He was appointed bishop of St. Augustine on April 27, 2011, and installed June 1.

When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

What he does on his day off:

"From early on in high school I kept the idea only to myself as an amazing dream."

"I usually do personal reading and correspondence; usually see a movie; have a beer with a friend, a couple of friends or family. It's a day in which I take care more of my personal items."

Person or event that triggered his vocation:

"I was very blessed as an adolescent to know 'Padre Aleido,' a very zealous and holy priest. One day he took my hands and said, 'These hands could consecrate the body of Christ.' I remained in shock and bewildered, not really understanding his words — it was a very sacred moment. Undoubtedly the seeds were then sown." That priest was Miami's retired Auxiliary Bishop Agustín Román, who has remained his friend and mentor for more than 40 years.

Last movie watched:

"Poetry" (a South Korean film). His favorite book:

"I love to read theology." His greatest joy:

"Seeing with my own eyes the growth that Christ makes possible in people."

Persons most surprised by his vocation:

"My father. When I broke the news he felt let down, as I would feel if a son of mine would join the Hare Krishna. Within a year I could feel he was happy over the idea of becoming the father of a priest, an idea he had never considered."

His greatest fear:

"I fear attacks, to be attacked, misunderstood; when your integrity is challenged or when your intentions are not well understood."

What the seminary did not prepare him for:

His greatest disappointment:

"I was trained immediately after the Council of Vatican II. It certainly did not prepare me to deal with the very subtle crisis that came simultaneously with the great work of renewal of the Holy Spirit. I have a great gratitude for the great pontificate of John Paul II. His courageous leadership brought clarity and a vision which the whole Church needed at the end of the '70s."

"My lack of holiness." Person he most admires:

"St. John the Evangelist — the breadth of his writing, the breadth of his understanding of the event Jesus is truly overwhelming." Priestly stereotype that he thinks should be discarded:

"That we are unhappy. Recent statistics point out that more than 94 percent, 95 percent of priests are happy and satisfied in what they do."

' A pastor of a parish (is) the best job in the Catholic Church.' What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

"Signs point to being an educator, a university professor perhaps; also I would have chosen to contribute in the field of international development and world peace." Favorite priestly assignment:

"A pastor of a parish, the best job in the Catholic Church." Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

"To live immersed in a living paradox or in an immense gap: on one side being a channel of God's mystery, on the other side at the same time being a very limited fragile individual who is also a sinner. … St. Paul expressed it perfectly: 'We carry the treasure in earthen vessels that the all-surpassing power may be of God and not from us' (2 Cor 4:7)."

The future Bishop Estévez is shown here as a 4-year-old, playing with a goat in his native Matanzas, Cuba.

Most rewarding aspect of being a priest:

"The celebration of the Eucharist." His description of the ideal priest:

"The ideal priest is really the holy, totally self-giving priest. The example is John Paul II — hard to match." Hobbies:

He loves music, long walks during which he prays the rosary, tennis and baseball. His favorite team is the Florida Marlins.

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Born Dec. 30, 1928, in Galway, Ireland, Msgr. Fogarty is the second youngest of seven children. He attended seminaries in Ireland, was ordained June 2, 1957, and was recruited for the Diocese of St. Augustine, which then covered all of Florida, by the late Archbishop Joseph Hurley. In addition to his duties as pastor and dean, Msgr. Fogarty is chairman of the board of trustees of the archdiocesan Pension Plan and a member of the board of trustees of the archdiocesan Health Plan. Among his assignments during the past 46 years in south Florida: founding pastor of St. Bartholomew Parish, Miramar; archdiocesan chancellor (1972-78) and vicar general; pastor of St. Rose of Lima Church in Miami Shores (1971-91).



What he does on his days off:

He plays golf year-round with three pastor friends: "The Tuesday game is almost sacrosanct." When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

"In my fourth year of high school." His father wanted him to follow in his footsteps and be a teacher. "I squandered the money he sent me to apply for admission to teachers' training college." What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

An attorney or an engineer - his debate club experience would have been useful in a career in law and his love of math would have served him well as an engineer.

Before becoming a priest, Msgr. Fogarty (above) was a nationallyrecognized hurling goalkeeper. Hurling is an ancient Irish sport, a cross between lacrosse and field hockey played with sticks called hurleys and balls known as sliotars. This photo was taken at the allIreland colleges semi-final in 1946. Although Msgr. Fogarty's side lost, the national newspaper praised his stellar goalkeeping.

Favourite movie:

"The Paper Chase" Favourite TV program:

His harshest critic:

"The O'Reilly Factor"

"I am my harshest critic when I allow myself to become enmeshed in the trivia of pastoral life at the expense of the more essential dimensions of parish ministry."

What the seminary did not prepare him for:

"The challenges regarding finances in parish administration, such as budgeting, fundraising and stewardship. You have to find your own way through that."

His greatest accomplishment:

Helping to steer the Pension Plan for archdiocesan employees to its present stable position as one of the better diocesan retirement plans in the nation; recruiting a large number of priests in Ireland for the Diocese of Miami.

Favourite priestly assignment:

Recruiting seminarians from Ireland for the Diocese of Miami during the 1960s: "Every September it was a battle. About 20 to 30 diocese were vying to recruit seminarians." Among those he recruited: Father Peter Lambert (pastor, St. Clement, Pompano);, Father Gabriel O'Reilly (Pastor, St. David, Davie); Father Edmond Prendergast (Pastor, St. Bonaventure, Davie); Father Michael Quilligan (Pastor, Annunciation, Hollywood); the Dalton brothers, Father Brendan (Pastor, St. Bernadette, Hollywood) and Father Bryan (Pastor, St. Ambrose, Deerfield Beach); Father James Murphy (Pastor, Our Lady of the Lakes, Miami Lakes); Father Timothy Hannon, (Pastor, St. Anthony, Fort Lauderdale).

Last book read:

"A People Adrift" by Peter Steinfels. "It's about the crisis of the Roman Catholic Church in America. It's well-written and stimulates thought, even though one does not necessarily agree with many of the author's conclusions." Favourite type of music:

Classical music - 1360 AM. Person he most admires:

Pope Paul VI for trying to keep the church together after Vatican II; and William Bennett, secretary of education during the Reagan administration and author of 14 books. Despite admitting to a gambling problem last year, Bennett is "perhaps the greatest secretary of education we've ever had."

"I fear retirement. I don't know what I'd do." Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

Thing he most fears:

"Being chained to a desk & enmeshed in administration."

"I fear retirement. I don't know what I'd do on a Monday morning if I had to face a week with nothing specific to do."

His description of the ideal priest:

"One who is engrossed in apostolic work founded on a prayer life to which one devotes sufficient time. One's energy flows from an adequate prayer life." Priestly stereotype that should be discarded:

"The expectation or concept that priests deserve special treatment or privileges in the ordinary affairs of life."

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Born Dec. 7, 1956, in Sacramento, Calif., Father Grady is the third of five brothers (the youngest is deceased). His father served in the Air Force and the family moved often. Father Grady entered the seminary for his then home Diocese of Providence, R.I., right after high school. He obtained a bachelor’s degree in political science and philosophy from Providence College, studied a year at the Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium, and nearly two years at the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C., before leaving the seminary. In order to support himself, he got a job as a desk clerk at a hotel in the nation’s capital and “kept getting promoted” until becoming regional director of marketing for a national chain, a position which ultimately brought him to South Florida. In 1991, he returned to the seminary, entering St. Vincent de Paul in Boynton Beach. He was ordained for the Archdiocese of Miami on May 14, 1994, and has served as associate pastor at St. Gregory in Plantation and Nativity in Hollywood, as well as teacher and assistant principal at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Fort Lauderdale. He was named administrator of St. Jerome in June 2011.



When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

At age 18, and then again at 34: “Every couple of years I would have the urge to go back but I would say, no, I’m enjoying my life.” Finally, while working at a hotel in Florida, a Jewish lady who knew nothing of his background said to him, “Have you ever thought of becoming a priest?” A year later, “I made a deal with God. I’ll call (the seminary). They’ll tell me I’m too old. And then you’ve got to leave me alone.” It didn’t work out that way: “If God wants you, God gets you.” What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

“I would be doing hotel management, which I loved.” What he does on his days off:

“I like to be able to sleep late in the morning and go out to dinner or lunch with friends.” Father Michael Grady traveled to Hollywood, Calif., in March 2011 to preside at the wedding of a former student.

Favorite TV series:

“The Daily Show with Jon Stewart”

Priestly stereotype that should be discarded:

“Ascribing any super human attributes to a mortal man is not really a good strategy. Priests are human like everybody else.”

‘If God wants you, God gets you.’ Favorite priestly assignment:

What the seminary did not prepare him for:

“I love the parish because it’s varied. I’ve had it where I’m burying somebody in the morning and marrying somebody in the afternoon … In parishes, people let you into their lives at the most difficult and joyous moments. And this is a great gift of being a priest.”

“They can’t really prepare you for diocesan priesthood because their training is structured as if you were entering a religious community prayer together, etc. Your schedules are so busy (as a diocesan priest) that to try to plan morning and evening prayer together every day, that’s not reasonable.”

Greatest disappointment:

“That there is still war in the world. I’m a big advocate of peace. I just see absolutely no sense to the violence.”

Favorite type of music:

Classic Motown: The Supremes, Temptations, Four Tops

Greatest joy:

Person he most admires:

“My family.”

“My grandmother … an incredible woman. She was a tiny little thing, lived to be 96 years old and she just had this wisdom.” Hers was the first family funeral he celebrated as a priest.

Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

“It seems there are not enough hours in the day to do everything. And those are the days you’re going to get these sick calls and have to go to the hospital. That’s when I remember the saying, ‘If you want to make God laugh, make a plan.’”

Thing he most fears:

“Spiders I’m allergic to them.”

His description of the ideal priest:

“A man of prayer, a man with a sense of humor, and a man who can recognize Christ in everyone.”

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Born Oct. 13, 1950 in Cuba, he came to the U.S. with his family at age 11, graduated from Hialeah High School and served in the U.S. Army. He entered the seminary at age 40, after 13 years as a criminal defense attorney, and was ordained for the Archdiocese of Miami in 1996. In addition to his duties as pastor, he also serves as a judge in the Metropolitan Tribunal and supervising principal of St. Brendan High School.



On his delayed vocation:

“For the longest of time I resisted his calling. One day I said, why am I fighting? I thought money would make me happy. I thought fame would make me happy. I thought power would make me happy. When I chose not to be rich to become a priest, I became the happiest… Finally I was doing God’s will and not mine.” Who was most surprised by his vocation:

“The one person in my family who was not surprised was my dad. He said, ‘I kind of expected it 20 years ago. What took you so long?’”

Artist’s sketches hanging in the rectory of St. Brendan show Father Heria as a criminal defense attorney during a high-profile drug case in Chicago.

On being an attorney:

“I love the law. Having been a lawyer has helped me be a more effective priest, because I can get my thoughts across to people.”

Most frustrating part of priestly ministry:

On choosing criminal law:

Local hero:

“I like jury trials. I have to be with people. I just get energized by people.” On becoming a canon lawyer:

Father Pedro Luis Perez, pastor of San Lazaro Parish in Hialeah, whom he has known since age 12: “I pray that through my years of priesthood I can always be as consistent and as transparent as he has been.”

“I thought that I was done with the law… I’m convinced God has an enormous sense of humor.”

Hobbies:

On celibacy:

“I’m a baseball fanatic. I’m a boxing fanatic. I believe De La Hoya was robbed.”

“The administrative part…. If we are not careful we can lose our sense of spirituality.”

All the years he was a lawyer, he knew God was calling him to the priesthood. So he attended Mass daily and led a Greatest fear: celibate life. “If you do not have the grace to live (celibacy) Failure. beforehand, then you should have the humility to decline.” Regrets:

“In the beginning of my seminary life I thought that I had waited too long. As I look back I realize there’s no reason to regret. Because God has used it all.”

"When I chose not to be rich to become a priest, I became the happiest… “

On the role of a priest:

On temptation:

“Sometimes, when people come to see a priest, they want our prayers. They also want to see the human aspect of a priest. They don’t ask for much: a kind word here and there, a supportive hand, and lots of prayer.”

“Just because we’re priests doesn’t mean we’re above it all.” He goes to confession at least twice a month, preferably once a week: “It is not because I’m in grave sin. It is because I wish to avoid sin.” On obedience:

“I knew obedience was going to give me a lot of headaches, because I had been on my own so many years.” So before entering the seminary, “I sold my Mercedes. All of my properties I placed in trust for the benefit of my parents. I would allow only $50 a month for my personal expenses.… I had to physically tell myself, you have to enter this discipline.” Priestly stereotype that should be discarded:

“We are not walking about in clouds or sitting on high pedestals. My connection with God is no different than the people I serve. In fact, I know that their connection is a better connection. Mine has static.”

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Born Dec. 22, 1966, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Father Hernandez considers himself a "Cuban-Rican" because he grew up on the island but his parents and grandparents are from Cuba. The middle of five children - two older brothers, two younger sisters - he studied in Passionist schools before entering the seminary in Miami in 1987. Ordained in 1994, he served at Epiphany Parish in South Miami and Sts. Peter and Paul, Miami before becoming the first Hispanic pastor of the historic St. Mary Star of the Sea Parish in 2002. It is the third oldest parish in Florida.

On studying for the priesthood:

Favorite type of music:

"When I was a kid I was not much attracted to studies. I said to the Lord when I graduated from high school, the shorter the career, the better. Like always, the Lord has a good sense of humor. So he said, 'Oh, yeah, you're going to study eight years for the priesthood.'"

For listening: Soft Spainsh melodies by artists such as José Luis Perales; for dancing: "If there's salsa or merengue I will dance, because the music gets into me." Collections:

He owns 60 Nativity sets. "I love Christmas time and I love nativities. I'm the one who sets up the nativity at my church."

Why the priesthood:

"I wanted to serve people. Really, the life of the priest did not interest me. What attracted me was the service that the priest does for the community." Seminary life:

"It was my first time away from home and I was learning English. God wanted me to stay, because it was a terrible year, difficult to adjust." Good advice from a fellow priest:

"You cannot live better than your parishioners." - Father Juan Lopez, pastor, Sts. Peter and Paul Parish, Miami. What he does on his days off:

"I go to Miami and eat with friends. Favorite TV series:

"Friends" (he has a collection of episodes) and "The Golden Girls": "I learned English watching 'Golden Girls.'"

Father Hernandez, who describes himself as "a social person," celebrates his birthday with former parishioners from Sts. Peter and Paul Parish in Miami, Luis Acosta and his wife, Kirsy. He celebrated their wedding and baptized their children.

How he makes decisions:

Hobbies:

"I always go to the tabernacle and pray to the Lord."

"Eating - you can see that. ... For three years I used to cook on Sundays in the major seminary. I don't have time now." He also likes antique shops. "I just look. I don't have the money to buy."

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

"I probably would have finished accounting and be in business - maybe selling, like my father."

Persons he most admires:

Greatest frustration:

"My parents and grandparents - they were people who were not rich but they were so centered in what they had to do in life that they gave me a model to follow."

"Some of our regulations are a little strict for our people. But it's part of our faith. It's part of our tradition. And you have to follow them."

Biggest fear:

"Not death, but suffering a long illness, a heart problem, or cancer. As a priest, you don't have anyone. ... If that happens to me, who's going to take care of me?"

"I don't want someone to leave the church because of me."

Upcoming challenge:

Difficult moment:

"My heart is calling me to do it - start a mission church in Stock Island. There are a lot of Hispanic and Haitian people over there. Even though they come to the big church, they don't feel part of the big church. I feel the responsibility and the need - if they can't come to me, I have to go to them."

During the height of the priestly sexual abuse crisis in 2002: "Do I need to be in this? I can be an active parishioner like my father is. I don't need to be labeled as one of them." Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

"To always make sure that what you do, you do it right ... I don't want someone to leave the church because of me."

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Born Oct. 6, 1952, in Washington, D.C., Father Hogan is the second of three children. His family moved to Florida in 1965 and became active in Holy Rosary Parish in Perrine. He entered St. John Vianney Seminary as a ninth-grader in 1966 and was ordained a priest for the Miami Archdiocese in 1980. After serving at St. Ignatius Loyola in Palm Beach Gardens and teaching at the minor seminary, he was sent to Rome, where he obtained his doctorate in liturgy. In addition to his archdiocesan duties, Father Hogan serves as North American director of the Patrons of the Arts of the Vatican Museums, a group dedicated to preserving the artistic and historical treasures of the Vatican.

Priestly stereotype that should be discarded: "That priests really are not in touch with what happens in the everyday life of people in the parish. When you wake up at 6 o’clock to open the church doors and 20 people start coming to you to talk about what’s going on in their lives, you sort of know what’s going on."

His early entrance into the seminary:

I’m one of the last lifers. His first day of school in 1966 there were 36 in the class. I was the only one out of the class to be ordained. When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

"It first hit me when I was 10 or 11, when I started serving Mass. He played at Mass at home, wearing a Superman cape for robes and using nickel-size candy wafers as Communion. It was a way of imitating what you saw at Mass. There was a majesty and a beauty (there). Then he went to an ordination at St. Mary Cathedral and I was just blown away by the dedication that I saw." What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

An architect or someone involved in politics. "Both work on building the physical and also building a better life for people, a better community." What he did before becoming a priest:

Young Terence Hogan playing the piano at home. At age 12, he played the organ at weekend Masses at Christ the King and Holy Rosary in Perrine.

At age 12, he played the organ at weekend Masses at Christ the King and Holy Rosary in Perrine. He left the seminary for a while and worked as a salesman in the commissary of an Air Force base, but he was not really good at it. "I always would tell people, this is a good deal or a bad deal."

Words of wisdom:

"Once the priest thinks he’s better than the people, that’s the beginning of the destruction of his vocation." Who was most surprised by his vocation:

"Once the priest thinks he’s better than the people, that’s the beginning of the destruction of his vocation."

"Oftentimes, I am." Person he most admires:

Mother Teresa and St. Francis of Assisi: The grace that she shared with others is just a con-stant opportunity for meditation on how we really are called to be. His story parallels Mother Teresa’s: That constant love for those who have nothing, and yet done joyously.

What he does on his days off:

"I love going out to dinner with priest friends. Anything where you can relax and enjoy being with people who understand what your daily life is about."

Thing he most fears:

Favorite TV series:

"I feel that we as a society are too rapidly losing respect for the individual as a human being and as a spiritual person. Once the ego becomes God in our life, then we are doomed to our orig-inal sin. How often do we as individuals think we know everything?"

"I’m a newsaholic. I watch a lot of (talk shows) until my blood pressure goes up. That’s the political side of me." Greatest joy:

"Celebrating the Eucharist."

His job with the Patrons of the Arts:

His description of the ideal priest:

"One of the best parts of the Patrons job is that I often have "Christ is the ideal priest. All we can attempt to do is be the the Vatican Museums or the Sistine Chapel all to myself." alter Christi, try to be like Christ."

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Born May 10, 1943 in Butte, Mont.,Father Holoubek moved to Clewiston, Fla.,with his parents and sister when he wasfour months old. He attended local publicschools, then studied one year at theUniversity of Florida before entering theseminary. He was a member of the secondclass to graduate from St. Vincent de PaulSeminary in Boynton Beach and wasordained to the priesthood May 24, 1969,for the Archdiocese of Miami. He hasserved at St. Juliana in West Palm Beach,as chaplain of the Civil Air Patrol in PalmBeach, as associate pastor at St. John theBaptist in Fort Lauderdale and St. Colemanin Pompano Beach, and as pastor at St.Lawrence in North Miami Beach. Hebecame pastor of St. Maurice in 2000 and also serves as chaplain of the Hollywood Fire Department.

What he did before becoming a priest:

He worked at an A&P grocery store as a bagger,stocker and checker, even mopping floors onoccasion. He also helped his dad mow lawns andwas a caddy at a golf course. One summer heworked as a security guard at United States SugarCorporation - seven days a week, from midnightto 7 a.m., swatting mosquitoes and punching aclock when he made rounds every half-hour.

Priestly stereotype that should be discarded: “Some people believe that priests are more holythan lay people. I don’t think priests are moreholy than anybody else.

When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

“If anything I was sure I didn’t want to be a priestwhen I was in high school. I had a misconceptionthat it would be a very boring life, that the semi-nary would be the most boring place in the world.My vocation wasn’t a sudden revelation; it hap-pened sometime during my time in the seminary. I grew into (the idea of becoming a priest). Someof the most wonderful people I have met in mylife were at the seminary.” What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

Teaching. Who was most surprised by his vocation:

“Myself. I really didn’t think I was going to lastmore than a couple of months in the seminary.”

Father Holoubek serves as chaplain of the Hollywood FireDepartment.

Last book read:

"Life is difficult; it is the wiseperson who can embrace that truth."

“The Road Less Traveled” by Scott Peck. “Life isdifficult; it is the wise person who can embracethat truth.” Favorite type of music:

Current responsibilities:

“New Age” and rhythm and blues."

In addition to his duties as pastor, he is responsi-ble for St. Maurice’s religious education programand oversees 43 active ministries at the parish.Along with volunteers of the parish’s “WreckingCrew,” he helps mow lawns, pick up trash, trimweeds and clean bathrooms on Fridays andSaturdays. “There are so many different dimen-sions to (being a priest). You have to specializein so many different things.”

What he collects:

University of Florida Gator memorabilia, includ-ing, but not limited to, sandals; Emmett Kellyclowns and gargoyles; reproductions of VincentVan Gogh paintings. Thing he most fears:

“I visit friends and enjoy their company. I usedto play golf and tennis but had to give up thosesports because of weakness in my arms.”

"I feel that we as a society are too rapidly losing respect for the individual as a human being and as a spiritual person. Once the ego becomes God in our life, then we are doomed to our orig-inal sin. How often do we as individuals think we know everything?"

Favorite movie:

Persons he most admires:

What he does on his days off:

Blessed Mother Teresa of Calcutta and DaveRobinson, director of Pax Christi, USA. “I caredeeply about peace and justice. We have a great hunger program here. There are peoplewho do care.”

“Midnight Cowboy.” “I like the story. It’s abouttwo very struggling people making their way inlife, how they help one another. They have thisdignity about them.” His description of the ideal priest:

Thing he most fears:

“Somebody who is very pastoral, very kind and agreat preacher, and someone who relates wellwith people.”

Declining health, or a medical condition that would make him retire early.

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Born May 27, 1955 in Suffern, N.Y., Father Hoyer has four brothers and two sisters. His father is 95 years old; his mother died three years ago at 88. His family operates an ice cream store in upstate New York that has remained in business at the same location for 53 years. He attended Catholic elementary school and public high school, and earned degrees from the Catholic University of America and St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary in Boynton Beach. He was ordained for the Archdiocese of Miami on May 24, 1980 and served at St. Helen, Fort Lauderdale and St. Rose of Lima, Miami Shores before becoming pastor of Our Lady Queen of Martyrs in 1989.



What he did before becoming a priest:

He was a disc jockey on a college radio station and during afternoon drive time on a “real” station, WETZ-AM in upstate New York. “That’s where the name ‘Happy Hoyer’ comes from. Someone said I was the happiest person they had ever met and the name stuck.” Vocation moment:

Father Hoyer was taught by the Marist brothers in elementary school. “We had lots of interaction with priests of the parish and school.The nuns, priests and brothers looked for and prayed for vocations. Vocations were positively presented, and they were looked upon favorably in the home. Being a priest is never dull, always challenging and never boring. Where else could I have more fun?”

Father Hoyer got his nickname “Happy” when he worked as a disc jockey at a radio station in New York. He still pulls DJ duty at his parish when the occasion requires it.

Harshest critic:

“Myself. I like things that are well-planned and executed perfectly.”

What he does on his days off:

“I try to catch up with work.” He also enjoys traveling, and has visited Europe and Greece, as well as Fatima and Greatest accomplishment: Lourdes. Building up strong communities of faith: “That’s what I’m working towards.” Favorite type of music:

Disco

Last book read:

“Tuesdays with Morrie” and “The Five People You Meet in Heaven,” both by Mitch Albom; and “The Purpose Driven Life” by Rick Warren.

Favorite TV show:

“The Amazing Race.” “It’s nice to see places you’ve been to and you want to go to.”

Priestly stereotype that should be discarded:

Favorite movie:

“The priest is aloof and lives in an ivory tower, disconnected from people.”

“The Good, The Bad and The Ugly” starring Clint Eastwood. Although he enjoys movies, he reads the reviews before deciding which ones to see. “The bad Persons he most admires: language and the violence (of today’s movies) are real turnNancy Grace of CNN and Court TV. “She was a offs.” prosecutor. She does her research and takes a stand. She’s a very good victim’s advocate.” What the seminary did not prepare him for:

The financial rules, regulations and legal aspects of running a parish. He remembers taking a management course in the seminary and having a good comprehension of what was being taught because of his exposure to the “business world” - his family’s ice cream store, where he learned about payroll taxes, accounting and sales taxes. His father read The Wall Street Journal every day.

Thing he most fears:

Having enough money to keep Our Lady Queen of Martyrs School viable. ‘Happy Hoyer’ Street:

In November 1997, the city of Fort Lauderdale named S.W. 11 Court, in front of Our Lady Queen of Martyrs, “Happy Hoyer Street.” Parishioners had lobbied officials for months to rename the street after their beloved pastor. He knew nothing of their efforts. “They told me they usually named streets after dead people. I was very happy to have it named after me when I’m alive. Sometimes I fear what they (parishioners) do behind my back!”

Favorite aspect of ministry:

Celebrating Mass with the children. “They are eager to listen and learn. The kids are good here.” Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

Trying to be all things to all people and trying to satisfy everyone. “It’s very hard, you just have to prioritize. Pray and hope you make the best decisions.”

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Born Sept. 22, 1958, in Havana, Father Isern moved to Venezuela with his family at the age of 5. When he was 9, they moved to Miami where he attended public elementary school and a private high school, Champagnat. (He still celebrates the school's graduation Mass each year.) He studied marketing and international business at Miami Dade College and Florida International University, and worked for a bank until “a gradual search for answers” led him to the priesthood. He was ordained for the Archdiocese of Miami on April 16, 1993, and has been at Our Lady of Lourdes since June 2002, taking over as pastor in March 2003.



What he did before becoming a priest:

He worked for First National Bank in the marketing department, promoting one of the first ATMs. “They were called Quick 'n' Easy back then.” When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

“I was looking for answers and I knew the Lord had them. I wasn't too happy where I was in my life and I definitely couldn't see myself promoting ATMs for the rest of my life.” Toward the end of his studies at FIU, “I would go to the Blessed Sacrament late at night. However, there really weren't any churches nearby that were open late, so I would stand outside the windows of the old church of St. Brendan, now the parish hall, and all I could see was the red glow from the sacramental candle. I would be there for a long while, looking for the answers I knew he had for me.”

A five-year-old Father Fernando Isern is pictured here swimming in 1963. He still loves the water and enjoys sailing on his days off.

His ideal priest:

Pope John Paul II. Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

“The multiple demands of being a pastor can be trying.” After a while, he realized that St. John Vianney Seminary was right next door and did have late-night adoration. “So I His harshest critic: drove up and walked in like I owned the place, and I “My friends keep me honest. That is a blessing. They keep wasn't leaving until I got some answers. I did that for a my feet on the ground whenever they come off.” while before the rector was notified that I was doing this, and I wasn't even a seminarian.” Priestly stereotype that should be discarded:

“That one gives up so much when you become a priest. Over time, he discovered his call to be “with (Christ) and in The reality is that you gain even more than you could ever him.” sacrifice. You don't have to stop doing what you love. And if you're away from your family, you gain an immense family in the Church. The Lord gives so much.” " The reality is that you gain even more

than you could ever sacrifice. The Lord gives so much. "

Thing he most fears:

“My computer crashing - it keeps blue-screening.”

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

“Probably still marketing and promoting those ATMs.” What he does on his days off:

“I own a little 25-foot sailboat, so I enjoy sailing. I get out there on the ocean. I really cherish it.” Favorite TV series:

“I don't usually get to watch the programs when they're on, but I record them and watch them later. I enjoy political commentary shows.” Greatest accomplishment:

“Realizing that it's not about my greatest accomplishment, but in helping others accomplish; accomplishing things together and growing in Christ.”

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Born Oct. 18, 1967, in Jean-Rabel, Haiti, Father Jean-Mary is the fifth of seven brothers and sisters. His father was a farmer who wanted him to study agronomy, but he was interested in law as a way of fighting the injustice he witnessed in Haiti. He finally settled on accounting “because it was something practical and less burdensome. But it was not my vocation.” He entered St. John Vianney College Seminary in 1992 and was ordained for the archdiocese in May 2001. He now leads a mission church with more than 2,000 registered families, where more than 4,000 people come to Mass each Sunday.



When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

At age 7, he was inspired by the example of his parish priest, Father Jean-Marie Vincent, who was murdered in Haiti in 1994. “He was a very down-to-earth priest” who played soccer with the kids, brought bands to the town and helped the peasants. “To me that was the perfect image of a priest who established a balance between the spiritual and the temporal.” He did not think about the priesthood again until age 19. “I was in search of meaning in my life. That’s when I began to discern a vocation.” He spoke to a priest in his hometown who gave him two books to read on the Soccer enthusiast Father Reginald Jean-Mary cheers on Notre Dame lives of Blessed Charles De Foucauld and St. Louis de d’Haiti’s team during the archdiocesan jubilee year soccer Montfort. “I think that was the wake-up call in my life. tournament held among Haitian parishes earlier this year. After reading those two books, I felt that God was calling me.” Favorite movie: “Contact” with Jodie Foster What he did before becoming a priest:

“I worked one year as an accountant for a French organization.”

Greatest disappointment:

Coming to Florida:

Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

“To see that we are still in that mess in Haiti.”

He entered the Montfort Fathers in 1989 and was sent to their novitiate in France, but realized he did not want to become a religious priest. While visiting family in south Florida in 1991, he met people who told him, “We need priests here. Why should you go back to Haiti?” He met Father Thomas Wenski (now bishop of Orlando) and spent the summer at Notre Dame d’Haiti, working alongside another young Haitian (now Father Robés Charles of Divine Mercy Haitian Mission in Fort Lauderdale). That’s when he decided, “The Holy Spirit knows what he’s doing. I’m going to let myself be carried by the winds of the Holy Spirit.”

“People have a lot of expectations of you. People see you in such a high standard. And you know your limitations as a human being.” His description of the ideal priest:

“A servant; a man who is inside what he is on the outside; a man who is on the outside what he is on the inside.” Priestly stereotype that should be discarded:

A Haitian stereotype: “That priests have money” because Haiti is a missionary country and the church provides everything to the people. Favorite type of music:

"I believe that God is on my side wherever I go."

Compas, Haitian dance music. “I enjoy singing.” Hobbies:

Playing soccer, watching movies and reading. “On my day off I will go to Barnes & Noble for at least two hours.”

On language:

He spoke neither English nor Spanish when he entered St. John Vianney Seminary. He now speaks English and Spanish in addition to French and Creole, and is trying to learn Ibo, a Nigerian language. “The role of the church is to preach integration, not isolation or assimilation. … The more languages you know, the more world is open to you.”

Person he most admires:

The late Brazilian bishop, Dom Helder Camara, and Bishop Frantz Colimon of the Diocese of Port-de-Paix, Haiti.

What he does on his days off:

Thing he most fears:

Visits his sister in Fort Lauderdale, who is a single mother of three. “I play a father role in the lives of my nephews.”

“Nothing. I have no fear. I believe that God is on my side wherever I go.”

Greatest joy:

“Being a priest and being a servant of God and of his people. I think that is the greatest blessing in my life.”

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Born Feb. 10, 1972, in Cap-Haitien, Haiti, Father Jeanty came to the U.S. in April 1990 to join his parents, who were already living in Pompano Beach. He began studying accounting at Broward Community College while working full time, but entered the seminary in August 1996. He was ordained for the archdiocese on May 15, 2004, and served as associate pastor at St. Bartholomew Parish in Miramar until 2006, when he went to Rome to study canon law. He was named archdiocesan chancellor for canonical affairs in September 2010, and also serves as a judge in the Metropolitan Tribunal and pastor of St. Philip Neri Parish in Miami Gardens.



When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

"It was only after I came here. I was doing everything else — pursuing a career, I had a girlfriend, I was involved in youth ministry and church. … There was a void in my heart calling me, as if this wasn’t enough.” The climax of his discernment came, by “God-incidence,” on the same date he would later be ordained a priest, May 15: “Jesus appeared to me in a dream. He said, ‘Chanel, come to me.’ I woke up from the dream; never slept the rest of the night. I called up the vocations director that morning and said, ‘I’m entering the seminary" Father Jeanty, seen here during a Pastoral Center Christmas party, taught himself to play the guitar while in the seminary. Eventually, he bought an acoustic guitar for $1,200. “It’s still my companion. It was a great investment.

Person or event that triggered his vocation:

"It’s all a mystery to me. The seed was planted in my heart."

Favorite TV series:

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

"I don’t have time."

"Probably a college professor, teaching philosophy or

Favorite book:

"The Road Less Traveled" by M. Scott Peck

something that has to do with humanity, with the arts. I love philosophy."

Favorite type of music:

What the seminary did not prepare him for:

"As long as it sounds good, that’s me. Give me a good sound, a good lyric and I love it already"

"There’s no way that I would imagine that I would end up being the chancellor of the archdiocese. The seminary doesn’t

Person he most admires:

prepare you for that."

"My mother. She wouldn’t expect from me anymore than what she knows I can do. But she accepts me even when I don’t do what she knows I’m capable of. If I could live up to her, I would wake up a better man every day."

Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

"To stand in the threshold of being the very incarnation of God is so mind-boggling. Hopefully you know your limitation."

His greatest disappointment:

"To stand in the threshold of being the very incarnation of God is so mindboggling."

"To not have made the best of the opportunities I have had as a person." His greatest joy:

"Whenever I say ‘yes’ to a call to serve, it’s going to be the place of (my) greatest joy."

His description of the ideal priest:

"To be able to satisfy the hunger that everyone has for the infinite, the divine, for God. That’s where I come in."

His harshest critic:

“"People who aren’t as easygoing as I am. I drive them nuts. They say I’m too relaxed, too peaceful. I’m always keeping my cool"

Priestly stereotype that should be discarded:

"I know people expect a priest to be a role model and a great human being. That’s as it should be. But we’re certainly not supermen. All of us have to struggle with our limitations."

Regrets:

"None. The stupid things that I’ve done have brought me to be the person that I am now and helped me to see a different perspective, to be a better human being for others"

What he does on his day off:

"He likes to go to the beach. “I simply enjoy the outdoors, read a good book." What he does on his day off:

Favorite movie: "Kingdom of Heaven,” “Gladiator,” “Avatar” and other epic-type movies whose message is, “What good would it be for a man to live in this world and not make it a better world?"

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Born Oct. 31, 1956, in Santa Clara, Cuba, Msgr. Marin came to the United States with his family - parents and younger sister - at age 4. They settled in Chicago. He went to medical school in the Dominican Republic and completed his residency at the University of Miami, specializing in investigational cardiology. He was ordained for the Miami Archdiocese in 1989 and later obtained a canon law degree from The Catholic University of America. He served as chancellor from 1993 - 2003 and, in addition to his work as promoter of justice and judge on the metropolitan tribunal, as well as chaplain of the Catholic Physicians & Dentists Guild.

When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

Favourite priestly assignment:

He felt the call in fifth grade at Our Lady of Mercy Catholic School in Chicago, where he was an altar server. He would have entered the high school seminary had it not been for the advice of the school's new principal who suggested he attend a "prestigious" public high school instead that focused on math and science. "The whole background of my family being in medicine came back again and I went back to medicine. Priesthood was out of the picture for those years."

Our Lady of Guadalupe: "There's such a great community that is constantly challenging me. I can place many of my gifts there at the service of this community." Greatest disappointment:

None. He sees them as "challenges, as moments of growth, time to learn. The alternative would be to sit down and cry and I don't do that." Greatest joy:

Vocation moment:

"Just being with people at the most important times of their In 1976, his first year of medical school, there was a huge life - the birth of a child, the death of a relative, their explosion at a sugar mill in the Dominican Republic. "The wedding day. Their whole life, you're involved with them." 400 men who were burned kept asking for a priest. The only priest was away at a mission. It was very clear to me, Greatest challenge: seeing all of the doctors and the nurses and 123 men dying, "To realize that you're not going to please everybody. I'm a that there was more need for priests than there was for pleaser. I like to keep people happy. You realize that not doctors." He decided to quit medicine, but again was everybody is going to be happy." advised not to by the seminary rector, who told him "the best thing to do was to finish medical school because that His harshest critic: would always be in the back of my mind. God would call "My mother. She's very truthful." me later." God did - in 1983 in New Orleans. "I was giving a keynote speech at a cardiologists' convention. These two Hobbies: gentlemen walked up to me and said, 'Are you a priest?' He collects coins and stamps and is an avid reader, at least They were Jesuit physicians." They told him: "Your whole one book a month. "I've had three at a time going." He empathy for the patient almost speaks of you being a priest especially loves reading history books. already." Favourite type of music:

On making the final decision:

He likes all types, from Annie Lenox to Bach. He also has season tickets to the opera.

"I needed to prove to myself that I could be a good physician - New Orleans was that proof. It was the pinnacle of medicine. So next, I needed to prove that I could be a good priest."

People he most admires:

His parents, who sacrificed their own futures to give their children a future in a free land. His mother worked nights in order to be with her children during the day. "She would put us to bed and be there when we woke up. We didn't realize she was working all night... It was a great sacrifice that they made. They are always my heroes."

"It was very clear to me, seeing all of the doctors and the nurses and 123 men dying, that there was more need for priests than there was for doctors."

Current difficulties in the church:

"This isn't the worst of times. It isn't the best of times. But we'll get through it and go into another wonderful adventure with God."

Who was most surprised by his vocation:

"Some of my medical colleagues. They didn't understand it. But in the long run they have come asking for help at times and are glad that I'm there for them. The friendships have remained."

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Father Marino was born July 27, 1967, in Flushing, N.Y. His family later moved to South Florida, and in 1985 he graduated from Chaminade College Preparatory (now Chaminade-Madonna College Preparatory) in Hollywood. After his freshman year at The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C., he was accepted as a seminarian for the Archdiocese of Miami. He studied at St. John Vianney College Seminary in Miami and St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary in Boynton Beach, and was ordained April 16, 1993. He has served as pastor of St. Michael since July 2008, and before that was pastor of Visitation Parish in North Miami. In addition, he serves as adjunct spiritual director at St. John Vianney; spiritual director of the Italian Apostolate; chaplain of the Knights of St. Gregory and St. Sylvester; and presbyteral council representative for the East Dade Deanery. He also is a member of the international movement Communion and Liberation, and serves as the priest responsible for member priests in the U.S.



What he did before becoming a priest:

“My parents owned a fish market in Pembroke Pines and both my brother Joseph and I worked there when we were younger.” When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

“I would say, the age of reason, 7.” Person or event that triggered his vocation:

“By the time I had my first Communion, I knew I wanted to do what the priest did. I wanted to stand at the altar and make Jesus present. My vocation stems from the liturgy of the Church.”

Father Marino is pictured here with his mother, Marie, and his brother Joseph, whom he calls “a great blessing in my life.”

What he collects?

Liturgical vestments and vessels (chalices)

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

Person he most admires:

“Probably work in the food industry, in some aspect of the seafood business. “Before I became pastor of Visitation Parish I was the fine dining food critic for the Miami Herald Broward edition for three years, from 2000 to 2003, and that was a lot of fun.”

"Many people (and) no one person in particular. I have spiritual fathers that I model my life as a priest after: Pope John Paul II; Msgr. Luigi Giussani, founder of Communion and Liberation; Archbishop Fulton Sheen; and Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger before and after becoming Pope Benedict XVI. As a high school student, I received the book 'Introduction to Christianity,' written by Cardinal Ratzinger, and although I didn't understand it I knew that it was important for my life. I have never put that book down since."

The most difficult aspect of being a priest:

“Not living up to people's expectations, even though sometimes their expectations are unreasonable.” His description of the ideal priest:

“A man who is faithful to Christ, the Church and the liturgy.”

His greatest disappointment:

“I would say to not communicate God's love and truth as I should. My own human failure is my disappointment, my lack of charity and mercy.”

‘My own human failure is my disappointment …’

His greatest joy:

“I have lots. The fact that I wake up in the morning, that A priestly stereotype that he feels should be discarded: people feel welcomed at my parish, being the person that “I don't believe there are any, especially in this archdiocese, can see the good in others are all joys. My brother Joseph is because we are all so diverse with such a variety of style.” a great blessing in my life.” What he does on his day off:

His greatest accomplishment:

“I like to cook, I like to fish (shallow water reef fishing), but mainly I like to relax at the parish.”

“I am only doing what I am supposed to do. … I may do it poorly, but I am still doing it.”

Favorite movie:

His harshest critic:

“The “Godfather” trilogy: “Yes, even Godfather III!””

“Myself. However, my mom is my greatest champion.”

Favorite TV series:

Thing he most fears:

“House” and “No Reservations” with Anthony Bourdain.” “Allowing my human failures to overwhelm me, to disappoint people or let them down.” Last book read:

“I just re-read, 'The Leopard' by Giuseppe di Lampedusa and the biography 'John Adams' written by David McCullough.”

Regrets:

“When I fail to show charity and mercy, sometimes on a daily basis.”

Favorite type of music:

"I enjoy music; I like having either classical or opera playing in the background. I have an appreciation for the human voice.”

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Born Dec. 5, 1962, in North Miami, Father McCormick is the fifth of eight children born to a Quaker mom and Presbyterian dad who converted to Catholicism in 1966. "They said they converted because they were tired of being called sex maniacs in the Protestant church." He grew up in St. Bartholomew Parish, Miramar, and graduated from Cooper City High School in 1981. His involvement in young adult groups led to his appointment as a "wisdom person" for the archdiocesan synod, 1985-1988. He was ordained in May 1996, and served at St. Louis Parish, Pine crest; and St. Andrew, Coral Springs; before being named pastor of St. Maximilian Kolbe in March 2002.

What did you do before becoming a priest?

He worked at a Sony manufacturing plant. "We built mixing consoles for recording studios. … It was very tedious work. But I did it for eight years. It enabled me to get involved in a lot of ministries. I worked my eight hours and then went to churches." When did you know you wanted to be a priest?

"Almost immediately after high school, because I just loved what I was doing for the church. … I just wanted to make a difference for God. To be honest, I didn't think that because of my disability, the seminary would give me one look." Why didn't you continue being a lay person?

"As a lay person, I had been involved in as many things as I could probably be involved in. But it just seemed that God was calling me to something beyond that. I'm very glad I followed up on that because I've been very happy as a priest. I mean, you can only say you're a young adult for how long?"

Father Jeff McCormick, a comic-book hobbyist, poses in the playground of St. Maximilian Kolbe's new education center.

What would you be doing if you had not become a priest?

What is your greatest joy?

"I really thought at different points that I was going to become a youth minister or a young adult minister. (The church) is such a part of my life, I can't imagine my life being not part of that."

"Preaching. That and hearing somebody's confession who's been away for a long time. To know you've made such a substantial difference in someone's life just by being there." What is your description of the ideal priest?

"Somebody who prays. Somebody who's present.Somebody who proclaims."

What is your disability?

He has cerebral palsy. "It's probably because I was so premature. I was born in the sixth month, which, in 1962, it's quite amazing that I survived."

Priestly stereotype that should be discarded?

"I don't play golf." What is people's reaction to your disability?

"The first two weeks I'm in a parish, people are just so terrified I'm going to fall crashing to the ground.… It's how the Lord made me. I was born with this. I've always had to go through life knowing that there were certain limitations."

Who was most surprised by your vocation?

Some of his friends, who told him: "'Priests aren't supposed to be funny. You can't be a priest. You laugh too much.' Of course, it's been my experience that priests have the best sense of humor." What is your favorite type of music?

"I just wanted to make a difference for God."

Contemporary Christian music, 88.1 WAY FM: "I turn it off when they start to preach because I can't deal with their theology."

What do you do on your days off?

What do you collect?

"I read my comics. I do a lot of things that most people do on the weekend, such as go to the dentist, get my hair cut, go to the bank."

Comic books: "I've been reading comic books since I was 10." His favorites: Avengers, X-Men, Justice League. Who do you most admire?

What is your favorite movie?

Miami Auxiliary Bishop Agustín Román "because he "Godspell" – "I memorized that entire album when I was 9 breathes and lives his ordination." years old. I put it on and I still enjoy it." What do you fear the most?

What is the most difficult aspect of being a priest?

"That people will see our faith as irrelevant, because the "Situations where you have to be in two places at once, Catholic faith has been under such heavy attack. It's hard to and unfortunately, you can't do that … I've had the beeper see our faith so heavily ridiculed." go off when I'm doing weddings or at the cemetery. … People don't need a priest according to your schedule. They need one according to theirs.Unfortunately, you can't be two places at once." What is your greatest disappointment?

"That probably falls under my greatest challenge – the times that I'm not able to be there for someone."

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Born Oct. 10, 1933, in Ennis, County Clare, Ireland, Msgr. McDonnell is the eldest of five children. He was ordained June 16, 1957, for the then-Miami Diocese. Among his many assignments during the past 47 years, he has served as supervising principal of St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Fort Lauderdale, Immaculatea-La Salle High School in Miami and Mary Immaculate High School in Key West. He also served as pastor of St. Jerome in Fort Lauderdale; St. Mary Star of the Sea in Key West; and St. Clement in Fort Lauderdale.

What he does on his days off:

"I don't have many days off, but when I do I like to read and shop. I like to go to Disney and the Keys. I played golf for 37 years, but I haven't played since 1992. I had a 10 handicap 30 years ago. Although I never played at Pebble Beach, I had lunch there last summer." Favourite movie:

"A Man For All Seasons" - "I admire St. Thomas More." Favourite TV program:

Old movies on AMC (American Movie Classics) Msgr. Patrick McDonnell is no longer able to play golf but still managed to have lunch at Pebble Beach last summer.

Who was most surprised by his vocation:

"My father and my friends and the guys I hung out with ... I went to the seminary right out of the blue. I didn't tell His harshest critic: anyone. My father told me that if I ever wanted to come "Me. I have difficulty managing my time. I went to a retreat home, I'd be welcome with open arms." where I heard that we minister to our interruptions. One of my problems is that I can't say, 'No.'" What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

"I have no idea ... I probably would have gone on to the university. I would like to have been a doctor, but taking a look at what they had to go through, I don't think I would have made it."

What the seminary did not prepare him for:

"Learning on the job, how to handle emergency calls in the night. In my first assignment I was blessed by a good pastor, (the late) Msgr. John O'Dowd in South Miami. I had a bunch of real great priests who taught me early on."

Favourite priestly assignment:

Starting a new parish, St. Cecilia in Fort Myers: "Many priests don't get an opportunity to do that."

Greatest accomplishment:

"Surviving. The older I get the more I admire the old priests for the faithfulness, by the grace of God."

"The older I get the more I admire the old priests for their faithfulness, by the grace of God."

Last book read:

"Bleachers" by John Grisham. He is currently reading "Ashes to Ashes." Favorite music:

Greatest disappointment:

"Every time I was transferred."

Golden oldies, "Little Things Mean a Lot."

Greatest joy:

Person he most admires:

Pope John Paul II and Jimmy Carter. "Carter's attitude towards his presidency was great - his value system and what he's done since he left the job, traveling the world promoting peace, and his work with Habitat for Humanity. I would like to see his place in Atlanta (The Jimmy Carter Library and Museum). I'd also like to read allof his books."

Celebrating the Eucharist & administering the sacraments. Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

"Making sure you have enough money to pay the bills. Administration, when you're in it, it's hard to let go of it."

"I don't want someone to leave the church because of me."

Thing he most fears:

"I don't have a fear of incapacitation. I'm working on being physically incapacitated. I understand what they mean when they say, 'physically challenged.' I'm all the time figuring out how I'm going to do something."

His description of the ideal priest:

"Many times we forget that priests are human beings. I don't have an idea of what an ideal priest is. You have to face the aspect that not everyone will like you. I suppose a man who serves the people and in the process keeps his sanity."

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Born June 22, 1969, in León, Nicaragua, Father Paguaga is the oldest of four children. He arrived in the United States Dec. 1, 1989, after a one-month, $2,000 journey from Guatemala. He worked in the construction industry, at fast-food restaurants and washing dishes before entering the seminary in 1991. He was ordained a priest for the Miami Archdiocese in May 2000, and served at Our Lady of the Lakes in Miami Lakes before being assigned to Little Flower last summer.

Why he came to the United States:

"To come, work, save, help my family and go back after six or seven years." His father had died in 1984, and the family had moved to Guatemala, partly due to the political troubles in Nicaragua. The family's pharmacy had been looted; their grandfather had been kidnapped. What he did before becoming a priest:

He was one of the first cooks at the McDonald's on S.W. 87th Avenue and 24th Street in Miami. He also worked at Burger King and as a busboy at the Radisson Hotel. At one point, he held three jobs simultaneously. "I'm very proud of it. If you want to work, you will find work. If you want to get ahead, you can get ahead."

Gardening enthusiast Father Paguaga with some student helpers from St. Teresa School in Coral Gables.

Favorite type of music:

When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

Country music, 99.9 KISS FM

He first asked his mother for permission to enter the seminary at 6. At 14, he attended a charismatic retreat for young people. "I remember saying, 'This is what I really want to be.'" His father's response: "Over my dead body." He tried to enter the seminary in Guatemala but his mother asked him to wait. After coming to Miami, "I knew I didn't want to stay (in the United States) to make money but to serve the people. I saw the need here. An immigrant can best understand an immigrant."

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

He was studying civil engineering at the University of Guatemala. "The thing is, I don't see myself doing something else other than being a priest. This is what I love. Sometimes I feel guilty that I get paid for what I do." Priestly stereotype that should be discarded:

"Sometimes people don't see us as human beings with the same needs and feelings as others. We come from a family. We sat for many years in the pews where people sit and listened to the liturgy. We're real. We weren't born wearing vestments."

"It's almost like God brought me here..." What he does on his days off:

"I like to go to the beach. I like to go to the gym. I spend a Most difficult aspect of being a priest: lot of time working in the garden. It puts my mind at ease." Transfers: "You get to love your people, you devote yourself to them, and then you have to move." Favorite movie:

"The Lion King."

Greatest disappointment:

"The Golden Girls", "Touched by an Angel" and the Discovery Channel.

"That my father didn't see me ordained because, actually, he would have been extremely happy with me. My father was never able to see his son fully realized as the man he wanted to be.

God's plan:

Person he most admires:

"It's almost like God brought me here and opened the doors because in less than two years I was in the seminary. It couldn't have been more clear that God wanted me to be here."

"My mother - her faith and trust in God, her simplicity, her sense of humor. She has never complained to God or anybody else for all the things that she has been through in her life."

Favorite TV series:

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Born in Haiti in 1954, he speaks fluent English and Spanish. In May, 1988, he became the first Haitian priest to be ordained for the archdiocese. In addition to his duties as pastor, he directs the Society for the Propagation of the Faith for the archdiocese.



His description of the ideal priest:

Greatest joy: “I have a lot of them. I discovered in the priesthood that you can do a lot of good. You can be a sign.”

“Being a priest is the ideal. It’s not so much what you are supposed to do. It’s what you are supposed to be. You can bring this ideal about in your personal life and in the life of others.”

Greatest disappointment: Haiti

Priestly stereotype that should be discarded:

“That priests are unhappy and our life is a sacrifice and misery. That’s not true. I have so much fun being a priest it’s just incredible.” What he did before becoming a priest:

While studying for his master’s degree, he used to support himself by playing the organ in churches in Toronto. “Italian churches – can you imagine?” Favorite book:

“Don Quixote” by Cervantes: “His ability to see what a lot of people couldn’t see. To feel what a lot of people couldn’t feel. To be able to search and find goodness At one point, Fr. Pierre thought he might pursue a career in music. Today, he plays the piano for relaxation. where a lot of people would not be able to find it. I think we need to do that also to believe in a human being so much that finally that person, seeing how much you believe Most difficult aspect of being a priest: “It can be crazy sometimes,” such as a recent Saturday in her, begins to believe in herself.” when he presided at the funeral of a 20-year-old and a couple of hours later witnessed the marriage of two young Person he most admires, other than Christ: people. “One minute I was terribly sad. The next hour I “My 95-year-old father, a man of faith, of conviction, who was smiling. Isn’t that crazy? You pass from one type of cares deeply for the people and who would share the shirt sad feeling to a joyful and happy moment If you are not off his back with anybody in need.” well balanced, that’s going to take a toll on you.” His biggest challenge:

" I discovered in the priesthood that you can do a lot of good. You can be a sign. "

“Challenges are also opportunities.” When he was named pastor of St. James, the school was on the verge of closing and parish buildings were run-down. He figured, “It cannot get any worse. Anything I do will be fine. I started working with my hands, cleaning. As the people saw me working, they joined me.”

When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

He thought about it after his first Communion. In high school, he considered becoming a musician or a doctor but the idea of the priesthood stayed with him. “My father and mother always prayed for vocations. They always ended their prayer with, ‘if it’s the will of God that a vocation should come out of the family, may the will of God be done.’ I don’t think they were thinking about me. When I began really to think about the priesthood, my father’s prayer became my prayer, basically: Lord, if it is your will that I become a priest, guide me, and may your will be done.”

Thing he most fears:

“The degradation I have seen around the world. We are becoming more and more insensitive to the plight of the poor, like somebody watching TV with a remote control. If we get to something unpleasant we just turn it off and tune out. It is very sad to see.”

Who was most surprised by his vocation:

His father, who jokes that he used to believe All Saints Day was the feast for deceased priests and religious until his son became a priest. “Now he knows better. But since I became a priest, I can never get him to call me by my name. He calls me ‘father.’”

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Born in 1955 in the state of Kerala, India, Father Puthusseril was ordained for the Diocese of Krishnagar, India, on Oct. 6, 1979. While studying for his canon law degree in Rome, he made friends with some priests from the northern United States, whom he visited a few summers. That is how he found out about Florida, where there was “great weather, similar to what we have back in Kerala, India.” He came to Miami in 1990 and was incardinated (made a part of the archdiocese) in 1995. Along with parish work, he has served as archdiocesan coordinator for high-tech, and a judge and defender of the bond in the Metropolitan Tribunal. Since July 2002, he has been pastor of St. Andrew Parish in Coral Springs.



What he did before becoming a priest:

“I was studying. I am not a 'late vocation.” When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

“From an early age, probably around 8 or 9. But that was not a definite. When I became a teenager, I was not 100 percent sure if that was the way I wanted to go. I had some questions and wavering moments, but then, finally, it worked out this way.” Person or event that triggered his vocation:

“No one, really, but there were people who wanted me to Father Puthusseril is shown here tinkering with an amplifier in the leave my vocation. … My father died when I was 21 and auditorium of the papal seminary in Pune, India, in the late 1970s. He in our culture, the oldest son takes on the family still loves tinkering with electronics and computers. responsibilities. So, when my father died, I was still in the Favorite movie: seminary and some members of my family told me, 'It's time to leave the seminary, come home and take care of the “Life is Beautiful" family.” Favorite TV series: What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

“What is TV? I have no time for TV!”

“I would have taken electronic engineering. Electronics was my hobby. I loved building my own little gadgets.”

Last book read:

What the seminary did not prepare him for:

“The Case for Christ” by Lee Strobel, an investigative journalist and agnostic who became a believer.”

The business aspect of the Church, administration and finances. “And I don't blame them, because that is not a business school. … You learn things at the parish. That happens in any profession. I don't look at it as a negative.”

Favorite type of music:

“I mostly listen to spirituals in my mother tongue.” Person he most admires:

“I do admire my mother greatly because of the struggles she had to go through: being a single mother raising seven children on her own; two or three of us were of age, but the others were still young.”

‘Electronics was my hobby. I loved building my own little gadgets’ The most difficult aspect of being a priest:

His greatest joy:

“Trying to please everybody. It's almost impossible.”

“I find great joy in celebrating the sacraments, in ministering to people.”

His description of the ideal priest:

“The ideal priest is, naturally, Jesus Christ. Can we imitate Jesus Christ 100 percent? We are human beings; we try the Thing he most fears: “I really don't want to die without the sacraments.” best we can.” Regrets:

On compassion and the law:

“I don't really have any. … If you ask me if I would be a “It is always a juggling act trying to be compassionate, priest all over again, I would say 'yes!' even with all the understanding, loving, caring and yet to fulfill the requirements of the laws of the Church. Being a canonist, it challenges that are out there today.” makes it more difficult because I know the law.” A priestly stereotype that should be discarded:

That priests have no faults or failures. “Priests are human beings.…They make mistakes.…I don't mean that priests should not be holy; they should be. But we do not always reach the ideal.” What he does on his day off:

“I wear a different set of clothes and I work in my office during the morning, trying to catch up on all the things that I need to do, and all the paperwork. But in the afternoon, I try to relax a bit and go out for dinner.”

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Born June 1, 1951, in Havana, Father Rivero left there with his family at age 9, moving to his great-grandmother's house in Barcelona, Spain. Three years later, the family moved to his grandfather's cattle ranch in central Florida, where he learned to drive a tractor and prepare the land for pasture. A year later, the family settled in Miami's Coconut Grove section, where Father Rivero attended Mass and served as an altar boy at St. Hugh. He was ordained May 15, 1982, for the Archdiocese of Miami and served at Immaculate Conception in Hialeah, Corpus Christi in Wynwood, the National Shrine of Our Lady of Charity in Miami, and as pastor of Holy Family in North Miami from 1999 to 2004. From 1992 to 2006, he served as director of the respect life ministry. In 2004, he was named pastor of St. Raymond and still serves as spiritual director of respect life.



When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

When he left Cuba at the age of 9: “I wasn't sure, so I procrastinated.” Vocation moment:

In his last year of college at Miami-Dade, he joined a charismatic prayer group: “I really experienced there a new awareness of the Lord and his love and his purposes for us. I had the peace in my heart to make the decision to go into the seminary.” After high school, Father Jordi Rivero joined the U.S. Navy. His assignment with the Seabees took him to the South Pole. “I was the first Cuban-born person in the South Pole.”

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

“Taking care of the environment.” Before becoming a priest, “I was concerned that we were wrecking our planet. I wanted to do something about it. But then through the prayer group I realized that the root of the problem is that we have drifted away from God. I became aware of Christ's lordship and his calling for us to be a new creation.”

His description of the ideal priest:

“A saint.” Priestly stereotype that should be discarded:

“That it is a profession or it's a job, or that the people are customers of a franchise or a social club, so then you can demand or expect services without understanding that we are called to be a body where we're all responsible for each other. The laypeople are as much the Church as the priests, and we all have to be a family.”

His Navy experience:

After high school, “I was about to be drafted. I had a very low number,” so he simply signed up and put in his four years. “I was never on a ship. I was always in construction work.” After the Navy, he began studying chemical engineering at Miami-Dade College and was accepted to the University of Florida but did not attend. “That's when I decided to change and go into the seminary.”

Travel:

“Once a year I try to go on a pilgrimage. That is my vacation.” Person he most admires:

" The measure of how well the parish is doing is how many people are confessing, because we are all sinners. "

“John Paul II and Benedict XVI - I really love them as fathers. At the local level, I really admire tremendously Bishop (Agustín) Román. Having lived with him, (I know) the man is a saint.”

Judging success:

“The measure of how well the parish is doing is how many Hobbies: “If you consider the Web site a hobby. I love to advance people are confessing, because we are all sinners.” the kingdom of God and use whatever resources I have to do it.” What he does on his days off: “I don't have a day off. I enjoy what I do so much that I don't see my time as being on the job or off the job. I'm just Regrets: “I have never had any doubt whatsoever of this vocation. a priest every day.” Never. This is who I am.” Web site:

A Web site he developed 13 years ago www.corazones.org - now has 1 million unique visitors each month, making it one of the top 12,000 of all the Web sites in the world. “I saw right away that this was the wave of the future.”

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Msgr. Schwanger was born April 25, 1960, in Harrisburg, Pa. He graduated from Middletown Area High School there, then followed his father to Florida, where he graduated from the University of Florida in 1982. He went to the University of Florida Law School, obtaining his law degree in 1984. That same year, he entered the seminary, completing his studies at St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary in Boynton Beach. He was ordained for the Archdiocese of Miami on May 12, 1990. In addition to his duties at Our Lady of Lourdes, he serves as adjutant judicial vicar of the archdiocesan Tribunal, promoter of justice for the archdiocese, president of Archbishop Coleman Carroll High School in Miami, chairman of the permanent diaconate advisory board and judge for the Tribunal of Nassau, Bahamas.



What he did before becoming a priest:

"I went to school. I worked for the University of Florida as an attorney. I also worked for Reisman & Brynn, a law firm that is no longer in existence, and I handled immigration matters for the Archdiocese of Miami." Person most surprised by his vocation:

"My friends because they thought I could do good things as a lawyer. They did not see a need for me to be a priest. It seemed radical to them at the time. They are still my friends." What the seminary did not prepare him for:

"Nothing prepares you for everything. The seminary gave me the tools I needed." What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

"I would probably be an attorney, working in legal aid or government work."

Msgr. Kenneth Schwanger is shown here on one of his pilgrimages through El Camino de Santiago (The Way of St. James) in Spain. He has walked the ancient pilgrim road in its entirety three times and been on some part of it a total of eight times.

Favorite priestly assignment:

"Being the pastor of Our Lady of Lourdes. It is the universal Church in miniature. There are so many cultures. It is such an active community. There are always more things to respond to and develop. I never wake up bored. And the spirit of our community is extraordinarily positive."

Favorite movie:

"'The Lion in Winter' because of its artful use of the English language in the dialog. The recent movie I have seen is 'The Way,' written and directed by Emilio Estevez and starring his father, Martin Sheen. I really enjoyed the movie. It is a good portrayal of the human stories that get intertwined and grow along the Way of St. James and the cinematography is great. It is more challenging physically than the movie lets on. It helped me relive my experiences and remember the people I have met over those years."

The most difficult aspect of being a priest:

"It is seeing the suffering for those who do not respond to Christ. It is knowing that if they gave their life to Christ, it would change their lives. I know the stories of people intimately, and the desperation, hurt and struggle people face. If they would give their life to Christ and believe, it would change everything."

Favorite TV series:

"Gator football." Last book read:

"El Sueño del Celta. The Celtic Dream."

'If (people) would give their life to Christ and believe, it would change everything.'

Favorite type of music:

Classical His description of the ideal priest:

"He loves God and loves his people."

Person he most admires:

A priestly stereotype that he feels should be discarded:

"My mom and dad. They were good souls and normal people."

"The thing about stereotypes is that they are partial truths. They are incomplete. Priests are as different as there are people in the world. People need to realize that."

His greatest disappointment:

"There is not enough time to do all that I want to do and experience it all."

What he does on his day off:

"I walk. If I have the whole day off, I walk a 15-mile circuit. I have walked El Camino de Santiago three times, and I have been on it a total of eight times. I also visit friends."

His greatest joy:

"A Mass where everyone is connected and you feel the Spirit." His greatest accomplishment:

"Being an authentic person." Thing he most fears:

"I don't know that person and I would rather not."

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Born July 16, 1941, on a farm in County Cork, Ireland, Father Singleton aspired to the priesthood from seeing priests who visited from many nations. He studied at St. Patrick's Seminary in Thurles, County Tipperary, was ordained in September 1965, and set off for South Florida. He was assigned first to St. Helen in Vero Beach, where he acquired a heart for agricultural workers and the underprivileged. That orientation would later guide his work at Sacred Heart in Homestead, San Isidro in Pompano Beach, the Pompano Beach Labor Camp and Our Lady of Guadalupe in Immokalee. While in Immokalee, he recognized he had an alcohol addiction and sought professional counseling.That led him to learn how to help others out of substance abuse. He studied the subject at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, then St. Mary's University in San Antonio. On returning to South Florida, he worked at Palm Beach Institute, became clinical director of Anon Anew in Boca Raton and eventually executive director of the Hanley-Hazelden Center, West Palm Beach. He later served at St. Joan of Arc in Boca Raton and most recently at St. Anthony, from where he retired this July 1.



How his work with migrants influenced his ministry:

"With migrants, you come to realize what is really significant in your life. The day-to-day story about the migrants was survival — for rent, for food. They always gravitated to the Church. We also had to become their advocates for the state. All that opens you up to what it means to survive and be a human being. And how you're aided by the spiritual." How alcohol addiction affected his ministry:

"It informs your whole life. I got into AA (Alcoholics Anonymous) and it gave me a whole new understanding of my vulnerability, and how you're not an island unto yourself. And (it provided) a new understanding of God the Father. Prior to that, it was 'Do you believe that God loves you?' But through AA, I experienced it. That influenced my relationship with God, and how I related to others." What the seminary did not prepare him for:

"The professors had been educated in Rome, so through no Father Jerry Singleton is seen here at the PGA National Charity Golf Tournament in 1990. fault of their own, they had no idea of the American Church and not much understanding what was going on in Favorite type of music: American society." "I like Irish music and light classical music, and some country-western. It's like Irish ballads."

' You get the sense that (Pope Francis) knows how to run a parish.'

Person he most admires:

"Pope Francis. He's the first one that I'm aware of who has a sense of the pastoral. Francis' sermons are very down to Culture shock on coming to U.S.: earth. You get the sense that he knows how to run a "A big cultural shock. Suddenly, you're out here and totally parish." free, and trying to manage your freedom in a responsible way. And how the people viewed Church and priests was Something most people don't know about him: very different. … You never saw a priest (in Ireland) "There are times I seem to be vain. I take maybe too much except at Mass, and people stayed at a distance. Here, pride in accomplishments." people saw the priest as approachable. They'd invite you to their house." Regrets: "Maybe one would be that I didn't go into recovery from alcohol sooner. I could have saved myself and others a lot of pain if I'd done it even three or four years earlier."

Hardest part of being a priest:

"Trying to be as available as possible, and trying to be all things to all people. That can eat you up over time. You hope you have enough spiritual life to sustain you."

Advice for others considering the priesthood:

"Learn to serve people. Forget about fancy vestments and vessels. Put into your head that you're going to serve."

Biggest challenge facing the Church today:

"To become relevant, to help people make sense of the Gospel message in their daily lives. That gets beyond a lot of the regulations and laws that some people can get caught up in." Favorite vacation spot:

"Back home in Ireland, on the home farm. And I play a lot of golf, if weather permits. I tell people that overnight, I become the laziest person in the world." Favorite TV series:

"I watch the news and golf and ESPN. I follow the Dolphins."

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Born Jan. 24, 1947, in Havana, Father Sosa arrived in Miami Oct. 27, 1961, one of the 14,000 unaccompanied minors brought to the U.S. through Operation Pedro Pan. He spent time at the Matecumbe and Kendall camps before moving into St. Raphael Hall, where the chaplain was Msgr. Bryan O. Walsh, one of the architects of Pedro Pan. Father Sosa completed his last two years of high school at St. John Vianney Seminary in Miami, went on to St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary in Boynton Beach, and was ordained May 20, 1972, one of the first Cuban priests to be ordained for the Archdiocese of Miami. Until his appointment to St. Joseph this fall, he served as pastor of St. Catherine of Siena in Kendall for 19 years, and before that was pastor of St. James in North Miami. He is a published author and composer. In addition to his duties at St. Joseph, he serves as president of the Instituto Nacional Hispano de Liturgia Inc., as consultor to the U.S. bishops' Committee on Divine Worship, as member of the archdiocesan Vocations Board, and as adjunct professor of liturgy and popular piety at his alma mater, St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary.

Hobbies: “I worked summers in various places while I was at the “I was a tennis player in the seminary. I still play it and I seminary. I entered the seminary when I was 15 years old. I love to watch it on TV.” have worked in libraries, banks and even in maintenance for a while during those summers.” What he did before becoming a priest:

When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

“I always had an inclination toward the religious life. For a while I wanted to be a (Marist) brother, like those who taught me in school in Cuba. Later on, after I arrived in the Pedro Pan program and stayed in Miami, I decided to join the seminary, for which Msgr. Bryan O. Walsh was very happy.” Person or event that triggered his vocation:

“Brother Modesto from the Marist School in Cuba and Msgr. Bryan O. Walsh.” Shown here is a young Father Juan Sosa helping out at a summer camp for children during his time in the seminary.

Person most surprised by his vocation:

“My parents and some of my schoolmates and friends.” In fact, he told his parents by phone about his plans, as they were still in Cuba. They suggested he wait until they arrived in the U.S., but that did not happen until 1967. By that time, he was halfway through his seminary years.

What he does on his day off:

“Rest, sleep, go to the movies or to the theater, share a meal with good friends.” Favorite movie:

He has many - “Forrest Gump,” “Casablanca,” “All About “That’s where I learned that I could sing, that I could write, Eve,” “The Lives of Others”: “Movies that display and Latin and Greek.” When he attended the seminary, opportunities for redemptive love and express it in some only 10 of 200 seminarians were Spanish-speaking. He form of a turning point.” spent four years at St. John Vianney - the last two years of high school and two years of college - and six more at St. Last book read: Vincent de Paul. “I used to wake up and say, ‘I’ll never Dean Koontz novels make it.’ Now, nearly 40 years have passed.” His experience in the seminary:

Favorite type of music: What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

Classical

“I would probably be a teacher. I love to teach and even if I am tired, still draw much nourishment from teaching a What he collects: group or a class. Also, counseling and spiritual direction - I “Too many gadgets, gifts that I received from people, love that.” mostly paintings and icons.” Person he most admires:

'I love to teach and even if I am tired, still draw much nourishment from teaching a group…'

“St. Paul and St. Damian of Molokai, for their perseverance as shepherds in the midst of a most difficult situation; opposed and rejected by their own and others and yet faithful to their priestly commitment.”

The most difficult aspect of being a priest:

His greatest disappointment:

“For me, as a pastor, knowing that I have to fire an employee, and the funeral of a child.”

“Anyone who leaves the Church without discernment and personal prayer.”

His description of the ideal priest:

His greatest joy:

“A man who can balance prayer, teaching and administration in such a way that his life reflects the values of priesthood with peaceful serenity; a man who sees Christ in others and others see beyond his frailties the Christ that lives in him.”

“Sunday and weekly Mass; receiving new members into the Church at the Easter Vigil.” His greatest accomplishment:

“Books and articles I have written over the years; music I have composed; the satisfaction of writing and composing for others.”

A priestly stereotype that should be discarded:

“A ‘climber,’ someone who thinks he can ‘feel’ better because he is recognized with titles or positions; someone who displays more clericalism than pastoral outreach.”

His harshest critic:

“Myself.” Thing he most fears:

“Not being able to shepherd to people in their life’s journey.”

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Born April 8, 1957 in New Jersey, he moved to Florida with his family around 1970, settling in St. Vincent Parish in Margate, where his parents still live. He was ordained in 1983 and served for 10 years as director of Catholic Charities' child welfare division. He has a master's degree in social work and is nationally certified as a social work manager and pastoral counsellor. He still serves as a state policy leader for the Child Welfare League of America.

When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

His involvement in the community:

During his first year of business and pre-law studies at Stetson University, while attending a retreat: "It was as if a voice was saying to me, 'Be a priest, be a priest.' It was quite audible to me. It was just a very strong urge or message. Finally, I believe I actually said it out loud. I said, 'All right, damn it, I'll do it' ... That I am a priest, that I responded to that call, is one of the things that proves to me there is a God... Why would I have thought of it? Why would I do such a thing?"

Despite running a one-priest parish, he serves on the board of the Urban League of Broward County, on the ethics committee at Plantation General Hospital and the coordination committee for Broward County's Million Meals organization. "The Gospel is not just a bunch of words in the pulpit. It has to be brought into action." Greatest Joy:

"The best time of my week is the Sunday liturgy. Everything else makes no sense without the liturgy."

Hobbies:

He is a runner (five miles about three times a week) and plays trumpet. Favourite TV series:

"The West Wing": "It's probably the most accurate program you're going to see when it comes to the freneticism of government." What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

Definitely a lawyer, "possibly elected office." His father had been a city councilman and police commissioner in New Jersey. Father Tywoniak treasures this 1993 how to of himself with one of the special needs children he helped find a home for when he was director of Catholic Charities' child welfare division. "Adoption isn't about finding children for childless couples. It's about finding parents for a family-less child."

Happiest times as a priest:

His ministry from 1984-1988 at St. Mary Cathedral in Miami, because of what he learned from the late Msgr. Gerard LaCerra's leadership, the bonds of camaraderie among the staff and the generosity of the parishioners. "We Most difficult aspect of being a priest: "Dealing with the drain of being on duty 24 hours a day. didn't have hot water in the winter. We didn't have air You never stop being a priest." conditioning in summer. We used to fight the roaches for breakfast in the morning." Regrets:

"There have been periods in my life when I've questioned. I've looked back and felt the angst of what if I had married and had kids? After a long day, to come home and have my beautiful wife waiting for me with dinner. And then I think, get real! Because that's just a fantasy, too."

"The Gospel is not a bunch of words in the pulpit. It has to be brought into action" Role of priests and laity:

Thing he most fears:

"The clerics are in charge of running the business of the church. But the laity are in charge of running the business of the world."

"I've faced death on many occasions during my ministry." The worst moment perhaps was weathering Hurricane Andrew at St. Anne's Residence and Nursing Center in south Miami-Dade. "You can't watch a building fall apart around you and not think you're going to die." He had often wondered how he would react to death, and thought of the martyrs. When it hit him that he might die that day, "a great sense of peace came over me. Then I went back to doing what needed to be done."

His 10 years in child welfare:

"God has a weird sense of humour. He called me to be celibate and made me the father of hundreds of kids a year." The job entailed dealing with abused and neglected children and their parents: "We were the God committee. Because we had to decide very often who was going to be a family and who was not going to be a family... We were asked to play God."

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Born Aug. 14, 1947, in Indianapolis, he moved to Miami with his family “in 1955 BC — before Cubans,” as he puts it. After graduating from St. Rose of Lima in Miami Shores, he attended high school and college at St. John Vianney Seminary in Miami and completed his studies for the priesthood at St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary in Boynton Beach. He was ordained for the Archdiocese of Miami on May 12, 1973. Among his assignments, he has served as director of religious education for the archdiocese, pastor of St. John the Apostle in Hialeah, and chairman of the archdiocesan Art and Architecture Committee. He has been pastor of St. Bartholomew since 1986 and also serves as president of Msgr. Edward Pace High School in Miami Gardens.



On south Florida’s diversity:

“I remember (when) there were no Cubans in Miami. … I remember there was one Spanish speaking kid in my class when I was in grade school, St. Rose of Lima, and he was from Nicaragua.” Today, in Miramar alone, there are people from everywhere in the Caribbean, South America and Central America. “We have a recognizable Filipino community and a significant Nigerian community. South Florida has completely transformed into an international community. I’ve been here since 1955 and I’ve learned two extra languages (Spanish and French), and I haven’t moved.”

Scuba diving is among Father Vuturo’s favorite sports. He obtained his license in December 1998. “It’s like going to a different part of the world that most people don’t get to see.”

What he did before becoming a priest:

What he does on his day off:

“Student. This is not a second career.”

“My father still lives in the area and I spend time with him.” He also likes to scuba dive and play racquetball.

What triggered his vocation:

“Probably my family. I was raised in a family of practicing Catholics. My parents were music teachers and involved in music ministry in different churches. I always kind of grew up very close to the Church and involved in it.”

Favorite TV series:

“I enjoy the ‘CSIs,’ any variety of them.” Last book read:

“Maybe some social work program or teaching.”

“A Marginal Jew,” by John P. Meier, and “The Gods of War,” a novel about Julius Caesar, the fourth and final in Conn Iggulden’s “Emperor” series.

Favorite priestly assignment:

Person he most admires:

“Where I am right now. … Father David Russell told me years ago, ‘The best job in the Church is being pastor of a parish.’ And it’s true.”

“My father because of his relationship with me; the example he showed loving and taking care of my mother, who died in 2003; supporting his children; and his ongoing relationship with his adult sons.”

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

‘I’ve been here since 1955 and I’ve learned two extra languages (Spanish and French), and I haven’t moved.’

His greatest disappointment:

“Narrow-mindedness in people, whether it’s in political or Church leaders or people in general. Sometimes narrowmindedness is reflected in prejudices, in racism.”

View of the priesthood:

His greatest accomplishment:

“I’m happy, very happy being a priest, very happy with the “Becoming pretty good at the sensitivity to ethnic choice I’ve made. I would make it again.” differences, and blending the multiple layers of languages and cultures in our community.” Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

“Leadership through sharing vision, not by simply trying to Regrets: give orders. It’s getting people motivated and directed, “The times when I might have hurt people, when I should whether it’s in terms of spirituality or stewardship.” have been more sensitive and I wasn’t.” His description of the ideal priest:

“Someone who is pastorally sensitive, a good liturgist and preacher, and a good administrator.” A priestly stereotype that he feels should be discarded:

“That it’s the priest’s Church and the people are helping him run it. … We need priests; there’s no question there. But everybody has responsibilities. That’s the big thing about stewardship: We’re all in this together. It’s not my Church; it’s our Church, and we must find out the different gifts that everybody has, as well as the different responsibilities we can all fulfill.”

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Born April 11, 1949, in Cleveland, Father Tom, as his parishioners typically call him, has a brother and a sister: Ronald Wisniewski and Anne Washburn. Their parents, Henry and Sophie Ann, were both purebred Polish: Their own parents immigrated from Poland in their youth. Eventually his parents bought a farm in North Bloomfield, Ohio, where they lived for 26 years until their deaths. Thomas moved to Florida in 1972 at the request of Msgr. William Dever, who was vocations director for the Archdiocese of Miami at the time. Except for kindergarten, Father Tom was educated wholly in the Catholic school system. A thoughtful student, he earned a degree in philosophy at St. Charles Borromeo High School and College in Wyckliffe, Ohio, then got a master’s degree in theology at St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary in Boynton Beach. On May 15, 1976, he was among the last priests ordained by the late Archbishop Coleman F. Carroll, Miami’s first archbishop. Before founding Mary Help of Christians in 1989, he served five years at St. Bernard Parish in Sunrise and eight at St. Anthony in Fort Lauderdale.



When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

“As far back as I can remember, I wanted to be either a priest or a spaceman. Weird combination, I know. Being a priest was probably more realistic. And when I was in first or second grade, Father Hugh Gallagher, the pastor at St. Monica (in Cleveland) said, ‘He’s going to be a priest some day.’” What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

“I probably would have gone into some branch of science and taught somewhere. I’m not sure, because once I’d selected the priesthood, I didn’t think of anything else.”

Father Thomas Wisniewski shows a whimsical, tongue-incheek side with a shelf of knickknacks in his office. Among the items are a wooden Starfleet insignia, a stuffed dog with a T-Rex face, Mr. Spock wearing a striped tie, and Gollum from “The Lord of the Rings” in a gnomish hat and tiny white beard.

You took a master’s in theology, an academic degree, rather

Favorite type of music:

than a master’s in divinity, a ministry degree. Why?

“New Age. It’s a free-flowing style, with instruments. I listen on Hearts of Space, a public radio station.”

“I have an inclination to be more academic and esoteric.” Does that affect your ministry today?

One person in history he would like to meet:

“Yeah, I have a tendency to say things that I think are very connected, but they’re not to most people. One Sunday, I gave a homily and said, ‘Think of sin as a black hole. It sits out there eating and destroying.’ People just looked at me like ‘What are you talking about?’”

“Outside of Jesus, it would be Peter. He was a stubborn idiot. I can be one at times. With all his failings and shortfalls, he still followed the Lord.” If he could ask God one question, it would be:

“‘Why me?’ He would probably say, ‘Why not?’”

‘I have an inclination to be more academic and esoteric.’

His most memorable spiritual experience:

“My ordination. I remember the feeling of awe as eachpriest came by, laid hands on my head, and asked God to be with me. I felt great joy and great peace.”

The hardest part of being a priest:

“Listening to complaints. I try to be patient.”

His greatest joy:

What he does on his day off:

“It will always be to celebrate Mass. That’s what we’re ordained to do: to give the life of Christ to the community.”

“I sometimes get away for a couple of days. I go to Cleveland to visit my brother and sister, but I hate traveling. I may also go to Mount Dora to do antique shopping.”

Something most people don’t know about him:

“I swim every day. It’s one thing I enjoy. I don’t like team sports.”

Hobbies:

“I like painting miniatures, especially from ‘Star Trek’ and ‘The Lord of the Rings.’ And I still have a collection of phasers (weapons from ‘Star Trek’) at the house.”

Thing he most fears:

“Disagreement. I hate conflict.” What he would like most to be remembered for:

Favorite movie:

“Being a good priest. Holy. God-like. Not necessarily serious” (smile).

“One is ‘The Lord of the Rings.’ I’ve been a fan of (J.R.R.) Tolkien since the books became available in high school. Another favorite film is ‘The Haunting,’ the blackand-white version with Claire Bloom. It’s scary without being gory. A third is the most recent ‘Star Trek.’ They remade the ‘Star Trek’ universe.” Last book read:

“Information and the Nature of Reality: From Physics to Metaphysics”: “It was on how information can become reality. And how it relates to our faith in God.”

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The son of a Cuban mother and Italian father, Father Alfred Cioffi was born in Havana, Cuba, Nov. 5, 1952, the older of two brothers. The family left Cuba in 1960 and lived in New Orleans and New York before moving to various countries in Central America. (His father worked for the airline Alitalia.) After high school, the young man came to Miami to study marine biology. In 1973, he received his undergraduate degree in biology from Florida International University but was not accepted for postgraduate work at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. After working at a fish farm, taking time off to care for his ailing mother and teaching at Miami's St. Brendan High School, he entered the seminary in 1980 and was ordained for the archdiocese on May 11, 1985. Father Cioffi served at Epiphany Parish in South Miami before being sent to Rome to obtain a doctorate in moral theology. Upon his return, he taught at St. Vincent de Paul Seminary in Boynton Beach and served five years as pastor of St. Kevin Parish in Miami before being sent to Purdue University in Indiana to obtain a doctorate in genetics. Because of Father Cioffi's expertise in this controversial field, the Archdiocese of Miami has "lent" him to the church at large.

Titles of his doctoral dissertations:

Greatest disappointment:

Moral theology: "The Fetus as Medical Patient: Moral Dilemmas in Prenatal Diagnosis From the Catholic Perspective." Genetics: "The Relationship Between the Structure and the Function of Chromosomes."

"The church abuse scandal." Favorite TV series:

"My best recommendation for TV is to shoot it before you throw it out the window. The happiest moment of my life was when I gave up TV. I'm addicted to TV, you see, so when I turn it on I can't turn it off."

What he did before becoming a priest:

After graduating from FIU, he got a job taking care of tropical aquarium fish at a fish farm on Sunset Drive in Miami. "It was a lot of fun. I would take care of the fish all Regrets: day. The weekends I would be sailing and diving and "All the sins of my life: being too wild, too young." dating and dancing – and I was getting paid for it." What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

Marine biologist.

"My best recommendation for TV is to shoot it before you throw it out the window." Vocation moment:

"I love nature. Through nature, I had a deeper relationship with God." As a teacher, he also "wanted to reach the teenagers at a deeper level, a more spiritual level; especially to try to help them not commit some of the mistakes that I had made when I was a teenager." Finally, taking care of his bedridden mother for more than a year "brought forth a generosity in my life." Until then, "I would have said 'I'll be a nun before I become a priest.' Those were the chances."

At home on the water: Would-be marine biologist Father Alfred Cioffi, center, during a diving trip with cousin-inlaw, Richard Jung, and his son, Ricky.

Wild days:

"I started smoking at 11." As a teenager in Central America, he and his friends would compete to see who could find a good wedding to crash and then be the first to get drunk. "It's by sheer miracle that I'm alive. … I have been the cause of my parents' sanctification."

Celibacy:

"That was a big sacrifice, and it is daily," although it has a practical advantage: "just being available for the people."

Thing he most fears:

Favorite sacrament:

Greatest joy:

What he does for fun:

What he collects:

Scuba diving and sailing.

Not much anymore, but "I used to collect coins, stamps, plants, animals, women, fossils. You name it."

"That the scandal is not over."

Confession, "because I've had to use it a lot. But seriously, Teaching. to think that people, total strangers, come to us with their conscience in their hands. They tell us things they don't tell Greatest accomplishment: their spouse. It's a very privileged moment that we have." "Convincing a mother not to have an abortion."

Favorite movies:

"It's a Wonderful Life" and "The Passion of the Christ."

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Born Jan. 6, 1953, in Santurce, Puerto Rico, Father Acevedo attended school there but studied for the priesthood at St. John Vianney Seminary in Miami and St. Vincent de Paul Seminary in Boynton Beach. He was ordained for the Archdiocese of Miami on May 8, 1999, and served at St. Mark Parish in Southwest Ranches, Immaculate Conception in Hialeah and St. Louis in Pinecrest. In 2005, he was named administrator, and then pastor, of Mother of Our Redeemer Parish in northwestern Miami-Dade County.



What he did before becoming a priest:

“Many things, but the last two careers were flight attendant for Eastern Airlines for 10 years, and just before it went on strike I began studying cardiovascular technology. I was a cardiovascular technologist for three or four years.” When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

At the age of 6, when he watched a movie about the life of St. Francis of Assisi. About a year ago, Father Jaime Acevedo switched to driving a Smart Car convertible. He says he has no regrets. It is a lot easier to get

Person or event that triggered his vocation:

When he was much older, the death of a friend. “His faith in God was so evident that at the moment of his death, I started wanting what he had – a personal relationship with God. As I began my journey to finding God … the desire to be a priest returned, so I had to act on it. Thank God I did!”

What he does on his days off:

What the seminary did not prepare him for:

Favorite TV series:

around in traffic, and its savings on fuel are great on the pocketbook and the environment.

“Read a book. I may go out to lunch with friends, but mostly I stay home and rest.”

“If I had to pick one, I’d say administration. The rest has been an ‘on-the-job training’; it prepares you to learn on the job. The seminary did help me to become a better person and to listen to God, to trust his will and follow his lead.”

“‘Battlestar Galactica’: I never watched it while it was being broadcast, but I’ve been watching it on DVD whenever I get a chance. It’s better than the one from the ’70s.”

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

Last book read:

“Come Be My Light: The Private Writings of the Saint of “I would be a cardiovascular technologist or be in a profession where I have to serve the public. All my life I’ve Calcutta.” been geared toward people.” Favorite type of music:

“My music taste is kind of eclectic; it depends on the mood. I like classical, especially piano concertos, jazz, movie soundtracks, R & B.”

" I have come to understand that everything that I have done in my life has brought me to where I am now. "

What he collects:

“Many things, but mainly icons – and monkeys.”

Favorite priestly duty:

“As a priest, what I enjoy the most, besides celebrating the Person he most admires: Eucharist, is funerals. It is a moment when you bring hope, “My parents, a great example of what true love and good comfort and healing to the person who mourns the loss of a marriage should be.” loved one. Sometimes it even triggers a conversion in members of the family.” His greatest disappointment:

“Maybe giving so much heartache to my folks because of my aversion to anything that had to do with studies. I was a lousy student!”

Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

“Accepting and loving everyone just as Jesus does.” His description of the ideal priest:

His greatest joy:

“One who is down-to-earth, who recognizes his brokenness and offers it to God; one who is as loving and merciful to (God’s) people as he is able to be, with the grace of God.”

“Being who I am, a priest!” Thing he most fears:

“Fear itself. It can paralyze you and prevent you from doing the will of God.”

A priestly stereotype that should be discarded:

“That we are perfect and should never make a mistake.”

Regrets:

“None. I have come to understand that everything that I have done in my life has brought me to where I am now. And God has been with me all the time.”

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Born April 8, 1957 in New Jersey, he moved to Florida with his family around 1970, settling in St. Vincent Parish in Margate, where his parents still live. He was ordained in 1983 and served for 10 years as director of Catholic Charities' child welfare division. He has a master's degree in social work and is nationally certified as a social work manager and pastoral counsellor. He still serves as a state policy leader for the Child Welfare League of America.



When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

His involvement in the community: Despite running a one-priest parish, he serves on the board of the Urban League of Broward County, on the ethics committee at Plantation

During his first year of business and pre-law studies at Stetson University, while attending a retreat: "It was as if a voice was saying to me, 'Be a priest, be a priest.' It was quite audible to me. It was just a very strong urge or message. Finally, I believe I actually said it out loud. I said, 'All right, damn it, I'll do it' That I am a priest, that I responded to that call, is one of the things that proves to me there is a God. Why would I have thought of it? Why would I do such a thing?"

General Hospital and the coordination committee for Broward County's Million Meals organization. "The Gospel is not just a bunch of words in the pulpit. It has to be brought into action." Greatest Joy: "The best time of my week is the Sunday liturgy. Everything else makes no sense without the liturgy."

Hobbies:

He is a runner (five miles about three times a week) and plays trumpet. Favourite TV series:

"The West Wing": "It's probably the most accurate program you're going to see when it comes to the freneticism of government." What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

Definitely a lawyer, "possibly elected office." His father had been a city councilman and police commissioner in New Jersey.

Father Tywoniak treasures this 1993 how to of himself with one of the special needs children he helped find a home for when he was director of Catholic Charities' child welfare division. "Adoption isn't about finding children for childless couples. It's about finding parents for a family-less child."

Happiest times as a priest:

Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

His ministry from 1984-1988 at St. Mary Cathedral in Miami, because of what he learned from the late Msgr. Gerard LaCerra's leadership, the bonds of camaraderie among the staff and the generosity of the parishioners. "We didn't have hot water in the winter. We didn't have air conditioning in summer. We used to fight the roaches for breakfast in the morning."

"Dealing with the drain of being on duty 24 hours a day. You never stop being a priest." Regrets:

"There have been periods in my life when I've questioned. I've looked back and felt the angst of what if I had married and had kids? After a long day, to come home and have my beautiful wife waiting for me with dinner. And then I think, get real! Because that's just a fantasy, too."

"The Gospel is not a bunch of words in the pulpit. It has to be brought into action"

Thing he most fears:

"I've faced death on many occasions during my ministry." The worst moment perhaps was weathering Hurricane Andrew at St. Anne's Residence and Nursing Center in south Miami-Dade. "You can't watch a building fall apart around you and not think you're going to die." He had often wondered how he would react to death, and thought of the martyrs. When it hit him that he might die that day, "a great sense of peace came over me. Then I went back to doing what needed to be done."

Role of priests and laity:

"The clerics are in charge of running the business of the church. But the laity are in charge of running the business of the world." His 10 years in child welfare:

"God has a weird sense of humour. He called me to be celibate and made me the father of hundreds of kids a year." The job entailed dealing with abused and neglected children and their parents: "We were the God committee. Because we had to decide very often who was going to be a family and who was not going to be a family. We were asked to play God."

Back

Born Jan. 21, 1953, in Havana, Cuba, Father García is an only child. He started elementary school in Cuba but completed it in Spain, where he had emigrated with his parents. He left Spain to move in with relatives in Kansas, where he attended college. He finished his studies at Florida International University, obtaining a degree in accounting. He entered the seminary at age 39 and was ordained for the Archdiocese of Miami on May 10, 1997. In addition to being pastor of St. Cecilia, he serves as spiritual director of Movimiento Familiar Cristiano (Christian Family Movement).



What he did before becoming a priest:

He worked for 16 years as an accountant at Florida Power and Light. When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

“I always knew it, since I was 9 years old. I can’t say the specific date. The desire just kept growing within me.” What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

“Accounting, which I actually have to keep doing because I do the bookkeeping for the parish.” Father Luis Garcia worked as an accountant for Florida Power and Light before becoming a priest.

Who was most surprised by his vocation:

“Nobody. Everybody more or less knew it, and they would Favorite type of music: tell me.” Old Cuban music, music from Spain and classical music. What the seminary did not prepare him for:

Last book read:

“The administrative aspects (of the priesthood) but thank God I already had that.”

Vida y Misterio de Jesús de Nazaret (Life and Mystery of Jesus of Nazareth) by José Luis Martín Descalzo.

His current responsibilities:

Most memorable priestly assignment:

“Everything involved in running a parish: Painting walls, changing lightbulbs, seeing people, keeping the books.”

When he was assigned as parochial vicar at St. Maximilian Kolbe in Pembroke Pines. “I spent two years there with Father James Vitucci. He was the best example of priesthood for me – a good friend, a colleague, a good son, a good priest. I was privileged to share the last years of his life. I heard his last confession and laid him to rest.”

" My greatest joy was when I was ordained. " What he does on his days off:

His description of the ideal priest:

“See friends, visit the mall, sometimes I go to the movies. Instead of being a day ‘off’ it’s a day ‘on’ because I leave everything for that day.”

Most difficult aspect of the priesthood:

Father James Vitucci.

“Trying to keep everybody happy.”

Greatest joy: Person he most admires:

“My ordination.”

“That I didn’t answer God’s call earlier.”

“My mother because she was a good woman, a good mother and wife, an example of piety, love and sacrifice for me.”

Favorite TV program:

His greatest fear:

Regrets:

“I don’t watch much television, but sometimes I watch A Mano Limpia (a local Spanishlanguage talk show) with Oscar Haza.”

“Not to be able to return to a free Cuba. It was something my parents longed for and they died without being able to go back.”

Favorite movie:

His biggest critic:

“I’m sure I have many, but I would say it would have to be me.”

“Marcelino Pan y Vino – it was the first storybook that I read.”

Back

The son of Colombian parents, Father Bohórquez was born in Argentina on Oct. 25, 1972. He lived in Venezuela and Colombia before coming to the United States in 1988. He graduated from McArthur High School in Hollywood in 1990, and entered St. John Vianney College Seminary in Miami six years later. He was ordained a priest for the Archdiocese of Miami in May, 2001. His mother died 24 days after his ordination. He has a sister who lives in Colombia and a brother who lives in Boston. His father lives in Miami. Before going to St. Jerome, he served at Epiphany Parish in South Miami.

Image of the ideal priest: He worked in many different trades, from cleaning offices “A candle: As the priest allows God’s fire to consume him, to delivering pizzas to stripping and waxing floors to that makes it possible for him to illuminate with the light of telemarketing (where he lasted only one day). Christ. But that light will not shine if he is not willing to let the Gospel burn him and consume him little by little.” What he did before becoming a priest:

What he does on his days off:

“I make it a point to always visit my father: I try to at least eat one meal with him on my day off.”

Priestly stereotype that should be discarded:

“The priest as a mere professional if the ministry is not embedded to my person, it is no priestly ministry at all.”

Favorite movie:

“Contact” starring Jodie Foster Favorite TV series:

“The Cosby Show” and “Home Improvement”

"I see how God transforms and that thrill is more awesome than anything else in this life." Father Bohorquez, far right, with his father, Francisco, his sister,

When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

María Carolina and his brother, José Luis. Although all three are wearing T-shirts that say Argentina, Father Bohorquez is the only

He never really considered the priesthood seriously until a year or so before he entered the seminary, but he sees now “that was the end of a well-planned-by-God journey.” His family had always been very connected to the church and as a child he sometimes dreamed of preaching the word of God. At 18, he began to pray, “If it is your will that I become a priest, just show me. The answer was so obvious, so in my face, that I could not recognize it.” Finally, a good friend advised him to try it, reminding him that going into the seminary did not mean he would have to stay. When he first got there, he would wake up in the morning and ask himself, “What have I gotten myself into? But the initial fears and cautions became joyful assurance as the years passed.”

one who was born there. His sister was born in Bogotá, Colombia, and his brother in Valencia, Venezuela.

Who was most surprised by his vocation:

“Me I dreamt of serving the Lord as a married man with children. The Lord showed me in more and more powerful and evident ways that the way towards holiness and thus, happiness that he had chosen for me was the priesthood.” Favorite type of music:

All types at different times: jazz, salsa, Colombian folkloric music, classical, Christian pop, merengue, Catholic and Protestant- Christian hymnody, liturgical, Gregorian. Person he most admires:

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

“My mother, who is deceased and planted so many seeds of eternal life in my own life, and my father, who continues to give me a powerful example of integrity, love for life, and unshakable faith in the midst of trials. Also, the three saints which the Lord has given me as continuous sources of spiritual inspiration: St. Teresa of Avila, St. John of the Cross, and St. Therese the Little Flower. Pope John Paul II is also in the bunch.”

At first he thought of becoming a veterinarian, then an aerospace engineer, later a pilot. Greatest disappointment:

“There is so much hurt in my heart when, instead of being a ‘bridge’ (to the divine), I have been in the way I relate to people, when I have been unfaithful to the call in my ministry or in the living of my Christianity a ‘rock of stumble’ for people’s faith.”

Thing he most fears:

“To go astray from the will of God”

Greatest joy:

“When I see the word of God and his grace working with all the force of his mercy, power and majesty in the lives of people who have the courage to receive it.I see how God transforms and that thrill is more awesome than anything else in this life.” Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

“The frustration I experience continuously is my incapacity to transmit my experience of faith. I see that the message of the Gospel cannot be explained or described. I have come to realize that the only way to share this Good News is to let God burn me and, as I am being consumed by that fire, allow the light of Christ to shine then, get out of his way. Letting God come through is my challenge, and many times, my frustration.”

Back

Zirilli was born in Melbourne, Fla., on April 26, 1971, the older of two boys. He graduated from the University of Florida in 1993 with a bachelor’s degree in accounting and later obtained a master’s in the field from the University of North Florida. For eight years, he worked as a certified public accountant in private practice in the Key Largo area. In 2002, he sold his firm and entered St. John Vianney College Seminary in Miami, where he completed the pre-theology program before entering St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary in Boynton Beach. He was ordained for the Archdiocese of Miami on May 10, 2008. He was assigned to St. Louis Parish in Pinecrest before being named vocations director in September 2010.



When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

“When I was about 22 the thought came to me while sitting at Mass one day. I was looking at the priest celebrate Mass and knew in that moment God was calling me to it. It was a powerful, beautiful, frightening moment. Before that moment I had an inkling, so I began to find out more about my faith on my own. I read the Bible one chapter at a time, every night. It took a few years to finish.” Person most surprised by his vocation:

“Me. I had always seen myself as a businessman with a wife and kids but the call (to priesthood) just couldn’t be ignored.” Father David Zirilli is pictured here during an Amor en Accionsponsored missionary trip to the Diocese of Portde- Paix, Miami’s

Seminary life:

“From the first day in the seminary I knew I had made the right decision. I felt as if God was telling me, ‘I want you to be happy and if you follow me you’ll be more happy than doing anything else.”

sister diocese in northwest Haiti. The group consisted of seminarians and parishioners from St. Mary Star of the Sea in Key West who supported the construction of a new school in the village of Dity.

Favorite type of music:

“Love the ’80s, but I can’t pass on a good Gregorian chant. That’s the best.”

Favorite priestly assignment:

“I have only had two, so far, and both assignments have been very different. As a parish priest I liked being involved in the day-to-day life at the parish and with the parish community; you get to develop solid relationships. I was always very moved by the example of faith. As vocations director I get to talk about the priesthood and how much I love it. I get to meet lots of people and travel to different parishes every weekend. I get to know both the pastors and the parish community.”

Person he most admires:

“St. Joseph because he was and is an ideal role model for Catholic men to be faithful husbands and fathers; he is also a good role model for priests because he was always open and willing to carry out the will of God.” His greatest disappointment:

“Not responding to the call (vocation) sooner, although that is hard to say. Sometimes things are for the best; no experience is wasted. We learn and grow both from our mistakes and successes.”

'(I) serve God, but I am not God.' The most difficult aspect of being a priest:

His greatest joy:

“(I) serve God, but I am not God. I pray I bring God’s comfort and love to people, but wish I could help everyone. It is difficult to see human suffering. I pray I bring hope and Christ to people; I’m in the business of hope.”

“When God lets you see the fruit of your ministry. As priests our task is to sow the seeds not necessarily to see the fruits, but when God does allow it, it’s a great joy to know that you have faithfully done your ministry.” His greatest accomplishment:

“If on my tombstone it reads: ‘Here lies David Zirilli, a holy priest.”

His description of the ideal priest:

“Must have a solid relationship with Christ, be happy, approachable, friendly, humorous and can articulate the faith to people yearning to hear it. Must have a beautiful heart and love God and have an incredible grasp of Scripture.” A priestly stereotype that he feels should be discarded:

“A lot of people think or view the priesthood as being a life without success or that it is a wasted or unhappy life. That tends to be a barrier to consider vocations. However, priesthood is filled with great happiness, joy and is fulfilling. I am reminded of Mother Teresa when she said, ‘God calls us not to be successful, but to be faithful’.” Favorite TV series:

“MythBusters” Last book read:

“Just finished reading the Sherlock Holmes mysteries on my e-reader and I’m now reading ‘The Divine Comedy’ by Dante, ‘Spirit of the Living’ by Pope Benedict XVI and ‘Pride and Prejudice’ by Jane Austen.”

Back

Born Dec. 5, 1935, in New Orleans, Archbishop Favalora is the only child of an Italian grocer and a Cajun homemaker. He attended the all-boys Jesuit High School in New Orleans and entered the seminary in the New Orleans area after graduation. He completed his theology studies at the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome and was ordained there on Dec. 20, 1961, for the Archdiocese of New Orleans. He worked as a seminary high school teacher, seminary rector, archbishop’s secretary, judge in the tribunal, pastor, director of the permanent diaconate office and vocations director until being named the first bishop of Alexandria, La., on June 23, 1986. On March 7, 1989, he was named bishop of St. Petersburg, and on Nov. 3, 1994, he was appointed Miami’s third archbishop. In addition to degrees in theology, he earned certification as a Latin and social studies teacher from Xavier University in New Orleans and a master’s in education from Tulane University.



What he did before becoming a priest:

He entered the seminary right after high school. When he knew he wanted to be a priest:

As a high school senior, he seriously considered joining the Jesuits, but decided against it for fear that he would spend more time teaching than doing parish work. Ironically, he spent 17 years of his priesthood working as a teacher and considers teaching the primary role of a bishop. Person or event that triggered his vocation:

The example of his Jesuit teachers and his own attendance at daily Mass.

Archbishop Favalora is shown here chatting with the confirmation class at St. Stephen School in Miramar in 2006. “I still enjoy visiting schools and spending a period just taking questions from (kids).”

On teaching: What he does on his day off:

“I was teaching high school (boys). It absolutely is tough. … But I enjoyed my teaching years very, very much. I would say there’s probably nothing that I did that prepared me better to be a bishop than that. Because my chief role as bishop is a teacher.”

“He loves to cook and tend to his herb garden; or sit in the sun and read. Favorite TV series:

The Honeymooners” (he has the complete series) and “Everybody Loves Raymond.

What he would be doing if he had not become a priest:

“I thought of medicine, but didn’t like science. I thought of law. I thought of architecture, but couldn’t draw. Probably the architecture is what I still like to dabble in.”

Favorite type of music:

Classical Thing he most fears:

‘I guess I’ve never perceived myself as a worrier.’

Not much. His episcopal motto is “God will provide.” “I guess I’ve never perceived myself as a worrier. I try to deal with whatever comes,” make a decision and move on. “You may find out tomorrow or next month or next year that the decision was wrong. Then my answer is, we’ll change our position. If it indeed is wrong, I don’t have any problem saying that.”

Favorite aspect of the priesthood:

“Preaching and hearing confessions. “Preaching and teaching are very much united. My vision, my image there, is Jesus preaching to the crowds. It’s the teacher’s challenge of whetting someone’s appetite so that their mind gets moving or their heart gets moving in the right direction.” Confession is similar, except the experience is one on one. “It’s the dialogue between Jesus and one other person. It’s that challenge that you have as an instrument of God’s grace to choose the right words, to pray for the enlightenment to say the right thing that will dispose that person to be as open to God’s grace as possible.”” Most difficult aspect of being a priest:

“Being misunderstood.…In an instance when the Church might be delivering a teaching that is very hard to hear, you very much feel as Jesus did in the Gospel, when he preached about the Eucharist and many of his close disciples walked away and never returned.…I guess that’s where I have the most difficulty, embracing the cross lovingly. I think, rather naturally speaking, you want to run away from the cross. You want to disassociate yourself from the cross. Yet you know that to do that would be to deny the Lord.”

age and Family Life Marriage Prep Divorce Bereavement Movements Resources Human Sexuality CONTACT INFO Betania

[email protected] 305-596-0001

Betania El Ministerio Betania es un grupo de apoyo y ayuda para padres que han perdido hijos. Betania está auspiciada por la Arquidiócesis de Miami. La formamos padres que hemos pasado por la misma experiencia y damos toda nuestra ayuda, apoyo, comprensión y empatía a las personas que atraviesan por este mismo dolor. Nos reunimos los primeros miércoles del mes de 7-9 p.m. en el Centro de Espiritualidad Ignaciana, 12190 S.W. 56 St. (Miller Road), Miami.

CONTACT INFO Joyful Again

[email protected] www.joyfulagainsouthflorida.org

Joyful Again (Program for loss of a spouse) Joyful Again is a national retreat program for people who have lost a spouse. We are happy to offer it for the first time later this year in the Archdiocese.

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CONTACT INFO Auxiliary Bishop of Miami

Bishop Peter Baldacchino 9401 Biscayne Blvd. Miami, FL 33138 305-762-1092 305-754-7762 Secretary to Bishop Baldacchino

Ileana Roque [email protected] 305-762-1152

The coat of arms of Peter Baldacchino as Auxiliary Bishop of Miami.

Born Dec. 5, 1960, in Sliema, Malta, Bishop Baldacchino is the second oldest of four children - three boys and a girl - born to Leonilda (known as Hilda) and Rinaldo (known as Rene) Baldacchino. When he was 13, his family joined the Neocatechumenal Way. He studied at St. Francis School in Msida and Mount Carmel College in Santa Venera, Malta, then studied science and chemistry at the University of Malta. He entered the Redemptoris Mater Archdiocesan Missionary Seminary in Newark, N.J., in 1990, obtaining a bachelor's in theology and a master's in divinity from Seton Hall University. On May 25, 1996, he was ordained a priest for the Archdiocese of Newark and assigned as parochial vicar to Our Lady of Mount Carmel in Ridgewood, N.J. In 1999, he was named chancellor of Our Lady of Divine Providence Mission in Turks and Caicos Islands, a missio sui iuris (independent mission) for which the Archbishop of Newark is responsible. He became pastor of Our Lady of Divine Providence Church in Providenciales in 2002, and in 2009 was named a Chaplain to His Holiness, with the honorary title of monsignor. Pope Francis appointed him auxiliary bishop of Miami Feb. 20, 2014. He was ordained to the episcopacy March 19, 2014. Click here to view Building City of God >> Click here to know more about Bishop Baldacchino >>

CONTACT INFO Director

Katrenia Reeves-Jackman [email protected] Office of Black Catholics

9401 Biscayne Blvd Miami Shores, FL 33138 305-762-1120 305-758-2027 Black Catholic Movements Knights of Peter Claver

Mr. Rudolph Hudnell 2120 NW 66 Street Miami, Fl 33147 Knights of Peter Claver Ladies Auxiliaries

Bernadette C. Poitier Grand Lady, Catherine Drexel Court 288 305-298-0622 [email protected] St. Martin de Porres Association

Mrs. Leona Cooper P.O. Box 330102 Miami, FL 33133

The archdiocese of Miami recognizes that the Black Catholic Ministry brings to the Church of South Florida a rich cultural tradition and historic faith. The Black Catholic Ministry, together with Movements of Black Catholics seek to provide spiritual, cultural, and social nourishment for Black Catholics; to enhance Black Catholic leadership; to welcome Blacks to join the Catholic Church; to help coordinate ongoing efforts with all faith communities. They also act as agents for the concerns of the Black community at large, assess the needs of the Black community and communicate these to the established Archdiocesan agencies; provide representation at the decision-making levels with the Archdiocese; represent the Archdiocese in state and national Black Catholic organizations and inform the Black Catholic community via materials, programs, and workshops on local, state, and national events.

ing and Property Office Hurricane Preparedness CONTACT INFO Senior Director

David Prada AIA, LEEd AP 305-951-4058 (cell) 305-762-1033 (work) 305-754-6792 [email protected] Project Manager

Carlos Sanabria 305-206-1544 (cell) 305-762-1034 (work) 305-754-6792 [email protected]eadom.org Assistant Building and Project Manager

Pawel Kobrzynski 305-205-3163 (cell) 305-762-1089 (work) 305-754-6792 [email protected] Office Manager

Kathleen Bost 305-762-1032 305-754-6792 [email protected]

The Building and Property Office oversees the maintenance of churches and other archdiocesan facilities, as well as the construction of new buildings in Catholic parishes. Office staff also manages the Pastoral Center of the Archdiocese and oversees the mail room, copy room, purchasing, telephone and voice mail systems, switchboard and maintenance. Anyone interested in purchasing any available archdiocesan properties or selling property to the Archdiocese of Miami should contact this office.

Mission statement: To support the Archdiocese of Miami in proclaiming the Good News of Christ through the work that we do related to its buildings and properties. We are charged with being faithful stewards of archdiocesan assets, and with providing professional guidance and assistance to Church entities in the planning and overseeing of maintenance and construction projects. When planning a project for your parish, please refer to the detailed

ADOM Project Procedures Outline.

ral Info Non Parochial Collections Tamper Evident Bags ADOM Financial Report CONTACT INFO Chief Financial Officer

Michael A. Casciato [email protected] Treasurer

Joseph M. Catania [email protected] Controller

Margie Pontillo [email protected] Address

9401 Biscayne Blvd. Miami Shores, FL 33138 305-762-1294 305-762-1026

The Business Office oversees accounting and finances for the Archdiocese of Miami.

olic Charities Camillus House Missionaries of Charity St. Vincent de Paul & Thrift Stores CONTACT INFO Chief Executive Officer

Hilda Fernandez Vice President, Mission Integration

Father Michael (Raphael) Mieszala, BGS Administrative Offices

1603 NW 7th Avenue Miami, FL 33136 305-374-1065 305-372-1402 www.camillushouse.org Health Concern Clinic

336 NW 5th Street Miami, FL 33128 305-577-4840 x106 Hearing-impaired

305-400-6246 Somerville Residence

400 NW 3rd Court Miami, FL 33128 Not administered by the Archdiocese of Miami

Camillus House has provided humanitarian services to the indigent and homeless populations of Miami-Dade County, Florida for more than 40 years. Established by the Little Brothers of the Good Shepherd in 1960, Camillus House has grown steadily over the years from a small overnight shelter into a full service center offering a full "continuum of care" for the poor and homeless.

CONTACT INFO Director

Peter J. Ductram [email protected]

Coordinator of Catechist Formation and Certification

Diana Guerrero 305-762-1085 Administrative Assistant

Yomaira Díaz 305-762-1107 [email protected] Coordinator of Certification for Catholic School Teachers/Data Entry Manager

Domenick Russo [email protected] Office

305-762-1107 305-762-1103 [email protected] www.miamicatechesis.org

Faith Formation Director’s Welcome Welcome to the Office for Catechesis Webpage! Click here to visit the Office of Catechesis website One of the ways the Catholic Church fulfills its Evangelizing mission of bringing of bringing the good news of the Gospel to all is through Catechesis. As the National Director for Catechesis states: “The object of all catechesis is to put people into communion and intimate relationship with Jesus Christ.” In other words, it is through Catechesis that the Church echoes and teaches the Word of God, passing on the faith and tradition received to adults, youth and children. At the Office for Catechesis we are deeply committed to apply the very best of Catholic theology and catechetical theory to the many kinds of catechetical services and programming we provide. Aware of our multicultural and multilingual reality of our Archdiocese of Miami, we strive to be sensitive to the spiritualities and cultural values of the people we serve. We prepare our catechists and catechetical leaders to have a collaborative role with us, with each other, and in their parishes so our Catholic Church of Miami is enriched by people’s faith. If this is your first time visiting us, I hope you find valuable information for your ministry and that you will return often for updates of our services and other important news. May Lord bless us all and in our catechetical mission!

olic Charities Camillus House Missionaries of Charity St. Vincent de Paul & Thrift Stores CONTACT INFO Chief Executive Officer

Deacon Richard Turcotte Central Office

1505 N.E. 26th Street Wilton Manors, FL 33305 305-754-2444 General Inquiries:

[email protected] Donations:

[email protected] Human Resources:

[email protected] Emergency Services

Miami: 305-573-3333 Broward: 954-630-9793 [email protected]

DOCUMENTS Annual Fact Sheet

The Mission of Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Miami is to honor God by: Enhancing human life and dignity, supporting individuals and families, building communities, and working for justice.

Our faith calls us to defend the life, dignity, and rights of all our sisters and brothers; to serve those in need, to build communities, and to work for justice on behalf of all of God's children. This is the story of the Church's social mission, a tradition to be shared and a challenge to be fulfilled. Founded on the life and words of Jesus Christ who came, "To bring glad tidings to the poor, liberty to the captives and recovery of sight to the blind…" (Lk 4:18-19), our Catholic social teaching is more than a set of documents. It is a living tradition of thought and action. We cannot celebrate a faith we do not practice. We cannot proclaim a gospel we do not live. Our mission statement allows us to proclaim our commitment to charity and justice and, through the delivery of our services, to make Christ visible in our community. Incorporated in 1931, Catholic Charities remains for the residents of Miami-Dade, Broward, and Monroe Counties, a pioneer in social service provision. As a leader in the field of providing specialized programs, outcome oriented results and social advocacy, Catholic Charities has remained faithful to the Gospel messages which call us to work for justice and mercy in the world. Our ministry makes Christ present in the local and international community to all who require His love and compassion. We serve people not because they are Catholic. We serve people because we are Catholic.© Click here to visit the Catholic Charities website.

CONTACT INFO President and CEO

Joseph M. Catania 4790 North State Road 7 Lauderdale Lakes, FL 33319 954-484-1515 954-484-5416 [email protected] www.catholichealthservices.org/ 2015 Report to Community”

Catholic Health Services provides a full continuum of healthcare and services to the southeast Florida community. We serve more than 5,000 people per year and operate 26 facilities in Broward and Miami-Dade counties. Our patients, residents and those who use our services are our first responsibility. We provide our services with love, skill, compassion and respect for all human dignity - regardless of race, creed or religious affiliation. To find a service or facility for you or your loved one, go to our

Website.

CONTACT INFO Administrative Offices

14875 NW 77 Avenue, Suite 100, Miami Lakes, FL 33014 305-822-2380 305-824-0665 www.catholichospice.org South Office

8700 West Flagler Street, Suite 250, Miami, FL 33174 305-822-2380 305-824-0665 Broward Office

2900 W Cypress Creek Rd, Suite 7, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 954-676-5465 954-676-5466 [email protected] For direct referrals and admissions, call or email for more information

305-351-7124 1-800-533-3933 [email protected]

Catholic Hospice is a not-for-profit health care organization providing end-of-life care to terminally ill patients and their families throughout Miami-Dade, Broward and Monroe counties. Catholic Hospice, a ministry of the Archdiocese of Miami is affiliated with Catholic Health Services and is dedicated to the preservation of the quality of life of people facing end of life issues. They serve over 500 patients a day and provide spiritual and psychological support to over 1400 bereaved families regardless of race, religion, age, gender, ethnic background, handicap, diagnosis or financial resources. Catholic Hospice also sponsors programs such as the L'chaim Jewish Hospice Program, Stars Program a Hospice Care for children and Camp Hope: A bereavement camp for children and other bereavement support groups.

Bereavement Support Groups Bereavement Support Group Line:

305-351-7025

Bereavement Support Group for Adults - Spanish St. Catherine's West Rehabilitation Hospital 8850 North West 122nd Street, Hialeah Gardens, FL 33018 (Lobby – Conference Room) Every Wednesday from 5:30 – 7:00 pm

Breast Cancer Survivor Support Group St. Catherine's Rehabilitation Hospital 8850 North West 122nd Street, Hialeah Gardens, FL 33018 (Lobby – Conference Room) Every 3rd Monday of the month from 5:30 – 7:00 pm

Educational Support Group Miami Springs Community Center 343 Payne Drive, Miami Springs, FL 33166 Every Two Months

Bereavement Support Group for Adults - Spanish Prince of Peace Catholic Church 12800 North West 6th Street, Miami, Florida 33182 Every Thursday from 6:00 - 7:30 pm

Open Forum on Age-Related Issues William Dickinson Community Center 1601 North Krome Avenue, Homestead, Florida 33030 2nd Tuesday of Every Month from 10:00 - 11:00 am

Bereavement Support Group William Dickinson Community Center 1601 North Krome Avenue, Homestead, Florida 33030 3rd Tuesday of every month from 10:00 - 11:00 am

Caregiver Support Group for Adults – English Mercy Hospital 3663 South Miami Avenue, Miami, FL 33133 (6 Carroll, Room 6104) Every Wednesday from 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Adult Services/Cultural Arts David Posnack Jewish Community Center 5850 S. Pine Island Rd, Davie, Florida 33328 Every Tuesday from 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Spousal Support Group - English Holy Cross Hospital Michael and Dianne Bienes Comprehensive Cancer Center 1951 North East 47th Street, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33308 1st Floor Conference Room Every Thursday from 6:00 – 7:30 pm

Developing Coping Skills for Children Hope Outreach Center 4700 South West 64th Avenue, Suite A, Davie, Florida 33314 Every Monday from 4:00 – 5:00 pm

Pet Loss Support Group St. Catherine's West Rehabilitation Hospital 8850 North West 122nd Street, Hialeah, Gardens, FL 33018 4th Thursday of the month from 5:30 - 7:00 pm

Please always call the Bereavement Support Group Line and leave a message before attending any support group for the first time. We will return your call to confirm and provide information. Thank you.

olic Legal Services Metropolitan Tribunal CONTACT INFO Executive Director

Randolph P. McGrorty Main Office

Courthouse Plaza Building 28 W. Flagler St. - 10th floor Children's Program Office - 2nd floor Miami, FL 33130 305-373-1073 305-373-1173 www.cclsmiami.org Doral Office

1914 NW 84 Avenue Miami, FL 33172 305-887-8333 305-541-2724 Broward Office

6565 Taft St., 4th Floor Hollywood, FL 33024 954-306-9537 1-800-691-5203

Not administered by the Archdiocese of Miami The Old Testament enjoins us to "treat the alien who resides with you no differently than the natives born among you." (Leviticus 19:34) The mission of Catholic Legal Services (CLS) is to implement this teaching by providing professional immigration services to South Florida 's refugee and immigrant communities and attorney representation before the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the Immigration Courts and the Board of Immigration Appeals. Over 1,000 individuals seek the services of CLS each month. CLS provides pro bono services to individuals and family who qualify based on income, eligibility status, and the availability of resources. For those who do not qualify for free services, CLS may represent you based on a sliding fee scale. For those who can afford a private attorney, CLS encourages you to seek the services of a qualified immigration attorney, particularly members of the American Immigration Lawyers Association. We will be happy to refer you to a qualified immigration attorney should we determine that we cannot help you.

Mass Times Worldwide

The World and the Vatican

Mass Times for Travel The Catholic Directory

Vatican homepage Vatican News Papal Encyclicals

Catholic Organizations / Resources

Catholic News

Favalora Archive and Museum (at St. Thomas University) Catechism of the Catholic Church Catholic News Service Catholic Living Wills Eternal World Television Network (EWTN) Florida Catholic Conference Eternal World Television Network (EWTN) (Spanish) For Your Marriage Florida Catholic Newspaper Por Tu Matrimonio Pax Catholic Communications (Radio Paz) Knights of Columbus Zenit National Catholic Bioethics Center National Catholic Partnership on Disability United States Conference of Catholic Bishops National Council of Catholic Women USCCB homepage Health Care Reform Dioceses of Florida USCCB Publishing Diocese of Orlando Catholic Campaign for Human Development Diocese of Palm Beach Catholic Relief Services Diocese of Pensacola- Tallahassee Diocese of St. Augustine Diocese of St. Petersburg Diocese of Venice

CONTACT INFO Broward County

Our Lady Queen of Heaven 1500 South State Road 7 North Lauderdale, FL. 33068 954-972-1234 Miami-Dade County

Our Lady of Mercy 11411 NW 25th Street Miami, FL. 33172 305-592-0521 Executive Director

Mary Jo Frick [email protected] www.catholiccemeteriesmiami.org

Consecrated in 1959, two Archdiocesan cemeteries serve the faithful of South Florida with Catholic burial. Making a Catholic Cemetery your choice is one final and lasting way to affirm your devotion to your faith and to your loved ones. For more than four decades, the Church has provided the Catholic South Florida community with a sacred enclosure for those who have lived within the faith and a measure of comfort to those who come in bereavement. Catholic Cemeteries perform a sacred function on behalf of the entire Christian community. They serve as symbols of the extended community of believers, a community unbroken by death. Each cemetery, one in Broward County and one in Miami-Dade County, consist of 125 acres designed, developed and landscaped to provide a setting of beauty and tranquility. They offer traditional ground burial, lawn crypts and niches for cremated remains. Columbaria are also located in the beautiful marble and stained glass chapel mausoleums, where remembrance Masses are celebrated regularly.

bishop's Office Chancellors' Office CONTACT INFO Chancellor for Canonical Affairs

Msgr. Chanel Jeanty [email protected] Chancellor for Administration

Sister Elizabeth Worley, SSJ [email protected] Pastoral Center, 9401 Biscayne Blvd Miami Shores, FL 33138 305-762-1220 305-754-1897

DOCUMENTS Obtaining papal blessings Obtaining tickets to papal events Papal audience for newlyweds Ordering Papal Portraits Archbishop's Portrait Information

FLORIDA CATHOLIC CONFERENCE Catholic Declaration on Life and Death

English

Español

English

Español

www.flaccb.org/ Chancellor for Canonical Affairs and Vicar General

Chancellor for Administration and Chief Operating Officer

Msgr. Chanel Jeanty Sister Elizabeth Anne Worley, SSJ

Archdiocese of Miami Policies Click here to view Policy Governing Sacramental Records and Certificates Marriage Certificate Release Form Baptismal Certificate Release Form Confirmation Certificate Release Form Policy for Marriage in an Eastern Rite Parish Archdiocesan policy requires that a priest coming from outside the Archdiocese, whether diocesan or religious, receive faculties to exercise ministry within the Archdiocese. The policy for requesting faculties for visiting priests, along with the form to be completed by the pastor or leader of the group or movement requesting the faculties and the Certificate of Aptitude to be provided to the priest to be completed by his diocesan Bishop or Provincial are all included on this website. General Faculties for Priests Protocol for Extern Priests Seeking to Serve in the Archdiocese of Miami Form: Requesting Faculties for Visiting Priests Form: Certificate of Aptitude (English) Form: Certificate of Aptitude (Spanish) Parish events that include priests from outside the Archdiocese may be publicized on this web site only after approval for faculties has been procured according to the requirements of the policy. The policy contains contact information for submission of the forms. Archdiocesan policy requires that any speaker - clergy, religious or lay - coming from outside the archdiocese be approved by the chancellor's office. No event can be publicized in the archdiocesan newspaper or website unless the speaker has received this approval. Please click on one of the two forms below to fill out the appropriate paperwork.. The forms can be mailed or emailed to: [email protected] Request approval for lay, religious and brothers

Policies of the Province of Miami The ecclesiastical Province of Miami includes the Archdiocese of Miami and the Dioceses of Saint Augustine, Saint Petersburg, Orlando, Pensacola-Tallahassee, Palm Beach and Venice. The policies of the Province have been approved by the bishops of these dioceses and are part of the policies and regulations of those dioceses and their parishes. To read additional Policies of the Province of Miami

click here

Policy on Cremation (English) Policy on Cremation (Spanish) Policy on Marriage Preparation Policy on Charitable Giving

Type the shortcut: www.miamiarch.org/ChancellorsOffice on your browser to come back to this page on the web site.

Groups Chivalric Orders Professional Groups Click on the links below to open respective pages

Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre

Knights of St. Gregory

Knights and Ladies of Malta

Knights of St. Sylvester

Knights and Ladies of St. Peter Claver

Knights of Columbus

Legatus

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e What is the Synod? Focus Teams Focus Team Resources The Synod Snapshot FAQ's Closing Assembly Photos Videos

Information about the Synod Closing Assembly on Sunday, October 26th. Archbishop Wenski has extended an open invitation to every faithful of the Church in South Florida. He would like to see every parish well represented. In fact, some parishes are organizing buses for their parishioners. If your parish is organizing a group, please, kindly let us know ahead of time by calling Jacqui Debs at 305-762-1088. There will be no registration, tickets or special group seating. The day´s events will be held mainly in the English language. The keynote speaker, His Excellency, Cardinal Rodriguez Maradiaga, will give his address in English and Spanish. Please plan on arriving wellbefore 9:00 AM. Event ends at 1:00 PM. (We do not recommend coming mid-morning as there will be no seatingavailable.) Discounted parking rate: $9 for self-park and $12 for valet parking. Please, bring ticket to assembly for validation. Entrance to the Ballroom level is through the 7th floor of the parking garage. Continental breakfast will be served right after Mass. There will not be food or beverages offered available before Mass. Location: The Ballroom at the Miami Hilton Downtown, 1601 Biscayne Blvd, Miami FL 33132

Closing Assembly Participants´ Orientation Webinar and the link to the webinar, below: Click here to watch the webinar* *Please note that the above link requires Java to be installed.

Ministry Campus Info Empowered by the Spirit of Christ, Catholic Campus Ministry strives to form a community of faith, which witnesses to the presence of the Risen Christ. We do this by building a sharing community of administration, faculty, staff, and students. Catholic Campus Ministry promotes the well being of higher education and society as a whole. We also strive to provide an atmosphere of welcome, hospitality, and support for the entire university community; while at the same time, we specifically aim to help Roman Catholics grow in their faith life.

Ministry Detention / Prisons Disabled Family Life Respect Life Travelers Youth Ministry College Directory College

Contact Info Director of C. Ministry: Dr. Anthony Bonta, PhD

305-899-3650 [email protected] University Chaplain: Fr. Solórzano, O.P. S.Th.D.

305-899-3650

Barry University

[email protected] Administrative Assistant: Ms. Nancy Arias

Sponsored by the Dominican Sisters of Adrian Michigan

305-899-3650 [email protected] Coordinator of Worship & Music: Sr. Fleischaker, O.P., D. Min.

[email protected] 305-899-3892 Faculty Advisor (Kendall): Dr. Ernesto Valdez

[email protected] Faculty Advisor (Wolfson): Dr. German Munoz

[email protected]

MDC - Kendall, North and Wolfson

Faculty Advisor (North): Prof. Julio Borges

[email protected]

Sponsored by the Archdiocese of Miami

Faculty Advisor: Prof. Ana Carolina Corrales

[email protected] Faculty Advisor: Elizabeth de Arazoza

[email protected] Fr. Luis Rivero

305-628-6751 305-628-6721 [email protected]

St. Thomas University

Associate Campus Minister: Claudia H. Herrera

Sponsored by St. Thomas University

305-628-6515

Ministry App.

305-628-6721 [email protected] Administrative Assistant: Maria Thompson

[email protected] Campus Minister: Michelle Ducker

[email protected]

University of Miami

Chaplain: Msgr. Michael Carruthers

Sponsored by St. Augustine's Church & Catholic Student Center

[email protected]

www.ucatholic.org

Associate Chaplain: Deacon Eddie Smith

[email protected]

Broward College North and Central Campus Sponsored by the Archdiocese of Miami Campus Minister: Rigoberto Vega

305-222-1500 [email protected]

FIU - University Park Campus

Director: Father Rolando Garcia

Sponsored by St. Agatha's Parish

[email protected] Chaplain: Fr. Eckechukwu, C.S.Cp.

[email protected] Associate Campus Minister: Claudia H. Herrera

FIU - Biscayne Bay Campus

305-628-6515

Sponsored by the Archdiocese of Miami

305-628-6721 [email protected]

Nova Southeastern University Sponsored by the Archdiocese of Miami

CONTACT INFO Communications Director

Mary Ross Agosta 305-762-1043 (Office). 305-751-1063 (Home) [email protected] Media Coordinator & Digital Media Specialist

Maria Alejandra Rivas 305-762-1046 [email protected] Administrative Assistant

Veronica Fernandez 9401 Biscayne Blvd. Miami Shores , FL 33138 305-762-1045 305-751-6227 [email protected] Request for coverage form

MEDIA RESOURCES Catholic Terms Catholic Florida Statistics

The Communications Department of the Archdiocese of Miami handles media relations, public relations and community information. It oversees the archdiocese's radio and television programming and the archdiocesan newspapers.

Mission Statement We are committed to using the mass media to communicate the word of God and the teachings of the church on social and moral issues to both the Catholic and non- Catholic communities. We strive to do so while developing unique story ideas, maintaining integrity and providing accurate and complete information in a timely manner. This is achieved through The Florida Catholic, La Voz Catolica, Television and Radio programming and the World Wide Web.

Media protocol in covering archdiocesan events Reporters and photographers are welcome to cover celebrations of the Mass and archdiocesan events, but we ask to be notified in advance so that we may assist you and provide proper clearance from the pastor in charge. With proper clearance, photography and videography is permitted inside the church during Mass, but no flash or camera lights please. Photographers and videographers are asked to stay a respectable distance from the altar, and not stand in the space between the sanctuary and the congregation. Finally, we ask that you respect the privacy of individuals receiving Communion.

Installation Mass video now available, for more information Click here >

Archives Statements Press Release Disclaimer

Ministry Campus Info

Barry University Director of Campus Ministry - Karen J. Stalnaker 305-899-3650 [email protected] University Chaplain - Father Cristobal Torres 305-899-3836 [email protected] Barry University is sponsored by the Dominican Sisters of Adrian, Michigan

FIU - University Park Campus Chaplain - Father Sahayanathan Nathan [email protected] (786) 304-7104 FIU University Park is sponsored by St. Agatha Parish

St. Thomas University Director of Campus Ministry - Claudia H. Herrera, Ph.D. 305-628-6515 305-628-6721 [email protected] St. Thomas Campus Ministry is sponsored by St. Thomas University.

University of Miami Catholic Chaplain - Father Phillip Tran [email protected] University of Miami is sponsored by the Archdiocese of Miami & Catholic Student Center

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CONTACT INFO Director

Father Jesús "Jets" Medina 9401 Biscayne Boulevard Miami Shores, FL 33138 305-762-1235 [email protected]

The Office of Cultural Groups ministers to the spiritual needs of non-Hispanic ethnic and language groups in the Archdiocese of Miami. Currently, Sunday Mass is celebrated in more than a dozen different languages in the archdiocese.

Cultural Groups

Contact Info Fr. Heitor Castoldi C.S.

954-972-0434

Brazilian and Portuguese Apostolate

[email protected] Dr. Prince Smith

Caribbean Apostolate

305-653-8492 Deacon Alex Lam

[email protected]

Chinese Apostolate

Bernadette Chik

[email protected] Ms. Janet Macasero

[email protected]

Filipino Apostolate

954-981-7843 Fr. Reginald Jean Mary Ms. Annette Decius

Haitian Apostolate

954-894-2018 305-756-6470 Fr. Kuriakose Kumbakeel

954-227-6985

Indian Apostolate

[email protected] Fr. Christopher Marino

Italian Apostolate

305-759-4531 Fr. Jeonghoon Cho, Administrator

Korean Mission

954-478-2795

St. Paul Chung Ha Sang

[email protected] Fr. Jesus "Jets" Medina

[email protected]

Native American Apostolate

305-762-1235 Fr. Fidelis Nwanko

305-621-9846

Nigerian Apostolate

305-621-5608 [email protected] Fr. Stanislaw Rakiej, S.Ch.

954-946-6347

Polish Apostolate

954-946-0512 [email protected] Fr. Joseph Long Nguyen

954-731-7314

Vietnamese Apostolate

954-739-9632 [email protected]

e of Ministry to Priests Deacons Necrology of Priests Office for Religious Retired Priests Seminaries Vocations CONTACT INFO Director

Rev. Deacon Victor Pimentel 9401 Biscayne Blvd. Miami, FL 33138 305-762-1133 305-754-7762 [email protected]

DOCUMENTS Deacon Directory 2017 - 18 Necrology Permanent Deacons 20… Retired Deacon Directory 2017 - 18

The diaconal ministry of service is a very ancient and a very beautiful ministry in the Church. Through deacons, God desires to provide for the needs of His people and especially the needs of the poor. The permanent diaconate is an ordained ministry along with the priesthood and the episcopacy. Permanent deacons preach and teach, assist priests and bishops in the celebration of the Eucharist and oversee ministries of charity and justice. In the Archdiocese of Miami, the permanent diaconate is open to both married and unmarried men between the ages of 31 and 60 with a strong Catholic faith and a solid reputation and character. Candidates must be in full communion with the Church. Men interested in the permanent diaconate should contact their parish pastor who is responsible for the nomination phase of the application process. The Office for the Diaconate is charged with the coordination and facilitation of the application process and the formation program.

CONTACT INFO Director

Deacon Edgardo Farías 9401 Biscayne Boulevard Miami Shores, FL 33138 305-762-1093 305-758-2027 [email protected] www.detentionministry.org

We recognize evangelization as the essential mission of the Church. We have welcomed and accepted the gift of Salvation in Jesus Christ. We desire to see Christ in the detainees, and the detainees can see Christ in us.

Mission We are called, formed and sent, to release the Good News, which is able to heal and transform the hearts of those affected within the Criminal Justice System.

CONTACT INFO St. Robert Bellarmine Mission 2640 NW 24 St., Miami, FL 33142 786-464-0864 [email protected] St. Joseph Mission 1210 N.W. 6th Ave., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 954-366-3267 [email protected]

Detention Ministry Information and Referral Centers (DMIRC) The DMIRC is committed to helping families (of offenders), juveniles at risk (children of an incarcerated parent), individuals (ex-offenders), and newly convicted criminals (prison consulting) to connect with the services they need. The DMIRC provides guidance for those seeking spiritual support and/or information regarding local services programs.

an Center Schott Communities CONTACT INFO Marian Center

15701 N.W. 37 Avenue Miami Gardens, FL 33054 305-200-8927 www.mariancenterschool.org Executive Director / School Principal

Sister Lidia Valli [email protected]

The Marian Center offers services for people with intellectual disabilities: a fully accredited school for students ages 6 to 21; an adult day training and work program; and a full-time residential facility for women. Each of these programs welcomes people from all races, religions and backgrounds. The Marian Center provides partial financial aid to all those who qualify.

age and Family Life Marriage Prep Divorce Bereavement Movements Resources Human Sexuality CONTACT INFO "Wellspring" Coordinators Miami-Dade and Monroe

786-252-7973 (Helen) 305-762-1140 (Family Life Office) Broward

954-718-7241 (Bob) 954-797-9770 (Jean) Miami-Dade and Broward

Elaine 954-270-4116 General Information [email protected]

The Family Life Office of the Archdiocese of Miami sponsors a two night, three day retreat for people dealing with significant loss with primary focus given to the divorce experience. The Wellspring Experience retreat provides a time out from every day stressors to work on oneself in a safe nurturing environment. This retreat is offered twice a year, once in the Fall and once in the Spring in both English and Spanish.

CONTACT INFO Director

Father Patrick H. O'Neill 9401 Biscayne Boulevard Miami Shor… 305-762-1254 305-751-6227 [email protected] www.ourelderbrothers.org/

MEDIA RESOURCES Brochure in English Brochure in Spanish Brochure in Creole

The Office of Ecumenical and Inter-faith Relations is the archdiocesan outreach to the larger community of many faith traditions. The outreach is accomplished through meetings, dialogues and workshops addressing the church's concern for unity and dialogue among other religious communities.

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Ministry RCIA RCIA FAQs Upcoming Events CONTACT INFO Cabinet Secretary of Parish Life

Stephen Colella 9401 Biscayne Blvd. Miami, FL 33138 305-762-1126 [email protected] Director of Evangelization and Parish Life

Mary Ann Wiesinger 305-762-1129 [email protected] Coordinator of Evangelization and Parish Life

305-762-1128 Administrative Assistant

Susana Diaz 305-762-1127 305-751-6227 [email protected]

The Office of Evangelization and Parish Life was created in response to a major priority of the Second General Synod of the Archdiocese of Miami and the Strategic Pastoral Plan, "Disciples of Faith, Missionaries of Hope." The office aims to provide support and serve as a resource primarily to the parishes in embracing the missionary call of Christ to "Go and make disciples of all nations" through creating a welcoming and vibrant experience of parish life. The office also designs, develops and implements plans and projects to enhance the implementation of the New Evangelization among the faithful in order to help them advance in authentic discipleship and fulfill their baptismal call and mission to grow to the full maturity of Christ.

CONTACT INFO Director

Stephen Colella 305-762-1126 [email protected] Administrative assistant

Mildred Ratcliffe [email protected] Office

9401 Biscayne Boulevard Miami Shor… 305-762-1127 305-751-6227

Type the shortcut: www.miamiarch.org/FamilyLife on your browser to come back to this page on the web site.

CONTACT INFO Senior Director of Faith Formation & Superintendent of Schools

Kim Pryzbylski, Ph.D. [email protected] Administrative Executive Assistant

Hope Sadowski [email protected] Office

9401 Biscayne Boulevard Miami Shores, FL 33138 305-762-1070 305-762-1115 [email protected] www.miamiarchschools.org

The Office of Faith Formation consists of the Office of Catholic Schools, the Office of Catechesis and the Office of Adult Faith Formation.

Our ministry is reflected in our mission statement: "With faith in Divine Providence and openness to the Spirit, the Division of Christian Formation is committed, as disciples of Jesus Christ, to confident and zealous service to the Church of Miami through evangelization and catechesis."

e What is the Synod? Focus Teams Focus Team Resources The Synod Snapshot FAQ's Closing Assembly Photos Videos Español

Frequently Asked Questions about the Second General Synod of the Archdiocese of Miami What is a Synod? In a synod, the bishop calls his people together in order to move forward on a pathway. The goal of the synod is to set pastoral priorities for the future and inspire and engage the People of God to share the Good News of Jesus Christ.

Why did Archbishop Wenski convoke this Synod? Archbishop Wenski believes that in order for the church to meet the challenges of this third millennia of Christianity, pastoral planning is absolutely vital, and that this planning must include the input of the people of the Archdiocese. The Archbishop cherishes the wisdom and talent that rests among the People of God and is looking forward to how the Holy Spirit can work through every Catholic in Miami in our call to be "Disciples in Faith and Missionaries of Hope."

This is the "Second General Synod" When was the first? The First General Synod of the Archdiocese of Miami was convened by Archbishop Edward McCarthy in 1985 and was concluded in 1988.

What do we expect to complete at the end of this process? The desired outcome of the Synod is to determine a course of action for the local church, one consisting of specific and attainable goals which will then be implemented during the following three to four years. This pastoral plan will be published and promulgated at the conclusion of the Synod, in the Fall of 2013.

How long will the Synod last? The Synod process will last eighteen months; it was convoked at the Chrism Mass on April 3, 2012, and will close at the final Synod Assembly in the Fall of 2013.

Who can participate in the Synod? All Catholics are invited to participate in the Synod. Click here for opportunities to participate

I'm curious about the theme, "Disciples in Faith, Missionaries of Hope" – what is the significance behind it? During his homily at the Chrism Mass, Archbishop Wenski referred to the challenge we each face: to discern what is expected of us, both in our life within the Church and in the world. Archbishop Wenski believes that this is a time both of great change and opportunity, and that our response to this challenge must be to continue to root ourselves in our deep faith and belief in our Savior, Jesus Christ, while simultaneously moving our faith forward into whatever the future holds, bringing hope to our own future as the people of God. The phrase "Disciples in Faith, Missionaries of Hope" also connects to the theme of the Fifth General Conference of the Bishops of Latin America and the Caribbean that took place in Aparacedia, Brazil in 2007. The theme of that conference was "Disciples and missionaries of Jesus Christ, so that our Peoples may have life in Him."

Who should I contact if I have questions about the Synod? The Synod office staff is happy to answer any questions you have about the Synod. For more information please send an e-mail to

[email protected] or contact Rosemarie Banich at the Synod Office at 305-762-1189.

Who is invited to the Listening Sessions? Any and all Catholics in the Archdiocese of Miami. Click here for the Synod Listening Sessions Calendar.

What if I can't make the Listening Session scheduled for my area? You are invited to attend any or all of the Listening Sessions, no matter the deanery or county.

Will this information really be used? Absolutely! The Archbishop, the Synod Leadership Team and the Focus Area Teams are eager to learn of your needs and expectations for our Church. We cannot plan without knowing what people need. In fact, the Focus Teams will be created based on the common themes and needs identified from these sessions.

What if I have more suggestions than can fit on this survey form? Please submit as many forms, as many ideas as you wish, to the Synod Office.

If I speak at a Listening Session do I still have to hand in my form? We would ask that you do. While Synod volunteers will be ferociously capturing notes, handing in your written responses to the questions will ensure that your thoughts are captured accurately in the planning process.

Will there be more listening sessions? Yes. Parishes are encouraged to host their own Listening Sessions and there may be additional opportunities for various constituencies to gather and share their responses to these questions. Check the Synod Listening Sessions Calendar regularly for the most current information.

What if I cannot attend any of the Listening Sessions; how can I submit my input to the Synod? After the conclusion off the Archbishop's Listening Session, there will be an online opportunity for submission of feedback. Check the Synod webpage for the link to that online feedback option beginning in July, 2012.

Can I participate in the planning process? Yes! Those who are interested can potentially serve as a member of or a resource to one of the 15 Focus Area Teams. For more information please send an e-mail to

[email protected] or contact Rosemarie Banich at the Synod Office at

305-762-1189.

What happens after the Listening Sessions? All of the Feedback Forms as well as the comments made during the Listening Sessions will be collected and recorded. The Synod Leadership Team and the Focus Area Teams will then review your feedback in order to discern the best possible actions and a plan for implementation.

Ministry RCIA RCIA FAQs Upcoming Events

RCIA Adapted for Children What is the "The Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults Adapted for Children"? What do children study in the "The Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults Adapted for Children"?

Timing of Liturgies When are the Rite of Acceptance and Rite of Welcoming usually celebrated? When is the Rite of Election usually celebrated?

Rite of Election Do Candidates sign the book of the elect?

Marriage Questions What marriage issues impede the RCIA process? Do married Catechumens or Protestant Candidates need their marriage convalidated? How should uncatechetized Baptized Catholics who are married civilly be incorporated into the RCIA process? How should individuals or couples who have been previously married be incorporated into the RCIA process? What about a person married to someone who has been divorced?

The Easter Vigil Who has faculties to confirm at the Easter Vigil? Can a pastor confirm a person outside of the Easter Vigil?

Dismissal Who from the RCIA group should be part of the dismissal from Mass?

Ash Wednesday Is it proper for catechumens and candidates to receive ashes on Ash Wednesday?

Scrutinies Are the scrutinies for the Elect only?

Godparents Is it possible to have two godmothers or two godfathers or two sponsors of the same gender? Who can be a godparent?

Situational Questions One of my RCIA participants, while a baptized Catholic, joined for a few years a separated ecclesial community. She has decided to return to the Catholic Church. Does she to make a profession of faith? Is it proper to include the candidates in the Rite of Presentation of the Creed and Presentation of the Lord’s Prayer? Can a white stole be used at the Baptism and/or Confirmation of a child or adult as the white garment called for in the Rite?

What is the "The Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults Adapted for Children"? According to Church teaching (Canon Law), the age of seven is called "the age of reason" (cf Canon 97 §2). By this age, children can have enough understanding to be responsible for their own actions. Therefore, they can make their own baptismal promises, whereas in infant baptism the parents make promises on behalf of the child. Accordingly, once a child has reached the age of 7, the Church requires that he or she then follows the preparation guidelines for RCIA, although in an age-appropriate manner. This catechesis will include learning about the Faith and especially about the sacraments of Baptism, Confirmation, and Eucharist, as well as reflection on the scripture. Top

What do children study in the "The Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults Adapted for Children"? The children are prepared to receive the sacraments of Baptism, Confirmation, and Eucharist. According to the guidance of the Church, once a child has reached the age of 7, he/she then follows the preparation guidelines for RCIA as if he/she was an adult. This catechesis will include sacramental education and reflection on the scripture. Top

When are the Rite of Acceptance and Rite of Welcoming usually celebrated? These Rites can be celebrated when people have completed the period of Pre-Evangelization and Inquiry, and can be celebrated 2 to 3 times in a year (RCIA no. 18). A recommended date is the Feast of Christ the King. Top

When is the Rite of Election usually celebrated? This Rite is always celebrated by the Bishop (cf. RCIA no. 121) and usually on the First Sunday of Lent (cf. RCIA no. 126). Parishes may celebrate the Rite of Sending which takes place immediately before the Rite of Election (cf. RCIA no. 106). Top

Do Candidates sign the book of the elect? No. Only catechumens sign the book. Top

What marriage issues impede the RCIA process? Anyone who is in an irregular marriage (i.e. a Catholic with only a civil wedding ceremony or any person remarried without an annulment issued by the Church)should discuss their situation with a parish priest or marriage advocate at the parish as early as possible in the RCIA process. Each case is unique so seek assistance when needed. Top

Do married Catechumens or Protestant Candidates need their marriage convalidated? Married couples who have had no prior marriages, and in which neither party is Catholic, are not bound by Catholic form and are, therefore, married in the eyes of the Church. After they receive their sacraments no convalidation is necessary. Top

How should uncatechetized Baptized Catholics who are married civilly be incorporated into the RCIA process? Individuals or couples who are Catholic but married outside of the Church, and who have no previous marriages will need to have their Marriage convalidated prior to receiving the sacraments. In certain circumstances it may be appropriate to convalidate the marriage after reception of the sacraments if the couple fully understands the expectations of Church prior to their convalidation (i.e. they must live as brother and sister until convalidation). Top

How should individuals or couples who have been previously married be incorporated into the RCIA process? What about a person married to someone who has been divorced? Anyone who has a previous marriage (Catholic or non-Catholic), or is married to someone with a previous marriage, without a decree of nullity (annulment) issued by the Church must have their situation carefully examined. People in irregular marriages or who are married to someone with a previous marriage can participate in the Period of Pre-Catechumenate, the Rite of Acceptance and the subsequent period of the Catechumenate, but they cannot be accepted as elect (i.e. be admitted to the Rite of Election) and/or approach the sacraments until their impediment is removed. Each case is unique so seek assistance when needed. Top

Who has faculties to confirm at the Easter Vigil? By law: pastors can (and must) confirm those adults they Baptize. “Unless there is a grave reason to the contrary, an adult who is baptized is to be confirmed immediately after baptism and is to participate in the Eucharistic celebration also by receiving communion.” (Canon no. 866) Top

Can a pastor confirm a person outside of the Easter Vigil? Yes. If the candidate is a baptized Catholic, a Pastor must request faculties in order to confirm him or her. No faculties need be requested to receive and confirm a candidate baptized into another Christian church. Conferral of the sacraments should take place at a Sunday liturgy during the Easter season, but not at the Easter Vigil or on Easter Sunday. Top

Who from the RCIA group should be part of the dismissal from Mass? The RCIA no. 73 states: Ordinarily when catechumens are present in the assembly of the faithful during the Mass they should be kindly dismissed before the liturgy of the Eucharist begins. They must await their Baptism, which will join them to God’s priestly people and empower them to participate in the celebration of the Eucharist. Therefore, catechumens should be part of the dismissal rite. Baptized candidates from another Christian tradition are already members of the Church [though not in full communion]and children of God. Their Baptism gives them the right to be present at the celebration of the Eucharist but they may not receive Holy Communion until they have been received into full communion with the Church. When these candidates are truly uncatechized they may choose to be dismissed with the catechumens, however, they must be made clear to them that they are not catechumens. Baptized Catholic candidates are never dismissed. By their Baptism they have the right and responsibility to be with the community for the celebration of the Eucharist. Top

Is it proper for catechumens and candidates to receive ashes on Ash Wednesday? Receiving ashes on Ash Wednesday would not be proper for catechumens. However, because they are baptized, it would be proper for the candidates to receive ashes on Ash Wednesday. Top

Are the scrutinies for the Elect only? Yes, as the prayer of exorcism in the three scrutinies is for catechumens who have received the Church’s election. The language of the prayers employs numerous images referring to their approaching Baptism, and thus are not proper rituals for candidates who have already received Baptism. In their place the RCIA provides a Penitential Rite for those preparing for Confirmation and Eucharist preserving the distinction between the scrutinies and the Penitential Rite. Furthermore, there is no combined rite for these celebrations. (RCIA no. 463) Top

Is it possible to have two godmothers or two godfathers or two sponsors of the same gender? No. At the celebration of Baptism there is to be only one male or one female godparent or one of each. (Canon no. 873). Top

Who can be a godparent? It is usual that at the time of Baptism and Confirmation a person has a godparent. This godparent takes on the responsibility of helping the person to live a Christian life in keeping with Baptism/Confirmation and to fulfill the obligations inherent in it. To take on the responsibility of being a godparent a person: Must be a Catholic who is not a parent of the one to be baptized or confirmed Must have received all the sacraments of initiation (Baptism, Eucharist, and Confirmation); Must live a life of faith that befits the role to be undertaken (e.g. if married, must be in a valid marriage according to Church law); Cannot have a canonical penalty like excommunication; Cannot be under the age of sixteen. If there is a just reason, someone of a younger age can be permitted by the pastor or the oneadministering the Baptism or Confirmation; Must be nominated by at least one of the parents in the case of infant Baptism, by the one tobe baptized in the case of an adult Baptism, or by the pastor or the one administering theBaptism in cases where necessity requires it. Regarding Witnesses: At the request of the parents, a baptized and believing person not belonging to the CatholicChurch may act as a Christian witness along with a Catholic godparent. An unbaptized person cannot act as a witness or godparent. Top

One of my RCIA participants, while a baptized Catholic, joined for a few years a separated ecclesial community. She has decided to return to the Catholic Church. Does she to make a profession of faith? No. She does not need to make a profession of faith. Her way back is via the sacrament of Reconciliation with individual confession and absolution. Top

Is it proper to include the candidates in the Rite of Presentation of the Creed and Presentation of the Lord’s Prayer? It depends on the spiritual needs of these candidates. If the candidates are truly uncatechized, have no experience with the Church of their baptism, were never raised in any faith, the Creed and the Lord’s Prayer will be totally unfamiliar to them. The presentations would be proper and would be needed by them. However, if the Lord’s Prayer has been part of their prayer life it would not make any sense to present them with this prayer. In a similar way, if a candidate has had some experience with their church of baptism and has prayed the Creed as part of religious services in that church then it would not make any sense to present them with the Creed which is already part of their prayer life. All candidates would benefit from a deeper study of both these prayers as would all in our parish community, but to ritually present them with these symbols as if they had never heard of them before would be incongruous. (See RCIA no. 407) Top

Can a white stole be used at the Baptism and/or Confirmation of a child or adult as the white garment called for in the Rite? No. The traditional vesture of the newly baptized/confirmed is the white robe (alb). The stole is the proper vestment for an ordained minister…priest, deacon. “The distinction between the universal priesthood of all the baptized and the ministerial priesthood of the ordained is blurred when the distinctive garb of ordained ministers is used at (Baptism), Confirmation. “[BCL Newsletter, Dec. 1984] Top

FINANCE COUNCIL Archbishop Thomas Wenski Bishop Peter Baldacchino Sr. Elizabeth Worley, SSJ Msgr. Tomás Marín Father Paul Vuturo Father David Zirilli Mr. Thomas E. Beier Mr. William G. Benson Mrs. Christina Brochin Mr. Sean Clancy Mr. Albert A. Del Castillo

The finance council gives counsel to the bishop on the following: Appointment of a finance officer (c. 494) Removal of the finance officer (c. 494) Imposition of taxes, either ordinary or extraordinary (c. 1263) Decisions relative to the more important acts of administration(c. 1277) Determination of the meaning of acts of extraordinary administration for institutes subject to his control if the statutes are not specific (c. 1281.2) Review of annual reports submitted to him by clerical and lay administrators of any ecclesiastical goods(c. 1287.1) Investment of tangible and intangible property assigned to an endowment (c. 1305) Modification of the obligations imposed in executing last wills for pious causes if such obligations cannot be fulfilled (c. 1310.2) The finance council must give or withhold consent to the bishop on the performance of an act of extraordinary administration as defined by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) (c. 1277): Alienation of property at or above an amount established by the USCCB (c. 1292 § 1) (effective March 31, 2004 , $1,000,000 for dioceses with Catholic populations of half a million persons or more; $500,000 for all other dioceses) In addition to alienation, the entering into any transaction that worsens the financial condition of the diocese (c. 1295)

Consent must also be obtained from the Holy See for alienation of property and for transactions that worsen the overall financial condition of the diocese in the following amounts: $10,000,000 or more for dioceses with Catholic populations of half a million persons or more $5,000,000 or more for all other dioceses

In addition to the canon law requirements, diocesan bishops should consider consulting with their finance councils on the following: Appointment of auditors Appointment of legal counsel Employee compensation and benefits Insurance and risk management Property management Construction management Investment policies Internal controls Development (fundraising) Banking arrangements Leasing of ecclesiastical property

Note For more information on the duties and responsibilities of finance councils, go to:

www.usccb.org/bishops/dfi/councils.htm

age and Family Life Marriage Prep Divorce Bereavement Movements Resources Human Sexuality CONTACT INFO www.portumatrimonio.org www.foryourmarriage.org

Por Tu Matrimonio invites couples to discover the great richness of Catholic Marriage and to strengthen spousal love within the community of faith.

da Catholic News Collaboration Read / Subscribe La Voz Catolica

In November 1, 2009 the Communications Department of the Archdiocese of Miami launched an updated news resource for clergy, parishioners and the general public.

News Center CONTACT INFO Miami editor

Ana Rodríguez-Soto 9401 Biscayne Boulevard Miami Shores, FL 33138 305-762-1131 305-762-1132 [email protected] Paid Advertising

Valerie Casko 888-275-9953 407-373-0087 [email protected] Digital Archives

The Voice 1959-1989 Click here

This function is comprised of daily news updates on the archdiocesan website's News Center. Clergy, parishioners and the public have the ability to post approved comments related to each article. Clergy, parishioners have the ability to post articles on the website through a new component called "News Collaboration". Pictures will be accepted to accompany the article.

Florida Catholic - Print edition The Florida Catholic newspaper has granted the Archdiocese of Miami permission to continue utilizing the Florida Catholic name; beginning November 2009, a monthly newspaper will be delivered to each parish on the third Thursday of each month, to be distributed at Masses that weekend. The new monthly publication will be comprised of feature in depth articles and will include collaboration from the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and the Florida Catholic Conference. The Florida Catholic's main office in Orlando handles advertising for the monthly printed edition. If you are interested in placing an ad contact the number above. Local news is handled by the archdiocesan editor. If you would like to submit a story idea or contribute please click here to read about our "News Collaboration" feature. To publicize an event of interest to Catholics in Miami-Dade, Broward and Monroe counties enter your event information online by clicking here and registering online. 2017 Publication deadlines 2018 Publication deadlines

e What is the Synod? Focus Teams Focus Team Resources The Synod Snapshot FAQ's Closing Assembly Photos Videos Message from the Synod of Bishops, Rome, October 2012 Letter of His Holiness Benedict XVI to the Bishops of Latin America and the Caribbean Aparecida) Summary of Ecclesia in America (Synod convoked by Blessed John Paul II on the Church in America) Bishop Ouellet's homily from opening Mass of Ecclesia in America Congress, Dec. 2012 Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life: Americans and Religious Affiliation National Catholic Reporter: 10 Signs of a Vibrant Parish Research and Resources for the New Evangelization: A Summary of CARA Research Paulist Evangelization Ministries: An essay reflecting on the New Evangelization in response to the Synod of 2012 CARA: Emerging Models of Pastoral Leadership CARA: Frequently Requested Church Statistics Gallup: Seven in 10 Americans Are Very or Moderately Religious CARA: Catholics' Use of New Media

e What is the Synod? Focus Teams Focus Team Resources The Synod Snapshot FAQ's Closing Assembly Photos Videos Nearly 800 volunteers from across the Archdiocese are engaged in the second phase of the Synod: the Focus Teams.

There are eighteen Focus Areas, which are particular areas of ministry which fall within the five "foundational ministries" of the Archdiocese: Communion – Sacraments and Worship Liturgy and Sacramental Life

Conversion – Education and Formation Forming the Faith of our Youth and Young Adults Forming the Faith of our Adults Catholic Education

Stewardship – Governance and Finance Parish Life and Stewardship Task Force: Archdiocesan Pastoral Council Task Force: Archdiocesan School Board Task Force: Archdiocesan Finance Council Task Force: Archbishop's Development Cabinet Collaboration in the Keys

Solidarity – Social Services and Outreach The Social Mission of the Church

Discipleship – Vocations and Evangelization Lay Ministry Marriage and Family Life Youth Ministry Campus Ministry Young Adult Ministry The Permanent Deaconate The Priesthood and Vocations The Focus Teams began meeting in September, at locations throughout the Archdiocese, including the Pastoral Center in Miami Shores, the parishes of St. Rose of Lima, Our Lady of the Lakes, St. Augustine and St. Thomas the Apostle, as well as Barry University and St. Thomas University. Each Focus Team meets three times, and is charged with providing recommendation of priorities, goals and initiatives for the Archbishop to consider for the next three years. As part of their work, the Focus Team members perform the following tasks: Analyzing and gathering data Identifying challenges and opportunities Discerning goals Developing approaches and requirements Recommending and supporting the fruit of the Synod The final work product of each Focus Team is a set of Goal Statements, which are the actions the Focus Team feels are most important to be taken in their particular area for the next three years. At the conclusion of the three Focus Team meetings, a small group of team members will work for two more months as a SMART Goal Drafting Team, converting the Goal Statements from the larger team into specific, measurable, attainable, relevant and trackable goals.

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e of Lay Ministry School of Ministry Fountain of Grace FORMS Fountain of Grace Order Form

What is the School of Ministry? This formation program was created at the request of Archbishop Favalora and promulgated as mandatory for all ministers in the Archdiocese of Miami in September of 2006. Fountain of Grace is an introduction to the

Catechism of the Catholic Church and is used as a method to update the theological knowledge of adult leaders in our parish communities and to encourage the use of the Catechism in parish formation programs.

Parish workshops on Fountain of Grace and the

Catechism of the Catholic Church in English or Spanish are available through this office.

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Picture: Archdiocese Archive Gilberto Fernandez

For nearly four decades, Bishop Gilberto Fernandez was a humble parish priest, serving first in Cuba, then in South Florida. That's what he aspired to be all his life, since following his two older brothers into the priesthood. "Sometimes people talk about the loneliness of the priests, but when you are in a parish you don't feel that loneliness because you are surrounded by love and warmth," he said June 24, 1997, when his appointment as Auxiliary Bishop of Miami was announced. "I never thought about doing anything else but being a parish priest," he added. "But man proposes and God disposes. That's the situation here." In accepting his new responsibilities, Bishop Fernandez pledged to follow the saintly example of a fellow Cuban, Miami Auxiliary Bishop Agustin Roman, whom he called "our local Mother Teresa." With characteristic humility, he accepted his new appointment, "knowing that many others among my brother priests are better qualified than me." He also credited the faith of his parents, a faith which nurtured eight children, five boys and three girls. Four of the boys became priests, and one of the girls became a religious. All of them ministered in South Florida. "This appointment is not an honor bestowed on me, but one on my family, for the total dedication of my mother, my father, and brothers and sister," Bishop Fernandez said. In his new role as bishop, he pledged to be "a servant of the people." For his episcopal motto, he chose "amor ultima ratio" -- love is the supreme reason. His episcopal coat-of-arms features two clasped hands in front of a golden cross. The hands represent Miami, a meeting place and a place of welcome. Stars above the cross symbolize the Virgin Mary as well as the Cuban and U.S. flags. The bottom half features blue and white waters, representing the Caribbean Sea and the Catholic Church, which is often portrayed as the "bark of Peter." Born in Havana, Cuba, on Feb. 13, 1935, Bishop Fernandez was ordained for the Archdiocese of Havana on May 17, 1959. He served in four parishes in the Havana area, including as administrator of the cathedral, before coming to Miami in July, 1967. His two older brothers, Msgr. Orlando Fernandez (deceased) and Father Nelson Fernandez, had arrived here in 1961. Another brother, Fausto Fernandez, served for a long time as administrator of Marian Towers, an archdiocesan apartment complex for low-income elderly. Sister Lilia Fernandez is a Sister of St. Joseph of St. Augustine who ministers at Mercy Hospital. Two other sisters, Ondina (deceased) and Teresita, also lived in Miami. Another brother, Miguel Angel Fernandez, lives in Mexico with his wife and two daughters. Among his assignments in South Florida, Bishop Fernandez ministered to migrant farmworkers in Naranja, Homestead and Delray Beach. In 1996, after six years as pastor of St. Kevin Church in southwest Dade County, he was named spiritual director of St. John Vianney Seminary in Miami.

Biography Auxiliary Bishop Gilberto Fernandez

Born/Died: Feb. 13, 1935, in Havana, Cuba Sept. 30, 2011, Miami

Ordained: To the priesthood, May 17, 1959, for the Archdiocese of Havana, Cuba Appointed Titular bishop of Irina and Auxiliary Bishop of Miami, June 24, 1997 Ordained to the episcopacy, September 3, 1997 Retired for health reasons, Dec. 11, 2002

Education: Buen Pastor Seminary, Havana, Cuba

Priestly Ministry: Archdiocese of Havana, 1959 to 1966

Assistant Pastor, El Salvador Church, Cerro, Havana (1959 to 1960) Administrator, St. Peter's Church, Batabano, Havana (1960 to 1961) Administrator, Cathedral of Havana (1961 to 1962) Pastor, El Cerro Church, Havana (1962 to 1966)

Archdiocese of Miami: Assistant Pastor, St. Ann's Mission, Naranja (September, 1967 to October, 1969) Administrator, Our Lady Queen of Peace, Delray Beach (October, 1969 to September, 1971) Assistant Pastor, St. Patrick Church, Miami Beach (September, 1971 to June, 1974) Pastor, Sacred Heart Church, Homestead (June, 1974 to May, 1979) Pastor, Sts. Peter and Paul Church, Miami (May, 1979 to April, 1988) Pastor, San Pablo Church, Marathon (April, 1988 to December, 1989) Pastor, St. Kevin Church, Miami (December, 1989 to June, 1996) Spiritual Director, St. John Vianney Seminary, Miami (June, 1996 to June, 1997) Past and current appointments include membership in the Archdiocesan Worship Commission; Personnel Board; Presbyteral Council; and Advisory Boards for Permanent Diaconate and Catholic Cemeteries.

Personal: Parents: Jose Fernandez and Consuelo (nee Villar) Fernandez, both deceased Brothers: Msgr. Orlando Fernandez, (deceased Jan. 13, 2000), Archdiocese of Miami; Father Nelson Fernandez, retired, Archdiocese of Miami; Fausto Fernandez, former administrator of Marian Towers, Miami Beach; Sister Lilia Fernandez, Sisters of St. Joseph, Mercy Hospital, Miami; Miguel Angel Fernandez, Mexico; Teresita Fernandez and Ondina Fernandez (deceased September 2011), Miami.

bishop Carroll Archbishop McCarthy First Synod Guantanamo Archbishop Favalora

Archbishop Coleman F. Carroll

Picture: Archdiocese Archive St. John Vianney College Seminary

On Aug. 13, 1958, the Diocese of Miami was created, with 51 parishes, 65 diocesan priests, and 21 religious order clergy ministering to 185,000 Catholics in 16 counties in southern Florida. Most of the rest of the state was covered by the original Diocese of St. Augustine. Bishop Coleman F. Carroll, formerly Auxiliary Bishop of Pittsburgh, was installed as Miami’s first bishop on Oct. 7, 1958, at the newly-elevated St. Mary Cathedral. He immediately moved to build the first minor seminary in the southeastern United States, St. John Vianney College Seminary in Miami, which was dedicated just 13 months after Bishop Carroll’s installation. The major seminary of St. Vincent de Paul in Boynton Beach, which now serves every diocese in Florida, opened its doors four years later, in 1963. Between 1958 and 1963, Bishop Carroll led the new diocese through a tremendous program of expansion. Those first five years saw the number of parishes nearly double, from 51 to 94, and the number of priests more than triple, from 86 to 305. The church in South Florida also grew due to the tremendous influx of Cuban refugees and Catholics from the northern United States. The diocese bore the brunt of the Cuban exile exodus for a full year prior to receiving federal government assistance. Between 1960 and 1962, Catholic Charities, led by Msgr. Bryan O. Walsh, welcomed, cared for, and placed with temporary guardians or family members more than 14,000 unaccompanied Cuban children in what became known as the Pedro Pan exodus. Most were later reunited with their parents.

Picture: Archdiocese Archive Left to right: Cuban Refugees, Catholic Charities Building and Msgr. Bryan O. Walsh

On May 8, 1968, the ecclesiastical Province of Miami was established. The Diocese of Miami was elevated to the rank of archdiocese and two new Florida dioceses were created, Orlando and St. Petersburg. Miami yielded eight counties to the new dioceses. It now consisted of 85 parishes and 10 missions; 164 diocesan priests, 141 religious order clergy, and about 900 women religious served a Catholic population of 400,000. By the time Archbishop Carroll died in office, July 26, 1977, the diocese had turned into a booming metropolitan see with more than 700,000 Catholics in eight counties. During his tenure, Archbishop Carroll founded close to 100 new parishes, an incredible pace of five a year.

Picture: Archdiocese Archive Bishop Carroll at Vatican

bishop Carroll Archbishop McCarthy First Synod Guantanamo Archbishop Favalora

Archbishop John Clement Favalora

Picture: Archdiocese Archive Archbishop Favalora

On Nov. 3, 1994, Bishop John Clement Favalora, a native of New Orleans, La., who served as Bishop of St. Petersburg since 1989, was appointed to succeed Archbishop McCarthy. He was installed Dec. 20, 1994, and in early 1995, he, too, paid a visit to the Cubans and Haitians detained at the refugee camps in Guantanamo. A week later, the archdiocese opened Varela Centers at several South Florida Catholic parishes, in order to teach English to Cuban and Haitian children just released from the camps. The schools helped them and their parents prepare for life in the U.S. On May 27-28, 1995, Cardinal Jaime Ortega of Havana made an official pastoral visit to South Florida as part of tour that included stops in New York, Chicago and Tampa. He celebrated Mass at St. Mary Cathedral, vespers at the Shrine of Our Lady of Charity on Biscayne Bay, and an outdoor Mass at St. Thomas University in Miami. Throngs greeted him at every site. The cardinal called for unity among Cubans, both those in exile and those inside the island. On Jan. 25, 1998, Archbishop Favalora led a group of about 180 pilgrims on a nine-hour visit to Havana, Cuba, to attend Pope John Paul II’s Mass in the civic plaza. On Aug. 13, 1998, its 40th anniversary, the archdiocese consisted of 108 parishes and three missions in three counties, with a registered Catholic population of more than 774,000 served by 265 diocesan priests, 122 religious order priests, 345 women religious and 56 men religious, and 128 permanent deacons.

Picture: Archdiocese Archive Archbishop Favalora

In September, 1999, Archbishop Favalora announced plans for Vision 2000, a campaign to generate a $75 million endowment that would enable the Church in South Florida to continue its educational and charitable ministries into the 21st century. In December 2000, Vision 2000 concluded after having raised $110 million in endowments for the archdiocese. On its 50th anniversary in 2008, the archdiocese consisted of 118 parishes and 3 missions in Miami-Dade, Broward and Monroe counties. More than 750,000 registered Catholics are served by 264 diocesan priests, 89 religious order priests, 150 permanent deacons, 314 women religious and 55 men religious.

bishop Carroll Archbishop McCarthy First Synod Guantanamo Archbishop Favalora

Andrew and Guantanamo

Picture: Archdiocese Archive 1992 Anniversary Mass

On Aug. 24, 1992, Hurricane Andrew, the first Category 4 storm to hit a highly populated urban area in the United States, struck South Florida, wreaking vast damage on the southernmost part of Dade County and an estimated $130 million in damages to Catholic facilities. Archdiocesan personnel and volunteers from unaffected parishes flocked to repair the damage and aid those left homeless. The task of rebuilding continued for months. To symbolize unity with those affected by the storm, the archdiocese marked its 34th anniversary in October with an outdoor Mass in South Dade. The altar was built out of hurricane debris. On April 10, 1993, at the Vatican-mandated age of 75, Archbishop McCarthy submitted his resignation to Pope John Paul II, but continued to run the archdiocese until the Holy See appointed a successor. On Oct. 7, 1993, its 35th anniversary, the archdiocese consisted of 107 parishes and three missions in three counties, with a registered Catholic population of more than 681,000 served by 198 diocesan priests, 127 religious order priests, 406 women religious and 56 men religious, and 103 permanent deacons. In the summer of 1994, thousands of Cuban rafters again took to the seas, fleeing Communism and dire economic conditions in their homeland. After being rescued by the U.S. Coast Guard, most were placed in temporary detainment camps in Guantanamo Naval Base in Cuba, where they languished while the Clinton Administration decided whether or not to admit them to the United States. The archdiocese asked Spanish-speaking priests to volunteer to work at the camps for rotating periods of time, and Archbishop McCarthy and Auxiliary Bishop Roman traveled to Guantanamo to visit and bring hope to the refugees.

Picture: Archdiocese Archive With Cuban refugees in Guantanamo: Left: Father Felipe Estevez. Right: Father Pedro Luis Perez

bishop Carroll Archbishop McCarthy First Synod Guantanamo Archbishop Favalora

Archbishop Edward A. McCarthy

Picture: Archdiocese Archive Archbishop Edward A. McCarthy

Archbishop Edward A. McCarthy, a native of Cincinnati and founding Bishop of Phoenix, arrived in Miami Sept. 17, 1976, as coadjutor, succeeding to the see less than a year later, upon the death of Archbishop Carroll in July 1977. Whereas Archbishop Carroll was a builder, Archbishop McCarthy saw his mission as blowing Spirit into the edifice built by his predecessor. He continued to found new parishes to keep up with the growing numbers of new Catholics. But he also established a Family Life office and a Lay Ministry office that became a model for the rest of the nation. Both were led by lay people, a hallmark of Archbishop McCarthy’s tenure. He consistently strived to call forth the gifts of the laity and empower them at the archdiocesan level. Administratively, he re-organized the archdiocese into seven major divisions and oversaw the construction of a new chancery to house them all. The renamed Pastoral Center was dedicated at 9401 Biscayne Blvd. in Miami Shores in April, 1983.

Picture: Archdiocese Archive. Right to Left: Archbishop McCarthy, Bishop Agustín Román, Bishop John Nevins with Our Lady of Charity

On Feb. 6, 1979, two new auxiliary bishops were appointed for Miami, including the first native Cuban to serve as a bishop in the United States in 200 years: Auxiliary Bishop Agustín Román. (His “episcopal twin” was Auxiliary Bishop John J. Nevins, another archdiocesan priest.) In 1980, Archbishop McCarthy announced the start of a five-year plan of evangelization. That same year, the Mariel boatlift brought nearly 125,000 Cuban refugees to South Florida. Haitians began arriving in significant numbers as well. Throughout the next decade, Archbishop McCarthy spoke forcefully on behalf of the Haitians’ right to plead for asylum in this country, and against presidential directives that call for high-seas interdiction of boatloads of Haitian refugees. On its 25th anniversary in 1983, the eight-county archdiocese included more than 896,000 Catholics, with 135 parishes and three missions, served by 312 diocesan and 210 religious order priests; 643 women religious and 63 men religious; and 45 permanent deacons. In 1984, the Kenedy Directory listed the Archdiocese of Miami as the second fastest growing See in the nation. On July 17, 1984, the archdiocese was divided once more, yielding Palm Beach and Martin counties to the newly-created Diocese of Palm Beach; and Glades, Hendry and Collier counties to the newly-created Diocese of Venice. The archdiocese now consisted of three counties, Dade, Broward and Monroe, with more than 527,000 registered Catholics served by 100 parishes, two missions, 279 diocesan priests, 164 religious order priests, 445 women religious, 63 men religious and 55 permanent deacons.

bishop Carroll Archbishop McCarthy First Synod Guantanamo Archbishop Favalora

First-ever Archdiocesan Synod

Picture: Archdiocese Archive Synod People

In 1985, Archbishop McCarthy convoked the first-ever Archdiocesan Synod and the first synod in Florida in 28 years. The Synod's goal was to renew the life of the Church in South Florida and plan for the 21st century. The first step taken by the Synod was the commissioning of a scientific survey of South Florida Catholics, including their ethnic identity and their level of religiosity. Among the statistics: The total Catholic population in Dade, Broward and Monroe counties could be as high as 1.1 million, although less than half that number were registered in the parishes; Hispanics made up 62 percent of the Catholics in the archdiocese and 80 percent of the Catholics in Dade County; blacks (African-Americans and Haitians) made up less than 4 percent of the Catholic population, and Asians about 1 percent. On Sept. 10-11, 1987, Pope John Paul II visited Miami as part of his second tour of the United States. After being greeted by President and Mrs. Reagan at the airport, he traveled to St. Mary Cathedral, where he was formally greeted by Archbishop McCarthy and religious dignitaries, as well as a cheering throng of Haitians gathered outside.

Picture: Archdiocese Archive Pope John Paul II visited Miami as part of his second tour of the United States. Top-right: Pope with McCarthy at pope mobile.

He traveled to St. Martha Church, next door to the Pastoral Center, for a meeting with representatives of the nation’s priests, then met with President and Mrs. Reagan at the historic Vizcaya mansion on Biscayne Bay. Afterward, he paraded through Biscayne Boulevard in his “popemobile” before retiring to the Archbishop's residence. The next morning, he met with Jewish leaders and toured a Vatican Judaica exhibit at Miami’s Center for Fine Arts before celebrating Mass for nearly a quarter-million people at the Dade County Youth Fairgrounds. Rain and lightning strikes forced an end to the Mass during the Pope’s homily. The Pope and bishops finished celebrating Mass in a nearby trailer before leaving for his next stop in South Carolina. On its 30th anniversary, Oct. 7, 1988, the archdiocese numbered more than 596,000 registered Catholics in 105 parishes and three missions. They were served by 177 diocesan priests, 146 religious order priests, 432 women religious, 58 men religious and 72 permanent deacons. The Archdiocesan Synod ended in May, 1988, and in October, Archbishop McCarthy promulgated 165 decrees establishing Archdiocesan priorities. Chief among them were: A more effective and all-encompassing effort at evangelizing inactive Catholics and the unchurched, with special emphasis on using the media — radio, television, newspapers; a more profound emphasis on "cradle to grave" religious education, for children as well as adults; and increased sensitivity to the needs and languages of the different cultural and ethnic groups of the archdiocese.

Picture: Archdiocese Archive Synod kids, logo and issues

Since its creation in 1958, 11 auxiliary bishops have served in the Archdiocese of Miami, and 12 archdiocesan priests (*) have been selected to serve the Catholic Church as bishops. Nine of these priests were originally chosen to serve as auxiliary bishops in Miami, one as Apostolic Nuncio in the Vatican diplomatic corps, and two have been chosen immediately to lead a diocese. Following is a chronological list of Miami’s auxiliary bishops, and the Miami priests who have been named bishops:

The Most * Rev. John Fitzpatrick Ordained to the episcopacy, Aug. 28, 1968 Auxiliary Bishop of Miami, 1968-1971 Bishop of Brownsville, 1971-1991 Retired, Nov. 30, 1991 Died, July 15, 2006

The Most * Rev. Rene Gracida Ordained to the episcopacy, Jan. 25, 1972 Auxiliary Bishop of Miami, 1972-1975 Bishop of Pensacola-Tallahassee, 1975-1983 Bishop of Corpus Christi, 1983-1997 Retired, April 1, 1997

The Most * Rev. John Nevins Ordained to the episcopacy, March 24, 1979 Auxiliary Bishop of Miami, 1979-1984 Bishop of Venice, 1984-2007 Retired, Jan. 19, 2007 Died, Aug. 26, 2014

The Most * Rev. Agustín Román Ordained to the episcopacy, March 24, 1979 Auxiliary Bishop of Miami, 1979-2003 Retired, June 7, 2003 Died April 11, 2012 More info >>

The Most * Rev. Ambrose De Paoli Ordained to the episcopacy, Nov. 20, 1983 Served as apostolic pro-nuncio in Sri Lanka, South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, Namibia, Botswana, South Africa, Japan and Australia Died Oct. 10, 2007

The Most Rev. Norbert Dorsey, CP Ordained to the episcopacy, March 19, 1986 Auxiliary Bishop of Miami, 1986-1990 Bishop of Orlando, 1990-2004 Retired, Nov. 13, 2004 Died, Feb. 21, 2013

The Most * Rev. Robert Lynch, Bishop of the St. Petersburg Ordained to the episcopacy, Jan. 26, 1996 Appointed to St. Petersburg, Dec. 5, 1995 Retired, Nov. 28, 2016 Bishop of the St. Petersburg

The Most * Rev. Gilberto Fernández Ordained to the episcopacy, Sept. 3, 1997 Auxiliary Bishop of Miami, 1997-2002 Retired, Dec. 10, 2002 Died Sept. 30, 2011 More info >>

The Most * Rev. Thomas Wenski, Archbishop of Miami Ordained to the episcopacy, Sept. 3, 1997 Auxiliary Bishop of Miami, 1997-2003 Appointed coadjutor Bishop of Orlando, July 1, 2003 Bishop of Orlando, 2004-2010 Appointed to Miami, April 20, 2010 More info >>

The Most * Rev. Felipe Estévez, Bishop of the St. Augustine Ordained to the episcopacy, Jan. 7, 2004 Auxiliary Bishop of Miami, 2004-2011 Appointed to St. Augustine, April 27, 2011 Bishop of St. Augustine More info >>

The Most * Rev. John Noonan, Bishop of Orlando Ordained to the episcopacy, Aug. 24, 2005 Auxiliary Bishop of Miami, 2005-2010 Appointed to Orlando, Oct. 23, 2010 Bishop of Orlando More info >>

The Most * Rev. Fernando Isern Ordained to the episcopacy, Dec. 10, 2009 Appointed bishop of Pueblo, Colo., Oct. 15, 2009 Retired, June 13, 2013 Bishop of Pueblo, CO, 2009 - 2013

The Most Rev. Peter Baldacchino Appointed Auxiliary Bishop of Miami, Feb. 20, 2014 Ordained to the episcopacy, March 19, 2014 More info >>

The Most * Rev. Enrique Delgado Appointed Auxiliary Bishop of Miami, Oct. 12, 2017 Will be ordained to the episcopacy, Dec. 7, 2017

Cath·o·hól·ic The dangers of ‘use and throw away’ logic December 14, 2017 123. The culture of relativism is the same disorder which drives one person to take advantage of another, to treat others as mere objects, imposing forced labor on them or enslaving them to pay their debts. The same kind of thinking leads to the sexual exploitation of children and abandonment of the elderly who no longer serve our interests. It is also the mindset of those who say: Let us allow the invisible forces of the market to regulate the economy, and consider their impact on society and nature as collateral damage. In the absence of objective truths or sound principles other than the satisfaction of our own desires and immediate needs, what limits can be placed on human trafficking, organized crime, the drug trade, commerce in blood diamonds and the fur of endangered species? Is it not the same relativistic logic which justifies buying the organs of the poor for resale or use in experimentation, or eliminating children because they are not what their parents wanted? This same “use and throw away” logic generates so much waste, because of the disordered desire to consume more than what is really necessary. We should not think that political efforts or the force of law will be sufficient to prevent actions which affect the environment because, when the culture itself is corrupt and objective truth and universally valid principles are no longer upheld, then laws can only be seen as arbitrary impositions or obstacles to be avoided. Source : Laudato Si'

Fr. David Zirilli NATIVITY CHURCH

Third Sunday of Advent The Nativity Scene The Nativity Scene is an enduring and beautiful part of our Advent and Christmas traditions, as it has been for nearly 800 years, since the first such scene was displayed. It was the beloved St. Francis of Assisi who is credited with creating the first ever Nativity Scene. On Christmas Eve, in the year 1223, St. Francis asked for, and received, permission from Pope Honorius III to make a special recreation of the Lord’s birth as part of the celebration of Mass. He was inspired to create the Nativity Scene after visiting the actual place of the Lord’s birth in the Holy Land, a pilgrimage that deepened his devotion to the Child Jesus. As he told a friend at the time: “I want to do something that will recall the memory of that Child who was born in Bethlehem, to see with bodily eyes the inconveniences of his infancy, how he lay in the manger, and how the ox and ass stood by.” Francis set up a manger inside a cave in the city of Grecio in Italy, and brought in hay and live animals, just as it was believed to have looked on that first Christmas night. In this way, Francis sought to teach the people how Christ had come into the world, in poverty and simplicity. The rest is history. St. Francis’ recreation of the first Christmas night became so popular that soon every church in Italy had its own Nativity Scene. From there, it spread throughout all of Christendom. Our parish and home Nativity scenes recall to our minds the Incarnation of Jesus Christ and the moment when God Himself entered into the world, the Creator taking on the flesh of the created, sharing in our humanity that we might share in His divinity. As Pope St. Leo the Great in the fifth century said of coming of Christ: “Lowliness is assumed by majesty, weakness by power, mortality by eternity. To pay the debt of our sinful state, a nature that is incapable of suffering was joined to one that could suffer The Nativity Scene is thus more than a pretty Christmas decoration. As it was 800 years ago, it is today an invitation to prayer and meditation about the humility of Christ, who shed the glory of his divinity to take on human flesh and a human soul, setting into motion his plan to save and redeem us. Fr. David Zirilli Pastor Hospital

Contact Info Fr. Charles Clements

Baptist Hospital (Miami)

786-596-6577

Broward Health Medical Center

954-355-5381

Catholic Health Services North Campus St. John's Nursing Center

954-739-6233

St. Anthony's Rehabilitation Hospital St. Joseph Assisted Living Facility

Catholic Health Services Central Campus

Fr. Parker Ogboe

Villa Maria Nursing Center

305-891-8850

St. Catherine's Rehabilitation Hospital

Catholic Health Services South Campus

Fr. Edmund Aku

305-252-4000

St. Anne's Nursing Center & Residence

Catholic Health Services West Campus

Fr. Parker Ogboe

305-351-7181

St. Catherine's West Rehabilitation Hospital

Fr. Luis A. Perez Fr. David Smith Fr. Raúl Pérez-Vasallo

Catholic Hospice Broward County

954-676-5465 Fr. John Mary Perez, SOLT

Catholic Hospice Miami-Dade

305-822-2380 Father Antony Vayalikarottu

Holy Cross Hospital (Fort Lauderdale)

954-771-8000 Fr. Fidelis Nwankwo, CSSP Msgr. Oscar Castañeda

Jackson Memorial Hospital (Miami)

305-585-2529

Jackson North (Miami)

Call St. Lawrence Parish -

Mercy Hospital

Fr. Jean Sterling Laurent, Chaplain Fr. Pedro Toledo Fr. Eric Zegeer Sr. Ana Laura Lois, SCTJM

305-932-3560

305-854-4400

Mount Sinai Medical Center

Call St. Patrick Parish -

Palmetto Hospital

Call Santa Barbara Parish -

305-531-1124 305-556-4442

Fr. Damian Flanagan Fr. Joseph Fishwick

South Miami Hospital

786-662-5392

UM Medical Center

305-332-6026

Veterans Administration Medical Center (Miami)

305-324-4455 (ext. 3200)

Westside Regional

Call St. Gregory Parish -

954-473-6261

CONTACT INFO Holy Cross Hospital

4725 North Federal Highway Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33308 954-771-8000 www.holy-cross.com

Holy Cross Hospital A member of Catholic Health East, Holy Cross Hospital in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. is a full-service, non-profit Catholic hospital, sponsored by the Sisters of Mercy. Since opening its doors in 1955, the 559-bed hospital has offered progressive services and programs to meet the evolving healthcare needs of Broward County. Today, Holy Cross has more than 600 physicians on staff representing more than 40 specialties and more than 3,000 employees. The hospital is fully accredited by the independent Joint Commission and its medical team has earned a reputation for excellence unsurpassed in the community.

CONTACT INFO Mercy Hospital

Fr. Jean Sterling Laurent, Chaplain Fr. Luis García Fr. Pedro Toledo Sr. Ana Laura Lois, SCTJM 3663 South Miami Avenue, Miami, FL 33133 305-854-4400 mercymiami.com

Mercy Hospital In witness of Jesus' healing mission, Mercy Hospital strives to improve the well-being of those served through a healthcare delivery system designed to promote wellness and cure illness. As a ministry of the Roman Catholic Church, we are committed to being a transforming, healing presence within our community. Adopting the spirit of the Sisters of St. Joseph of St. Augustine, Florida in "working to achieve unity of neighbor with neighbor and neighbor with God," we attest to the value of human life in all its cycles. This is done through respect for the unborn and recognition of the transcendent meaning of suffering and death by combining professional excellence with a compassionate concern for the whole person. We seek to understand and respond to the needs of our community through collaboration with others that share a common mission and vision. With attention to fiscal responsibility, quality services are made available and accessible to those who need them.

e Health Plan Job Openings Retirement Plan CONTACT INFO Senior Director

Lisa Pinto, SPHR 305-762-1201 [email protected] HR Coordinator

Jaime Tejeda 305-762-1203 [email protected] HR Manager

Janet Milian 305-762-1202 [email protected] HR Generalist

Karla Sánchez 305-762-1204 [email protected]

The Office of Human Resources directs the development and administration of Human Resources policies and programs (employee recruitment, background screening and retention, employee performance evaluation and performance improvement efforts, management training, and employee compensation and benefits) in order to maximize employee effectiveness in support of the mission of the Archdiocese and its parishes and schools. The Office provides services to employees as well as training and consult to pastors and administrators on Human Resources topics. The Office is located in the Pastoral Center. The Human Resources office information for

Catholic Health Services,

St. Thomas University, and

Catholic Charities may be located on their respective Web pages.

Before God, no occupation is in itself great or small. Everything gains the value of the Love with which it is done. St. José María Escrivá

age and Family Life Marriage Prep Divorce Bereavement Movements Resources Human Sexuality

Want to build a strong marriage and family?

CONTACT INFO Silvia 1-800-745-8252 www.register.ccli.org/

Learn Natural Family Planning (NFP) and help build communication skills and enhance intimacy in your marriage. Attend a three-part series of introductory classes offered by the Couple to Couple League to learn more about this medically safe, morally acceptable and highly effective method, both for postponing and achieving pregnancy. Dates

Time

Parish

Instructors

Contact

June 24, July 22, Aug. 19, 2017

9:00 am

St. Patrick Catholic Church 3716 Garden Ave. Miami Beach, FL 33140

Alejandro & Carmen Santamaria

(305) 321-4240 [email protected]

Aug. 17, Sept.21, Oct. 19, 2017

7:30 pm

Epiphany Catholic Church 8235 SW 57 Ave. Miami, FL 33143

Richard & Annamaria Sacher

(305) 668-2866 [email protected]t

Oct. 21, Nov. 11, Dec. 9, 2017

9:30 am

St. Gregory Catholic Church 200 N. University Ave. Plantation, FL 33324

Carlos & Victoria DeBayle

(786) 302-2116 [email protected]

Nov. 16, Dec.14, 2017 and Jan. 11, 2018

7:30 pm

Epiphany Catholic Church 8235 SW 57 Ave. Miami, FL 33143

Richard & Annamaria Sacher

(305) 668-2866 [email protected]

ing and Property Office Hurricane Preparedness

DOCUMENTS Hurricane Preparedness Guide Roof Top Pre- Storm Checklist Hurricane Plan Hurricane Emergency Contact Hurricane Facility Assessment Plan

When planning a project for your parish, please refer to the detailed

ADOM Project Procedures Outline.

Back

Copies of the video that captured the historic Mass of installation for Archbishop Thomas Wenski, fourth archbishop of Miami, are now available from the archdiocese's Communications Department. So are the pictures of many of those who personally greeted the new archbishop after the Mass ended. The cost of the DVD is $10 per copy, and it is available with commentary in English or Spanish. To order, write to: Archdiocese of Miami c/o Communications Department 9401 Biscayne Blvd Miami Shores, FL 33138 Make checks payable to the Archdiocese of Miami. In the memo section of the check, please write Installation Mass DVD. Make sure to include the address where you would like the DVD mailed and which language (English or Spanish) you prefer.

Those wishing to look through the photos should go to: tinyurl.com. Photos may be viewed and purchased directly from that site, other events he has attended since then, go to www.DotPhoto.com and sign in as a "guest" with the user name "flcmiami."

www.DotPhoto.com. To view/purchase photos from Archbishop Wenski's installation and

This video component is not supported in this browser. Please update your browser.

Important To All Pastors, Administrators and Bookkeepers

Third Party Claims Administrator: 1-844-220-5076. Client number: 060050

All claims shall be reported to Gallagher Bassett Services. The claims reporting telephone number is: The toll free claims reporting number is in operation 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Initially, you will only need to notify the operator that you are calling to report a claim under the insurance policy issued to the Archdiocese of Miami. Thereafter, the operator will request additional information from you in a question and answer format. Even if you do not have all requested information, the claim notification will be accepted and the claim will be directed to the office handling claims for the Archdiocese of Miami.

Note Please make sure that you provide a copy of these claim reporting instructions to anyone at your location who may need to notify Gallagher Bassett in the event of an accident or loss.

e Health Plan Job Openings Retirement Plan Welcome to the Archdiocese of Miami job openings page. Below you will find the links to employment opportunities currently available within the archdiocese. Read each posting thoroughly and follow the particular instructions on how to submit your resume properly. The Archdiocese of Miami understands the importance of providing quality-of-life benefits and considers them to be a significant part of employee compensation. Eligible Archdiocesan employees will be provided with $15,000 life insurance, $15,000 accidental death & dismemberment insurance as well as longterm disability insurance to provide income protection in the event of illness, injury and/or inability to work. The Archdiocese will share the cost of your choice of three medical plans: PPO, HMO or Value HMO. Optional Dental PPO and HMO Plans, Short Term Disability, Supplemental and Spouse Life Insurance will be available on a voluntary basis. The contributions made by the Archdiocese of Miami and its Entities are like a second paycheck, providing for a wide range of benefits to support the needs of our employees and their families. As the Church professes that "Life and physical health are previous gifts entrusted to us by God. We must take reasonable care of them" (Catechism of the Catholic Church 2288), the Archdiocese is an advocate of quality care and works to provide our employees with quality benefits. All employees hired by the Archdiocese of Miami will need to complete the Archdiocesan criminal background screening prior to employment, and participate in Safe Environment Virtus Training (U.S. Bishops' Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People) shortly after hire. The Human Resources office information for

Catholic Health Services,

St. Thomas University, and

Catholic Charities may be located on their respective Web pages. Thank you for your interest in working with the Archdiocese of Miami

Interested applicants will need to submit an updated resume, cover letter and application to the email provided on the job posting. Click here to download the Application for Employment Click here to download the Application for Employment – Schools

Click on a category above to display related job openings Administrative Assistant / Respect Life: South Dade Pregnancy Help Center The Respect Life Ministry of the Archdiocese of Miami is seeking an Administrative Assistant position for the So. Dade Pregnancy Help Center located at 3410 S.W. 107 Ave., Miami, Fl. 33165. This position will assist the Program Coordinator with responsibilities in the office specifically with regard to oversight of the volunteers. This will include training new volunteers coming into the ministry. Schedule: 15 hours per week.

Responsibilities: Answering the phone, interviewing clients, and recording keeping.

Qualifications: Minimum: high school diploma or GED / some prolife ministry experience preferred. Good oral and written English language communication skills is a must, including a clear speaking voice / bilingual ability in Spanish preferred. Knowledge of the basic tenets of Catholic Church and parish structures. Good time management skills including ability to manage several projects at the same time. Must be supportive of the Respect Life Ministry mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to: Joan Crown, Respect Life Director, [email protected] Subject line should read: Administrative Assistant / So. Dade Pregnancy Help Center. Position open until filled

Administrative Assistant - Respect Life: North Broward Pregnancy Help Center The Respect Life Ministry of the Archdiocese of Miami is seeking an Administrative Assistant for the North Broward Pregnancy Help Center located at 5515 Coconut Creek Parkway, Margate FL 33063. This position will assist the Program Coordinator with responsibilities in the office specifically with regard to client-focused office procedures and oversight of office volunteers. This will include training new volunteers coming into the ministry. Schedule: 16 hours per week; Tuesday - Friday, 9:00 A.M. - 1:00 P.M. with an occasional Saturday.

Responsibilities: Answering the phone, helping clients, and recording keeping.

Qualifications: Minimum: high school diploma or GED / some prolife ministry experience preferred but not required. Good oral and written English language communication skills is a must, including a clear speaking voice / bilingual ability in Spanish preferred. Knowledge of the basic tenets of Catholic Church and parish structures. Good time management skills including ability to manage several projects at the same time. Must be supportive of the Respect Life Ministry mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to: Joan Crown, Respect Life Director,

[email protected]

Subject line should read: Administrative Assistant / North Broward Pregnancy Help Center. Position open until filled. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Administrative Assistant to the Auxiliary Bishops - Archdiocese of Miami The Archdiocese of Miami has an opening for a full-time Administrative Assistant to the Auxiliary Bishops at the Pastoral Center. This candidate is responsible for providing administrative support to two auxiliary bishops: receiving calls and visitors; ensuring the timely and accurate scheduling and posting of calendar items; composing, proofreading and editing correspondence, and other tasks to ensure efficient operations in the context of a welcoming culture. Primary duties include managing telephone calls, correspondence, requests from priests and deacons, appointments, coordination of travel, data entry and filing. The Administrative Assistant to the Auxiliary Bishops performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami.

Responsibilities: Provide exemplary customer service to those who contact the Office of the Bishop by phone or in person and directing them to the appropriate parties, answering basic questions as directed by the Bishop, or documenting their concerns for escalation to the Bishop. Cultivate a sense of hospitality with a joyful, welcoming mannerism consistent with the goal tasked to the parishes to become centers of hope and evangelization. Screen all phone calls using good judgment, and maintain a daily, accurate list of callers, messages left, and where calls were directed. Make appointments and travel arrangements for the Bishops as needed, learning and remaining up-to-date on appointments and calendar, using discretion when scheduling. Maintain electronic and hard-copy calendar of the Bishops, posting details of meeting arrangements and agendas to calendars, notifying parties of changes or cancellations. Prepare and distribute correspondence and memos. Proofread and translate correspondence from English and Spanish and vice versa. Respond to miscellaneous requests from priests, deacons, other Archdiocesan offices or outside entities. Prepare travel reimbursement statements for each bishop for monthly reimbursement. Prepare memos, letters, invoices, reports and other documents, using word processing, spreadsheet, database, or presentation software. Create, update and maintain electronic and hard-copy filing system for documentation. Attend meetings to record minutes as needed. Compile, transcribe and distribute minutes to appropriate parties. Assist with tasks assigned by the Bishops with confidentiality and discretion, demonstrating excellent internal and external customer service according to protocols established for the Office. Learn and remain up-to-date on archdiocesan priest assignments, archdiocesan-wide initiatives, ecclesiastical etiquette and policies and procedures of the Office. Learn terminology of Church hierarchy and structure in order to effectively relay messages. Support the vision and mission of the Church and demonstrate an attitude of commitment to pastoral priorities as identified by the auxiliary bishops. Demonstrate Christian conduct in this role, including modest style of dress, character, positive interpersonal actions, etc. Assist with tasks as assigned with confidentiality and discretion, demonstrating excellent internal and external customer service. Perform other duties as assigned.

Qualifications: Minimum: High School diploma or GED and 10 years’ administrative experience supporting an executive. Preferred: Bachelor degree and 5 years’ experience as an executive secretary or administrative assistant. Good oral and written English- and Spanish-language communication skills, including clear speaking voice. Haitian Creole a plus. Experience working in an environment requiring high confidentiality. Experience working in a Roman Catholic environment required. Excellent customer service skills, including ability to maintain focus on and professionalism with people in challenging situations, both in person and by phone. Demonstrated ability to exercise good judgment and protect confidential information. Knowledge of modern office procedures and practices, including record keeping and data security methods and techniques. Knowledge of tenets of Catholic Church and parish structures. Excellent spelling and grammar required. Transcription and dictation skills a plus. Good time management, including ability to manage several projects at the same time. Must be able to multi-task and retain accuracy in an environment of competing deadlines. Must be supportive of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church. Must have a professional demeanor. Proficiency in MS Outlook (including calendar), Word, and Excel; PowerPoint a plus. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to

[email protected]

Subject line should read: Administrative Assistant to the Auxiliary Bishops - Pastoral Center NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

ADT Unit Supervisor / Marian Center The Marian Center School & Services, Inc. in Miami Garden, Florida is an Educational Center for childrenand adults with developmental disabilities of different ages and varying levels of disability.They are currently seeking an ADT Unit Supervisor to supervise and interact with people with developmental disabilities; providing activities (indoor and outdoor), training, maintaining paperwork, attend training/meetings, and assisting with clients in all other activities.

Qualifications: Required: High-school diploma or GED equivalent. Must have excellent interpersonal skills; experience with intellectually disabled preferred. Good communication skills, including adaptive to audience, required. Ability to follow detailed instructions. Ability to assign and maintain discipline. Ability to stimulate and involve others in recreational or group activities. Demonstrates belief that issues can be address edandre solved with mutually beneficial out comes for all parties; expressing anoptimistic attitude. Demonstrates positive interactions with clients/staff/supervisors. Must be supportive of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church. Experience in a Roman Catholic environment preferred. Must have a pleasant, service-oriented demeanor. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to

[email protected]

Subject line should read: ADT Unit Supervisor. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Art Teacher (Part-Time) – St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic High School St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic High School in Fort Lauderdale (Broward), FL. is seeking an energetic and creative teacher to teach art. The candidate should be professional, disciplined and be a team player. Also, the candidate should have experience working with pottery equipment. This teacher will be expected to plan, organize and implement an appropriate instructional program for high school Art students. This candidate performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision, and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami.

Qualifications: Required: Bachelor’s degree in Art or related field. Florida Department of Education certificate, Art grades K-12 temporary or professional required. Minimum of 3 years’ experience preferred. Must have clear and concise communications with students and parents. Must possess classroom management techniques, planning, organization and implementation of instruction with excellent oral & written communication skills. Technology skills needed to use digital gradebooks and interactive classroom technology. To apply: Please send cover letter, resume and any other documents to:

[email protected]

NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Assistant Mechanic - Our Lady Queen of Heaven Cemetery Our Lady Queen of Cemetery in North Lauderdale (Broward), Florida has an opening for a Assistant Mechanic. This position is responsible for maintaining our entire fleet of small, large, and diesel engines. This person must also maintain and repair lawn equipment, backhoe, utility vehicles, and automobiles and maintain a maintenance and inventory log. The Assistant Certified Mechanic performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami.

Qualifications: High-school diploma or G.E.D required. Experience in landscaping and lawn maintenance a plus. 2 years of experience required. Must be able to endure frequent exposure to all weather conditions. Must be able to work around dust and high levels of noise and vibration. Good English-language communication, reading and writing skills. Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the lawn maintenance and landscaping. Must be able to bend, climb stairs, lift and move heavy objects (up to 50 pounds). Good time management, including ability to manage several projects at the same time. Must be supportive of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church. Experience in a Roman Catholic environment preferred. Must have a pleasant, service-oriented demeanor. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to Sara Martinez at

(305) 592-6938, or email

[email protected]

Subject line should read: Certified Mechanic – Our Lady Queen of Heaven Cemetery

Assistant Toddler 2 Teacher – St. Patrick Pre-School St. Patrick Preschool in Miami Beach, Florida has an opening for an Assistant Toddler 2 Teacher. The Assistant Toddler 2 teacher is expected to be knowledgeable of all licensing guidelines and assure compliance with these guidelines along with those set forth by the Archdiocese of Miami. The Assistant Toddler 2 Teacher performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision, and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami.

Qualifications: DCF 45 hours and CDA, FCCPC or Associate’s degree in Early Childhood Education. DCF level 2 background screening. 2 years of more experience working with toddlers in a classroom setting. Must be supportive and respectful of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church; experience in Roman Catholic environment preferred. Excellent presentation skills with skill in use of instructional technologies. Excellent classroom management skills. Must have knowledge of basic tenets of Catholic Church. Excellent oral and written English -language communication skills, including clear speaking voice. Good spelling and grammar required. Proficiency in MS Outlook, Word, and Excel, PowerPoint a plus. Must have a professional demeanor. To apply: Send cover letter, resume, supporting documentation and 3 letters of reference to:

[email protected]

Subject line should read: Toddler Assistant Teacher Position NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

Athletic Director – Immaculata-La Salle High School Immaculata-La Salle Catholic High School in Miami (Coconut Grove), Florida has an immediate opening for a qualified and experienced Athletic Director. This person will organize and administer the overall program of athletics for the district and intramural athletics for the high school. Secondly, they will serve as an advisor to the Administration regarding student athletes The Athletic Director schedules and provides students an opportunity to participate in athletic activities that foster physical skills, a sense of worth and competence, a knowledge and understanding of the pleasures of sport, and the principles of fair play. The Athletics Director performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision, and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami.

Qualifications: BS/BA Degree preferred with administrative and/or coaching experience. Possess and maintain a moral character that is in congruence with the expectations of the Archdiocese of Miami and the Mission of Immaculata-LaSalle High School. Possess a first-rate knowledge of the sport assigned including but not limited to, knowledge of training and conditioning techniques and the ability to diagnose player deficiencies and prescribe corrective activities to close skill gap. Possess a superior ability to communicate with parents and students. Experienced in applying first aid, including the ability to address situations dealing with blood bodily fluids, and tissues. Demonstrated professionalism and ability to foster positive work environment. Ability to manage time effectively. Skilled at managing individual, group, and organizational interactions. Ability to lead with consistency and maintain professionalism in challenging situations. Skilled at resolving conflict and coaching others to work out conflicts. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to: Sr. Kim Keraitis, FMA. at

[email protected]

NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

Bookkeeper (Part-Time) / Southeastern Pastoral Institute The Southeast Pastoral Institute (SEPI), the formation branch of the US Catholic Bishops Southeast Regional Office for Hispanic Ministry, has an opening for a Part-time Bookkeeper. The part-time bookkeeper will be responsible for performing duties related to bookkeeping and payroll services, for SEPI. Responsibilities include processing bi-weekly payroll for employees; weekly deposits, and clerical tasks of accounts payable and accounts receivable. The Bookkeeper will assist the Director with reports on the above. The Bookkeeper of the Southeast Pastoral Institute performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision and values of the Florida Catholic Conference.

Qualifications: Bachelor degree in Accounting or related field preferred, with 2 years of professional – level experience in not-for-profit environment. Experience in a Roman Catholic environment strongly preferred. Good oral and written English and Spanish-language communication skills, including clear speaking voice. Knowledge of GAAP; not-for-profit accounting a plus. Knowledge of accounts receivable and general ledger. Proficiency in Quickbooks. Knowledge of human resources policies regarding compensation and benefits. Knowledge of basic tenets of Catholic Church, hierarchical structure and entities. Ability to maintain confidentiality concerning financial and contributors’ files. Must have a positive, can-do attitude; must be a team-player. Skilled at building and maintaining good, collaborative relationships and working through conflicts. Knowledge of modern office procedures and practices, including record keeping and data security methods and techniques. Must have demonstrated confidentiality and discretion. Knowledge of HIPAA, state and federal guidelines on privacy, transactions and security. Proficiency in MS Outlook, including calendar function. Proficiency in MS Excel; must be able to prepare data for reporting. Basic skills in MS Word. Good computer literacy, including ability to navigate search engines effectively. Type at least 35 wpm with 90% accuracy; 65kpm with 99% accuracy. Excellent customer service skills, including ability to maintain focus on and professionalism with people in challenging situations, both in person and by phone. Must be dependable and reliable. Must be extremely organized. Must be able to multi-task and retain accuracy in an environment of fielding simultaneous callers and visitors. Must be supportive of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church. Must have a professional demeanor. To apply: Please send cover letter and resume to

[email protected]

Subject line should read : PT Bookkeeper.

Bookkeeper (Full-Time) / St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic Church St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic Church in South Miami has an opening for a Bookkeeper who will be responsible for providing accounts payable, payroll, deposits, bank reconciliation, and other administrative support to the church and elementary school. The full-time Bookkeeper performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami.

Responsibilities: Enter invoices submitting for payables in Connect Now, cut checks, obtain Pastor’s signature and mail. Correspond with vendors regarding invoices, charges, disputes, and provide information required by vendors. Challenge questionable charges. Post invoices on a weekly basis. Process payroll for parish and school staff on bi-weekly basis. Create and maintain inventories of parish and school materials, supplies, and services. order new items as needed, proactively anticipating needs while exercising cost-consciousness. Process bi-weekly payroll, monthly/quarterly/yearly payroll tax forms and returns, year-end W-2s, 1099s, quarterly UCT-6 for the Parish and School. Oversee 403(b) for all employees. Process journal entries in Connect Now software. Process and distribute Accounts Payable. Prepare weekly deposits including collection deposits on Mondays after weekend Masses collection count. Prepare all annual Archdiocese of Miami reports. Oversee all financial responsibilities for annual 4-day carnival fundraiser. Prepare tamper-evident envelopes for all masses on a weekly basis. Facilitate Archdiocese of Miami auditing process, including preparation of necessary records and reports. Processing new hire information into payroll system, Health Plan, and other benefits. Work with the Archdiocese of Miami Office of Human Resources to ensure that appropriate documentation is maintained in payroll, accounting and personnel files. Secure and maintain personnel and financial records per federal, state regulations. Maintain balances and apprise pastor and principal of actual balances. Other duties as assigned.

Qualifications: Bachelor degree in Accounting or related field, with 3 years of professional -level experience, non-profit helpful. Experience in a Roman Catholic environment is a plus. Knowledge of the basic tenets of Catholic Church and parish structures. Must be supportive of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church. Knowledge of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and accounting practices. Knowledge of modern office procedures and practices, including record keeping and data security methods and techniques. Knowledge of principles and practices of non-for profit accounting a plus. Knowledge of accounts receivable and general ledger. Ability to maintain a high level of accuracy in preparing and entering financial information. Ability to maintain confidentiality concerning financial and contributors files. Must have professional demeanor. Excellent customer service skills, including ability to maintain focus on and professionalism with people in challenging situations, both in person and by phone. Good computer literacy, including ability to navigate online applications and search engines effectively. Proficiency in MS Outlook, Word, Excel and PowerPoint is required. Good oral and written English-language communication skills, including clear speaking voice. Good Spanish-language spoken and written communication skills strongly preferred. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to

[email protected]

Subject line should read: Bookkeeper – St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic Church and School. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Business Manager - St. Patrick Catholic Church St. Patrick Catholic Church, located in beautiful Miami Beach, Florida, has an opening for a full-time Business Manager to manage business activities for the parish, school and pre-school. The Business Manager is responsible for supporting the Pastor in planning, directing and coordinating the financial, facilities management and basic human resources operations of the parish and school, reporting directly to the pastor. Primary areas of responsibility include, but are not limited to: office management; human resources; accounting and finance. The Business Manager, St. Patrick Church, performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami. Schedule: Monday through Friday. May be required to work occasional evenings or weekends.

Responsibilities: Under the direction of the pastor and in alignment with his strategic plan: direct, plan and coordinate the financial, facilities management and basic human resources operations of the parish, school and pre-school. Direct and coordinate financial and budget activities to fund operations and increase efficiency. Set up accounting infrastructure such as cash accounts, payroll, vendors, bank reconciliation. Design and implement internal controls, policies and procedures and forms and train staff and others on the policies and procedures and the proper completion of the forms. Work in consultation with the Pastor, Principal, Pre-School Director, Finance Committee, School Advisory Board and the Parish Council. Oversee and assist in the timely preparation of budgets, annual reports, interim reports, general ledgers and monthly reports (balance sheets and statements) and provide reports to pastor, principal and Finance Council. Handle bank relations to include management of accounts and problem solving. Serve as staff liaison to Finance Committee and School Advisory Board. Oversee Accounts Payable and Receivable functions. Oversee the management of parish operational and financial records. Ensure that all federal, state and local taxes are paid in accordance with federal, state and local regulations. Work with Archdiocesan Office of Finance to ensure that appropriate documentation is maintained in payroll and accounting files. Secure and maintain financial records according to federal, state, and any other applicable regulations. Ensure that the weekly offertory is counted and deposited accurately. Facilitate Archdiocese of Miami auditing process, including preparation of necessary records and reports. Ensure that contracts with vendors and third-party service providers are negotiated to obtain best value for service provided.

Human Resources: Process payroll and the administration of salaries and benefits. Assist with personnel recordkeeping and processing of new hires into payroll, health Plan and other benefits. Work with Archdiocesan Office of Human Resources to ensure that appropriate documentation is maintained in payroll, accounting and personnel files. Secure and maintain personnel and financial records according to federal, state, and any other applicable regulations. Implement personnel policies in accordance to the ADOM guidelines regarding hiring and termination, job descriptions, personnel evaluations, etc. Evaluate support staff through yearly performance reviews.

Qualifications: Bachelor degree in Management, Business or Public Administration, Accounting or related field, with 5-7 years of combined experience in management and finance; non-profit preferred. Some experience in human resources required. Experience in a Roman Catholic environment a plus. Good oral and written English-language communication skills, including clear speaking voice. Good Spanish-language spoken communication skills a plus. Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources, and coordination of people and resources. Knowledge of facilities management and building services. Knowledge of GAAP and accounting practices. Knowledge of modern office procedures and practices, including record keeping and data security methods and techniques. Knowledge of principles and practices on non-profit accounting a plus. Knowledge of accounts receivable and general ledger required. Ability to maintain a high level of accuracy in preparing and entering financial information. Ability to maintain confidentiality concerning financial and contributor’s files. Knowledge of contract negotiation and RFPs. Skilled in personnel administration; knowledge of human resources policies and practices. Knowledge of basic tenets of Catholic Church and parish structures. Must be dependable and reliable. Knowledge or understanding sufficient to direct the implementation and use of servers, data storage networks, desktop technologies, and print technologies. Knowledge of fundraising and promotion of non-profit religious institutions helpful. Skilled at needs analysis, using systematic approaches to assess and identify needs. Skilled at implementing action plans. Knowledge of and skilled in communications methodologies and strategies. Experience with an accounting software system. Proficiency in MS Outlook, Word, Excel and PowerPoint, are required. Good computer literacy, including ability to navigate online applications and search engines effectively. Excellent customer service skills, including ability to maintain focus on and professionalism with people in challenging situations, both in person and by phone. Good time management, including ability to manage several projects at the same time. Must be supportive of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church. Must have a professional demeanor. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to

[email protected]

Subject line should read: Business Manager, St. Patrick Church. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Certified Mechanic – Our Lady of Mercy Cemetery Our Lady of Mercy Cemetery in Miami, Florida has an opening for a Certified Mechanic. This position is responsible for maintaining our entire fleet of small, large, and diesel engines. The Certified Mechanic must also maintain and repair lawn equipment, backhoe, utility vehicles, and automobiles and maintain a maintenance and inventory log. The Certified Mechanic performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami.

Qualifications: High-school diploma or G.E.D required. Must have Master Mechanic’s certification. Experience in landscaping and lawn maintenance a plus. 5 years of experience required. Must be able to endure frequent exposure to all weather conditions. Must be able to work around dust and high levels of noise and vibration. Good English-language communication, reading and writing skills. Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the lawn maintenance and landscaping. Must be able to bend, climb stairs, lift and move heavy objects (up to 50 pounds). Good time management, including ability to manage several projects at the same time. Must be supportive of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church. Experience in a Roman Catholic environment preferred. Must have a pleasant, service-oriented demeanor. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to Sara Martinez at 305-592-6938, or email

[email protected]

Subject line should read: Certified Mechanic – Our Lady of Mercy Cemetery NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

College Counselor / Christopher Columbus High School Christopher Columbus High School will hire a full-time High School College Counselor for the 2017-2018 school year. The College Counselor is a member of the Guidance Department. This individual would assist the students and their parents with career and college decisions while also processing transcripts, completing college applications, writing counselor recommendations, completing secondary school reports, assisting with scholarship applications, maintaining standardized testing results, facilitating a college fair and college visits. This position may also be involved in coordinating Advanced Placement Exams. The High School College Counselor performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision and values of the Marist Brothers.

Qualifications: Required: Master’s degree in Guidance Counseling or related field. Florida Certification in Guidance Counseling. Knowledge of the Naviance Program. Five years of experience in Catholic School setting preferred. Excellent oral and written English -language communication skills. Must have a professional demeanor.

Communications/Fundraising Coordinator (Full-Time) - Southeast Pastoral Institute (SEPI) The Southeast Pastoral Institute (SEPI), the formation branch of the US Catholic Bishops Southeast Regional Office for Hispanic Ministry, has an opening for a full-time Communications/Fundraising Coordinator. The Communications/Fundraising Coordinator will be responsible for planning, preparing, and executing communications and fundraising campaigns for the promotion of SEPI services, courses, and programs.

Qualifications: • Minimum: High School diploma or GED and three (3) years’ experience in communications and/or fundraising. • Preferred: Bachelor’s degree and two (2) years’ experience in communications and/or fundraising. • A Catholic in good standing, who understands and supports the mission of the Church and Hispanic ministry. Practicing Catholic with active participation in Church life. Must be able to help prepare and set up during some evening or weekend events. Excellent interpersonal skills. Strong organizational and time management skills including ability to manage several projects at the same time is required. Ability to follow detailed oral and written instructions. Excellent computer literacy. Proficiency in; MS Outlook, Word, Publisher, Excel, PowerPoint. Experience in constituent management systems, constant contact, and social media. Excellent written communication skills in Spanish and English a must. Previous experience in Catholic educational environment and/or Hispanic Ministry a plus. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to:

[email protected]

Subject line should read: Communications/Fundraising Coordinator. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Coordinator of Religious Education - San Isidro Catholic Church San Isidro Catholic Church in Pompano Beach, FL is seeking a full-time Coordinator of Religious Education (CRE). This person will organize and direct the program of lifelong faith formation for all parishioners under the direction of the pastor and in collaboration with the pastoral staff. This Coordinator will have the pastor’s delegated responsibility and authority to implement a plan for lifelong comprehensive and systematic catechesis and will work in collaboration with parish staff members who share the responsibility for catechesis. The Coordinator of Religious Education performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision, and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami. Schedule: 30 hours/week, to include weekends and some evenings.

Responsibilities: Implement a plan for comprehensive and systematic catechesis, including Sacramental Preparation for children, youth and adults based on the plan for comprehensive and systematic catechesis of the Archdiocese of Miami. Implement the catechetical policies and curriculum of the Archdiocese of Miami. Coordinate the administration of parish catechetical programs from adults to children. Recruit, screen, train and evaluate candidates for the role of catechist. Ensure that all their catechists are certified according to the guidelines of the Archdiocese of Miami. Collaborate with the pastor, other parish ministers and appropriate committees, boards and councils to develop catechetical vision, establish catechetical policy, and facilitate the understanding of catechetical ministry within the larger community. Participate in the on-going formation opportunities, continuing education and professional development for CREs. Coordinates children’s liturgies and retreats for the parish. Work with parents to ensure the support and involvement of the family in the parish catechetical program. Assist the pastor in developing and coordinating programs and processes for adult faith formation for adults of all ages which may include adults in the RCIA/ parents of school-aged children, senior adults, etc. Implement Virtus programs for religious ed. students and ensure that catechetical personnel are in compliance with Safe Environment policy.

Qualifications: Bachelor’s Degree in Catholic Religious Education, Theology or a related field from a Catholic University or equivalent. Practicing Catholic in good standing who fully adheres to and models the Church’s teachings in faith and morals. Must have knowledge of tenets of Catholic Church and parish structures. Must be fully committed, supportive and respectful of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church. Must have active participation in parish life. Excellent oral and written English and Spanish language communication skills, including clear speaking voice. Three - five years of experience in parish catechetical ministry. Must be a self-starter, with excellent interpersonal and communication skills. Must possess strong skills in organization, administration, recruitment/formation of volunteers. Proficiency in MS Outlook, Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. Must have good business writing / correspondence skills. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to:

[email protected] and

[email protected]

Subject line should read: CRE – San Isidro Catholic Church. Position open until December 31, 2017. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

Coordinator of Youth Ministry / Mary Help of Christians Catholic Church Mary Help of Christians Catholic Church in Parkland (northern Broward County), Florida, seeks a dynamic Coordinator of Youth Ministry to work under the direction of the pastor to provide vision and coordination for the parish’s efforts in ministry to young people from 6th through 12th grades. This includes high school and middle school sessions, monthly activities; working closely with the DRE to coordinate sacramental preparation (confirmation). This person is responsible for designing, developing and implementing programs and events to enhance and foster the faith formation of the youth. The Coordinator of Youth Ministry would work collaboratively with the pastor, and other parish staff. The Coordinator of Youth Ministry performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami. Schedule: 40 hours/week, to include weekends and some evenings.

Qualifications: Practicing Catholic in good standing who fully adheres to and models the Church’s teachings in faith and morals. Bachelor’s degree in Theology, Pastoral Studies or related preferred. Minimumthree (3) years’ experience as a volunteer in a parish; parish employment history preferred. Knowledge of and the ability to convey effectively the official teaching of the Church in the areas of Scripture, doctrine, morality and spirituality with a demonstrated fidelity to these teachings. Knowledge of church documents relating to youth ministry, particularlythe1997 USCCB document, Renewing The Vision: A Framework for Catholic Youth Ministry. Knowledge of current resources, processes and methodologies for youth faith formation. Skilled at conflict resolution. Must demonstrate enthusiasm and joy. Must be able to provide a ministry of presence: being present and building and maintaining good relationships with church personnel in the parish, including employees, volunteers in ministry, etc. Good group facilitation skills. Ability to initiate, plan, organize, implement and evaluate parish youth faith formation. Excellent oral and written communication skills in English; Spanish language a plus. Proficiency in MS Outlook, Word, and PowerPoint; Excel a plus. Good computer literacy, including ability to navigate online applications and search engines effectively. Excellent customer service skills, including ability to maintain focus on and professionalism with people in challenging situations, both in person and by phone. Good time management, including ability to manage several projects at the same time. Must have a professional demeanor. Demonstrated comfort in multi-cultural setting required. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to: Rev. Naughton at:

[email protected]

Subject line should read: Youth Minister MHOC Position open until filled. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Coordinator of Youth Ministry / St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic Church St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic Church in South Miami, Florida, has an exciting opening for a Coordinator of Youth Ministry. This is a new position calling for an energetic self-starter to build the program under the direction of the pastor, designing, developing and implementing programs and events to enhance and foster the faith formation of the youth. The Coordinator of Youth Ministry will provide vision and coordination for the parish’s efforts in ministry to young people from 6th through 12th grades by leading sessions, providing monthly activities and working closely with the DRE to coordinate sacramental preparation (Confirmation). The Coordinator of Youth Ministry performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami. Schedule: 40 hours/week, to include weekends and some evenings.

Qualifications: Practicing Catholic in good standing who fully adheres to and models the Church’s teachings in faith and morals. Bachelor’s degree in Theology, Pastoral Studies or related preferred. Minimum three (3) years’ experience as a volunteer in a parish; parish employment history preferred. Knowledge of and the ability to convey effectively the official teaching of the Church in the areas of Scripture, doctrine, morality and spirituality with a demonstrated fidelity to these teachings. Knowledge of church documents relating to youth ministry, particularly the 1997 USCCB document, Renewing The Vision: A Framework for Catholic Youth Ministry. Knowledge of current resources, processes and methodologies for youth faith formation. Skilled at conflict resolution. Must demonstrate enthusiasm and joy. Must be able to provide a ministry of presence: being present and building and maintaining good relationships with church personnel in the parish, including employees, volunteers in ministry, etc. Good group facilitation skills. Ability to initiate, plan, organize, implement and evaluate parish youth faith formation. Excellent oral and written communication skills in English; Spanish language a plus. Proficiency in MS Outlook, Word, and PowerPoint; Excel a plus. Good computer literacy, including ability to navigate online applications and search engines effectively. Excellent customer service skills, including ability to maintain focus on and professionalism with people in challenging situations, both in person and by phone. Good time management, including ability to manage several projects at the same time. Must have a professional demeanor. Demonstrated comfort in multi-cultural setting required. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to: Rev. Alejandro Rodríguez-Artolaat

[email protected]

Subject line should read: Youth Minister STA Position open until filled. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Coordinator, Hispanic Pastoral Formation and Catechesis - The Archdiocese of Baltimore The men and women employed by the Archdiocese of Baltimore are dedicated professionals who endeavor to support the mission of the Archdiocese in many diverse areas including spiritual ministry, formation, social work, education and administrative services. We are seeking to add committed and dedicated professionals to our team. If you love the mission of the Catholic Church and seek to make a difference, a role at the Archdiocese of Baltimore may be right for you. We are actively seeking candidates for the role of Coordinator, Hispanic Pastoral Formation and Catechesis. In this role, you will be responsible for developing ongoing faith and ministry formation opportunities that meet the needs of the Spanish-speaking members of the Archdiocese of Baltimore. As a part of the Evangelization team, you will assist in building missionary disciples, and promote the ongoing formation of those in the parishes involved in religious education, youth and young adult ministry and adult formation. As a missionary disciple yourself, you will need to be grounded in and actively share the proclamations of the Gospel in support of the Church's mission.

You are a great candidate if you: Have a Master’s degree in Church Administration, Theology, Education Administration or a closely related field or an equivalency gained through a combination of education and experience Have a deep knowledge of the Hispanic community and want to be active in the evangelization of the community Are fluent in Spanish and English Possess a mastery of Microsoft Office Have a good understanding of digital and social media If you believe that you possess the skills, talent, and aptitude to be a part of this vital ministry, come join our team! In addition to our many benefits like health and vacation, we offer a welcoming environment where Christ is central in all that we do! To apply for this position: Please visit our website at www.archbalt.jobs.net/en-US/job/coordinator-hispanic-pastoral-formation-and-catechesis/J3L4XD6RNHJ317G2K7F

Data Clerk (Temporary) The Archdiocese of Miami has an opening for a Data Clerk (Temporary) who will provide administrative and data entry support to the Director of Annual Giving and Development Services during the Archbishop's Charities and Development Drive (ABCD). This person will be someone who pays attention to details and accuracy. As needed, he or she will provide general support to the President and other senior team members of the Development Corporation. The Data Clerk will perform all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami. Length of Assignment: January 2018 through March 2018 (approximately) Salary: $12.50 per hour

Responsibilities: Enter data from Excel Spreadsheets into Raiser's Edge database and prepare Raiser's Edge reports and queries Assist the Director with reports and data collection at the parish level Provide exemplary customer service to internal and external constituents Process all gifts in accordance with Archdiocese policies and procedures. Compile, update and maintain donor records in Raiser's Edge with strict confidentiality

Qualifications: Minimum: High School diploma or GED and two (2) years' experience in a data entry and/or administrative support position. Preferred: Bachelor's degree and two (2) years' experience in a data entry and/or administrative position. Must be supportive of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church. Knowledge of the basic tenets of Catholic Church and parish structures; experience in a Roman Catholic environment is a plus. Experience in a fundraising environment and working with Raiser's Edge is strongly preferred. Proficiency in MS Word and Excel is required and type at least 60 wpm with 90% accuracy. Excellent customer service skills required. Good oral and written English language communication skills are a must, including a clear speaking voice. Good Spanish-language spoken and written communication skills strongly preferred. Good Haitian Creole-language spoken and written communication skills is a plus. Ability to follow detailed oral and written instructions with good spelling and grammar required. Knowledge of fundamentals of project management preferred. Good time management skills including ability to manage several projects at the same time is required. Must have professional demeanor. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to

[email protected]

Subject line should read: DATA CLERK (TEMPORARY) - ABCD DRIVE Position open until filled NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Director of Plant Operations – Immaculata-La Salle High School Immaculata-La Salle High School, a private Catholic school in Miami (Coconut Grove), Florida is looking to hire a qualified and experienced Director of Plant Operations to start January 2018. The Director of Plant Operations will be responsible for planning, directing and/or coordinating the operations, maintenance, administration, improvement, traffic and security of the grounds, facilities, and related equipment of Immaculata-La Salle High School. Responsibilities include basic building, repairs, and installation tasks in carpentry, plumbing, painting, mechanical repairs, structural repairs, lighting, heating and ventilation, setup and breakdown for events and limited assistance in A/C and electrical functions. The Director of Plan Operations would oversee new construction, inspections and permitting.

Qualifications: High-school diploma or GED and ten years’ related experience and/or training; or equivalent combination of education and experience. Technical or trade school coursework in building technology and/or HVAC preferred. Experience in risk management required. Valid FL driver license and automobile insurance. Universal certification a plus. Basic PC skills, including ability to navigate the Window OS, enter data into systems and perform e-mail functions in MS Outlook required. Ability to read and understand blueprints, MSDS, Hazard Communication labels and safety warnings. Good oral and written English-language communication skills. Good Spanish-language spoken communication skills strongly preferred. Good time management, including ability to manage several projects at the same time. Must be supportive of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church. Experience in a Roman Catholic environment preferred. Must have a pleasant, service-oriented demeanor. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to: Sr. Kim Keraitis, FMA. at

[email protected]

Subject line should read: Director of Plant Operations – Immaculata-La Salle High School NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Elementary School Teacher - St. Timothy Catholic School Saint Timothy Catholic School in Southwest Miami-Dade, Florida has an opening for a Full-Time Elementary School Teacher for the current 2017-2018 school year. The applicant must be nurturing, creative and a dedicated professional with the ability to support the learning environment, cultivate critical thinking skills, work collaboratively as part of a team and lead small group lessons. The candidate must be supportive and respectful of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church.

Qualifications: Bachelor’s Degree in Education or Elementary Education. Florida Department of Education Certification in Elementary education, temporary or permanent required. Must be supportive and respectful of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church; experience in Roman Catholic environment preferred. Experience teaching in an elementary school preferred. Must be flexible in assessing needs and strategies and adapt appropriately in a ministerial environment. Must have excellent classroom management skills. Must be supportive and respectful of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church; experience in Roman Catholic environment preferred. Excellent presentation skills with skill in use of instructional technologies. Must have knowledge of basic tenets of Catholic Church. Excellent oral and written English -language communication skills, including clear speaking voice. Good spelling and grammar required. Proficiency in MS Outlook, Word, and Excel, PowerPoint a plus. Must have a professional demeanor. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to Ms. Annie Seiglie, Principal, via email:

[email protected]

NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Employment Opportunities - Local and National Positions at the Archdiocese of Chicago Do you have a passion to develop Latino parish leaders to serve their immigrant communities as they begin to organize and respond to community needs? Do you have a background in faith formation, Catholic Social Teaching or social action? Do you have experience in building strong relationships with faith leaders and community partners at the grassroots level? Are you bilingual (Spanish/English)?

If so, please visit legacy.archchicago.org/Employment/ to learn about and apply for the following full-time, Chicago-based local and national positions with our Immigration Ministry. Assistant Senior Coordinator for Immigration Pastoral Migratoria National Outreach Coordinator Pastoral Migratoria National Formation Coordinator Pastoral Migratoria is an immigrant social ministry for service and justice actions in parish communities. The ministry advances the integration of immigrants in society, while providing the opportunity to connect their faith and lives as immigrants in this country. It is grounded in the methodology of Aparecida, the 2007 document developed by the Latin American Bishops under Pope Francis’s leadership. To apply: If you are interested in being considered for any of these openings, please send your resume and cover letter to Elena Segura at Archdiocese of Chicago, visit www.catholicsandimmigrants.org.

[email protected] For more information about Pastoral Migratoria and the work of the Office for Human Dignity and Solidarity-Immigration Ministry of the

Enrichment Specialist / Playground Teacher (Part-Time) - Mary Help of Christians Catholic School Mary Help of Christians Catholic School in Parkland (Broward), Florida is seeking a Part-time Enrichment Specialist / Playground Teacher for the current school year. The applicant must be a nurturing, creative, and a dedicated professional with the ability to use an outdoor space as a classroom and provide age appropriate activities for ages 18 months to 4 years old. The candidate must be supportive and respectful of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church. Schedule: Monday – Friday: 8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Qualifications: Must have an Associate’s degree or CDA. Florida Department of Education certification in Pre-Kindergarten/Primary Education required, temporary or professional. Must be supportive and respectful of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church; experience in Roman Catholic environment preferred. Must be able to work collaboratively with peers to promote age-appropriate best practices in early childhood education. Must have the ability to provide a hands-on approach enabling children to discover, learn, and critically solve problems about the world. Excellent communications skills including written, verbal, public speaking, and presentation skills. Flexibility in assessing needs and strategies and adapt appropriately in a ministerial environment. Must have excellent classroom management skills. Must have knowledge of basic tenets of the Catholic Church. Excellent oral and written English -language communication skills, including clear speaking voice. Good spelling and grammar required. Proficiency in MS Outlook, Word, and Excel, PowerPoint a plus. Must have a professional demeanor. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to:

[email protected]

NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Events / Alumni Coordinator - Chaminade-Madonna College Preparatory Chaminade-Madonna College Preparatory located in Hollywood, FL. is seeking to hire a full-time Events/Alumni Coordinator. This candidate will be primarily responsible for the planning and execution of two major fundraisers per year in addition to friend-raising events over several months. As a member of the Advancement Department, this position also assists with events or other duties as needed. The Events/Alumni Coordinator performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision, and values of the Catholic/Marianist character of the school.

Qualifications: Bachelor’s degree in business, non-profit management, education, or related field. Experience in budget management a plus. Must be supportive of the mission, vision, and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church. Must be supportive of the mission of the school and the Marianist philosophy of education. Good computer literacy, including ability to navigate online applications, online social media outlets, and search engines effectively. Proven ability to assimilate and communicate information verbally in print and online. Excellent verbal, editing, organizational and writing skills. Good interpersonal and relationship-building skills. Strong leadership and conflict resolution skills. Good computer literacy. Good time management skills. To apply: Please send all resumes and cover letters to:

[email protected]

NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

Finance Manager - St. Brendan Catholic School St. Brendan Catholic Church in Miami (Westchester), Florida has an immediate opening for a full-time Financial Manager who will be responsible for providing day-to-day fiscal/financial and operation services to the Pastor, school principal, and parish and school. Primary responsibilities include maintaining and/or preparing all financial reports, books and records for St. Brendan Church Parish and School. This position will also perform and supervise, as necessary, the month end closing process, accounts payable activities, payroll processing and other duties as assigned. The St. Brendan Church and Parish School Financial Manager carries out all duties and responsibilities and performs essential functions in a manner that is consistent with the mission, vision and values of the St. Brendan Church and Parish School and the Archdiocese of Miami. Schedule: 40 hours per week.

Qualifications: Bachelor degree in Accounting or related field, with minimum of 5 years of professional experience. Demonstrated proficiency in Microsoft Office Products (Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Outlook) and accounting systems (e.g. ConnectNow, Quickbooks, ParishSoft, etc.). Must possess knowledge of the Catholic Church and its structures, functions and institutions. Requires strong ethical values, including honesty and integrity, especially in matter of confidence. Experience in a Roman Catholic environment strongly preferred. Must have a strong command of GAAP and accounting practices. Modern office procedures and practices, including record keeping and data security methods and techniques. Knowledge of accounting principles and practices for non-profit organizations. Knowledge of basic compensation and benefits principles of personnel administration. Ability to maintain a high level of accuracy in preparing & entering financial information. Ability to maintain strict confidentiality concerning financial matters. Good computer literacy, including ability to navigate online applications and search engines effectively. Good spelling and grammar required. Excellent customer service skills, including ability to maintain focus on and professionalism with people in challenging situations, both in person and by phone. Good time management, including ability to manage several projects at the same time. Must be able to multi-task and retain accuracy in an environment of competing deadlines. Must be supportive of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church. Must have a professional demeanor. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to

[email protected]

Subject line should read: Financial Manager – St. Brendan

Full-Time and Part-Time Residential Assistant / Marian Center The Marian Center School & Services, Inc. offers services for people with intellectual disabilities through its school, adult day training and work program, and full-time residential facility for women, in service to the Gospel and the Church’s call to love, charity and justice. They are currently seeking a full-time and part-time Residential Assistant to assist a small group of girls with homework, arts and crafts, recreational activities, household chores, grooming and hygiene.

Qualifications: High-school diploma Must have excellent interpersonal skills; experience with intellectually disabled preferred. Good communication skills, including adaptive to audience, required. Ability to follow detailed instructions. Ability to assign and maintain discipline of self and clients in residence. Ability to stimulate and involve clients for personal care, home chores, recreational or group activities. Must be supportive of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church. Experience in a Roman Catholic environment preferred. Must have a pleasant, service-oriented demeanor Send resume with cover letter to:

[email protected]

Subject line should read: F/T and P/T Residential Assistant NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Full-time Housekeeper / Cook – McCarthy Residence The McCarthy Residence has an immediate opening for a full-time Housekeeper/Cook. This individual will be responsible for the meal preparation for and upkeep of the McCarthy Residence for the Archbishop Emeritus and resident priest. This upkeep includes but is not limited to: cleaning of all rooms in the home and cooking meals for the Archbishop Emeritus and resident priest and any invited guests. The Housekeeper/Cook is also responsible for ordering and maintaining food inventory and keeping the kitchen area clean. This employee performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami.

Responsibilities: Clean rooms, hallways, bathrooms and other areas. Clean area rugs, carpets, upholstered furniture, and/or draperies, using vacuum cleaners and/or shampooers. Sweep and mop tile floors. Empty wastebaskets and transport to outside trash cans. Dust and polish furniture. Keep storage areas / linen closets/ kitchen pantry clean and tidy. Dust window blinds, ceiling fans and woodwork as necessary. Wash windows as needed. Change bed linens weekly (or as directed) Sort clothing and other articles, load washing machines, iron and fold dried items Wash dishes, clean kitchen including any cooking utensils and silverware as well as the refrigerator and microwave. Plan menus according to preferences of the priests. Cook and serve breakfast, lunch and dinner daily for the week. Peel, wash, trim and cook vegetables and meats, and bake breads and pastries. Purchase groceries and household supplies to keep kitchen stocked. Purchases must be made in a cost-conscious manner, providing receipts to parish bookkeeper for reimbursement Keep storage areas / linen closets/ kitchen pantry clean and tidy Direct the operation and organization of kitchen and all food-related activities, including presentation and serving of food. Plan and prepare food for parties, holiday meals, luncheons, brunches, special dinners and fundraising functions, and other social events. Must be supportive of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church. Other assignments as directed by supervisor

Qualifications: To perform this job successfully, and individual must be able to perform each essential duty satisfactorily. The requirements listed below are representative of the knowledge, skill, and/or ability required. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the essential functions. High-school diploma or G.E.D.; experience with cooking and cleaning is required. Valid FL driver license and personal automobile insurance. Basic oral and written English- and Spanish-language communication skills necessary. To apply: Cover letter & resume to:

[email protected]

NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Groundskeeper / Gardener - Our Lady of Mercy Cemetery Our Lady of Mercy Cemetery in Miami, Florida has an opening for a Groundskeeper/Gardener. This position is responsible for landscape and maintenance duties including lawn mowing, edging and trimming, plants installation, and lawn fertilization. The Groundskeeper/Gardener performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami.

Qualifications: High-school diploma or G.E.D required. Experience in landscaping and lawn maintenance a plus. Two years of experience required. Must be able to endure frequent exposure to all weather conditions. Must be able to work around dust and high levels of noise and vibration. Good English-language communication skills, Spanish-language and/or Haitian-Creole or French-language spoken communication skills preferred. Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the lawn maintenance and landscaping. Must be able to bend, climb stairs, lift and move heavy objects (up to 50 pounds). Good time management, including ability to manage several projects at the same time. Must be supportive of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church. Experience in a Roman Catholic environment preferred. Must have a pleasant, service-oriented demeanor. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to Esther Rodriguez at

305-592-6938, or email :

[email protected] you may also call

305-592-0521 ext. 225

Subject line should read: Groundskeeper/Gardener – Our Lady of Mercy Cemetery. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Guidance Counselor (Full-Time) / St. Brendan High School St. Brendan High School seeks a full-time guidance counselor. The counselor provides the supportive services necessary to facilitate the transition of students from middle school into high school, and from high school into college and career. The counselor helps students succeed in academics, sports, and social life, and encourages students to take ownership of their faith. Preferably, the applicant must be a Roman Catholic in good standing who is able to share his/her faith with students and model a moral code which is consistent with the teachings of the Roman Catholic Church.

Qualifications: Master’s degree in Guidance and Counseling, preferred. Florida Professional Certificate in Guidance and Counseling, preferred. School experience, preferred. Good oral and written English-language communication skills, including clear speaking voice. Good oral Spanish-language communication skills. Must have a professional demeanor. Must be supportive and respectful of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church and have knowledge of its structures, functions and institutions. To apply: Interested and qualified candidates are asked to submit electronically a letter of introduction addressing the requirements/skills listed above, a resume, and the names, addresses, telephone numbers, and email addresses of three professional references to desired in the e-mail subject line. Review of applications taking place in September 2017 and continue until the position is filled.

[email protected] Please indicate position

Subject line should read: Guidance Counselor– St. Brendan High School NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

High School Health Teacher / Archbishop Edward McCarthy High School Archbishop Edward McCarthy High School located in Southwest Ranches, Florida is looking to hire a qualified and experienced educator for High School Health Teacher. This teacher will be expected to plan, organize and implement an appropriate instructional program for High School Health. This candidate performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision and tenets of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami.

Qualifications: Required: Bachelor’s Degree in Health, specifically Health or related field with experience in teaching at a high school level. Florida DOE Teaching Certification or Certified Eligible in Health grades 9-12. ADOM Catechist Certification preferred. Knowledge and skill in use of instructional technology, including iPads, in the classroom Must have knowledge of tenets of Catholic Church. Must be fully committed, supportive and respectful of the mission, teachings and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church. Excellent oral and written English -language communication skills, including clear speaking voice. Excellent presentation skills. Must have good classroom management and demonstrated ability to engage students. Must have a professional demeanor. To apply: Please send cover letter, copy of certification, and resume to:

[email protected]

NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

High School Math Teacher - Archbishop Edward McCarthy High School Archbishop Edward McCarthy High School located in Southwest Ranches, FL is looking to hire a qualified and experienced educator for High School Math. This teacher will be expected to plan, organize and implement an appropriate instructional program for High School Math grades 9-12. This candidate performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision and tenets of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami.

Qualifications: Required: Bachelor’s Degree in Mathematics or related field with specialization in higher cognitive level math. Florida DOE Teaching Certification in Math grades 9-12. Knowledge and skill in use of instructional technology, including iPads, in the classroom. Must have knowledge of tenets of Catholic Church. Must be fully committed, supportive and respectful of the mission, teachings and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church. Excellent oral and written English -language communication skills, including clear speaking voice. Excellent presentation skills. Must have good classroom management and demonstrated ability to engage students. Must have a professional demeanor. To apply: Please send cover letter, copy of certification, and resume to:

[email protected]

NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

High School Science Teacher – Archbishop Coleman Carroll High School Beginning in January 2018, Archbishop Coleman Carroll High in Miami-Dade, FL. is looking to hire a qualified and experienced educator for its Science Department that has a love for Science, can help students learn, integrate and apply scientific concepts in Environmental Science, Chemistry and Honors Anatomy. This candidate performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami.

Qualifications: Required: Bachelor’s Degree in Science; Master’s degree in Science preferred. Required: State of Florida Department of Education certification in Science 6-12. One year experience in teaching at a high school level. Practicing Catholic in good standing who fully adheres to and models the Roman Catholic Church teachings in faith and morals. Knowledge and skill in the use of instructional technology in the classroom such as SMART Board and IPad and/or a willingness to learn these applications. Willingness to take on extracurricular duties as requested by the Principal and Vice Principal of Academics. Must have a professional demeanor. Good spelling and grammar required. Proficiency in MS Outlook, Word, Excel, and PowerPoint a plus. Must be fully committed, respectful, and supportive of the mission and teachings of the Roman Catholic Church and Archbishop Coleman Carroll High School. Excellent classroom management skills. To apply: Please send cover letter and resume to:

[email protected]

NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Maintenance / Custodial Person (Full-Time) – St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church and School St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church and School in Miami Shores, Florida has an opening for a Full-time Maintenance/Custodial Person. This position is responsible for the execution of tasks that support the operations, maintenance, cleanliness, repair and improvement of the grounds, facilities, and related equipment of all properties of St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church and School. The Maintenance/Custodial Person performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami. Schedule: Monday – Friday 2:00pm – 10:30pm

Responsibilities: Custodial duties: Including but not limited to: setup and breakdown for events, janitorial cleanliness, church, and education center maintenance. Perform basic building, repair, and installation tasks in carpentry, plumbing, painting, mechanical repairs, structural repairs, lighting, heating and ventilation, setup and breakdown for events and limited assistance in A/C and electrical functions. Keep facilities and grounds clean, safe, and orderly through regularly scheduled custodial and maintenance duties per scheduled tasks). Perform all work per safe work practices while maintaining a safe, clean work area and tools, and reports any hazards to supervisor.

Qualifications: High-school diploma or G.E.D.; and two years’ related experience. Technical or trade school coursework in building technology and/or HVAC a plus. Basic knowledge and skills in some of the building trades; Knowledge of construction, roofing a plus. Good oral and written English-language communication skills. Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance. Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings or other structures. Must be able to bend, climb stairs and, lift and move heavy (up to 50 pounds) objects. Good time management, including ability to manage several projects at the same time. Must be supportive of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church. Must have a pleasant, service-oriented demeanor. To apply: Please email cover letter and resume to

[email protected]

Subject line should read: Maintenance / Custodial person – St. Rose of Lima Catholic School. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

Maintenance Team Member (Full-Time) - St. Patrick Catholic Church, School, and Preschool St. Patrick Catholic Church and School in Miami Beach, Florida has an opening for a Maintenance Team Member. This position will be part of the overall maintenance team and be responsible for the execution of a variety of tasks that support the maintenance, repair and improvement of the grounds, facilities, and related equipment of all properties of St. Patrick Catholic Church and School. The Maintenance Team Member performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami.

Responsibilities: Basic repair and installation tasks in carpentry, plumbing, mechanical and electrical. Periodic setup and breakdown for parish and school events. Touchup painting and cleaning of the church and school. Keeping facilities and grounds of parish and school clean, safe, and orderly through regularly scheduled custodial and maintenance duties according to scheduled tasks. Perform all work according to safe work practices while maintaining a safe, clean work area and tools, and reports any hazards to supervisor.

Qualifications: High-school diploma or G.E.D.; or three years' related experience and/or training; or equivalent combination of education and experience. Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance. Technical or trade school a plus. Basic ability to repair and install. Must have good oral and written English-language communication skills. Spanish-language spoken communications skills strongly preferred. Must be able to bend, climb stairs and, lift and move heavy (up to 50 pounds) objects. Must be able to work in all environments, indoors and outdoors. Must have good time management, including ability to manage several projects at the same time. Must be supportive of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church. Must have a pleasant, service-oriented demeanor around students and adults. To apply: Send resume with cover letter:

[email protected]

Subject line should read: Maintenance Team Member - St. Patrick Miami Beach NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

Maintenance Team Member (Full-Time) - Mary Help of Christians Catholic Church and School Mary Help of Christian Catholic Church and School in Parkland, Florida has an opening for a Maintenance Team Member. This position will be part of the overall maintenance team and be responsible for the execution of a variety of tasks that support the operation, maintenance, repair and improvement of the grounds, facilities, and related equipment of all properties of Mary Help of Christian Catholic Church and School. The Maintenance Team Member performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami. Schedule: Sunday 6:30 am to 3 pm; Tuesday – Friday 7:30 am to 4 pm

Responsibilities: Keeping facilities and grounds of parish and school clean, safe, and orderly through regularly scheduled custodial and maintenance duties according to scheduled tasks. Periodic setup and breakdown for parish and school events. Working on Sunday to open and close church facilities, handle custodial needs and assist with ministry events as scheduled throughout the day. Touchup painting and cleaning of the church and school. Basic repair and installation tasks in carpentry, plumbing, mechanical and electrical. Perform all work according to safe work practices while maintaining a safe, clean work area and tools, and reports any hazards to supervisor.

Qualifications: PHigh-school diploma or G.E.D.; or three years’ related experience and/or training; or equivalent combination of education and experience. Basic ability to build, repair and install small office and classroom furniture. Basic PC skills, including ability to navigate the Windows OS, enter data into system and perform e-mail functions required. Must have good oral and written English-language communication skills. Spanish-language spoken communications skills strongly preferred. Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance. Must be able to bend, climb stairs and, lift and move heavy (up to 50 pounds) objects. Must be able to work in all environments, indoors and outdoors. Must have good time management, including ability to manage several projects at once. Must be supportive of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church. Must have a pleasant, service-oriented demeanor around students and adults. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to: Donna Murphy at:

[email protected]

Subject line should read: Maintenance Team Member – MHOC Church and School NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Middle School Language Arts Teacher - St. Jerome Catholic School St. Jerome Catholic School in Fort Lauderdale (Broward), Florida has an opening for a Middle School Language Arts teacher starting in January 2018. This teacher will be expected to plan, organize, and implement an appropriate instructional program for Middle School grades 6-8. The Middle School Social Studies teacher must be supportive and respectful of the mission, vision, and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church.

Qualifications: BS / BA Degree in Education, Reading, English, or related field. Florida Department of Education certification in English-9 or English 6-12 is required, temporary or professional. Must be supportive and respectful of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church; experience in Roman Catholic environment preferred. Must have excellent classroom management skills. Excellent presentation skills with skill in use of instructional technologies. Must have knowledge of basic tenets of Catholic Church. Excellent oral and written English - language communication skills, including clear speaking voice. Good spelling and grammar required. Proficiency in MS Outlook, Word, and Excel, PowerPoint a plus. Must have a professional demeanor. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to

[email protected]

NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

Middle School Social Studies Teacher - St. Jerome Catholic School St. Jerome Catholic School in Fort Lauderdale (Broward), Florida has an opening for a Middle School Social Studies teacher starting in January 2018. This teacher will be expected to plan, organize, and implement an appropriate instructional program for Social Studies grades 6-8. The Middle School Social Studies teacher must be supportive and respectful of the mission, vision, and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church.

Qualifications: BS / BA Degree in Social Studies Education or related field. Florida Department of Education certification in Social Sciences (History) 5-9 or Social Sciences 6-12 is required, temporary or professional. Must be supportive and respectful of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church; experience in Roman Catholic environment preferred. Must have excellent classroom management skills. Excellent presentation skills with skill in use of instructional technologies. Must have knowledge of basic tenets of Catholic Church. Excellent oral and written English - language communication skills, including clear speaking voice. Good spelling and grammar required. Proficiency in MS Outlook, Word, and Excel, PowerPoint a plus. Must have a professional demeanor. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to

[email protected]

NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

Middle School Substitute Reading Teacher - St. Mark Catholic School St. Mark Catholic School in Southwest Ranches, FL has an opening for a qualified Middle Reading teacher (6-8 grade) starting on November 27, 2017 and ending on March 16, 2018. This is a temporary position. Candidates must be passionate about the reading, can help students learn, apply higher order thinking skills, and is qualified to teach all levels of Middle School Reading. This teacher will be required to plan, organize, and implement an appropriate instructional program for middle school Reading. The Middle School Reading teacher performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision, and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami.

Qualifications: BS / BA Degree in Education or Reading related field. Florida department of Education Reading/English 6-8 teaching certificate, SOE, temporary or professional required. Excellent classroom management. Must be supportive and respectful of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church; experience in Roman Catholic environment preferred. Excellent presentation skills with skill in use of instructional technologies. Excellent classroom management skills. Must have knowledge of basic tenets of Catholic Church. Excellent oral and written English -language communication skills, including clear speaking voice. Good spelling and grammar required. Proficiency in MS Outlook, Word, and Excel, PowerPoint a plus. Must have a professional demeanor. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to:

[email protected]

NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

Music Teacher – St. Brendan Catholic School St. Brendan Elementary Catholic School in Southwest Miami Dade, FL is seeking an energetic teacher to be responsible for the design, coordination, and implementation of a comprehensive music curriculum. The candidate must be able to teach music and choir, prepare for school liturgies, conduct a Christmas program, and support the school mission through music and song. The Music Teacher performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami.

Qualifications: Bachelor's Degree in Music. Music instrument knowledge a plus. State of Florida Department of Education Teacher Certificate, Temporary or Professional required. Must be a Roman Catholic in good standing with considerable knowledge and familiarity of the Roman Catholic liturgy and an ability to integrate the liturgy with musical skills so that the liturgical music component of worship can be celebrated. Ability to communicate musical concepts and instruction with oral and written communications skills. Possess performance proficiency in a keyboard instrument used in liturgical celebration and voice/choral performance experience. Knowledge of keyboard technique, liturgical service-playing techniques, group vocal techniques and experience in choral conducting. Familiarity with the vast repertoire of sacred music available today, both contemporary and treasured. Must be supportive and respectful of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church; experience in Roman Catholic environment preferred. Excellent inter-personal skills with capacity to interact with priests, professional and volunteer musicians, parishioners, and parish staff. Excellent oral and written English-language communication skills, including clear speaking voice; Spanish required. Must be able to multi-task and retain accuracy in an environment of competing deadlines. Must have a professional demeanor. To apply: Send resume and cover letter to:

[email protected]

Subject line should read: Music Teacher – St. Brendan Catholic School NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Office Assistant - St. Augustine Catholic Church and Student Center St. Augustine Catholic Church and Student Center, located adjacent to the University of Miami campus in Coral Gables, Florida has an immediate opening for an Office Assistant. This person will be responsible for providing customer service for general inquiries and visitors to the parish office in the spirit of Christian hospitality. Primary duties are answering the phone, greeting visitors and callers, assessing their needs, and directing them to the appropriate parties. As a member of the Parish administration office, this employee reports to the Office Manager and assists in clerical and administrative tasks of the office as needed, particularly answering requests for information, coordinating calendar events, posting to the Web page, and publishing the parish bulletin. The receptionist performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami.

Responsibilities: Provide a ministry of welcome, greeting, and service at the reception desk of the parish office. Answer phones, take messages, and provide assistance; direct queries to appropriate offices and personnel. Serve as the initial contact person in response to those in need, particularly with individuals seeking charitable assistance and direct them to the appropriate parish, Archdiocesan, or other charities; provide food assistance if requested. Welcome new and prospective parishioners, distribute registration forms and help them register in the parish. Assist in the requests of sponsorship and Godparent verification. Oversee and facilitate the scheduling of Mass intentions. Prepare and publish the weekly parish bulletin. Receive and sign for all packages and deliveries, ensure their delivery to appropriate parties and locations. Keep reception area clean, orderly and professional in appearance. Handle medical emergency phone calls with due diligence; ensure that the priest on duty is contacted immediately, when there is a request for the Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick. Assist in the preparation of Prayers of the Faithful for daily Masses, and in the Announcements for weekend Masses.

Qualifications: High school diploma and 5 years’ clerical experience in a customer-service environment, church or Catholic school preferred; or equivalent combination of education and experience. Demonstrated history of maintaining strict confidentiality. Must demonstrate a positive, welcoming and service-oriented disposition. Must have knowledge of basic tenets of Catholic Church and parish structures. Must be supportive and respectful of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church; experience in Roman Catholic environment preferred. Good oral and written English-language communication skills, including clear speaking voice. Good oral and written Spanish communication skills a plus. Good spelling and grammar required. Proficiency in MS Outlook, Word, Excel, Publisher; basic Web site content management. Good computer literacy, including ability to navigate online applications. Excellent customer service skills, including ability to maintain focus on and professionalism with people in challenging situations, both in person and by phone. Must be able to multi-task and retain accuracy in an environment of competing deadlines. Good time management, including ability to manage several projects at the same time. Must have a professional demeanor. To apply: Please send Resume and Cover letter to:

[email protected]

Subject line should read: Office Assistant – St. Augustine Catholic Church and Student Center NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Receptionist or Coordinator of COTLF Charities (Full-Time) / Church of the Little Flower, Coral Gables Church of the Little Flower in Coral Gables, FL. has an immediate opening for a Receptionist / Coordinator of COTLF Charities (Full-time) who will be responsible for providing first-point-of-contact customer service for general inquiries and visitors to the parish office, maintaining a welcoming environment to the parish. Primary duties are operating the main switchboard and greeting visitors and callers, assessing their needs, and directing them to the appropriate parties. Stationed at the front desk, the Receptionist / Coordinator of COTLF Charities receives and directs both walk-in and scheduled visitors. As a member of the Parish administration office, this employee assists in other clerical and/or administrative tasks of the office as needed, particularly in the area of composing correspondence, entering and maintaining sacramental and other records, answering requests for information, coordinating calendar events, and other office administrative tasks. The Receptionist / Coordinator of COTLF Charities performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami. Schedule: Monday – Friday 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Responsibilities: Answer phones, take messages, and offer help in any way; direct queries to appropriate offices and personnel, and filter calls. Provide a ministry of welcome, greeting, and parishioner service at the front door. Be the initial contact person in response to those in need, particularly with individuals seeking the assistance of the COTLF Charities. Completes the COTLF Charities application, seeks to ascertain the level of need and verifies authenticity of the request. Facilitates reasonable resolution to problems and challenges. Attends regular meeting with the Chair of COTLF Charities and schedules de-briefing sessions with the Pastor. Invite those who are in the waiting area in the mornings to visit the Blessed Sacrament Chapel. Regarding walk-in new parishioners, give them the registration forms and explain the process; and on the computer, enter the information in our PDS and e-mail or call the new parishioner with their member number. A welcoming disposition goes a long way in furthering the cause. Regarding inquiries for Baptisms, invite those interested in baptizing their child to visit the website, where they will find the Baptism application form and all the requirements and sacramental expectations; explain the procedures to them. People are always welcome to come to the office for consultation with the Curator of Records for further clarification and procedural information. At the office they are likewise welcome to personally pick the forms and required documents; everything must be turned into the office for processing. Assist the Curator of Records with the Baptismal registration process, checking availability of dates in the book, and assuring that all documents have been turned and are filed accordingly. Assist in the requests, the filling out, and the receipt of sponsorship and godparent verifications, as well as the production of all certificates and letters regarding the reception of Sacraments. Oversee and facilitate the scheduling of Mass Intentions; offer date and time and input the information in the Mass Intention book; have the individual fill out the Mass Intention envelope adding the corresponding donation, preferably in person; we do not hold dates. Hand out wedding applications to walk-ins that request it, explaining the wedding application process, the COTLF procedures and requirements, and directing them to the Wedding Coordinator for any clarification on application matters. When calls arrive, guide people to the website for all the information. Direct them, too, to speak with the Calendar Coordinator. Always have plenty of complete wedding information folders in the cabinet. Assist in the coordination and scheduling of priest appointments for the Parochial Vicars, and any secretarial assistance they may need. Receive, sign for all packages and deliveries, and sort and distribute mail to all staff mailboxes & offices. Keep reception area clean and professional in appearance, clearing out all boxes and deliveries, asking the Maintenance Staff to deliver them, e.g. items pertaining to Saint Theresa School, or the sacristy, etc. Handle emergency phone calls with due diligence, assuring the people receive the attention that they need, and that the priest on duty is contacted immediately, when there is a medical or life and death emergency requiring a priest, and the request for the Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick. In the spirit of collegiality, assist the Pastor and staff in any ways needed.

Qualifications: High School diploma and 5 years’ clerical experience in a customer-service environment. Non-profit helpful. Preferred: Bachelor degree with 2 years of office experience. Ability to maintain confidentiality concerning files and sensitive information. Must demonstrate a positive, welcoming and service-oriented disposition. Must have knowledge of basic tenets of Catholic Church and parish structures. Must be supportive and respectful of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church; experience in Roman Catholic environment preferred. Good oral and written English-language communication skills, including clear speaking voice. Good Creole and Spanish communication skills strongly preferred. Type at least 60 wpm with 90% accuracy. Good spelling and grammar required. Proficiency in MS Outlook, Word, and Excel; Web editing software and Adobe PDFMaker a plus. Good computer literacy, including ability to navigate online applications and knowledge of search-engine-optimization best practices. Excellent customer service skills, including ability to maintain focus on and professionalism with people in challenging situations, both in person and by phone. Demonstrated history of maintaining strict confidentiality. Must be able to multi-task and retain accuracy in an environment of competing deadlines. Must have a professional demeanor. Good time management, including ability to manage several projects at the same time. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to

[email protected]

Subject line should read: Receptionist / Coordinator of COTLF Charities – Church of the Little Flower, Coral Gables. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Physics Teacher – Immaculata La Salle High School Immaculata - La Salle High School in Miami is seeking to hire a qualified and experienced full time Physics teacher. This teacher is expected to plan, organize, and implement an appropriate instructional program for Physics. The Physics teacher performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision, and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami.

Qualifications: Bachelor’s Degree in Physics or Engineering, and/or related field with experience in teaching at a high school level. Florida DOE Teaching Certification in Physics 6-12 preferred. Knowledge and skill in use of instructional technology, including iPads, in the classroom. Excellent oral and written English -language communication skills, including clear speaking voice. Excellent presentation skills. Must have good classroom management and demonstrated ability to engage students. Must have a professional demeanor. Must have knowledge of tenets of Catholic Church. Must be fully committed, supportive and respectful of the mission, teachings and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church. ADOM Catechist Certification preferred. To apply: Interested and qualified candidates are asked to submit electronically a letter of introduction addressing the requirements/skills listed above, a resume, and the names, addresses, telephone numbers, and email addresses of three professional references to position desired in the e-mail subject line.

[email protected] Please indicate

Subject line should read: Physics Teacher – Immaculata- La Salle High School NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Property Manager - St. Mark Catholic Church and School St. Mark Catholic Church and School in Southwest Ranches (Broward), Florida has an opening for a Property Manager. This person is responsible for planning, directing and/or coordinating the operations, maintenance, administration, improvement, traffic and security of the grounds, facilities, and related equipment of all properties of St. Mark Catholic Church and School. These properties consist of the church, school, parish office, rectories and priest’s residence. Responsibilities include basic building, repair, and installation tasks in carpentry, plumbing, painting, mechanical repairs, structural repairs, lighting, heating and ventilation, setup and breakdown for events, and limited assistance in A/C and electrical functions. This position also supervises maintenance and custodial staff as well as volunteers for the completion of custodial tasks. Responsibilities also include emergency plans and systems to ensure continuity of parish and school activities in the event of interruptions in facility operations or natural or man-made disasters. The Property Manager performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami.

Qualifications: High-school diploma or G.E.D and ten years’ related experience and/or training; or equivalent combination of education and experience. Technical or trade school coursework in building technology and/or HVAC preferred. Experience in roofing, painting, and construction. Experience in risk management preferred. Valid FL driver license and automobile insurance; good driving record. Universal Certification a plus. Basic PC skills, including ability to navigate the Windows OS, enter data into system and perform e-mail functions in MS Outlook, required. Ability to read and understand blueprints, Hazard Communication labels and safety warnings. Good oral and written English-language communication skills. Good Spanish- and/or Haitian Creole-language spoken communication skills a plus. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to:

[email protected]

Property Manager / St. John Bosco Catholic Church St. John Bosco Catholic Church in East Little Havana, Florida has an opening for a Property Manager. This person is responsible for planning, directing and/or coordinating the operations, maintenance, administration, improvement, traffic and security of the grounds, facilities, and related equipment of all properties of St. John Bosco Catholic Church. These properties consist of the church, parish office, parish halls, and the priests’ residence. Responsibilities include basic building, repair, and installation tasks in carpentry, plumbing, painting, mechanical repairs, structural repairs, lighting, heating and ventilation, setup and breakdown for events, and limited assistance in A/C and electrical functions. This position also supervises maintenance and custodial staff as well as volunteers for the completion of custodial tasks. Responsibilities also include emergency plans and systems to ensure continuity of parish and school activities in the event of interruptions in facility operations or natural or man-made disasters. The Property Manager performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami.

Qualifications: High-school diploma or G.E.D and ten years’ related experience and/or training; or equivalent combination of education and experience. Technical or trade school coursework in building technology and/or HVAC preferred. Experience in risk management required. Valid FL driver license and automobile insurance; good driving record. Universal Certification a plus. Basic PC skills, including ability to navigate the Windows OS, enter data into system and perform e-mail functions in MS Outlook, required. Ability to read and understand blueprints, MSDS, Hazard Communication labels and safety warnings. Good oral and written English-language communication skills. Good Spanish- and/or Haitian Creole-language spoken communication skills strongly preferred. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to

[email protected]

Position open until filled. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Receptionist (Part-Time) – St. Mary Cathedral St. Mary Cathedral has an immediate opening for a Receptionist (Part-time) who will be responsible for providing first-point-of-contact customer service for general inquiries and visitors to the parish office, maintaining a welcoming environment to the cathedral. Primary duties are operating the main switchboard and greeting visitors and callers, assessing their needs, and directing them to the appropriate parties. Stationed at the front desk, the Receptionist receives and directs both walk-in and scheduled visitors. As a member of the cathedral administration office, this employee assists in other clerical and/or administrative task of the office as needed, particularly in the area of composing correspondence, entering and maintaining sacramental and other records, answering requests for information, coordinating calendar events, and other office administrative tasks. The receptionist performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami. Schedule: Monday – Friday 2:00 p.m. – 4:30p.m.and Saturday 9:00a.m. – 12:00p.m.

Responsibilities: Provide exemplary customer service to visitors, parishioners, employees and others who contact the parish by phone, in person, and by e-mail; assess their needs and direct them to the appropriate parties. Develop a sense of hospitality and professionalism with an open-door mannerism in order to facilitate the renewal of parish structures and methods. Provide callers and visitors answers to basic questions on operations, office locations and schedules, or document their concerns for escalation to the appropriate party. Operate switchboard to relay incoming, outgoing, and interoffice calls. Maintain order in visitor waiting / reception area. Perform clerical duties such as data input; preparing mailings; accepting and distributing packages. Learn basic terminology and titles of personnel in the Roman Catholic Church, especially in relation to hierarchical structure, in order to effectively relay messages and policies. Maintain contact information for re-direction to parties outside of the Parish (i.e., Catholic Charities for people seeking immediate direct services, etc.) Assist with St. Mary Cathedral office tasks as assigned with confidentiality and discretion, demonstrating excellent internal and external customer service.

Qualifications: High school diploma and 5 years’ clerical experience in a customer-service environment. Non-profit helpful. Ability to maintain confidentiality concerning files and sensitive information. Must demonstrate a positive, welcoming and service-oriented disposition. Must have knowledge of basic tenets of Catholic Church and parish structures. Must be supportive and respectful of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church; experience in Roman Catholic environment preferred. Good oral and written English-language communication skills, including clear speaking voice. Good Creole and Spanish communication skills strongly preferred. Type at least 60 wpm with 90% accuracy. Good spelling and grammar required. Proficiency in MS Outlook, Word, and Excel; Web editing software and Adobe PDFMaker a plus. Good computer literacy, including ability to navigate online applications and knowledge of search-engine-optimization best practices. Excellent customer service skills, including ability to maintain focus on and professionalism with people in challenging situations, both in person and by phone. Demonstrated history of maintaining strict confidentiality. Must be able to multi-task and retain accuracy in an environment of competing deadlines. Must have a professional demeanor. Good time management, including ability to manage several projects at the same time. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to

[email protected]

Subject line should read: Receptionist (PT) – St. Mary Cathedral. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Receptionist/Administrative Assistant – St. Pius X Church St. Pius X Church in Fort Lauderdale has an immediate opening for a Receptionist/Administrative Assistant, providing first-point-of-contact customer service for general inquiries and visitors to the parish office, maintaining a welcoming environment to the parish. Primary duties are: operating the main switchboard and greeting visitors and callers, assessing their needs, and directing them to the appropriate parties. Stationed at the front desk, the Receptionist/Administrative Assistant receives and directs both walk-in and scheduled visitors. As a member of the parish administration office, this employee assists in other clerical and/or administrative tasks of the office as needed, particularly in the area of composing correspondence, entering and maintaining sacramental and other records, answering requests for information, coordinating calendar events, and other office administrative tasks. The Parish Receptionist/Administrative Assistant performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami. Schedule: 30 hours / week, Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Qualifications: Bachelor degree preferred; at least 2 years of office experience. Experience in a Roman Catholic environment preferred. Good oral and written English-language communication skills, including clear speaking voice required. Ability to maintain confidentiality concerning files and sensitive information. Must demonstrate a positive, welcoming and service-oriented disposition. Knowledge of basic tenets of Catholic Church. Proficiency in MS Outlook, Word, and Excel; Web editing software and Adobe PDFMaker a plus. Good computer literacy, including ability to navigate search engines effectively in order to locate information for callers. Type at least 60 wpm with 90% accuracy. Good spelling and grammar required. Excellent customer service skills, including ability to maintain focus on and professionalism with people in challenging situations, both in person and by phone. Must be able to multi-task and retain accuracy in an environment of competing deadlines. Must be supportive of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church. Must have a professional demeanor. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to

[email protected]

Subject line should read : St. Pius X Church - Receptionist/Administrative Assistant. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Full-Time Receptionist/Administrative Assistant – St. Mark Catholic Church St. Mark Catholic Church in Southwest Ranches has an immediate opening for a full-time Receptionist/Administrative Assistant providing first-point-of-contact customer service for general inquiries and visitors to the parish office, maintaining a welcoming environment to the parish. Primary duties are: operating the main switchboard and greeting visitors and callers, assessing their needs, and directing them to the appropriate parties. Stationed at the front desk, the Receptionist/Administrative Assistant receives and directs both walk-in and scheduled visitors. As a member of the parish administration office, this employee assists in other clerical and/or administrative tasks of the office as needed, particularly in the area of composing correspondence, entering and maintaining sacramental and other records, answering requests for information, coordinating calendar events, and other office administrative tasks. The Parish Receptionist / Administrative Assistant performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami.

Qualifications: High School diploma or GED and one-year administrative experience in a customer-service environment. Some switchboard experience required. Post-secondary College or business-school education and one-year switchboard experience in a customer-service environment preferred. Experience in a Roman Catholic environment preferred. Good oral and written English-language communication skills, including clear speaking voice required. Good Spanish-language spoken communication skills required. Ability to maintain confidentiality concerning files and sensitive information. Must demonstrate a positive, welcoming and service-oriented disposition. Knowledge of basic tenets of the Catholic Church. Proficiency in MS Outlook, including calendar function. Basic word processing skills in MS Word. Good computer literacy, including ability to navigate search engines effectively in order to locate information for callers. Type at least 35 wpm with 90% accuracy. Good spelling and grammar required. Excellent customer service skills, including ability to maintain focus on and professionalism with people in challenging situations, both in person and by phone. Must be able to multi-task and retain accuracy in an environment of competing deadlines. Must be supportive of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church. Must have a professional demeanor. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to

[email protected]

Subject line should read: St. Mark Receptionist/Administrative Assistant. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

STU IMPACT Program Manager - St. Thomas University Immediate Supervisor: STU IMPACT Faculty Project Director. Department: School of Theology and Ministry. Length of Position: October 2017 to September 2018. Status: Part-time, 20 to 30 hours a month with more time involved in May and June; full time during the eight days of the intensive high school summer theology institute. Salary: $15/hour (no benefits).

Major Functions and Responsibilities: The STU IMPACT Program Manager will administer, maintain, and develop the high school youth theology institute at St. Thomas University – STU IMPACT. This includes the coordination of recruitment, training, evaluation, and development of young adult ministry counselors/mentors. The program manager must be well-formed in the theology and spirituality of the Catholic faith, and be passionate about sharing his/her enthusiasm with young people.

Qualifications: 3 – 5 years of parish or school based ministry with young people, and supervisory experience. Demonstrated knowledge of adolescent human and faith development and youth culture. Competence in Microsoft Office Applications (Word, Excel, Publisher, PowerPoint, Outlook) and fluency in the use of social media tools (Facebook, Twitter, etc.). Excellent communication skills: written, verbal, and interpersonal. Ability to work in a team environment and to work well with youth, parents, staff, volunteers, supervisors/directors. Must have initiative, creativity, sensitivity to the needs of people, and sound judgement regarding individual and program needs. Organizational skills in time management, delegation, short term and long term planning, financial management, and budgeting. Prior experience organizing and implementing youth events and trips. Ability to multi-task, and work independently with minimal supervision. Availability to work nights and weekends, as required. Must complete a thorough background check and present a Virtus certificate.

Highlighted Specific Duties: Oversee aspects of STU IMPACT program. Coordinate staff recruitment efforts and selection, supervise STU IMPACT Staff. Assist with recruitment, application, selection process, and registration of youth participants. Coordinate community immersion trips and on-campus events. Collaborate with STU IMPACT partners for training, program implementation, marketing, etc. Coordinate counselor/mentor meetings before, during, and after the summer institute. Follow up with participants in the implementation of justice-service program. Plan, organize, and promote fall service project and mid-year convocation. Assist with outreach to local partners including local congregations. To apply: Applicants should submit a cover letter, resume, and two letters of reference via email to:

[email protected]

Temporary Junior Accountant - Office of Finance (Pastoral Center) The Archdiocese of Miami, Office of Finance has an immediate opening for a temporary full-time Junior Accountant. The temporary Junior Accountant is responsible for performing a variety of standard, technical accounting functions in the Finance Office with a primary responsibility of providing bookkeeping and payroll services to Archdiocesan entities, accounting support to parishes, preparing reports, and other. The responsibilities of the Accountant include review of source documents used for accounting, maintenance of ledgers, registers and other records of initial entry, the maintenance of control accounts and preparation of periodic and special financial reports. The Accountant maintains fiscal records applying professional accounting principles and methods. Although some independent judgment is used in the application of accounting techniques, the development or modification of procedures is subject to approval of manager. The Accountant performs all duties and responsibilities in alignment with the mission, vision and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami.

Qualifications: Required: Bachelor degree in Accounting or related field, with 3 years of professional-level experience. Must be supportive of the mission and tenets of the Roman Catholic Church; experience in a Roman Catholic environment a plus. Good oral and written English-language communication skills, including clear speaking voice. Good Spanish-language spoken communication skills strongly preferred. Knowledge of General Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and accounting practices. Knowledge of principles and practices on non-for profit accounting a plus. Knowledge of accounts receivable and general ledger. Ability to maintain a high level of accuracy in preparing and entering financial information. Experience in modern office procedures and practices, including record keeping and data security methods and techniques. Proficiency in MS Outlook, Word, and Advance Excel, including ability to navigate online applications and search engines effectively. Excellent customer service skills, including ability to maintain focus on and professionalism with people in challenging situations, both in person and by phone. Good time management, including ability to manage several projects at the same time. Ability to multi-task and retain accuracy in an environment of competing deadlines. Demonstrated history of maintaining strict confidentiality concerning financial and contributors files. Demonstrated professional demeanor. To apply: Send resume with cover letter to

[email protected]

Subject line should read: Temporary Junior Accountant – Pastoral Center Position open until filled. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Pre-School Director – Christ the King Pre-School Christ the King Pre-School, in Miami, Florida has an immediate opening for an experienced Director with a passion for the early childhood development and Catholic faith formation of young children. The Pre-School Director is responsible for ensuring the health, safety, and quality of education for all children within the center’s care. This position reports to the pastor of Christ the King Catholic Church and is directly accountable for overall operational management in accordance with well-established guidelines, including curriculum development, staff and facilities management, legal and budgetary considerations, and long-range planning. The Pre-School Director must be supportive and respectful of the mission, vision and values of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami.

Key Responsibilities Maintain a vision for quality for the center. Manage adherence to quality standards in accordance with the vision and with state and local requirements. Maintain quality effectiveness measurements. Continue implementation of High/Scope curriculum in collaboration with the Curriculum Coordinator. Lead weekly teacher meetings (informative and motivational). Manage adherence to state and local regulations. Maintain student records in accordance with established enrollment procedures and guidelines. Maintain communications with parents of current and prospective students through direct conversation, newsletters and parent handbook; implement community outreach activities to maintain and promote positive community relationships. Maintain positive relationships with regulatory agencies; ensure legal and financial compliance. Maintain positive relationships with the parents and families. Ensure that each family who inquires information about the schools, schedules a tour. Oversee all office functions including payroll, accounts payable and receivable, tuition billing and payment, human resources, staff and purchasing. Resolve conflicts including corrective action when necessary to ensure a positive experience for everyone. Manage budget planning and review. Establish illness and emergency procedures; ensures staff is trained appropriately. Implement a strategic plan and goals in keeping with the mission of program. Maintain a personal professional development plan to ensure continuous quality improvement.

Qualifications Required: Bachelor’s Degree in early childhood education or related field of study. Three years’ Pre-school Director experience. 5 years of direct professional experience in an early childhood setting. Advanced Director Credential from the Florida Department of Children & Families Child Care Services. Knowledge and experience with DCF rules, regulations and inspections. Must be supportive of the mission, vision and values of the Catholic Church of the Archdiocese of Miami. Three years’ experience teaching part-time or full-time in program for Pre-school Children. Experience in the development and implementation with Creative Curriculum. Experience with leadership and management. Experience in customer service and building professional relationships with parents. Strong oral and written English communications skills; technology skills. Strong oral Spanish-language communication skills preferred. Proficiency in MS Outlook, Word, and Excel. PowerPoint a plus. Ability to work well with others (staff, children, and parents) and to foster a team environment. A strong understanding of child development. Strong finance and budgeting skills. Excellent leadership, organizational, and interpersonal skills. Infant/child CPR and First Aid certification. Must have a professional demeanor. Must clear full background check. Must meet health requirements indicated by DCF / NAEYC. To apply: Interested and qualified candidates are asked to submit electronically a letter of introduction addressing the requirements/skills listed above, a resume, and the names, addresses, telephone numbers, and email addresses of three professional references to

[email protected]

NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

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Picture: Archdiocese Archive John Noonan

Miami 's ninth auxiliary bishop is Irish by birth but Floridian by choice. He cooks dinners for his fellow priests every Sunday afternoon. He is a jokester who likes playing pranks on people. Friends and co-workers also describe Bishop John Noonan as a "priest's priest," a wise man with strong principles, gentle ways and total dedication to service. "There's no guile in him," said Father Bob Vallee, who teaches philosophy at St. John Vianney College Seminary in Miami , where Bishop Noonan served as rector since 1996. "His whole life is characterized by great, great gentleness. Even when he's mad, he's gentle." Father Vallee and Bishop Noonan have worked together for eight years. "He's the best boss I've ever worked for. He's a very wise man. He has strong principles," Father Vallee said. "He's a man dedicated to service. He's always serving," said Father Sean O'Sullivan, a retired archdiocesan priest whose family is friends with the Noonans in Ireland . One illustration of Bishop Noonan's dedication to service, according to Father O'Sullivan, are the Sunday dinners he hosts for his fellow priests. The dinners are held at St. Rose of Lima Parish in Miami Shores and are open to any priest who wants to drop by. Bishop Noonan often does the cooking. It would be easy to connect those meals with Bishop Noonan's role as director of the Ministry to Priests in the archdiocese. But the fact is the meals began long before he took on the role. His mother started the tradition around the time he was ordained in 1983. "My mother said that priests should enjoy themselves Sunday nights" after they're done for the weekend, Bishop Noonan explained. She also thought they should do so in a casual atmosphere, not in a restaurant. When she died in 1995, Bishop Noonan carried on. At the seminary, he began a similar tradition, cooking Monday nights for the faculty. "He's approachable, caring and a hard worker, which we really need now," said Father Bob Tywoniak, pastor of Blessed Sacrament Parish in Fort Lauderdale and a classmate of the bishop. He remembers Bishop Noonan as a rather fun-loving seminarian. According to Father Vallee, Bishop Noonan is still "very energetic, very spirited. He loves pranks and jokes." "Therefore no seminarians can put one over on him," said Father Tywoniak. "He has an Irish sense of humor and they get him back," said Barbara Reitberg, academic dean at St. John Vianney, recounting how the seminarians literally filled Bishop Noonan's room with balloons on his last birthday. "He's the heart of the seminary," she said. "He's wonderful. The seminarians have great respect for him. He's fatherly. He's fair. He's really interested in their welfare as priests in formation. He's a real gentleman." Bishop Noonan compared his role at the seminary to that of a parent. "They (seminarians) have challenged me. They are like my children. If you know what it's like to have teenagers, you know how that can be," he said, adding that being seminary rector has been his favorite assignment as a priest. "I didn't plan my life to become a bishop. I was having too much fun enjoying my priesthood," he said after his appointment was announced June 21, 2005 . He then recalled something his mother told him soon after he was ordained: "'If you want to be a good priest, you better take care of the people.' I kind of live my life that way." Archbishop John C. Favalora appointed Bishop Noonan as executive director of the Ministry to Persons, which includes priests, deacons, religious, vocations, associations of Christian faithful, and ministries to professional groups such as attorneys, doctors and policemen. Under the leadership of Archbishop Thomas Wenski Bishop Noonan was appointed Vicar General alog with Bishop Estevez. He remained in that position until assuming his new role as Bishop of the Diocese of Orlando on December 16, 2010.

Biography Auxiliary Bishop John Noonan Bishop Noonan Biography (08:14) September 5, 2005 This video component is not supported in this browser. Please update your browser.

Born: Limerick , Ireland , Feb. 26, 1951 Father: John Noonan (deceased April 1, 1962 ) Mother: Margaret Purcell (deceased Oct. 13, 1995 )

Ordained: To the priesthood, Sept. 23, 1983, for the Archdiocese of Miami, at St. Paul of the Cross Church, North Palm Beach Appointed chaplain to His Holiness, with the title of Monsignor, Oct. 22, 2001 Named Auxiliary Bishop of Miami, June 21, 2005 Ordained to the episcopacy, Aug. 24, 2005, Cathedral of St. Mary, Miami Appointed Bishop of Orlando, October 23, 2010 Installation as Bishop of Orlando, December 16, 2010

Education: Bachelor of Arts, St. John Vianney College Seminary, Miami (1977-1979) Master of Divinity, St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary, Boynton Beach, Fla. (1979-1983) Master of Education, Boston College, Boston, Mass. (1993-1996) Languages spoken, understood: Spanish

Priestly Ministry: Parochial vicar, St. Elizabeth of Hungary, Pompano Beach (1983-1989) Chaplain, Youth Ministry, Broward County (1985-1987) Dean of Men, St. John Vianney College Seminary (1989-1993) In residence, St. Rose of Lima, Miami Shores (1993-1994) Supervising principal, Msgr. Edward Pace High School, Miami Gardens (1993-1994) Supervising principal, St. Brendan High School, Miami (1994-1996) Rector/President, St. John Vianney College Seminary (1996- 2005) Director, Priestly Life and Ministry (2001-2010)

Archdiocesan Appointments: Vocation Board (1985-1987) Archdiocesan Pre Cana Committee (1990-1992) Archdiocesan Marriage Preparation Board (1990-1992) Vocation Acceptance Committee Board (1997-Present) Advisory Board Diaconate Program Archdiocese of Miami (1997- 2010) Ministry to Priests Archdiocese of Miami (2001- 2010) Personnel Board of Archdiocese of Miami (2001- 2010) Board of National Association of College Rectors (1998-1999) Vicar for Religious (2008 – 2010) Vicar General (2010)

Episcopal Motto: "God before me and God with me" from the Breastplate of St. Patrick



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CONTACT INFO Editor

Emilio de Armas [email protected] Production Manager

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Rocío Granados 305-762-1130 305-751-6227 [email protected] Advertising

Maritza Álvarez 305-979-9603 [email protected] Media Kit La Voz /Rates

REFERENCES STU Archives

LA VOZ CATÓLICA 2017 Publication deadlines 2018 Publication deadlines

La Voz Católica was the Spanish-language newspaper of the Archdiocese of Miami from 1958 to April 2009. It resumed publication with a limited distribution to predominantly Spanish-speaking parishes in September 2013. See links to recent editions below. La Voz began as two-pages in Spanish within the English-language "The Voice," expanded to four pages, and in 1982 was launched as a stand-alone newspaper, distributed monthly in the parishes, in Hispanic markets and storefronts, and by subscription. At one point, from 2003-2005, it also was inserted every first Sunday in El Nuevo Herald. Its circulation reached 160,000 in Miami-Dade, Broward and Monroe counties. La Voz Católica ceased publication in April 2009 due to archdiocesan budget cuts but many of its issues have been preserved on the Web and in the archives of St. Thomas University. The current circulation is 7,000 copies distributed in more than 80 archdiocesan parishes. Click here to read the editor's inaugural column for La Voz Católica, second generation>>

Groups Chivalric Orders Professional Groups CONTACT INFO Spiritual Director

Father Guillermo García-Tuñón, SJ Lay Coordinator

Erik M. Vieira Juan Pablo II Retreat House 720 NE 27 St Miami, FL 33137 305-576-2748 [email protected] www.acumundi.org www.estovir.org

Agrupación Católica Universitaria The Agrupación Católica Universitaria (ACU) is a Marian Sodality within the Jesuit Christian Life Communities. The ACU is composed of professional Catholic men, fomed within the molds of the Society of Jesus, whose goal is to live a life in Christ based on the principles established in the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignacious of Loyola.

CONTACT INFO Spiritual Director

Deacon Rafael De Los Reyes 305-267-9061 305-264-9287 [email protected]… divinamisericordiamiami.org Casa de Oración

2300 SW 67 Ave, Miami, FL 33155 Horario/hours: Monday-Saturday: 9:30am -3:30pm Sundays 2-4 pm

Apostolate of the Divine Mercy/ Apostolado de la Divina Misericordia The Apostolate of the Divine Mercy (Apostolado de la Divina Misericordia) is dedicated to promoting the message of Jesus, Divine Mercy of the Father. The essence of the message is trust in God and the works of mercy. Prayer groups dedicated to deepening their understanding of the message of our Lord to Saint Faustina are promoted throughout the Archdiocese of Miami. El Apostolado de la Divina Misericordia se dedica a propagar y promover el mensaje de Jesús, Divina Misericordia del Padre. La esencia del mensaje es la Confianza en Dios y las Obras de Misericordia. Nuestra misión incluye promover la creación de grupos en la Casa de Oración y en las parroquiasque se dediquen a profundizar su entendimiento del mensaje de Jesús a Santa Faustina. Programación radial por Internet:

www.divinamisericordiamiami.org

CONTACT INFO Spiritual Director

Father José Espino Father Francisco Hernández Lay Coordinators

Frank Díaz Serafin Sarduy Ricardo López 305-300-3880 305-332-0829 [email protected] www.caballeroscatolicos.org

Caballeros Católicos Men who love and respect the moral and Christian traditions of the Catholic faith. They assist parishes through their volunteer work helping the Pastor in his pastoral efforts.

CONTACT INFO Spiritual Director

Father Rafael Capó, Sch.P. 305-226-4664 [email protected] www.caminodelmatrimonio.org

Camino del Matrimonio "On the way" to marriage: preparation weekend retreat for couples who will be getting married within the Church. (In Spanish)

CONTACT INFO Coordinator

Gabriela Marting 9737 NW 41 St., Suite 278 Miami, Florida 33178 305-951-7531 [email protected] www.facebook.com/castosporamo… Centro San Jose

8181 NW 36 St., Suite 14C Doral, Florida 33166 Línea de consejería: 305-316-4934

Castos por Amor / Chaste for Love Castos Por Amor es un movimiento apostólico de la Arquidiócesis de Miami que comunica la Buena Noticia en una nueva evangelización de auténtico compromiso apostólico "proclamando el evangelio de la castidad". Aporta una pastoral sobre la sexualidad humana basada en el Magisterio de la Santa Madre Iglesia a través de apostolados de educación, prevención y recuperación. Da herramientas y educación para llevar la castidad como virtud en todos los estados de vida, solteros, consagrados y casados. Las enseñanzas y catequesis incluyen pero no limita a: programa radial "Creciendo en el Amor" por EWTN Radio Católica Mundial, talleres, misiones parroquiales, congresos y el retiro Libres Para Amar, basado en la Teología del Cuerpo del beato Juan Pablo II, para mayores de 18 años, hombres, mujeres, solteros y casados. La prevención y recuperación se realiza a través de la consejería clínica cristiana católica de su apostolado Misión San José CCC y grupos de apoyo para hombres ("Grupo de apoyo San José") y para mujeres ("Mujer, llena de gracia") para vivir y recuperar la sexualidad integrada.

CONTACT INFO Spiritual Director English

Father John Fink Lay Coordinators

Emery (Jim) Horvath Mary Horvath 954-961-1856 954-961-3662 [email protected] www.miamiccr.com Haitian Charismatic Renewal Lay Coordinator

Jessie Francois [email protected] Hispanic Charismatic Renewal Spiritual Director

Father Armando Tolosa Coordinator

Concepción (Conchita) Gonzalez 500 NW 22 Ave Miami, FL 33125 305-631-1007 305-642-0006 [email protected] www.rcchmiami.us

Charismatic Renewal The mission of the Catholic Charismatic Renewal is to foster the dynamic grace of baptism in the Holy Spirit (Acts 1:5) which empowered the members of the early Church at Pentecost. This mission is accomplished by offering Life in the Spirit seminars, and proclaiming the Lordship of Jesus Christ and the love of the Father as manifested and experienced in the power and charisms of the Holy Spirit. The goal is to foster a renewal of the grace and culture of Pentecost and encourage the awareness and the experience of the full role of the Holy Spirit among Catholic Charismatic Renewal groups and ministries.

CONTACT INFO Miami Coordinator

Dr. Luis Raez, M.D. [email protected] www.clmusa.org

Christian Life Movement The Christian Life Movement in an International Private Association of the Faithful by Pontifical Right. Its members are clergy, people in newly consecrated forms and the laity in general. Men and women, singly or organized in communities, or other forms of association are part of the Christian Life Movement. They all have the aim of living and developing Christian life in their lives, the society, the world.

CONTACT INFO Spiritual Director

Father Marcelino Garcia, SSJ Coordinator

Ady Viera Villa Javier 12725 SW 6th St Miami, FL 33184

Comunidad de Vida Cristiana Regina Mundi (CVX) It is an Ignatian community of apostolic life. Their patron is St. Francis Xavier. Its members are lay men and women who desire to follow Christ closely and work in the construction of His kingdom. The spiritual exercises of St. Ignatius are the specific fountain and instrument of their spirituality.

CONTACT INFO Director Provincial

Francisco A. Rodríguez 3100 NW 77th Ct Miami, FL 33122 305-599-1343 305-599-1829 [email protected] www.cscvmiami.org

Comunidad Siervos de Cristo Vivo La Comunidad Siervos de Cristo Vivo es una unión de personas laicas, católicas, apostólicas y romanas (Can. 298), que viviendo en el mundo y acogiéndose al derecho que la Iglesia le concede (Can. 299), se han asociado para formar una comunidad carismática y evangelizadora, no necesariamente viviendo bajo el mismo techo. La Comunidad tiene un llamado con tres vocaciones fundamentales: a la vida contemplativa, a la vida evangelizadora, a la transformación en Cristo. En nuestra Casa de Oración ofrecemos: retiros, cursos y talleres (Escuela de Evangelización), seminarios, programas de radio y televisión (Lumen 2000), casa de retiro, acogida espiritual (oración de intercesión, teléfono de oración, consejería, etc.), librería y grupos de oración para adultos, jóvenes, jóvenes adultos y niños. Los Siervos de Cristo Vivo visitan constantemente a Jesús para adorarle, para estar con Él y así ser transformados por Él.

CONTACT INFO English Spiritual Director

Deacon Robert Binder St John Neuma… Lay Coordinator

Clarinda Gill [email protected] www.cursillomiami.org Spanish Spiritual Director

Father Jose Santiago Matheu [email protected] Lay Coordinator

Eduardo de Varona Casa Emaús 305-235-7160 305-235-7392 [email protected] www.cursillos.org

Cursillo Movement / (Cursillos de Cristiandad) The Cursillo Movement is a movement of the Roman Catholic Church ministering worldwide and having the same apostolic purpose as the Church herself, evangelization. The Cursillo, by means of its own method, makes it possible for Catholic people to live what is fundamental for being a Christian, and to live it in community. It helps people discover and fulfill their personal vocations and it promotes the creation of core groups of Christians in all walks of life. They, in turn, leaven their environments with the Gospel of Jesus Christ, fulfilling their baptismal responsibility.

CONTACT INFO Coordinator

Myrna Gallagher 305-273-7650 Spanish

Judith Pasos 786-258-3654 [email protected]

Emmaus Experience / Experiencia Emaús Parish retreats for both men and women separately. This is a retreat for all those who wish to experience God, renew and deepen their relationship with the Lord; this is a time for personal growth. The retreat is based on the Gospel passage of Luke 24: 13-35 (the apparition of Jesus to the Disciple of Emmaus.)

CONTACT INFO Spiritual Coordinator

Sister Nelly Rodriguez Coordinator

Adela Simán 9779 SW 72nd St Miami, FL 33173 305-412-1700 305-412-1777 [email protected] www.fcpeace.com

Florida Center for Peace/ Centro por la Paz The Florida Center for Peace is an organization dedicated to the propogation of the evangelical message of love, good will, prayer and conversion through two ministires: evangelization and prayer groups of adults and children. These incorporate a special devotion to Our Lady, the Queen of Peace.

CONTACT INFO Coordinators

Martin Alfaro Mercedes Mont 305-798-2359 305-412-1777 [email protected] www.focolare.org

Focolare Movement The message of the Focolare is not a complicated one; its spirituality is drawn straight from the Gospel. For 2,000 years, Jesus has asked his followers to give God the first place in their lives. He desires the fulfillment of His New Commandment: "Love one another as I have loved you" (Jn 13:34 ). It is not great works that characterize Christians, nor knowledge, miracles or mystical phenomena. If we love one another, then the world will believe. (Chiara Lubich, Founder).

CONTACT INFO Superior for the USA

Fr. Mario Beccar Varela, E.P. Third Order Coordinators

Mr. Rene Garcia (786) 344-7363 Mr. Pedro Casanova (305) 710-5687 Casa Nuestra Señora de Nazaret 13611 SW 75 St Miami, Florida 33183 (786) 353-2157 [email protected]… www.heraldsusa.org www.facebook.com/HeraldsUSA

Heraldos del Evangelio / Heralds of the Gospel Heralds of the Gospel is an International Private Association of Christ's Faithful of Pontifical Right, approved by Pope Saint John Paul II, through a decree issued by the Pontifical Council of the Laity on the Feast of the Chair of St. Peter, February 22, 2001. It was founded by Monsignor João Scognamiglio Clá Dias, E.P., an honorary canon of the Papal Basilica of Saint Mary Major in Rome. Active in over seventy countries in the Americas, Europe, Africa and Asia, the Heralds are committed to the New Evangelization. This broad apostolate includes disseminating the call for conversion and penance asked by Our Lady at Fatima and promoting devotion to the Most Holy Rosary. They can frequently be seen in churches, schools, homes and other public and private venues carrying out ceremonial crownings of the statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Two societies of apostolic life have arisen from within the Heralds of the Gospel. The Clerical Society of Apostolic Life Virgo Flos Carmeli (Virgin Flower of Carmel) is composed of male members who have answered the call to the priesthood. Though primarily ministering to the members of the association, the priests of Virgo Flos Carmeli have also taken on parochial assignments and other duties when requested by diocesan bishops. The second is the Society of Apostolic Life Regina Virginum (Queen of Virgins), which is composed of female members of Heralds of the Gospel who have professed the evangelical counsels and live as religious in community. Both the masculine and feminine branches are characterized by their life in separate communities in which they seek to 'follow Christ with greater freedom and imitate Him more closely' (Perfectae Caritatis 1) in order to better devote their lives to the service of the Church. From a desire expressed by so many individuals in different places throughout the world, another institution arose within the Heralds of the Gospel. The "Companions" consists of married or single individuals, living in the secular world, who, while faithfully fulfilling the obligations and duties proper to their vocation and state in life, undertake to live in conformity with the charism and spirituality of the association by dedicating their free time to carrying on its apostolate and assuming certain spiritual obligations.

CONTACT INFO Spiritual Director

Father Jorge L. Rodríguez de la Viuda Pastor, St. Timothy, Miami 305-274-8224 [email protected]

Hermandad El Señor de los Milagros/ The Lord of Miracles Peruvians and faithful from other nationalities residing in the Archdiocese of Miami have brought this tradition to our local Church and the different parishes where the spirituality and devotion to the Lord continues with the celebration of Masses and processions.

CONTACT INFO Regional Director

Victor Gonzalez 954-937-2242 [email protected] www.floridakofc.org www.kofc.org Archdiocesan chaplain

Msgr. Gregory Wielunski PR Coordinator

Kevin Kelleher 305-253-4926 [email protected]

Knights of Columbus Knights of Columbus – Caballeros de Colón "The Knights of Columbus is a Catholic men's fraternal benefit society that was formed to render financial aid to members and their families. Mutual aid and assistance are offered to sick, disabled and needy members and their families. Social and intellectual fellowship is promoted among members and their families through educational, charitable, religious, social welfare, war relief and public relief works. The history of the Order shows how the foresight of The Venerable Father Michael J. McGivney, whose cause for sainthood is being investigated by the Vatican, brought about what has become the world's foremost Catholic fraternal benefit society. The Knights of Columbus has grown from several members in one council to more than 14,000 councils and 1.8 million members throughout the United States, Canada, the Philippines, Mexico, Poland, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Panama, the Bahamas, the Virgin Islands, Cuba, Guatemala, Guam, Saipan, Lithuania, Ukraine and South Korea.

CONTACT INFO Coordinator

Nestor Arguello Miami Coordinator

Bill Brown P.O Box 164903 Miami, FL 33116 305-320-1587 [email protected] www.comunidadlnj.org Casa de Misión

12123 SW 114th Place Miami, FL 33176

La Nueva Jerusalén La Nueva Jerusalén Covenant Community is a private association of the faithful since 1987. As a "community of disciples on mission" they proclaim the good news of Christ through direct evangelization and develop and support strong family life and values.

CONTACT INFO Coordinators

John and Beatriz Harriman 305-667-6138 [email protected] http://www.matrimoniosenvictoria…

Matrimonios en Victoria/ Marriages in Victory Matrimonios en Victoria es un movimiento laico católico internacional y un apostolado en la Arquidiócesis de Miami para el enriquecimiento matrimonial. A través de la combinación de retiros en español y en inglés y asambleas semanales de crecimiento espiritual en sus diferentes comunidades, el movimiento busca fortalecer el compromiso de los esposos a medida que descubren el plan de Dios para su matrimonio, ofreciéndoles herramientas a nivel práctico y espiritual. Su principal objetivo es la santificación del matrimonio, célula fundamental de la familia, la Iglesia y la sociedad. La evangelización, la oración y el servicio están en el corazón de MEV/MIV y sus ministerios. Entre estos se encuentra "Niños en Victoria", ofreciéndole formación y crecimiento en la fe a los niños mientras sus padres asisten a las asambleas en su comunidad. También el ministerio de "Mamás en Victoria", mediante conferencias-desayunos mensuales, les brinda a todas las mamás de la Arquidiócesis la educación y herramientas necesarias para cumplir su labor de madres por medio de la Palabra de Dios y la enseñanza de la Iglesia Católica. La pastoral del movimiento también cuenta con el programa radial en vivo, "Hombre y Mujer los Creó", semanalmente a través de la emisora de Radio Paz. Matrimonios en Victoria/Marriages in Victory is a lay Catholic international movement and an apostolate in the Archdiocese of Miami with emphasis on marriage enrichment. Through a combination of retreats both in Spanish and English, and weekly follow-up meetings at its various communities, the movement strives to strengthen the married couple's commitment to growing in their faith and marriage relationship as they discover God's unique plan for their marriage, and to receiving the necessary spiritual and practical tools to achieve this. Its main objective is the sanctification of marriage as the fundamental cell of the family, the Church and society. Evangelization, prayer and service are at the heart of all MEV/MIV its various ministries. Among these, the ministry of "Niños en Victoria" offers faith formation and growth to the children while their parents attend their community meetings. There's also the ministry of "Mamás en Victoria," open to all mothers in the Archdiocese; it provides faith formation and the necessary tools to accomplish their motherhood with the help of the Word of God and Church teachings. The movement also has a weekly radio program, "Hombre y Mujer los Creó," which is aired live by Radio Paz .

CONTACT INFO General

305-510-3163 www.maccw.org Spiritual Moderator

Father Michael Greer President

Sharon Utterback [email protected]

Miami Archdiocesan Council of Catholic Women The goal of the Miami Archdiocesan Council of Catholic Women (MACCW) is to unite all the Catholic women's organizations of the archdiocese in purpose, direction and action in religious, educational, social and economic fields; to stimulate these organizations to greater efficiency and usefulness in meeting the needs of the times; and to give full support to the statements and programs of the United States Bishops Conference and to render them assistance in these efforts. The MACCW is affiliated with the National Council of Catholic Women, which acts through its affiliated organizations to support, empower and educate all Catholic women in spirituality, leadership and service. The national council's programs respond with Gospel values to the needs of the church and society in the modern world.

CONTACT INFO Spiritual Director

Father Raul Angulo Pastor, Mother of Christ Parish 305-510-3163 Coordinators

Loly Verona García [email protected] Olga Henneforth [email protected] 305-553-1543 www.ministeriopmo.org

Ministerio Padres y Madres Orantes Parents filled with the love of God and for the family that have come together through the Eucharist, in a ministry of prayer andintercession for their sons and daughters. Our patroness is Our Lady of Guadalupe.

CONTACT INFO Spiritual Director

Father Alfredo Rolón Lay Coordinator

Luis Rico 954-600-7511 Loly Verona García [email protected] www.elcuartodia.com

Movimiento Juan XXIII They conduct three-day spiritual retreats in Spanish only.

CONTACT INFO Diocesan responsible team

Stefano Benigni Lucia Benigni 305-898-0643 [email protected] www.neocatechumenalway.us

Neocatechumenal Way Since the early years of Christianity, the catechumenate has been the means through which the Church enabled people to acquire an adult faith so that they could receive baptism. The Neocatechumenal Way is an instrument approved by the Holy See that helps baptized people to rediscover the greatness and gifts of their baptism in the midst of a secularized society. This takes place through an itinerary, that by means of the preaching of the Kerygma and the tripod of Christian Life "Word of God-Liturgy-Community", leads people to fraternal communion and mature faith. In 1990, Pope John Paul II recognized the Neocatechumenal Way as "an itinerary of catholic formation valid for our society and for our times," encouraging bishops and priests to "value and support this work for the New Evangelization." At different times and in different ways, also Benedict XVI has addressed the Neocatechumenal Way in order to stress the abundant fruits of Gospel lived in the daily life and the extraordinary missionary zeal that it brings to the life of the lay faithful, to families, to parish communities, and the wealth of vocations it inspires to the priestly and religious life.

CONTACT INFO Spiritual Director

Father Andrés Coucelo 786-265-8774 786-265-7884 Coordinator

Dr. Ariel Duran Mondragón 786-265-9116 786-554-5177 [email protected] www.nuevavida.org

Nueva Vida Nueva Vida (New Life) is a movement to help those who have been affected by substance abuse (addiction) and to help them and their families to heal. The movement holds spiritual retreats for both the family members and the addict. They hold weekly meetings to follow up on their recovery as support groups.

CONTACT INFO Director

Msgr. Oscar F. Castañeda (305) 635-1331

Opus Caritatis Opus Caritatis is presently involved in ministry to the homeless, the elderly and those who need substance abuse recovery. They are committed to work with those suffering from alcohol and drug dependency.

CONTACT INFO Coordinator

Martha Rubatto 305-629-9620 [email protected]

Prayer and Life Workshops / Talleres de Oración Y Vida Prayer and Life Workshops aim to help participants learn about prayer and deepen their prayer life. They are taught how to enter into a personal relationship with the Lord, from the very first step until the heights of contemplation. The result is becoming a friend and disciple of Christ. Talleres de Oración y Vida es un servicio para aprender y profundizar en el arte de orar. Se aprende a entrar en la relación personal con el Señor, desde los primeros pasos hasta las alturas de la contemplación. El resultado es llegar a ser amigos y discípulos del Señor.

CONTACT INFO Delegate / Delegada

Sr. Teresa Rodriguez, FMA Salesian Sisters of St. John Bosco / H… Coordinator / Coordinadora

Dory Anselmi 305-244-6778 [email protected] www.salesian.ning.com www.cooperatori.sdb.org

Salesian Cooperators / Cooperadores Salesianos The Salesian Cooperators are a Public Ecclesiastical Association of the Faithful founded by St. John Bosco, better known as Don Bosco, with guidelines and regulations approved by Pius IX in 1876. The Salesian Cooperators are Catholics who, while living their faith within the framework of their own secular condition, draw their inspiration from Don Bosco's apostolic project, to contribute to the salvation of the young, "that part of human society which is so exposed and yet so rich in promise. The lay cooperators fulfill their commitment and live the Salesian spirit in the normal situations of their life and work, according to their lay state, and spread their values in their environment. Los Cooperadores Salesianos son una Asociación Eclesial Pública de Fieles fundada por San Juan Bosco, comúnmente conocido como Don Bosco, con su propio reglamento, aprobado por Pío IX en 1876. El Cooperador Salesiano es un católico que vive su fe inspirándose, desde su realidad secular, en el proyecto apostólico de Don Bosco, para contribuir a la salvación de la juventud, "la porción más delicada y preciosa de la sociedad humana". Los laicos Cooperadores cumplen con su compromiso y viven el espíritu salesiano en las situaciones normales de la vida y el trabajo, en función de su estado laical, y difunden sus valores en su entorno.

CONTACT INFO Spritual Director

Father Christian Chistiensen Miami Coordinators

Luis Asanza Kathy Asanza 305-248-4800 22800 SW 187th Ave Miami, FL 33170 [email protected] [email protected]

Schoenstatt Apostolic Movement Schoenstatt is a Marian movement founded in Germany on October 18, 1914. It was among the first of the lay communities that emerged in the 20th century in the Catholic Church. The movement emphasizes family life, and has branches to support individuals in their specific stage in life. For example, there are hundreds of Schoenstatt youth groups around the world. The Spanish language movement in Miami offers groups for married couples, women, mothers, children and youths. Casa Schoenstatt also hosts weekly rosaries, Mass, and adoration of the Blessed Sacrament on Saturday mornings. El Circulo de Sión, or Zion's Circle, meets every first Thursday of the month to pray for vocations.

CONTACT INFO Coordinadora Provincial

Dulce C. Zuloaga Coordinador del Norte

Juan Ulises Restrepo Coordinadora del Sur

Ana Lorena Ortiz 305- 746-8465 [email protected]… www.servidoresdelservidor.org

Servidores del Servidor, Hijos di Padre Pio Nuestro carisma es llevar el amor de Jesucristo a las personas más necesitadas, especialmente a los habitantes de la calle, y nuestra espiritualidad es ser fieles a la Santísima Trinidad por medio de nuestra Iglesia Católica.

CONTACT INFO Poveda Center 3400 SW 99 Ave Miami, FL 33165 305-554-0035 [email protected]

Teresian Association An international private lay association dedicated to human development and social transformation through education and culture in the light of the Gospel message.

e of Lay Ministry School of Ministry Fountain of Grace Spanish

Registration deadline for class of 2017-2019 is August 31, 2017. At this time, we have very limited space available in Creole and all Spanish classes and are accepting registrations for English Online classes only. For further information, please contact us at 305-762-1184 or

[email protected]

FORMS Brochure Lay Recommendation Pastor Recommendation Payment Plan Form (2016-18) Payment Plan Form (2017-19) Registration (2017-19)

CONTACT INFO Director

Florángel González Associate Director for Hispanic Formation

Rogelio Zelada, M.A. Office Assistant

Fior Ramirez 9401 Biscayne Boulevard Miami Shores, FL 33138 305-762-1184 305 762-1086 305-762-1298 [email protected]

What is the School of Ministry? The School of Ministry forms lay men and women who desire to grow in their understanding of the Catholic faith and in their ability to serve the Church. Over the course of two years, participants develop knowledge in spirituality, theology, and pastoral ministry. Upon completion of the certificate program, graduates find they are closer to Jesus and are better able to serve in their parish and community.

What is the format of the program? There are two different formats. Choose the format that works best for you. Traditional classroom format is offered in English, Spanish, or Creole. This course meets once a week for two years (summers off). Online program is offered in English or Spanish and incorporates 8 online courses, and in person meetings over a two year period of time.

What type of certificate can I receive at the end? There are 2 different certificate programs within the School of Ministry. Catholic Studies Certificate is available to Catholics interested in learning more about the faith who aren't certain about their call to ministry. Pastoral Ministry Certificate is for people who desire to be commissioned to serve in a specific ministerial area. All participants enjoy connecting with a community of adult believers from parishes throughout the Archdiocese. This leads to rich discussion, and a broader notion of Church.

School of Ministry Requirements: Complete Registration Materials: Registration form, Non-refundable Registration fee ($25 if received by July 31st and $50 if received August 1st and after), two Personal Recommendations (one from pastor and one lay person), and Payment Plan form. Excellent attendance and participation in class or online. One Weekend Overnight Retreat and one Enrichment Day – TBA. Tuition for 2017-2019: Only 20 payments of $28 per person (plus a nonrefundable $100 payment in September 2017) or 20 payments of $51 per couple (plus a non-refundable $200 payment in September 2017).

Candidates for the Pastoral Ministry Certificate will meet the requirements for the School of Ministry and the following: Candidate MUST BE recommended by their pastor. Candidate must be a fully-initiated Catholic. Candidate is required to complete a Ministerial Project during the last six months of their formation. Candidate is willing to serve sponsoring parish for a period of five years and commit to on-going faith formation. Registration forms are due by August 31, 2017. Forms may be accepted after that date depending on availability. Some classes fill quickly. Please register as soon as possible. Download the Registration Form located in the box "Forms" at the top of this page.

ral Info Resources World Events Local Events The following churches in the Archdiocese have a designated Holy Door. In this way, the Jubilee is being celebrated both in Rome and throughout the Archdiocese of Miami as a visible sign of the Church's universal communion. The Cathedral of Saint Mary 7525 NW 2nd Ave., Miami, FL 33150. (305) 759-4531. www.thecathedralofstmary.org/ The Basilica of Saint Mary Star of the Sea 1010 Windsor Lane, Key West, FL 33040. (305) 294-1018. www.stmarykeywest.com/ The National Shrine of Our Lady of Charity 3609 South Miami Avenue, Miami, FL 33133. (305) 854-2404. www.ermitadelacaridad.org Gesu Catholic Church 118 NE 2nd Street, Miami, FL 33132. (305) 379-1424 www.gesuchurch.org Saint Anthony Catholic Church 901 NE 2nd Street, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301. (954) 463-4614. www.saintanthonyfl.org Our Lady of Mercy Catholic Church 5201 N. Military Trail, Deerfield Beach, FL 33064. (954) 421-3246.

Upcoming Events

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h Ministry Young Adult Ministry World Youth Day March for Life Resources Upcoming Events Catholic Scouting CONTACT INFO 305-762-1189 [email protected]

What Is The March For Life? The March for Life is an annual pro-life rally protesting abortion, held in Washington D.C. on the anniversary of the January 22, 1973 U.S. Supreme Court decision in the Roe v. Wade case which legalized abortion for any reason throughout all nine months of pregnancy. The 2015 March for Life occurred on January 22, 2015. Organizers estimated 500,000 attendees. EWTN, the global Catholic television network, broadcasts live from the March for Life every year. The Archdiocese of Miami organizes two trips to the March for Life each year. The Respect Life Office organizes a trip for our Catholic high school students, while the Office of Youth and Young Adult Ministry's group includes both young adults and high school-aged youth. The three-day itinerary includes attending the March for Life Mass and rally in Washington, D.C. the morning of the March, visits with elected officials (schedules permitting), a retreat, visit to the Holocaust Museum, private Mass celebrated by Fr. Manny Alvarez at the Basilica of the Immaculate Conception and a nighttime tour of the capitol and monuments. Download the 2018 Pilgrimage flyer Learn more about the March for Life Respect Life Miami

2018 Pilgrimage January 18 - 20, 2018 at Washington, DC The Archdiocese of Miami's Youth and Young Adult Pilgrimage to the National March for Life is open to all parish youth and young adult groups. Young adults can also join us, even if you are not part of a group.

Itinerary Thursday, January 18, 2018 Depart Miami Attend Mass At Basilica Of The Immaculate Conception Group Dinner

Friday, January 19, 2018 Attend Florida Pilgrims' Mass Attend March For Life Rally At National Mall Participate In March For Life Visit Lawmakers At Capitol Free Time Group Retreat

Saturday, January 20, 2018 Attend Students For Life Conference Depart Dc For Miami

Cost and Details Quad Occupancy: $475 per person. Double Occupancy: $580 per person.

$100 deposit due October 15th; final payment due December 1st. Pilgrimage includes: Two Nights Accommodation At DC Hotel Round-Trip Airfare Transportation To/From Airport In DC $20 DC Metro Card Breakfast Daily One Group Dinner Attendance At The Students For Life Conference Travel Insurance Commemorative Item

age and Family Life Marriage Prep Divorce Bereavement Movements Resources Human Sexuality CONTACT INFO Director

Stephen Colella [email protected] Coordinator

9401 Biscayne Boulevard Miami Shores, FL 33138 305-762-1140 [email protected] 954-525-5157, ext. 1140 (Broward) 305-751-6227

The Office of Family Life's staff and volunteers are dedicated to meeting the needs of families. Moreover, we validate the family as holy in all of the various dimensions that constitute the family unit. We recognize the multi cultural make-up of our Diocese, and as such offer services and programs in English and Spanish, that provide education, resources, and support to families, during times of transition as well times of crisis.

Upcoming Marriage Preparation events: Click here

Made For Each Other

"Prayed For Him" - What Have …

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age and Family Life Marriage Prep Divorce Bereavement Movements Resources Human Sexuality Español

Steps to Receive the Sacrament of Marriage Step 1: Contact your parish and arrange to meet with your Priest When: BEFORE you set a wedding date or begin any other steps When you become engaged, you first point of contact should be your parish, your home of faith, whether or not you are being married at your home parish. They are the ones who will guide you through the entire marriage preparation process from start to finish. At that time, you will schedule a time to meet and begin walking together on this joyous journey, receiving the guidance and assistance you need to complete steps 2-7, while keeping in mind they may even have specific recommendations as to which courses or tools listed below are best for the couple to follow. You may also want to take a moment to plan out a timeline for completion of these steps and other wedding arrangements.

Step 2: Take the Fully Engaged Premarital Inventory and Evaluation Fully Engaged is a Catholic catechetical premarital inventory that is grounded in Church teaching. This dynamic premarital inventory is a trustworthy guide that meets the real challenges today’s couples face. It helps to get to know each other even more deeply and reveal relationship strengths and grow in them while proactively helping identify areas that may need attention before they turn into issues later. The bride and groom complete the Fully Engaged Inventory either online or by pen and paper. Once the parish receives the printout, the couple meets with a Facilitator(s) who will help lead the discussion regarding areas of agreement and difference. This step is completed through the parish. Therefore, be sure to complete Step 1 before moving to this step.

Step 3: Register and Take your Marriage Preparation Course The Archdiocese of Miami offers a variety of Pre Cana programs, in English and in Spanish, to prepare couples for the Sacrament of Marriage - Camino del Matrimonio and Transformed in Love for engaged couples and Matrimonio 2000 for couples married civilly – throughout different parishes and at the Pastoral Center. Please keep in mind that the pastor may have specific recommendations as to which course may be more suitable for a couple, so it is best to first ask for his advice. To see the schedule and register for any of the Marriage Preparation programs, please go to

www.miamiarch.org/familylife and click on "Upcoming marriage preparation events."

Step 4: Natural Family Planning Instruction Part of a good marriage preparation process is receiving the gift of learning about what some have said may be one of the best kept secret treasures around, Natural Family Planning (NFP). NFP uses great science to plan our families while doing so in accord with God’s plan, and 100% naturally! There is live instruction and local support to answer your questions offered throughout the Archdiocese, as well on demand virtual classes plus plentiful resources on the subject.

Step 5: Sacrament of Reconciliation Give yourselves the blessing of coming into your special day prepared spiritually by receiving the gift of the Sacrament of Reconciliation and the wellspring of grace it provides. But why wait until just before the wedding when it is there for you always? The Office of Marriage and Family Life will be happy to share resources about this beautiful Sacrament and other marriage topics if desired.

Step 6: Final Meeting(s) with your Priest As you continue to keep in touch with your parish and working together to prepare your special day, you should meet with the Priest who will be celebrating your wedding 4-6 weeks before the wedding. If you are getting married at a different parish, do keep in close touch with your home parish and embrace any opportunities they may offer for you to receive spiritual guidance and final wedding tips there as well. They are your family of faith!

Step 7: Keep Connected! Your journey is just beginning, and there are plentiful resources and opportunities available to continue enriching your lives and marriage. By keeping connected and involved, first with your parish and second with any of the other great groups and ministries in the Archdiocese, you tap into one of the greatest resources of all: a family of faith with whom to walk and find mutual inspiration, encouragement, support, while making great new friends in the process! Last but not least, count on our Office of Marriage and Family Life as another support source. We are here to serve you! We wish you a lifetime of love, happiness, and blessings!

Masses in English & Spanish For Masses in English and Spanish, please search for a church near you by clicking on "Parishes" on the top bar above, and check their Mass schedules.

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olic Legal Services Metropolitan Tribunal CONTACT INFO Judicial Vicar

Msgr. Gregory Wielunski, J.C.D. 305-762-1161 Adjutant Judicial Vicar

Msgr. Michael Souckar, J.C.D. Defender of the Bond

Father Kenneth Whittaker, J.C.L. Chorbishop Michael Thomas, J.C.D. Promoter of Justice

Msgr. Kenneth Schwanger, J.C.D. Judges

Msgr. Chanel Jeanty, J.C.L. Father Mathew Thundathil, J.C.D. Father Fernando Hería, J.C.L. Father Jude Ezeanokwasa, Ph.D., J.C.D. Msgr. Tomás Marín, J.C.D. Dr. Stefano Benigni, J.C.D. Assessor

Father Luis García 9401 Biscayne Boulevard Miami Shores, FL 33138 305-762-1161 305-762-1178 [email protected] http://tribunal.miamiarch.org

The Metropolitan Tribunal handles those issues relating to marriage, i.e., dispensations and annulments, as well as providing advocates to assist those going through the annulment process. The Metropolitan Tribunal has an ongoing program at St. Thomas University to train future advocates to assist those in need in all matters concerning the application and practice of Canon Law in a Declaration of Nullity. The Judicial Vicar is the Presiding Judge of the Metropolitan Tribunal of Court of Law, and is assisted in case management and judicial processes by the judges, advocates, notaries, and other professionals of the court. The Judicial Vicar is a consultant to the Archbishop and coordinates all aspects of Archdiocesan Administration and services which are concerned with the application and practice of canon law throughout the Archdiocese of Miami.

e of Ministry to Priests Deacons Necrology of Priests Office for Religious Retired Priests Seminaries Vocations CONTACT INFO Episcopal Vicar for Priests

Msgr. Roberto Garza 305-762-1221 Ministry to Retired Priests

Fr. Patrick O’Neill 305-762-1254

The Ministry to Priests Office stresses the fundamental importance of support, ongoing education and formation in the life of the priest in a time of rapid change and transition within the life of the Church. Ministry to Priests seeks to provide a holistic approach toward the challenge of ongoing formation and education for the priests in the Archdiocese of Miami. Retreat programs, days of prayer, counseling, educational events, sabbaticals, and other types of gatherings more social in nature describe the major thrust of the Ministry to Priests Office in the Archdiocese. Ministry to Priests encourages the priests to have a spiritual director and also encourages support groups.

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Priests are encouraged to take advantage of the sabbaticals offered by the Archdiocese for enrichment in spirituality and pastoral skills. In order to respond to the needs of the priests & the requirements for fruitful ministry, programs for the continuing education of priests ministering in the Archdiocese shall continue to be offered. (S. 467)

1. Definition A sabbatical is an extended renewal period, not for the purpose of meeting a specific need of the Archdiocese, but to promote the personal renewal of the priest and foster the development of his ministerial effectiveness. It is not primarily intended as a time of continuing education, although frequently it will include time to update ministerial skills. The ultimate purpose of the sabbatical is to provide the individual priest with renewed motivation for serving the People of God. A sabbatical is thought of not primarily as time away from ministry, but time invested in an enhanced ministry. A sabbatical should not, therefore, be confused with sick leave, vacation, retreat, archdiocesan-assigned further study, or leave of absence. Mindful of Jesus’ own declaration that “man was not made for the Sabbath, but rather the Sabbath for man”, the Archdiocese of Miami affirms that the priest who has faithfully borne the heat of the day and its pressures is entitled to sufficient time for personal renewal, or his own “Sabbath.”

2. Allocation of Time The Archdiocese of Miami is committed to providing short term sabbaticals for priests. A short term sabbatical is understood to be a period of three or four months. A long term sabbatical is understood to be a period of five months or one year. The long term sabbatical is not considered normative, although the request of an individual priest will be considered.

3. To Whom is a Sabbatical Available? Since a sabbatical is to be conceived as a positive affirmation and support of the priest as well as recognition for services rendered to the Church, primary consideration will be given to those who have greatest seniority. A priest is eligible to apply for a sabbatical after seven years of priestly service in the Archdiocese of Miami. Seven years after his sabbatical, the priest may again apply. It is important to note that the special merit of the petition will also be taken into consideration. While foremost consideration will be given to requests from incardinated priests of the Archdiocese of Miami, Religious and non-incardinated priests who staff parishes or institutions owned and operated by the Archdiocese may also apply when a comparable program is not available to them. The goal of the Archdiocesan Sabbatical Program is to have a maximum of ten priests taking advantage of the program four times each year.

4. Application Procedure The priest who desires a sabbatical should discuss it with his priest-counsellor or the Director of Continuing Education for the Clergy. At that time, the decision will be reached concerning the type of program which would be of most benefit to the priest. At the time application is made to the Archbishop, a letter of recommendation from the priest-counsellor or Director of Continuing Education for the Clergy should be included along with a description of the program. This application, including the specific plan, should be submitted no less than one year before the proposed sabbatical leave.

5. Funding Expenses (tuition, required books, room and board, and transportation) are shared 50 percent by the Archdiocese, 25 percent by the parish or institution to which the priest is assigned, and 25 percent by the priest. The portion of expenses paid by the priest is seen as a valuable expression of the seriousness of his commitment. The monthly salary and Mass stipends are continued by the parish or institution to which the priest is assigned. In instances where a real hardship might be involved if a priest had to provide 25 percent of the total cost, the Archdiocese of Miami will work out a suitable financial arrangement with the individual. In instances where paying the expenses of the sabbatical plus a continued salary would severely limit a poor parish, other provisions may need to be made by the Archdiocese.

6. Replacements Should it be necessary to provide a replacement for a priest on a sabbatical, the responsibility for so doing lies primarily with the priest who will be away. This must be done in consultation with the Moderator of the Curia.The cost of the replacement is to be paid by the parish or institution.

olic Charities Camillus House Missionaries of Charity St. Vincent de Paul & Thrift Stores CONTACT INFO Shelter

724 N.W. 17 St. Miami, FL 33136 305-545-5699

The Missionaries of Charity of Mother Teresa arrived in the archdiocese in 1980 to care for the "poorest of the poor" in Miami's inner city. They currently operate a shelter for homeless women and children near Jackson Memorial Hospital.

e Pontifical Mission Societies Mission Cooperative Plan Amor en Accion CONTACT INFO Mission Office Director

Teresita Gonzalez Director of the Propagation of the Faith

Fr. David Zirilli 9401 Biscayne Boulevard Miami Shores, FL 33138 305-762-1236 305-762-1249 [email protected]

DOCUMENTS MCP Application 2018

English MCP Guidelines 2018

English

The Mission Cooperative Plan (MCP) of the Archdiocese of Miami is a program in which missionary dioceses, religious congregations and lay mission groups are invited to send representatives to preach at the weekend Masses in our parishes. The program helps to raise awareness in our community of the richness of missionary work across the world, and inspires us all to live the missionary call in our daily lives. The offerings collected in each parish during these MCP weekends are sent to the mission organizations represented by these visiting missionaries.

e Pontifical Mission Societies Mission Cooperative Plan Amor en Accion CONTACT INFO Mission Office Director

Teresita Gonzalez 9401 Biscayne Boulevard Miami Shores, FL 33138 305-762-1226 305-762-1249 [email protected]

The Mission Network of the Archdiocese of Miami is an association of missionary organizations, parishes, groups, and individuals united in a common vision to support each other in responding to our baptismal call to mission. We seek to promote mission by sharing resources, missionary experiences and activities, formation, and advocacy for justice and peace.

e Pontifical Mission Societies Mission Cooperative Plan Amor en Accion CONTACT INFO Director

Teresita Gonzalez Director of the Propagation of the Faith

Fr. David Zirilli 9401 Biscayne Boulevard Miami Shores, FL 33138 305-762-1236 305-762-1249 [email protected]

The goal of the Mission Office is to promote awareness and enthusiasm for our common call to mission, and to be a bridge of support for missionaries and missionary activities locally and throughout the world. The office brings together the summer Missionary Cooperative Plan, the work of the Propagation of the Faith in the annual World Mission Sunday celebration, Amor en Acción (a lay missionary community of the Archdiocese of Miami,) and the Mission Network of the Archdiocese of Miami ( an association that gathers mission groups and parish representatives to grow in missionary understanding).

2018 Mission Opportunities

Click here to download the 2018 Mission Opportunites flyer >>

age and Family Life Marriage Prep Divorce Bereavement Movements Resources Human Sexuality CONTACT INFO Coordinator

Gabriela Marting 9737 NW 41 St, #278 Miami, FL 33178 [email protected] www.castosporamor.org Centro San Jose

8181 NW 36 St # 14C Doral, Florida 33166 305-316-4934 Lunes a sábado: 9am - 7pm

Castos Por Amor Castos Por Amor es un movimiento apostólico de la Arquidiócesis de Miami que comunica la Buena Noticia en una nueva evangelización de auténtico compromiso apostólico "proclamando el evangelio de la castidad". Aporta una pastoral sobre la sexualidad humana basada en el Magisterio de la Santa Madre Iglesia a travós de apostolados de educación, prevención y recuperación. Da herramientas y educación para llevar la castidad como virtud en todos los estados de vida, solteros, consagrados y casados. Las enseñanzas y catequesis incluyen pero no se limitan a: programa radial "Creciendo en el Amor" por EWTN Radio Católica Mundial, talleres, misiones parroquiales, congresos y el retiro Libres Para Amar, basado en la Teología del Cuerpo del beato Juan Pablo II, para mayores de 18 años, hombres, mujeres, solteros y casados. La prevención y recuperación se realiza a través de la consejería clínica cristiana católica de su apostolado Misión San José CCC y grupos de apoyo para hombres ("Grupo de apoyo San José") y para mujeres ("Mujer, llena de gracia") para vivir y recuperar la sexualidad integrada.

CONTACT INFO Coordinators

Robert and Anne Tomonto 15925 SW 77 Court Palmetto Bay, FL 33157 305-226-4664 [email protected] www.cfm.org

Christian Family Movement The goal of the CFM is the development of couples, their families and others in their personal relationships through social consciousness and involvement. This development is built through three cornerstones: (a) a prayerful relationship with God; (b) the community achieved in the CFM group; and (c) the ability of each CFM group to make considered judgments and act upon them through the use of social inquiry method in our meetings. (In English)

CONTACT INFO Spiritual Director

Father Jeff McCormick Coordinators

Glen and Elizabeth Santayana 954-610-8178 [email protected] www.couplesforchristusa.org

Couples for Christ The Couples for Christ (CFC) is a Private International Association of the Faithful of Pontifical Right. This movement is intended for the renewal and strengthening of Christian family life, with its global membership committed to the Lord and to one another, so that they may grow in maturity as men and women of God and fulfill their primary vocation of raising up families under the leadership of Jesus Christ and for the service of the Kingdom of God. Couples for Christ are families in the Holy Spirit renewing the face of the earth.

CONTACT INFO Coordinator

Irene Tomonto 14311 SW 74 Court Miami, FL 33158 305-253-2036 [email protected] thecovenantexperience.com

Covenant Experience The Covenant Experience is a parish based weekend program to enrich and stabilize marriages. The objective is to enrich marriages by providing a conversion experience on the weekend and a support community of like-minded couples in the follow-up.

CONTACT INFO Casa Manresa Spiritual Director

Father Marcelino García, S.J. 305-596-0001 [email protected] www.encuentrosfamiliares.org

Encuentros Familiares Family Encounters provides spiritual and psychological retreats for families with teenage children.

CONTACT INFO Spiritual Director

Deacon Isidoro Villa P.O. Box 440973 Miami, FL 33144 305-571-7111 305-222-8769 [email protected] www.impactos.org

Impactos de Cristiandad Weekend retreats for young couples who have children between the ages of 3 to 11. The whole family is invited to participate: parents and children.

CONTACT INFO Pedro Pelaez 305-821-0002 305-821-0772 [email protected] www.matrimonio2000.com

Matrimonio 2000 El programa Matrimonió 2000 es una preparación para matrimonios que llevan años de casados por lo civil y no han recibido el Sacramento del Matrimonio (Convalidación). El programa es de un día de duración.

CONTACT INFO Coordinators

John and Beatriz Harriman 305-667-6138 [email protected] http://www.matrimoniosenvictoria…

Matrimonios en Victoria/ Marriages in Victory Matrimonios en Victoria es un movimiento laico católico internacional y un apostolado en la Arquidiócesis de Miami para el enriquecimiento matrimonial. A través de la combinación de retiros en español y en inglés y asambleas semanales de crecimiento espiritual en sus diferentes comunidades, el movimiento busca fortalecer el compromiso de los esposos a medida que descubren el plan de Dios para su matrimonio, ofreciéndoles herramientas a nivel práctico y espiritual. Su principal objetivo es la santificación del matrimonio, célula fundamental de la familia, la Iglesia y la sociedad. La evangelización, la oración y el servicio están en el corazón de MEV/MIV y sus ministerios. Entre estos se encuentra "Niños en Victoria", ofreciéndole formación y crecimiento en la fe a los niños mientras sus padres asisten a las asambleas en su comunidad. También el ministerio de "Mamás en Victoria", mediante conferencias-desayunos mensuales, les brinda a todas las mamás de la Arquidiócesis la educación y herramientas necesarias para cumplir su labor de madres por medio de la Palabra de Dios y la enseñanza de la Iglesia Católica. La pastoral del movimiento también cuenta con el programa radial en vivo, "Hombre y Mujer los Creó", semanalmente a través de la emisora de Radio Paz. Matrimonios en Victoria/Marriages in Victory is a lay Catholic international movement and an apostolate in the Archdiocese of Miami with emphasis on marriage enrichment. Through a combination of retreats both in Spanish and English, and weekly follow-up meetings at its various communities, the movement strives to strengthen the married couple's commitment to growing in their faith and marriage relationship as they discover God's unique plan for their marriage, and to receiving the necessary spiritual and practical tools to achieve this. Its main objective is the sanctification of marriage as the fundamental cell of the family, the Church and society. Evangelization, prayer and service are at the heart of all MEV/MIV its various ministries. Among these, the ministry of "Niños en Victoria" offers faith formation and growth to the children while their parents attend their community meetings. There's also the ministry of "Mamás en Victoria," open to all mothers in the Archdiocese; it provides faith formation and the necessary tools to accomplish their motherhood with the help of the Word of God and Church teachings. The movement also has a weekly radio program, "Hombre y Mujer los Creó," which is aired live by Radio Paz .

CONTACT INFO Coordinating Committee Presidents

Adán & Olga Zúñiga 480 East 8th Street Hialeah, FL 33010 305-888-4819 [email protected] www.casacana.org

Movimiento Familiar Cristiano The Christian Family Movement was founded by the late Father Angel Villaronga, O.F.M. Spiritual retreats are offered to young, middle age or older couples that want to enhance their marriage relationship or those who are having difficulties in their marriage.

CONTACT INFO Mildred Ratcliffe 305-762-1140 [email protected]

Transformed in Love

Transformed in Love is a marriage preparation program that uses a "house building" metaphor to illustrate the concepts of establishing, building, and nurturing marriage and family life. It uses a holistic approach -body, soul, intellect and will- to prepare couples for sacramental grace.

CONTACT INFO Frank & Frances Kulzer 954-804-0661 954-961-5078 [email protected] flse-wwme.org

Worldwide Marriage Encounter Worldwide Marriage Encounter's mission of renewal in the Church and change in the world is to assist couples and priests to live fully intimate and responsible relationships by providing them with a Catholic 'experience' and ongoing community support for such a lifestyle.

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Your participation is very important to us Create an account and participate by requesting that we publish your events. School of Ministry Fountain of Grace RCIA Our Hearts Were Burning

School of Ministry Español Welcome Class of 2011!!

CONTACT INFO Address: 9401 Biscayne Boulevard Miami Shores, FL 33138 Office: 305 762-1184 / 305 762-1086 Fax: 305 762-1298 E-mail: [email protected] Director: Cheryl J. Orwig Whapham, M.A. Associate Director for Hispanic Formation: Rogelio Zelada, M.A. Special Projects: Sr. Ann E. McDermott, osf, MSW Office Assistant: Fior Ramirez

Registration is now closed for the 2009-2011 School of Ministry. Please review the information below to learn more about the School of Ministry and the Registration Process. Registration for the Class of 2012 will begin in February of 2010. We hope you will prayerfully considering participating in this wonderful faith formation opportunity! Archdiocesan School Of Ministry 2009 - 2011 - Pray, Learn, Serve The School of Ministry forms lay men and women who desire to grow in their understanding of their Catholic faith and in their ability to serve the Church. Over the course of two years, participants develop knowledge in spirituality, theology, and pastoral ministry. Upon completion of the certificate program, graduates find they are closer to Jesus and are better able to serve in their parish and community. One recent graduate said, “I will be forever grateful to the School of Ministry for opening the doors for me to serve the Lord by serving those who are less fortunate.” - Glenroy, St. Bartholomew Parish

RELATED TOPIC Lay Ministry & Adult Faith Formation Fountain of Grace RCIA Our Hearts Were Burning

Anyone interested in learning about the Catholic Faith may register for the program. Many people participate for their own adult faith formation, and others come to be formed to serve in a specific ministerial area. Participants enjoy connecting with a community of adult believers from parishes throughout the Archdiocese. This leads to rich discussion, and a broader understanding of Church. Traditional classes (English, Spanish, or Creole) meet once a week from September to May for two consecutive years. Please see the chart on the opposite page for class location and time. New for 2009-2011 is an ONLINE Learning option (English only). This class will also meet for two consecutive years from September to May. Classes will be taught online via the Virtual Learning Community sponsored by the University of Dayton. Participants will gather in PERSON only 5 Friday evenings each year. This is an excellent option for those who do not want to travel, or can’t commit to a Tuesday or Thursday evening due to work or family obligations. Meeting location is TBA. Registration forms are due by May 31, 2009. The staff needs time to prepare this life-giving experience for you. Some classes have been known to fill quickly and space is limited. Other classes have had to be cancelled because not enough registrations were filed by the deadline. Please make sure your registration form arrives on or before May 31, 2009 to ensure a place for you and an opportunity for others to learn.

School of Ministry Requirements: Completed Registration form, $25.00 Registration fee (non-refundable), and two personal recommendations (one clergy and one lay person). Excellent attendance and participation in class or online. One Weekend Retreat – TBA One Morning of Reflection – TBA One Pastoral Evaluation – TBA Attendance at Commitment Ceremony – TBA Tuition for 2009 – 2011 Per person First year Second year Retreat Books Total per person =

Per Married Couple First year Second year Retreat (x2) Books (x2) Total per Couple =

$225.00 $225.00 $180.00 $30.00 $660.00

$400.00 $400.00 $360.00 $60.00 $1220.00

(Limited financial assistance is available.) Commissioned Pastoral Ministers For The Archdiocese Of Miami Will Meet The Requirements For The School Of Ministry And The Following: Candidate MUST BE recommended by their pastor or director of the sponsoring Archdiocesan office, agency, or movement. Candidate must be a fully-initiated Catholic in good standing. Candidate is required to complete a Ministerial Project during the last six months of their formation. Candidate is willing to serve sponsoring parish/office/movement for a period of five years and commit to on-going faith formation.

Fountain of Grace Fountain of Grace This formation program was created at the request of Archbishop Favalora and promulgated as mandatory for all ministers in the Archdiocese of Miami in September of 2006. (A Spanish version became available in the Archdiocese in 2007 and a French version is anticipated by the end of 2008). Fountain of Grace is an introduction to the Catechism of the Catholic Church and is used as a method to update the theological knowledge of adult leaders in our parish communities and to encourage the use of the Catechism in parish formation programs. Parish workshops on Fountain of Grace and the Catechism of the Catholic Church in English or Spanish are available through this office. Content 3 d School of Ministry Fountain of Grace RCIA Our Hearts Were Burning

School of Ministry Español Welcome Class of 2011!!

CONTACT INFO Address: 9401 Biscayne Boulevard Miami Shores, FL 33138 Office: 305 762-1184 / 305 762-1086 Fax: 305 762-1298 E-mail: [email protected] Director: Cheryl J. Orwig Whapham, M.A. Associate Director for Hispanic Formation: Rogelio Zelada, M.A. Special Projects: Sr. Ann E. McDermott, osf, MSW Office Assistant: Fior Ramirez

Registration is now closed for the 2009-2011 School of Ministry. Please review the information below to learn more about the School of Ministry and the Registration Process. Registration for the Class of 2012 will begin in February of 2010. We hope you will prayerfully considering participating in this wonderful faith formation opportunity! Archdiocesan School Of Ministry 2009 - 2011 - Pray, Learn, Serve The School of Ministry forms lay men and women who desire to grow in their understanding of their Catholic faith and in their ability to serve the Church. Over the course of two years, participants develop knowledge in spirituality, theology, and pastoral ministry. Upon completion of the certificate program, graduates find they are closer to Jesus and are better able to serve in their parish and community. One recent graduate said, “I will be forever grateful to the School of Ministry for opening the doors for me to serve the Lord by serving those who are less fortunate.” - Glenroy, St. Bartholomew Parish

RELATED TOPIC Lay Ministry & Adult Faith Formation Fountain of Grace RCIA Our Hearts Were Burning

Anyone interested in learning about the Catholic Faith may register for the program. Many people participate for their own adult faith formation, and others come to be formed to serve in a specific ministerial area. Participants enjoy connecting with a community of adult believers from parishes throughout the Archdiocese. This leads to rich discussion, and a broader understanding of Church. Traditional classes (English, Spanish, or Creole) meet once a week from September to May for two consecutive years. Please see the chart on the opposite page for class location and time. New for 2009-2011 is an ONLINE Learning option (English only). This class will also meet for two consecutive years from September to May. Classes will be taught online via the Virtual Learning Community sponsored by the University of Dayton. Participants will gather in PERSON only 5 Friday evenings each year. This is an excellent option for those who do not want to travel, or can’t commit to a Tuesday or Thursday evening due to work or family obligations. Meeting location is TBA. Registration forms are due by May 31, 2009. The staff needs time to prepare this life-giving experience for you. Some classes have been known to fill quickly and space is limited. Other classes have had to be cancelled because not enough registrations were filed by the deadline. Please make sure your registration form arrives on or before May 31, 2009 to ensure a place for you and an opportunity for others to learn.

School of Ministry Requirements: Completed Registration form, $25.00 Registration fee (non-refundable), and two personal recommendations (one clergy and one lay person). Excellent attendance and participation in class or online. One Weekend Retreat – TBA One Morning of Reflection – TBA One Pastoral Evaluation – TBA Attendance at Commitment Ceremony – TBA Tuition for 2009 – 2011 Per person First year Second year Retreat Books Total per person =

Per Married Couple First year Second year Retreat (x2) Books (x2) Total per Couple =

$225.00 $225.00 $180.00 $30.00 $660.00

$400.00 $400.00 $360.00 $60.00 $1220.00

(Limited financial assistance is available.) Commissioned Pastoral Ministers For The Archdiocese Of Miami Will Meet The Requirements For The School Of Ministry And The Following: Candidate MUST BE recommended by their pastor or director of the sponsoring Archdiocesan office, agency, or movement. Candidate must be a fully-initiated Catholic in good standing. Candidate is required to complete a Ministerial Project during the last six months of their formation. Candidate is willing to serve sponsoring parish/office/movement for a period of five years and commit to on-going faith formation.

Fountain of Grace Fountain of Grace This formation program was created at the request of Archbishop Favalora and promulgated as mandatory for all ministers in the Archdiocese of Miami in September of 2006. (A Spanish version became available in the Archdiocese in 2007 and a French version is anticipated by the end of 2008). Fountain of Grace is an introduction to the Catechism of the Catholic Church and is used as a method to update the theological knowledge of adult leaders in our parish communities and to encourage the use of the Catechism in parish formation programs. Parish workshops on Fountain of Grace and the Catechism of the Catholic Church in English or Spanish are available through this office. Content 3 d Blog #1 Blog #2 Blog #3 Blog #4 Blog #5 Blog #6 Blog #7 Blog #1 Blog #2 Blog #3 Blog #4 Blog #5 Blog #6 Blog #7 Blog #1 Blog #2 Blog #3 Blog #4 Blog #5 Blog #6 Blog #7 Blog #1 Blog #2 Blog #3 Blog #4 Blog #5 Blog #6 Blog #7

What is the National Catholic Youth Conference (NCYC)? The National Catholic Youth Conference is a powerful, biennial, three-day experience of prayer, community, and empowerment for Catholic teenagers (of high school age) and their adult chaperones. More than 23,000 young people and their chaperones attended National Catholic Youth Conference is November 19-21, back in Indianapolis, with the theme Here I Am Lord/Aquí Estoy Señor.

2013 NCYC in Indianapolis. The 2015

What Happens During NCYC? The program includes keynote presentations, prayer, workshops, Mass, and opportunities to participate in reconciliation and adoration of the Blessed Sacrament, as well as recreational activities, concerts, and exhibits. A key component of NCYC is the thematic park which is a blend of traditional exhibit booths with interactive areas featuring service projects, games, recreation, live musical performances, arts, and sports.

Who Can Attend NCYC? To participate in NCYC, students should be in high school in the Fall of 2015. Chaperones must be over the age of 21 and in compliance with the Archdiocese's youth protection/safe environment policies. Two adult chaperones are required for every parish group (for up to ten youth), with one additional chaperone for each additional ten youth.

How Much Does it Cost? The event registration fee is $215 (if you stay at an NCYC block hotel; if you stay at a non-block hotel, add $40). This does not include travel to and from Indianapolis, lodging, ground transportation or meals. The Office of Youth and Young Adult Ministry is putting together travel package options; that information will be available in mid-February.

I am interested in attending-what should I do? The first step is to notify Rosemarie at the Office of Youth and Young Adult Ministry that you plan to attend. You will then register your own group at will also try to coordinate our air travel.

pipregistration.eventsair.com. As soon as we know which parishes are attending and how many total travelers we have, we will book the hotel as a group. We

e of Ministry to Priests Deacons Necrology of Priests Office for Religious Retired Priests Seminaries Vocations DOCUMENTS Necrology: Archdiocese of Miami A Record of the Deaths of the Priests who have served the Archdiocese of Miami

Archbishop's Prayer O Lord, to whom no one is a stranger and from whose help no one is ever distant, look with compassion on all your people and especially refugees and exiles, on segregated persons and on lost children; restore them we pray to a homeland, and give us a kind heart for the needy and for strangers. Continue to guide us as you have shown your Church the joys and hopes, the grief's and anxieties of the followers of Christ through the Vatican Council which we now renew with hope. May the venerable intercession of Blessed Mary ever-Virgin manifest in Our Lady of Charity, come to our aid, O Lord, and free us from every danger, so that we may rejoice in your peace. For your priests and bishops, open to them the gates of Paradise, that they may return to that homeland where there is no death, where eternal joy endures. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen. Thomas Gerard Wenski Fourth Archbishop of Miami

This new interactive feature will allow you, the general public, to submit news articles for posting on the archdiocesan website. News articles refer to events that have taken place recently, preferably within the last week. (To announce future events, use the request to publish your event link.)

News articles that will be considered for publication on the archdiocesan website consist of: News events regarding parishes News events regarding Catholic schools News events regarding archdiocesan and parish approved ministries and organizations All articles submitted are subject to editing by the editor. If your article is declined, you will receive an email explaining why. Your article also will be edited for content and style, and in some cases, you might receive an email from the editor explaining why it has been edited. Up to three pictures can be submitted with each article; include information for each picture caption (i.e. names of all those in the photo from left to right with brief explanation of what taking place in the picture; relevant identifications, such as pastor, associate pastor, principal, seventh-grader, etc.). DOCUMENT Fill in the facts

HINT: Try to avoid pictures of large groups; look for action photos rather than photos of people standing and looking straight at the camera. Use this guide to make sure your story or caption have all the information required.

Submitting an Event: Events must be sponsored or hosted by an archdiocesan church, school, or agency, or a Catholic organization that has permission to function in the Archdiocese of Miami. We do not announce raffles or games of chance and we only announce events that are open to the general public. Visit the My Account page. If you do not already have an account, please open an account. It is free. Simply use your email and a password and fill in the information requested. Log on and click on "My Events" on the right hand side of the page and follow the instructions. You may post a PDF or DOC of the flyer, or a JPG image (logo, photo, etc.) that is 230 pixels wide by 180 pixels deep, to illustrate the nature of the event. Click Submit and your event will be sent to the archdiocese for approval. You will be notified via e-mail if more information is needed.

Promoting an Event: Once an event is approved it is posted on the Events Calendar page, and possibly featured on the home page on the week leading to the event. Once an event is approved it is received by the Miami editor of the Florida Catholic newspaper, which comes out monthly and is distributed free in the parishes. If it is in time for the next edition, the announcement will appear in print as well, either in the Around Your Community section or as a News Brief, depending on the scale of the event. Keep in mind that the newspaper usually comes out the third weekend of the month; the deadline for submitting events is the first week of the month BEFORE the event takes place; that means an April event has to be in our offices the first week of March to make sure it is announced in time. Earlier is always better: As soon as the time and place of an event are fixed, feel free to submit it. It will be posted online that much longer so more people can see it, and it will certainly be in time for print publication.

Request for Lay Speakers, Religious Sisters Or Brothers: Archdiocesan policy requires that any speaker - clergy, religious or lay - coming from outside the archdiocese be approved by the chancellor's office. No event can be publicized in the archdiocesan newspaper or website unless the speaker has received this approval. Please click policy and obtain the forms that need to be filled out.

here to read the archdiocesan

Disclaimer The Archdiocese reserves the right to deny posting any information on the Archdiocesan website that does not adhere to the teachings of the Catholic Church. Insults, use of ethnic slurs or personal insults, obscenities or any conduct that would not be acceptable to the Archdiocese of Miami or the Catholic Church in general will not be accepted. Minors should seek parental permission before submitting an article. All articles will be reviewed and approved by the Communications department before going live on the website. You agree that you are responsible for any postings you make, and for any consequences thereof. You agree that all postings will be in compliance with all applicable local, state, national and international laws, rule and regulations. The Archdiocese takes no responsibility for third-party content nor does it have any obligation to monitor such third-party content. By submitting or posting content ("Content") you grant the Archdiocese a worldwide, non-exclusive, royalty-free license to reproduce, publish and distribute such Content. You represent and warrant that you have all the rights, power and authority necessary to grant the rights granted herein to any Content. You agree that the article submitted was written by yourself and no information was copied without permission. For the complete Terms of Use, please

click here.

CONTACT INFO Email the Editor

Ana Rodriguez- Soto [email protected]

How to submit your article Style Guide: Do not use all caps in the headline or sub- title. Always identify your source or interviewee by their full name (First name, Last name) followed by who they are. (i.e. Father Joseph Carney, pastor, Blessed Trinity Parish) Titles before names: Abbreviate Msgr. and Rev. (although Catholic priests are always referred to as Father). All other religious titles spell out. Indicate when and where the event took place within the body of the article. Pictures can be submitted with each article; include information for each picture caption (i.e. names of all those in the photo from left to right with brief explanation of what taking place in the picture; relevant identifications, such as pastor, associate pastorï, principal, seventhgrader, etc.).

Submission deadlines for Florida Catholic and La Voz Católica in 2017 In parishes Jan. 22; deadline: Jan. 6 In parishes Feb. 19; deadline: Feb. 3 In parishes March 19; deadline: March 3 In parishes April 23; deadline: April 7 In parishes May 21; deadline: May 5 In parishes June 18; deadline: June 2 In parishes July 23; deadline: July 7 In parishes August 20; deadline: Aug. 4 In parishes Sept. 24; deadline: Sept. 8 In parishes Oct. 22; deadline: Oct. 6 In parishes Nov. 19; deadline: Nov. 3 In parishes Dec. 24; deadline: Dec. 8 Submission deadlines for Florida Catholic and La Voz Católica

News Archive

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Please click on a title of the articles listed below to read entire publication.

List of articles ral Info Non Parochial Collections Tamper Evident Bags ADOM Financial Report These non-parochial collections are to be taken up at all the Masses in all the parish and mission churches of the Archdiocese of Miami. Date

Collections

January and February

Archbishop's Charities and Development Campaign (ABCD)

Sunday, March 5, 2017

Church in Latin America

Sunday, March 26, 2017

Catholic Relief Services

Good Friday, April 14, 2017

Shrines in the Holy Land

Sunday, April 23, 2017

Catholic Home Missions

Sunday, May 28, 2017

Catholic Communications Campaign

Sunday, June 4, 2017

Church in Central and Eastern Europe

Sunday, June 25, 2017

Holy Father's Appeal (Peter's Pence)

Sunday July 16, 2017

American Black and Indian Missions

Sunday, August 6, 2017

Parish Burse – Seminary Appeal

Sunday, September 10, 2017

Catholic University of America

Sunday, October 22, 2017

Society for the Propagation of the Faith/World Mission Sunday

Sunday, November 19, 2017

Campaign for Human Development

Sunday, December 10, 2017

Retirement Fund for Religious

e of Lay Ministry School of Ministry Fountain of Grace Spanish

CONTACT INFO Director

Florángel González Associate Director for Hispanic Formation

Rogelio Zelada, M.A. Office Assistant

Fior Ramirez 9401 Biscayne Boulevard Miami Shores, FL 33138 305-762-1184 305-762-1086 305-762-1298 [email protected]

The Office of Lay Ministry calls forth the gifts of the laity and empowers men and women in their universal call to holiness, Christian maturity, mission and ministry. We reach out to all adult Catholics who desire to learn and grow in faith and knowledge. The goal of the department is to enrich the Christian formation and spiritual life of the laity of the Archdiocese so that they may be more conscious of their role in the Church and in society. Guided by the vision of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops in their document "Co-Workers in the Vineyard of the Lord: A Resource for Guiding the Development of Lay Ecclesial Ministry”, the office develops and implements formation programs that foster and enable lay ministry, and that are sensitive to language and culture.

"Through fervent prayer and pastoral work - and relying on the grace of the Holy Spirit - our efforts together will help the whole Catholic people advance in authentic discipleship and fulfil their baptismal call and mission to grow to the full maturity of Christ (cf. Eph 4:13)."

What's new in Lay Ministry? Pathways of Faith Stay tuned new workshops coming soon...

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CONTACT INFO Senior Director of Faith Formation & Superintendent of Schools

Kim Pryzbylski, Ph.D. 305-762-1078 [email protected] Coordinator of Foreign Students and Administrative Executive Assistant

Hope Sadowski 305-762-1070 [email protected] Associate Superintendent of Schools

Donald Edwards, Ed. D. 305-762-1018 [email protected] Coordinator of School Finances and Administration

Zoe Doble 305-762-1268 [email protected] Coordinator of Special Programs

Marcey Ayers 305-762-1070 [email protected] Coordinator of Certification

Domenick Russo 305-762-1075 [email protected] Office

9401 Biscayne Boulevard Miami Shores, FL 33138 305-762-1076 305-762-1115 [email protected] www.miamiarchschools.org

Office of Catholic Schools is part of the Office of Faith Formation. Within the Archdiocese of Miami there are 48 elementary schools, 13 secondary schools (4 of which are owned by religious orders) and one virtual school, enrolling nearly 34,000 students. The elementary schools are accredited by the Florida Catholic Conference; the secondary schools are accredited by AdvancED . While we take understandable pride in the academic excellence of our schools, it is the Catholic milieu of the schools and the commitment of Catholic families to a Catholic education which is the most important characteristic in our schools. Click here for the Teach, Learn Earn Program Application Click here for a Directory of Catholic Schools Click here for a Brochure on Catholic Schools

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Benedictine Monks

Capuchin Friars

Carmelite Fathers and Brothers

Congregation of Christian Brothers

Congregation of the Mission

Congregation of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus & Mary

Discalced Carmelites

Franciscan Friars

Holy Ghost Fathers - Congregation of the Holy Spirit

Jesuit Fathers and Brothers - Society of Jesus

Little Brothers of the Good Sheperd

Marist Brothers

Missionaries of St. Charles - Scalabrinians

Missionaries of the Company of Mary

Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate

Oblates of St. Francis De Sales

Order of Friars Minor - Franciscans

Order of Preachers -Dominicans

Pauline Fathers and Brothers

Piarist Fathers

Priests of the Congregation of the Holy Cross

Society of Divine Savior

Society of Mary - Marianists

Society of Mary - Marists

The Augustinians

Society of the Precious Blood

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www.miamiarch.org/religious on your browser to come back to this page on the web site.

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Carmelite Sisters of the Most Sacred Heart Claretian Missionary Sisters Congregation of Bon Secours Daughters of Charity of St. Vincent de Paul Daughters of Mary Help of Christians Daughters of Mary Mother of Mercy Daughters of Our Lady of Visitation Daughters of St. Paul Daughters of Wisdom Discalced Carmelite Nuns Dominican Sisters Adrian, MI Dominican Sisters of St. Catherine De Ricci Dominican Sisters of the Holy Rosary Franciscan Sisters of Allegany Missionary Guadalupanas of the Holy Spirit Handmaids of the Sacred Heart of Jesus Holy Spirit Sisters Marianitas - Institute of St. Marian of Jesus Missionaries of Charity Oblate Sisters of Providence Our Lady of Mount Carmel House of Prayer Religious of the Assumption Salesian Sisters of St. John Bosco School Sisters of Notre Dame Chicago Secular Institute OMMI Servants of Jesus of Charity Servants of the Pierced Hearts of Jesus and Mary Siervas de los Corazones Traspasados de Jesus y Maria Sisters of Jesus the Saviour Sisters of Mercy Sisters of Notre Dame Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur Sisters of St. Francis of Mary Immaculate Sisters of St. Francis of Penance & Christian Charity Sisters of St. Joseph Benedict Cottolengo Sisters of St. Joseph of Chambery Sisters of St. Joseph of Philadelphia, PA Sisters of St. Joseph of St. Augustine Sisters of St. Philip Neri Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, Spain Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary Immaculata, PA Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary Monroe, MI Society of Mary Reparatrix Society of St. Teresa of Jesus Society of the Sacred Heart Theatine Sisters of the Immaculate Conception

Type the shortcut: www.miamiarch.org/religious on your browser to come back to this page on the web site.

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Women: OMMI-Oblate Missionaries of Mary Immaculate Secular Institute of the Schoenstatt Sisters of Mary

Men: Voluntas Dei Institute

Type the shortcut: www.miamiarch.org/religious on your browser to come back to this page on the web site.

How to submit your article: Email the Editor: Ana Rodriguez- Soto [email protected] Style Guide

Do not use all caps in the headline or sub- title. Always identify your source or interviewee by their full name (First name, Last name) followed by who they are. (i.e. Father Joseph Carney, pastor, Blessed Trinity Parish) Titles before names: Abbreviate Msgr. and Rev. (although Catholic priests are always referred to as Father). All other religious titles spell out. Indicate when and where the event took place within the body of the article. Pictures can be submitted with each article; include information for each picture�s caption (i.e. names of all those in the photo from left to right with brief explanation of what�s taking place in the picture; relevant identifications, such as �pastor�, �associate pastor�, principal, seventh-grader, etc.). Submission deadlines for Florida Catholic and La Voz Católica

In parishes Jan. 19; deadline: Jan. 3 In parishes Feb. 23; deadline: Feb. 7 In parishes March 23; deadline: March 7 In parishes April 20; deadline: April 4 In parishes May 18; deadline: May 2 In parishes June 22; deadline: June 6 In parishes July 20; deadline: July 4 In parishes August 24; deadline: Aug. 8 In parishes Sept. 21; deadline: Sept. 5 In parishes Oct. 19; deadline: Oct. 3 In parishes Nov. 23; deadline: Nov. 7 In parishes Dec. 21; deadline: Dec. 5 Submission deadlines for Florida …

Welcome to News Collaboration This new interactive feature will allow you, the general public, to submit news articles for posting on the archdiocesan website. News articles refer to events that have taken place recently, preferably within the last week. (To announce future events, use the request to publish your event link.) News articles that will be considered for publication on the archdiocesan website consist of: News events regarding parishes News events regarding Catholic schools News events regarding archdiocesan and parish approved ministries and organizations All articles submitted are subject to editing by our editor. If your article is declined, you will receive an email explaining why. Your article also will be edited for content and style, and in some cases, you might receive an email from the editor explaining why it has been edited. Up to three pictures can be submitted with each article; include information for each picture caption (i.e. names of all those in the photo from left to right with brief explanation of what taking place in the picture; relevant identifications, such as pastor, associate pastor, principal, seventh-grader, etc.). HINT: Try to avoid pictures of large groups; look for action photos rather than photos of people standing and looking straight at the camera. Once an article has been submitted and edited by our editor you, the user, can no longer make changes to the article. Submitting an Event Events must be sponsored or hosted by an archdiocesan church, school, or agency, or a Catholic organization that has permission to function in the Archdiocese of Miami. We do not announce raffles or games of chance and we only announce events that are open to the general public. 1)Visit the My Account page. If you do not already have an account, please open an account. It is free. Simply use your email and a password and fill in the information requested. 2)Log on and click on "My Events" on the left hand side of the page and follow the instructions. You may post a PDF or DOC of the flyer, or a JPG image (logo, photo, etc.) that is 130 pixels wide by 90 pixels deep, to illustrate the nature of the event. 3) Click Submit and your event will be sent to the archdiocese for approval. You will be notified via e-mail if more information is needed. Promoting an Event 1) Once an event is approved it is posted on the Events Calendar page, and possibly featured on the home page on the week leading to the event. 2)Once an event is approved it is received by the Miami editor of the Florida Catholic newspaper, which comes out monthly and is distributed free in the parishes. If it is in time for the next edition, the announcement will appear in print as well, either in the Around Your Community section or as a News Brief,depending on the scale of the event. Keep in mind that the newspaper usually comes out the third weekend of the month; the deadline for submitting events is the first week of the month BEFORE the event takes place that means an April event has to be in our offices the first week of March to make sure it is announced in time. Earlier is always better: As soon as the time and place of an event are fixed, feel free to submit it. It will be posted online that much longer so more people can see it, and it will certainly be in time for print publication. Request for Lay Speakers, Religious Sisters Or Brothers Archdiocesan policy requires that any speaker - clergy, religious or lay - coming from outside the archdiocese be approved by the chancellor's office. No event can be publicized in the archdiocesan newspaper or website unless the speaker has received this approval. Please click here to read the archdiocesan policy and obtain the forms that need to be filled out.

Disclaimer The Archdiocese reserves the right to deny posting any information on the Archdiocesan website that does not adhere to the teachings of the Catholic Church. Insults, use of ethnic slurs or personal insults, obscenities or any conduct that would not be acceptable to the Archdiocese of Miami or the Catholic Church in general will not be accepted. Minors should seek parental permission before submitting an article. All articles will be reviewed and approved by the Communications department before going live on the website. You agree that you are responsible for any postings you make, and for any consequences thereof. You agree that all postings will be in compliance with all applicable local, state, national and international laws, rule and regulations. The Archdiocese takes no responsibility for third-party content nor does it have any obligation to monitor such third-party content. By submitting or posting content ("Content") you grant the Archdiocese a worldwide, non-exclusive, royalty-free license to reproduce, publish and distribute such Content. You represent and warrant that you have all the rights, power and authority necessary to grant the rights granted herein to any Content. You agree that the article submitted was written by yourself and no information was copied without permission. For the complete Terms of Use, please click here.

Meet the Bloggers

Teresita Gonzalez

Joan Crown

Deacon Elvis A. González

Peter Ductram

Sister Ondina Cortés Special Guest Bloggers

Meet the Bloggers

Teresita Gonzalez

Joan Crown

Deacon Elvis A. González

Peter Ductram

Sister Ondina Cortés Special Guest Bloggers

Click on the links below to open respective pages

Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre

Knights of St. Gregory

Knights and Ladies of Malta

Knights of St. Sylvester

Knights and Ladies of St. Peter Claver

Knights of Columbus

Legatus

ral Policy Employees Parish/School Carnival Policy Requirements Volunteers Español

The

Safe Environment Policy for the Archdiocese of Miami dictates that all Covered Volunteers at parish carnivals are required to successfully pass the Archdiocesan level 2 background check, complete Virtus training and sign a pledge to promote Safe Environment

Volunteers under the age of 18 are not allowed to have unsupervised access to children, youth or vulnerable adults. These individuals who may assist with children, youth and vulnerable adults must be supervised by a volunteer or employee who has been Virtus trained and has successfully completed a Level 2 Background Check. Virtus training for volunteers under the age of 18 is optional.

Click on the thumbnail below to download PDF file. Volume 23, Issue 12 - December 13, 2017 Click here to view Past Bulletins Archive >> Click here for Holy Days of Obligation and Principal Moveable Feasts >>

CONTACT INFO President/ General Director

Msgr. Roberto Garza 305-638-9729 305-636-3976 Programming

Jorge Díaz Production

Gonzalo Penagos [email protected] Sales Department

1779 N.W. 28 St. Miami , FL 33142 305-636-3976 www.paxcc.org

PAX Catholic Communications is a service of the Archdiocese of Miami with the unique mission of evangelizing and proclaiming the Good News of the Gospel of Jesus Christ through the media. We are committed to utilizing the latest technologies in bringing a message of faith, hope and love to today's world. On Monday, January 3, 2011 Pax Catholic Communications began a programming partnership with internationally-known Eternal Word Television Network. With this partnership, Spanish listeners of Radio Paz on 830 AM will now also enjoy EWTN's "Radio Catolica Mundial" along with the station's local programming. Under the umbrella of PaxCC you will find our flagship Radio Paz WACC 830 AM, which is twenty-four hours/seven days a week of Catholic radio programming in Spanish, including daily news and a wide-variety of spiritual enrichment programs. Our very diverse audience actively participates in the daily prayer of the Angelus, the Holy Mass, the Rosary and other devotions. Also the PaxCC family consists of Tele Paz (Spanish Language Catholic TV programming including the celebration of the Holy Mass), Radio Paz Musical "RPM" (24/7 Spanish Christian music on the internet geared towards the youth and young adults), and PaxNet - Radio Paz Satelital (Our twenty-four hour/seven days a week Satellite Service produced by Radio Paz in Miami).

PARISHES WITH PERPETUAL ADORATION Monroe County St. Mary Star of the Sea Catholic Church

1010 Windsor Lane Key West, FL 33040 305-294-1018 Miami-Dade County Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church

11291 SW 142nd Ave Miami, FL 33186 305-386-4121 St. Agnes Catholic Church

100 Harbor Dr Key Biscayne, FL 33149 305-361-2351 St. Brendan Catholic Church

8725 SW 32nd St Miami, FL 33165 305-221-0881 St. Catherine of Siena Church

9200 SW 107th Ave. Miami, FL 33176 (305) 274-6333 St. Louis Catholic Church

7270 SW 120th St Miami, FL 33156 305-238-7562 St. Raymond Catholic Church

3475 SW 17 St Miami, FL 33145 305-446-2427 St. Timothy Catholic Church

5400 SW 102nd Ave Miami, FL 33165 305-274-8224 St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic Church

7310 SW 62nd St Miami, FL 33143 305-665-5600 Broward County St. Andrew Catholic Church

9950 NW 29th St Coral Springs, FL 33065 954-752-3950 St. Boniface Church

8330 Johnson Street Pembroke Pines, Florida 33024 954-432 - 2750 St. Malachy Church

6200 John Horan Terrace Tamarac, FL 33321 954-726-1237

Perpetual Adoration is a Eucharistic devotion whereby members of a given parish unite in adoration before the Most Blessed Sacrament (in most cases, exposed), both during the day and throughout the night, seven days a week.

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Picture: Archdiocese Archive Peter Baldacchino

Priesthood? As a young man, Peter Baldacchino was adamant. "I wouldn't touch the priesthood with a 10-foot pole." But God obviously had other plans for Miami's 10th auxiliary bishop, and they began to take shape at the 1989 World Youth Day in Santiago de Compostela, Spain. "When I arrived there, the first thing I heard we were late in arriving was the voice of Pope John Paul II saying, 'Do not be afraid to be holy.' And I thought, 'Well, I better take my bag and go back home because this is not for me.' "I didn't understand what it means to be holy," said Bishop Baldacchino, 53, a Malta native who laughs easily including at himself. He often repeats St. Teresa of Avila's adage "un santo triste es un triste santo," which roughly translated means, "A saint who is sad is a sad saint." No surprise then, at the motto he chose for his episcopacy: "Ubi Dominus, ibidem letitia" where God is, there is joy. Bishop Baldacchino is approachable, warm and disarming, a man who worked with his hands and vacuumed his own church in the Turks and Caicos, where he was sent as a missionary from the Archdiocese of Newark. He is a priest not prone to quoting vague theology but one who makes deep points with clear examples a man, in fact, very much in the style of Pope Francis. He speaks his native Maltese a mixture of Arabic and Sicilian as well as English, the country's other official language. In Newark, he learned Spanish, and in the Turks and Caicos he learned Creole. He also attended a Redemptoris Mater seminary where his fellow students came from all over the world. "My accent is no longer mine," he said. "It's not Maltese. It's not English. It's not Italian. It's a mixture of all. My niece says, 'Uncle Pete, you speak funny.'" As for the priesthood, don't get him wrong. He grew up in a family of practicing Catholics. His father served on the parish council. The family joined the Neocatechumenal Way when Peter was 13. Theirs was the first Neocatechumenal community in the whole of Malta. Moreover, Peter's father, Rinaldo known by everyone as Rene had studied for the priesthood with the Salesians in England for 11 years. His two younger brothers, John and Robert, also had entered the seminary and left. Both are now married with children. Peter had never been inclined in that direction. He studied chemistry and science at the University of Malta and worked as technical manager for the Canada Dry bottling plant, where he was, by his own admission, "a workaholic." He was 28 when he attended World Youth Day. "I didn't understand what it means to be holy. I had this impression that to be holy means to walk with a slanted head," he recalled. "Later I discovered that to be holy means the holiness of God. It's that he lets the rain fall on the good and the bad alike and he lets the sun shine on the good and the bad alike. You and I, we don't do this. Somebody harms us and we don't show the sun of our face anymore. We don't look at them. Somebody harms us and we don't speak to them anymore. I realized that I did not have this (holiness)." But he knew where to find it. "If you want fruit and you don't have it, you go to buy it. I realized that the place to get these things was the Church," he recalled. "Concretely, for me, it came through the experience of the Neocatechumenal Way in my parish." After a "brief but intensive discernment process," he was sent on a two-by-two mission during which he discovered a lot about himself, including "that I did not even recognize the poor that were around me. I did not see their needs. I was blind, completely blind." That is when he felt the Lord calling him to the priesthood. But he did not respond right away. "I had too many things on my mind," he said. "But then in a very concrete and historical way, the Lord started to move things from my path." Not only did he feel a calling to priesthood, he felt a calling to mission. "I showed a disposition to serve the Church anywhere," he said. "I fell in love with the missionary aspect of the Church. It was like falling in love. And the Lord took it from there. Everything else was easy." He wound up in Newark literally at random. Someone picked his name out of one hat, and matched it with the name of a Redemptoris Mater seminary in another hat. At the time, there were 12 such seminaries, operated by the Neocatechumenal Way, around the world. Today there are 100, including one in Miami which opened in December 2011. "I could have gone anywhere," Bishop Baldacchino said. "The question was: Are you willing to serve the Church wherever? I had no choice. I did not choose." And that's a good thing. "There's always a danger to choose the place," he said. "Because I think that is a big trap. The moment in your mind you think you should be somewhere, in that moment, wherever you are, is not the right place… To refuse to answer that question has been a great liberation for me. It means God is here. And if God is here, I'm staying. If he's not, I'm the first one to leave." As for coming to Miami, he remembers the first words that came to mind when he was told of his appointment: "Do you love me? Because 'mi ami' in Italian means 'you love me.' Do you love me? Feed my flock. Do you love me? Tend my sheep. Do you love me? Miami. Christ is asking, 'Do you love me? Then help me. We've got work to do.'"

Biography Auxiliary Bishop Peter Baldacchino

Born: Sliema, Malta, Dec. 5, 1960; second oldest of four children, one girl and three boys Father: Rinaldo (Rene) Baldacchino Mother: Leonilda (Hilda) Baldacchino (deceased September 2001 )

Ordained: To the priesthood, May 25, 1996, for the Archdiocese of Newark, N.J. Appointed chaplain to His Holiness, with the title of Monsignor, 2009 Named Auxiliary Bishop of Miami, and Titular Bishop of Vatarba, Feb. 20, 2014 Ordained to the episcopacy, March 19, 2014, Cathedral of St. Mary, Miami

Education: Studied science and chemistry at the University of Malta Attended Redemptoris Mater Seminary, Kearny, N.J., 1990-1996 Bachelor of Arts and Master of Divinity degrees, Seton Hall University, 1996 Languages spoken, understood: Maltese, English, Italian, Creole, Spanish

Priestly Ministry: Parochial vicar, Our Lady of Mount Carmel, Ridgewood, N.J., 1996-1999 Member, Presbyteral Council, Archdiocese of Newark, 1997-1998 Chancellor, Our Lady of Divine Providence Mission, Turks and Caicos, 1999; this is a missio sui iuris (independent mission) for which the Archdiocese of Newark is responsible. Pastor, Our Lady of Divine Providence Church, Turks and Caicos, 2002

Episcopal Motto: "Ubi Dominus, ibidem laetitia" (Where God is, there is joy)

Español

General Fingerprinting Procedure Church Personnel and Covered Volunteers must register online by accessing

www.fieldprintflorida.com and following these instructions:

Click "Schedule an appointment" (registration can be done in English or Spanish) Create a secure username/password and enter the Fieldprint scheduling system In the "Reason why you need to be fingerprinted" screen, select the web link: "I know my Fieldprint Code". (To obtain this access code, please call your parish or school beforehand.) Please note that the access code is case sensitive. Provide all the information requested. This information is required by the FDLE/FBI in order to process the criminal search. At this point, the website will prompt the applicant for the information required to find a local fingerprinting facility and schedule an appointment. Instructions, directions, maps and photos will all be provided directly online. If additional questions or problems arise, please contact Fieldprint customer service at: 1-800-799-1067 or [email protected] Or select the "Contact Us" link on the website.

Third Party Vendors No third-party vendors, other than vendors approved by the Office of Safe Environment, can be used by any Archdiocesan entity for the purpose of background checks and/or clearance. Results of all fingerprinting and background checks will be processed through the Office of Safe Environment.

Special Procedures for Instructional Personnel Instructional personnel certified through the State of Florida will be re-screened every five years in conjunction with the State's certification process (this will include a renewed FDLE/FBI check). All other school employees will be re-screened every five years according to this policy. The State of Florida certification approval and the related screening results for instructional personnel will be reviewed by the Office of Safe Environment.

International Background Check Any prospective Church Personnel from another country who has not been in the U.S. for at least one year will receive an International Background Check. Special forms are required and available through the Office of Safe Environment.

Renewals All Church personnel need to be re-fingerprinted and screened according to this policy every five (5) years.

Disqualifying Offenses Prior findings of guilt, pleas of guilt or pleas of no contest (regardless of adjudication) for certain misdemeanors and felonies prohibit an individual from employment or volunteer ministry in an entity of the Archdiocese. Click here for a list of disqualifying offenses. CONTACT INFO Myriam Leinweber 305-762-1057 [email protected] Erica Gutierrez 305-762-1059 [email protected]

Record Maintenance Digital fingerprint images will be retained in a secure electronic database through a vendor approved by the Archdiocese of Miami. Any identified criminal history, along with Archdiocesan recommendations for clearance or denial, will be held in a secure location in the Office of Safe Environment. If you have any questions, regarding this process, please contact the Background Check Department: Individuals who do not have access to a computer or require assistance in registering should contact their pertinent parish, school, Archdiocesan entity or the Archdiocese of Miami directly for their designated coordinator.

Additional Information General Fingerprinting Procedure List of Disqualifying Offenses Pwosedi Jeneral pou Anprent

Spanish

CONTACT INFO Director, Safe Environment Program

Mary Ross Agosta Virtus Training Coordinator

Jan Rayburn 305-762-1250 Statewide (DCF) Abuse Hotline

1-800-96-ABUSE (1-800-962-2873) Archdiocesan Abuse Hotline

1-866-802-2873 Victim Assistance Coordinator

Deacon Richard Turcotte 1-866-802-2873 Background Check Coordinators

Myriam Leinweber 305-762-1057 [email protected] Erica Gutierrez 305-762-1059 [email protected]

IMPORTANT To report sexual abuse to the Archdiocese of Miami, fill out the following form: English Spanish Creole To report suspected abuse to civil authorities call the: FLORIDA ABUSE HOTLINE

Recognizing that each individual is created by God, the Archdiocese of Miami is committed to the safety and well-being of its children and vulnerable adults and implements procedures to minimize risk and barriers and to build and foster a culture of safe environment. The Archdiocese does not tolerate abuse or neglect of anyone. It will comply with all obligations of civil and canon law; it will promote healing where it is needed, provide education, training and guidance when it is appropriate, and endeavor to prevent any abuse of minors or vulnerable adults with firm justice and mercy towards all. The Archdiocese of Miami maintains a dedicated hotline, 1-866-802-2873, that is broadly advertised and available, with voice message capacity, 24/7, to receive calls from victims. A call received via the hotline is logged according to policy and immediately referred to the Victim Assistance Coordinator to contact the victim and offer assistance. All allegations of sexual abuse by Church Personnel or on church premises shall be reported promptly to the Archdiocesan Contact Person. The Archdiocesan Contact Person shall immediately notify the Archdiocesan Attorney who will in turn notify the local State Attorney.

Archdiocesan Policy Creating and Maintaining a Safe Environment for Children and Vulnerable Adults U.S. Bishops' Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People

ral Policy Employees Parish/School Carnival Policy Requirements Volunteers Español

DOCUMENTS Employee Pledge to Promote Safe…

For purposes of this policy only, Church Personnel includes all individuals who minister, work, or volunteer in any school, parish, or ministry of the Archdiocese whose compliance with this policy is sought.

Church Personnel shall mean all of the following: Clergy: All priests and deacons who have faculties in the Archdiocese

Employee: Any lay individual who is employed by, or engaged in, ministry who is given payment for services (any form of compensation, whether monetary or otherwise) rendered in which the obligation to withhold for payroll tax (FICA, Medicare and withholding) exists, whether parttime or full-time. This definition shall include all such persons whether employed by the Archdiocese, parish, school, early childhood center, nursing home, group home, or other Archdiocesan entity that is controlled by or operated by the Archbishop. This definition does not include independent contractors, consultants, vendors or other persons who are not subject to the supervision of the Archdiocese and for whom no such duty to withhold payroll taxes exists.

Religious Brothers and Sisters: Religious brothers and sisters who are regularly involved in ministry on behalf of an entity controlled or operated by the Archdiocese.

Seminarians: Those men enrolled in a seminary as seminarians of the Archdiocese of Miami or who are regularly involved in ministry at an entity controlled or operated by the Archdiocese.

Covered volunteer: Any unpaid person who is engaged in or involved in any archdiocesan institution or parish activity, and who is entrusted with the care or supervision of children or vulnerable adults; or has regular contact with children or vulnerable adults.

Independent contractor: Any non-employed lay individual who is hired or engaged to perform services (for any form of compensation, whether monetary or otherwise) on behalf of the Archdiocese including any parish, school, early childhood center, nursing home, group home or other archdiocesan entity that is controlled by or operated by the Archdiocese.

ral Policy Employees Parish/School Carnival Policy Requirements Volunteers Español

The following is the Safe Environment Policy of the Archdiocese of Miami. All Church Personnel, ages 18 and older, including applicants offered a position, independent contractors and volunteers working with Vulnerable Persons will be required to: Complete the appropriate criminal background process and receive clearance from the Office of Safe Environment. Complete the Pledge to Promote Safe Environment and Virtus training. Covered Volunteers are required to complete the Pledge to Promote Safe Environment and Virtus training. There is no cost to the individual for any of these requirements, as long as the person is affiliated with an Archdiocesan entity.

Safe Environment Program The following is the Safe Environment Policy of the Archdiocese of Miami. All Church Personnel, ages 18 and older, including applicants offered a position, independent contractors and volunteers working with Vulnerable Persons will be required to: Complete the appropriate criminal background process and receive clearance from the Office of Safe Environment. Complete the Pledge to Promote Safe Environment and Virtus training. Covered Volunteers are required to complete the Pledge to Promote Safe Environment and Virtus training. There is no cost to the individual for any of these requirements, as long as the person is affiliated with an Archdiocesan entity.

ral Policy Employees Parish/School Carnival Policy Requirements Volunteers Español

DOCUMENTS Volunteer Pledge to Promote Safe Environment

English Spanish Creole

Covered Volunteer means any unpaid person who is engaged in or involved in any Archdiocesan institution or parish activity, and who is entrusted with the care or supervision of children or vulnerable adults; or has access or regular contact with children or vulnerable adults. If duties are assigned to any volunteer that include the care or supervision of children or vulnerable adults or otherwise involve access or regular contact with children or vulnerable adults, the volunteer is then classified as a Covered Volunteer and fingerprinting, background screening and training are required. Not all volunteers need to be screened for a criminal history. Those volunteers that do not have access or regular contact with children or vulnerable adults and those volunteers who are not entrusted with the care or supervision of children or vulnerable adults need not be screened for a criminal history.

Some examples of volunteers who do not need to be screened for a criminal history are: Volunteer Parish Roles Not Requiring Fingerprinting (VIRTUS Training is Optional) 1. Sacristan duties, unless accessible to altar servers who are minors 2. Altar dressers; persons responsible for washing and maintaining altar linens Lectors Adult choir member, unless practicing and/or performing with minors (children's choir) Cantor Extraordinary Minister of Eucharist (if at Masses only) Bereavement Group Leader Parish Council members; Finance Council members Ladies' Guild, Council of Catholic Women, Bible Study Groups, Ministry groups that do not have unsupervised or regular contact with children Men's and Women's adult organizations that do not have unsupervised or regular contact with children

Volunteer or Vendor School Roles Not Requiring Screening: (if accompanied by an Employee or Covered Volunteer at all times) Presenter at meeting or event Career Day type events (participant or person staffing a booth) Repair person It is anticipated that the above-listed volunteers' duties will not involve the supervision or care of children or vulnerable adults and will not involve regular contact with children or vulnerable adults.

Archdiocesan Policy Creating and Maintaining a Safe Environment for Children and Vulnerable Adults U.S. Bishops' Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People

DOCUMENTS Child Abuse Prevention Blessing Office Brochure Promise to Protect/Pledge to Heal Prayer Brochure

Promise to Protect/Pledge to Heal Poster English Spanish

Promise to Protect/Pledge to Heal Prayer Cards English Spanish

Rosary Guide for Healing and Protection Online Versions: English Spanish Printable Booklet Version: English Spanish Parents and guardians are encouraged to use all the resources available to them to help protect children.

The following websites offer excellent information for providing safe environments: April is Child Abuse Prevention Month

Click on the PDF's to read weekly bulletin announcements. English |

Missingkids.com

NetSmartz.org

Spanish

FDLE

ral Policy Employees Parish/School Carnival Policy Requirements Volunteers Español

In an effort to guard the safety of Vulnerable Persons under the care of the Archdiocese, all Church Personnel, ages 18 and older, will be required to sumbit a completed Criminal Background Check Form as well as a complete set of fingerprints so as to facilitate a criminal background investigation. Eligibility for employment, volunteer work, or ministry will be contingent and conditioned upon a satisfactory background investigation. This background investigation will be updated every five years. This policy applies even if an individual has been cleared through an FBI or FDLE check conducted by their employer or another entity. Volunteers under the age of 18 are not allowed to have unsupervised access to children, youth or vulnerable adults. This includes youth ministers, coaches, mentors, scout leaders, babysitters, etc. These individuals who may assist with children, youth and vulnerable adults must be supervised by a volunteer or employee who has been Virtus trained and has successfully completed a Level 2 Background Check. Because volunteers under the age of 18 are not allowed to have unsupervised access to children, youth or vulnerable adults, they are not screened for criminal history. Virtus training for volunteers under the age of 18 is optional. All Church Personnel, including applicants offered a position, independent contractors and volunteers working with Vulnerable Persons are required to successfully complete safe environment training through the Virtus program. For new Church Personnel, Virtus training must be completed within 45 days of hire. Archdiocesan Policy Creating and Maintaining a Safe Environment for Children and Vulnerable Adults

Español

CONTACT INFO Safe Environment Coordinator

Jan Rayburn 305-762-1250 [email protected]

The archdiocese has identified Teaching Touching Safety as its program for children. Teaching Touching Safety was developed by the same people who developed Virtus. The strong points of this program are that it is age-appropriate, or geared to the different grade levels of children. Also, it is taught by teachers who know the readiness level of the children in their class-room. In addition, parents are able to opt out of the program. Nothing is taught to their children unless they approve. Teaching Touching Safety also includes an educational component for parents. Teaching Touching Safety is a safe environment program that speaks to children at various grade levels in an effort to keep them safe from abuse.

Español

Virtus training sessions run approximately three hours long. Due to the subject matter, children are not allowed in the sessions. Participants will not be allowed to enter if arriving late, nor will their attendance be counted if they leave early. To register for a Virtus "Protecting God's Children for Adults" session, log in to www.virtusonline.org and click on "first time registrant" located on the left hand side of the page. Next choose Archdiocese of Miami as the "organization" and then view a list of sessions available or start the registration process. Follow the prompts.

How To Print Your Virtus Training Certificate Registration for the session is required to get a certificate. If you did not pre-register then post register at www.virtusonline.org by clicking on “first time registrant” located in the column on the left hand side of the page. From here follow the prompts. The facilitator of your training session will fax the sign-in sheets to the Safe Environment Office. Once your signature is on file, your account will be activated. You will receive an automatic e-mail from Virtus indicating your account status at the time of activation. Once activated, you may log in to www.virtusonline.org and enter your user id and password. Next, click on the green Training tab at the top of the page. From here, click on “live training” in the green column to the left. Here you will see an option to print your certificate. The Training tab is also where you can access your monthly bulletins. If you have trouble with this process, please contact the Safe Environment Office at

305-762-1250.

Virtus Training Scheule

e What is the Synod? Focus Teams Focus Team Resources The Synod Snapshot FAQ's Closing Assembly Photos Videos Click on the thumbnails to view pictures

Focus team: Youth ministry

Focus team: Young Adult Ministry

Focus team: Parish Life & Stewardship

Focus team: Adult Faith Formation

Focus team: Liturgy

Synod Year of Faith Mass

Youth Listening Session

Synod Listening Sessions 3

Synod Listening Sessions 2

Synod Listening Sessions 1

Synod Announcement Scroll

Synod Chrism Mass

First Synod Leadership Team meeting

Synod Listening Movements

Synod Focus Deacons

Synod Closing

Leaders Meeting August

Listening Session at Notre Dame d'Haiti

Pilgrimage to Cuba Passenger Information Passenger Name Phone Email Address / FL

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Passport Information Country of Issue Passport Number Expiration Date Date of Birth

What is the name of your parish?

Are you a U.S. citizen? Yes No

Were you born in the U.S.? Yes No

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Friday, August 17th Click to download August 17th radio conversation.

Wednesday, August 15th Click to download August 15th radio conversation.

Monday, August 13th Click to download August 13th radio conversation.

Saturday, August 8th Click to download August 8th radio conversation.

Podcast Archives - Archbishop Thomas Wenski June 2017 May 2017 February 2017 February 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015

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June 2017 May 2017 February 2017 February 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015

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Sunday, December 25th Click to download December 25th radio conversation.

Thirsday, December 11th Click to download December 11th radio conversation.

Thirsday, December 8th Click to download December 8th radio conversation.

Wednesday, December 7th Click to download December 7th radio conversation.

Podcast Archives - Archbishop Thomas Wenski June 2017 May 2017 February 2017 February 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015

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Monday, February 13th Click to download February 13th radio conversation

Monday, February 13th Click to download February 13th radio conversation.

Monday, February 13th Click to download February 13th radio conversation.

Monday, February 13th Click to download February 13th radio conversation.

Podcast Archives - Archbishop Thomas Wenski June 2017 May 2017 February 2017 February 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015

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Tuesday, July 19th Click to download July 19th radio conversation.

Tuesday, July 12th Click to download July 12th radio conversation.

Tuesday, July 5th Click to download July 5th radio conversation.

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June 2017 May 2017 February 2017 February 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015

Wednesday, June 29th Click to download June 29th radio conversation.

Podcast Archives - Archbishop Thomas Wenski June 2017 May 2017 February 2017 February 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015

Wednesday, June 20th Click to download June 20th radio conversation.

Wednesday, June 20th Click to download June 20th radio conversation.

Wednesday, June 20th Click to download June 20th radio conversation.

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Saturday, May 14th Click to download May 14th radio conversation.

Friday, May 13th Click to download May 13th radio conversation.

Thursday, May 12th Click to download May 12th radio conversation.

Wednesday, May 11th Click to download May 11th radio conversation.

Podcast Archives - Archbishop Thomas Wenski June 2017 May 2017 February 2017 February 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015

Thursday, May 17th Click to download May 17th radio conversation.

Thursday, May 17th Click to download May 17th radio conversation.

Thursday, May 17th Click to download May 17th radio conversation.

Thursday, May 17th Click to download May 17th radio conversation.

Podcast Archives - Archbishop Thomas Wenski June 2017 May 2017 February 2017 February 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015

Monday, November 20th Click to download November 20th radio conversation.

Wednesday, November 9th Click to download November 9th radio conversation.

Monday, November 7th Click to download November 7th radio conversation.

Wednesday, November 2nd Click to download November 2nd radio conversation.

Podcast Archives - Archbishop Thomas Wenski Tuesday, November 1st June 2017 May 2017 February 2017 February 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015

Click to download November 1st radio conversation.

Tuesday, November 1st Click to download November 1st radio conversation.

Monday, November 12th Click to download November 12th radio conversation.

Friday, November 9th Click to download November 9th radio conversation.

Thursday, November 8th Click to download November 8th radio conversation.

Wednesday, November 7th Click to download November 7th radio conversation.

Podcast Archives - Archbishop Thomas Wenski Wednesday, November 5th June 2017 May 2017 February 2017 February 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015

Click to download November 5th radio conversation.

Wednesday, November 5th Click to download November 5th radio conversation.

Friday, November 2nd Click to download November 2nd radio conversation.

Thursday, November 1st Click to download November 1st radio conversation.

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Monday, October 26th Click to download October 26th radio conversation.

Podcast Archives - Archbishop Thomas Wenski June 2017 May 2017 February 2017 February 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015

Wednesday, October 31st Click to download October 31st radio conversation.

Tuesday, October 30th Click to download October 30th radio conversation.

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Tuesday, September 29th Click to download September 29nd radio conversation.

Tuesday, September 27th Click to download September 27th radio conversation.

Monday, September 26th Click to download September 26th radio conversation.

Thursday, September 22nd Click to download September 22nd radio conversation.

Podcast Archives - Archbishop Thomas Wenski Wednesay, September 21st June 2017 May 2017 February 2017 February 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015

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Monday, September 19th Click to download September 19th radio conversation.

Friday, September 7th Click to download September 7th radio conversation.

Thursday, September 6th Click to download September 6th radio conversation.

Wednesday, September 5th Click to download September 5th radio conversation.

Tuesday, September 4th Click to download September 4th radio conversation.

Podcast Archives - Archbishop Thomas Wenski Monday, September 3th June 2017 May 2017 February 2017 February 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015

Click to download September 3th radio conversation.

e Pontifical Mission Societies Mission Cooperative Plan Amor en Accion CONTACT INFO Director of the Propagation of the Faith

Fr. David Zirilli 305-762-1236 305-762-1249 [email protected] Director

Teresita Gonzalez 9401 Biscayne Boulevard Miami Shores, FL 33138

DOCUMENTS WMS Poster 2017

English /

Spanish

WMS Clipart 2017

English /

Spanish

WMS Clipart BW 2017

English /

Spanish

World Mission Sunday, organized by the Propagation of the Faith, is a day set aside for Catholics worldwide to recommit themselves to the Church's missionary activity through prayer and sacrifice. Offerings collected every year from Catholics in the United States, on World Mission Sunday, are combined with offerings to the Propagation of the Faith worldwide to serve the needs of the Catholic Church in the Missions. The World Mission Sunday is a time for each of us to remember and reflect upon our own baptismal call to mission and how we can live that in our daily lives, while we join is support of the urgent needs in the global mission.

We can arrange for a guest speaker, materials and ideas to help promote World Mission Sunday in your parish, classroom or ministry. Call the Mission Office today!

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ect Life State Conference Prayer Vigils Project Rachel Upcoming Events

Abortion Clinic Prayer Vigils A prayerful witness to end the atrocity of abortion in America. Our prayers are directed to the unborn, their mothers and fathers, all who promote and carry out abortion, and our nation who sanctions this holocaust.

Every Saturday From 10 a.m.-noon, abortion site located at: 8603 S. Dixie Highway, Kendall 1 Plaza, Suite 102, Miami. From 7-8 a.m., abortion site located at: Centro Calle 8 Shopping Center, 2742 S.W. 8 St., Miami.

First Saturday of the month From 8-9 a.m., abortion site located at: 3829 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood. From 8-9 a.m., abortion site located at: 6161 Miramar Parkway, Miramar.

Second Saturday of the month From 8:45-10 a.m., abortion site located at: 7707 N. University Drive, Tamarac (Meet for 8 a.m. Mass at St. Malachy, 6200 John Horan Terrace, Tamarac). From 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., abortion site located at: 3250 S. Dixie Highway, Miami.

Third Saturday of the month From 9-10 a.m., abortion site located at: 263 N. University Drive, Pembroke Pines

Fourth Saturday of the month From 9 to 10:30 a.m., abortion site located at: 3600 N.W. 79 Ave., Doral. Diocesan Guidelines for presence at an abortion clinic

Note Please park on adjacent streets not to block other local businesses. Please remember to adhere to Diocesan Guidelines for presence at an abortion clinic.

Type the shortcut: www.miamiarch.org/respectlife on your browser to come back to this page on the web site.

"For me, prayer is a surge of the heart; it is a simple look turned toward heaven, it is a cry of recognition and of love, embracing both trial and joy." - CCC, no 2558, citing St. Therese of Liseux, Manuscrits Autobiographiques, C 25r

Help us pray for your specific situation by filling out the online request form. Every request sent to us receives loving, compassionate attention. The your intentions.

Servants of the Pierced Hearts of Jesus and Mary and the

Carmelite Fathers and Brothers will pray daily for

Users are limited to submitting one request every three days; each request is limited to 150 characters. Due to privacy, please, do not use last names, use initials. All requests are reviewed for content; when approved they will be posted on the website for the public to view. Prayer requests will remain active for 30 days.

Type the shortcut: www.miamiarch.org/prayers on your browser to come back to this page on the web site.

Submit a Prayer Request.

Groups Chivalric Orders Professional Groups CONTACT INFO President

Felipe E. Vizcarrondo, M.D., M.A. Chaplain

Father Alfred Cioffi [email protected]

Catholic Medical Association, Miami Guild The Catholic Medical Association is a national, physician-led community of healthcare professionals that informs, organizes, and inspires its members, in steadfast fidelity to the teachings of the Catholic Church, to uphold the principles of the Catholic faith in the science and practice of medicine. Their goal is to inspire physicians to imitate Jesus Christ. The Miami Guild is open to medical professionals as well as medical students. Members meet every other month. One of their activities is an annual Hippocratic Oath Mass where all physicians and medical students present take the Catholic Hippocratic Oath.

CONTACT INFO President

William Mulligan c/o Espinosa / Trueba PL 1428 Brickell Ave., Suite 100, Miami FL 33131 Spiritual Advisor

Father Eduardo Alvarez, SJ miamicatholiclawyers.com/

Miami Catholic Lawyers Guild An association of Catholic lawyers in Miami-Dade County dedicated to fostering spiritual growth and fellowship among Catholic lawyers, judges, law students and others involved in the legal profession; enhancing appreciation for and observance of high ethical standards in the practice of law; and encouraging attentiveness among legal practitioners to the weightier matters of the law justice, mercy and faith; so that their competence in secular disciplines may serve to promote human dignity and the common good, to the glory of God. Sponsors an annual Red Mass at Gesu Church, where members meet the third Friday of every month after the noon Mass.

CONTACT INFO President

Robert Bulfin 954-565-6002 [email protected] Spiritual Director

Father Anthony Mulderry redmass.com

St. Thomas More Society of South Florida An organization of Catholic lawyers in the South Florida community, founded in 1989, and dedicated to the advancement of the principles of St. Thomas More, the patron saint of lawyers and politicians. Each year the Society sponsors The Red Mass, a traditional Roman Catholic ceremony with a long and rich history, at St. Anthony Church in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, as well as a reception and banquet following the Mass at a Fort Lauderdale hotel.

Moral theologian and geneticist Native of Cuba, ordained May 11, 1985 for the Archdiocese of Miami. Doctorate in moral theology, Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome. Doctorate in genetics, Purdue University, Indiana. Florida Blue Endowed Chair in Bioethics and director, Institute for Bioethics, at St. Thomas University, Miami Gardens. Chaplain, Catholic Medical Association, Miami Guild.

Editor, Miami edition, Florida Catholic newspaper Editor, Miami edition, the Florida Catholic since January 2002; produced "Conversations with Archbishop Favalora", Radio Peace, from 1995-2010. Began working for the Archdiocese of Miami as intern editor of La Voz Católica in summer 1979; returned to The Voice in 1980, becoming news editor in 1982; worked for The Voice and Florida Catholic as freelancer and part-timer from 1989-2001. Graduate of Immaculate Conception School, Hialeah; Msgr. Edward Pace High School, Miami Gardens; and Barry University, Miami Shores. Married, two children, member of Our Lady of the Lakes Parish, Miami Lakes. Born in Havana, Cuba; has lived in New York, Puerto Rico and Miami. Married to Niní, father and grandfather; member of Our Lady of Guadalupe Church, Doral. Worked in financial field; also possesses master's degree in Hispanic ministries from Barry University. Lifetime involvement in the Catholic Church includes membership in Federación de Juventudes Cubanas (Catholic Youth Association) in Cuba; leadership of Unión de Cubanos en el Exilio youth group in New York; involvement in pre-marriage, marriage and family life programs in Puerto Rico. Assisted in the celebration of the CELAM (Latin American bishops) conference in San Juan, Puerto Rico in 1976. Conducted workshops on liturgy and facilitates Lay Ministry groups for Archdiocese of Miami; facilitates online courses on religious studies for the University of Dayton. Participant in both archdiocesan Synods. Recipient of the archdiocese's Primum Regnum Dei Medal in 1998.

Florida Catholic / La Voz Catóica correspondent Fulltime wife and mother, freelance writer, member of St. Timothy Parish, Miami Has a bachelor's degree in journalism and international relations from the University of Miami and a master's degree in theology from Boston College Joined the staff of La Voz Católica in 2003 and served as reporter until 2007, when she left to become a stay-at-home mom; she and her husband are the proud parents of five children Serves as leader in the Magis Retreat program, based on the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola, and is a member of Christian Life Communities Co-author of "The Infertility Companion for Catholics" (Ave Maria Press) "Pray as though everything depended on God. Work as though everything depended on you." A native of Lake Worth and parishioner of Sacred Heart Church there, Archbishop Wenski entered St. John Vianney (then a high school seminary) in ninth grade and completed his studies at St. Vincent de Paul Seminary in Boynton Beach 12 years later. He was ordained a priest of the Archdiocese of Miami in 1976 and served at Corpus Christi Parish in Miami until 1979; from 1979 to 1997, he served at Notre Dame d'Haiti and ministered to Haitians throughout south Florida. He was appointed auxiliary bishop of Miami in 1997, and coadjutor bishop of Orlando in 2003. He served as bishop of Orlando from 2004 until June 1, 2010, when he was installed as Miami's fourth archbishop. Education Coordinator, Archdiocesan Respect Life Ministry Began working for the Archdiocese of Miami as the Education Coordinator for the Respect Life Office in 1990. Public speaker on the life issues, as well as establishing and coordinating a pro-life speakers bureau. Hosted the radio program, “Life Matters,” on Radio Peace for 12 years. Assists in the coordination and facilitation of Project Rachel, a diocesan post-abortion reconciliation program. Ordained to the priesthood July 5, 1959 for the Diocese of Matanzas, Cuba, he was expelled from his homeland by the communist regime on Sept. 17, 1961 along with 132 fellow priests and Havana's Auxiliary Bishop Eduardo Boza Masvidal. Ministered in the Diocese of Temuco, Chile from 1962 to 1996, when he came to south Florida, where in 1967 he was appointed rector of the yet-to-be constructed Shrine of Our Lady of Charity on Biscayne Bay. Named auxiliary bishop of Miami March 24, 1979, becoming the first Cuban in 200 years to be appointed bishop in the U.S. Retired from active ministry May 5, 2003, he continues to work as rector emeritus of what is now the National Shrine of Our Lady of Charity.

St. Augustine Church and Catholic Student Center Freelance news writer and blogger based in Miami; has written and photographed for the Florida Catholic since 2009. Has a degree in religious studies from Florida International University as well as a certificate in Judaic studies. Has worked and served in college and young adult ministry for several years, including Encuentros Juveniles. When not writing, she enjoys photography, traveling, attending cultural events and a good conversation. Worked for the Archdiocese of Miami in Radio Paz/Radio Peace and La Voz Católica until November 2003, when she moved to Georgia and worked for the Archdiocese of Atlanta's Office of AIDS Ministry. Co-founder of the Southeastern Conference of Catholic AIDS Ministers (SECCAM), a non-profit organization that provides formation and spiritual enrichment opportunities to Catholic AIDS ministers. Worked for an Atlanta-area organization that provides housing opportunities to persons living with HIV or AIDS who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. Favorite quote: From the Missionaries of Charity: "God still entrusts us to one another."

Executive Director, Catholic Hospice President and chief executive officer of Catholic Hospice since May 2007. Has more than 10 years of experience in the hospice health care industry. Received his bachelor of business administration with a focus on marketing from Texas Tech University and is a board certified clinical associate, member of the American Board of Certified Managed Care Providers.

Principal, Sts. Peter and Paul School, Miami Obtained a bachelor's degree in education, a master's in secondary education and a doctorate in instructional leadership from the University of Miami, as well as certification in elementary education from Barry University. Taught in archdiocesan Catholic schools since 1967; served as assistant principal of Sts. Peter and Paul School, Miami, from 1981 to 1990; principal of St. Agatha School, Miami, from 1990-2001; principal of Sts. Peter and Paul School since 2001. Received the Papal Medal Benemerenti in 2008; named National Catholic Educational Association Distinguished Principal in 2000. President and CEO of Catholic Relief Services since January 2012; she had served on its board of directors from 2004 to 2010. Born and raised in Hong Kong; immigrated to the U.S. to attend Purdue University, where she earned bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate degrees. From 1997 to 2011, served as dean of the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business; previously served as associate executive vice president for academic affairs at Purdue University. Married, two children; author of “Working for a Better World,” published in 2015 by Our Sunday Visitor Catholic Relief Services (CRS) is the official international humanitarian agency of the Catholic community in the U.S.

Cesar Baldelomar Executive Director, Pax Romana Center for International Study of Catholic Social Teaching Will start pursuing Master of Theological Studies at Harvard Divinity School, Harvard University in fall 2009 Theology teacher, Archbishop Curley-Notre Dame High School, Miami 2008 graduate, St. Thomas University, with majors in Global Leadership and Religious Studies and minors in Philosophy and History.

Cesar Baldelomar's Blog Archive

Director, Lay Ministry and Adult Faith Formation Has been with the department for five years. "This is what we are about. We plant the seeds that one day will grow, we water seeds already planted, knowing that they hold future promise. We lay foundations that will need further development. We provide yeast that produces effects far beyond our capabilities. We cannot do everything, and there is a sense of liberation in realizing that. This enables us to do something and to do it very well. It may be incomplete, but it is a beginning, a step along the way, an opportunity for the Lord's grace to enter and do the rest. We may never see the end results, but that is the difference between the master builder and the worker. We are the workers, not master builders, ministers, not messiahs. We are prophets of a future not our own. May that future be filled with grace, peace, and hope." — martyred Archbishop Oscar Romero of El Salvador

The Florida Catholic Has interned as a reporter/photographer at the Florida Catholic, Miami, since spring 2014. Earned a bachelor’s degree in English literature and composition from Florida International University in 2013, and an Associate in Arts from Miami Dade College in 2010. A parishioner at Immaculate Conception Church in Hialeah. Favorite quote: “Not all those who wander are lost.” Born and raised in Miami, a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design. Member of Our Lady of the Lakes Parish, Miami Lakes, married to Elisa, father of two. Has participated in YAMI (Young Adult Ministry Institute), St. Brendan's Young Adult Group, Office of Lay Ministry's School of Ministry, Bible study at his parish, Catholic Scripture program at St. Thomas University and Amor en Acción (lay missionary group). Creator of the "MassExplained" iPad app and founder of Ampersand Design Group and Agnus Gift Shop.

Father Daniel Martin Born in Miami to Indian immigrants, raised in Coral Springs, a graduate of St. Andrew School there and St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Fort Lauderdale Graduated from Fordham University with a bachelor's degree in philosophy Earned a pre-theology certificate from St. John Vianney College Seminary and a Master of Divinity from St. Vincent de Paul Seminary in Boynton Beach Ordained for the Archdiocese of Miami in May 2013; assigned as parochial vicar to Little Flower Parish, Coral Gables

Freelance Photojournalist Daniel Soñé is a freelance photojournalist based in Washington, D.C. He grew up in Miami and graduated from Florida International University He has written and reported for the Florida Catholic since 2004 Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., studied architectural drafting and became a commercial kitchen designer after serving in the Navy; eventually started his own business. Moved to North Miami in 1969 with his first wife, Yolanda, and their daughter; after Yolanda’s death, he married Charlotte. They have been married over 43 years, with five children (his, hers and ours), nine grandchildren and two great grandchildren. Ordained a permanent deacon Nov. 20, 1999, at age 66, and assigned to his home parish, St. Mark in Southwest Ranches. Author and presenter, from 2001 to 2009, of a three-day parish mission based on Divine Mercy, “Three Days with the Lord” In 2009, started a prayer group called Adorers of the Blessed Sacrament (

adorersoftheblessedsacrament.com), to encourage men, women and children to experience exposition of the Blessed Sacrament and believe.

In the real presence of Jesus. All St. Mark School and religious education students become members once they receive their first Communion. Quote: “I was a poor to average student. The one thing that made a deep impression on me was being taught who Jesus Christ was. I knew that no matter what happened in my life He would always take care of me.” Ordained a permanent deacon for the Archdiocese of Miami in 2008. Has a master’s in theology from The Augustine Institute, Denver, Colo.; is a Master Catechist with the archdiocese; and a member of the Fellowship of Catholic Scholars. Serves as coordinator of Adult Faith Formation at St. Bonaventure Parish in Davie.

Executive Director, Office for the Diaconate Ordained a permanent deacon for the Archdiocese of Miami Nov. 17, 2001 Became executive director of the archdiocesan Office for the Diaconate and Director of Formation in January, 2005 Obtained a licentiate in theology from the Angelicum, The Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas, Rome, in 2008 "The will of God will never take you where His grace will not protect you"

The Archdiocesan Office of Detention Ministry Ordained to the permanent diaconate June 11, 2005 for the Archdiocese of Miami Member of Our Lady of Divine Providence Parish, Sweetwater Married for 25 years, father of a 21-year-old daughter Former elementary school teacher and catechist in Argentina; currently completing a bachelor's degree in Organizational Leadership at St. Thomas University Director, Archdiocese of Miami Office of Detention Ministry, since 2006 "Speak up and judge fairly; defend the rights of the poor and needy." (Proverbs 31:9)

Dennis Rohan Director of Religious Formation Schott Center, Fort Lauderdale Joined Schott Communities in March 2008 after serving as Director of Religious Education at St. Bernadette Parish in Hollywood from 2000-2006. Received a bachelor’s in Business Administration from Baruch College and has continued his education at Barry University in theology, spirituality and counseling; completed the two-year Graduate Advocate Program at St. Thomas University and two-year Lay Ministry Program of the Archdiocese of Miami. Has expanded Schott’s religious education for children who were deaf or disabled, specifically to reach out to autistic children. This unique program prepares deaf, disabled or autistic children, sometimes with one-on-one teaching, for the sacraments of Reconciliation, Eucharist and Confirmation.

Dennis Rohan's Blog Archive

Has been working in the field of blindness and visual impairments since 1981 Earned a master's degree in visual disabilities from Florida State University in 1980 and a master's degree in pastoral ministries from St. Thomas University in 2009 Currently works as public awareness project leader for Lighthouse of Broward, pioneering a new program -the first in the nation - that includes the spiritual component in the rehabilitation process Has worked with local Catholic churches and religious educators to make parishes more aware of the needs of the visually impaired, and to help the visually impaired "see" their churches by taking tactile tours of their sanctuaries Attends Blessed Sacrament Church in Oakland Park Pediatric cardiologist with a master’s degree in bioethics; president of the Miami Guild of the Catholic Medical Association. Currently affiliate associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, and on the faculty of the Institute of Bioethics and Health Policy. Graduate of Temple University Medical School in Philadelphia; residency in pediatrics at University Hospital, University of Puerto Rico Medical Sciences Campus; training in pediatric cardiology at University Hospital, Puerto Rico, and Kings County Medical Center, New York University. As active duty U.S. Air Force officer, held positions as chair of the Department of Pediatrics, program director of Pediatric Residency, and chief of the medical staff at major medical centers of the Department of Defense; was on the faculty of the Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland; and was affiliate scholar at the Georgetown University Center for Clinical Bioethics, Georgetown University Medical School, Washington, D.C.

Executive Director, Marian Center, since 2002 Licensed psychologist in Pennsylvania and Florida. Employed in both a clinical and administrative capacity with government, for-profit and non-profit organizations (including the Archdiocese of New York) for over 35 years. "Every day is like Christmas for me"! (Juan, one of the adult students who has been attending the Marian Center daily for many years) Born July 11, 1943 in Bayamo, Cuba; ordained June 24, 1972 for the Jesuit Province of the Antilles. Began service in the Archdiocese of Miami in January 1998, as a member of the faculty at Belen Jesuit Preparatory School; taught there until 2006 and then again from 2008 to 2012. Served at Gesu Church in downtown Miami and at St. Kieran Parish, Miami. Received Pro-Ecclesia et Pontifice (For the Church and the Pope) Cross, the highest honor awarded by the Vatican, in March 2013. Frequent contributor to El Nuevo Herald and La Voz Católica. Born in Nicaragua; came to Miami at age 15; graduated from Miami Coral Park Senior High School and entered St. John Vianney College Seminary in Miami. He completed his studies for the priesthood at St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary in Boynton Beach. He blogged about his journey as a seminarian before his ordination as a transitional deacon April 21, 2012. He was ordained a priest for the Archdiocese of Miami on May 11, 2013. He served at Our Lady of Lourdes Parish in Kendall until June 2015, when he was appointed archdiocesan Vocations Director. "When the evening of this life comes, we shall be judged on love" (St. John of the Cross) / "Al atardecer de nuestra vida, seremos juzgados en el amor." (San Juan de la Cruz) Born in Mount Vernon, N.Y., to parents who immigrated from Kerala, India. Lived in Miami since 1982, home parish is St. Louis in Pinecrest. Graduate of Palmetto Senior High School and Florida International University. Worked as a medical social worker at Baptist Hospital before entering St. John Vianney Seminary in Miami. Ordained June 23, 2012. Pastor of St. Pius X in Fort Lauderdale since September 2015.

Pastor, St. Sebastian Parish Grew up in North Miami's Holy Family Parish and attended Archbishop Curley (now Curley Notre Dame) High School. Entered the seminary as a high school senior and was ordained for the Archdiocese of Miami in 1968. Served as director of the Office of Worship from 1978-1984, and as pastor of St. Louis Church in Pinecrest from 1982 to September 2010, when he was appointed pastor of St. Sebastian in Fort Lauderdale. Ordained to the priesthood by Archbishop John C. Favalora on May 8, 2010 at the Cathedral of St. Mary Has served at St. Agnes Parish, Key Biscayne; as director of campus ministry at St. Thomas University; and as parochial vicar at St. John Neumann Church in Kendall. Currently pursuing higher studies in canon law at the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. "In the simplicity of my heart I have given you everything." — Ambrosian Liturgy

Auxiliary Bishop of Miami Oversees the archdiocese of Miami's ministry of Pastoral Services including family life, youth, campus, prison and Respect Life ministries, as well as all the apostolic movements. Ordained a priest: May 30, 1970. Ordained a bishop: January 7, 2004. "He loved them to the end" — John 13, 1

Pastor, St. Brendan Parish, Miami Born in Cuba, arrived in U.S. at age 11. Served as Intelligence Officer during the Vietnam War (1970-1972) at the Department of the Army, Joint Chiefs of Staff. Earned bachelor's degrees in political science and history from FIU; a law degree from Thomas M. Cooley Law School, Michigan; master's degrees in biblical systematic theology and divinity from St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary in Boynton Beach; licentiate in canon law from the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome. Practiced criminal defense law for 13 years before entering the seminary at age 40. Ordained in May 1996; pastor of St. Brendan since March 2003. Quote: "I pray that at the end of my journeying I can always say to my Lord and God: I have tried my best notwithstanding my sinfulness, my omission and imperfections of life - truly Lord, I have tried!"

Vocations Director OA native of Melbourne, Fla., Father Zirilli graduated from the University of Florida with a degree in accounting. Prior to entering the seminary, he worked in private practice as a certified public accountant in the Key Largo area. He was ordained in May 2008, and appointed Vocations Director for the Archdiocese of Miami in September 2010.

Family Life Department Ordained a priest in his native Havana, Cuba, in 1982. Worked in marriage ministry in the Diocese of Cienfuegos-Santa Clara and youth ministry and religious education in the Archdiocese of Santiago before coming to Miami in 1992. Has a licentiate in theology from the Pontifical Salesian University in Rome; a master?s in catechetical theology from the Pontifical University of Salamanca, Spain; and a master?s in marriage and family therapy from St. Thomas University in Miami Gardens. Served as director of the archdiocese?s Family Life Office from 2004 to May 2011.

Belen Jesuit Preparatory School Born Nov. 26, 1969; studied at Fordham University, N.Y. Ordained Sept. 2, 2000, for the Jesuit Order, Antilles province Currently serving as principal of Belen Jesuit Prep in Miami "Vocatus atque non vocatus Deus aderit" (Invoked or not invoked, God is present)

Father Harry Loubriel Director, Archdiocesan Campus Ministry A native of Puerto Rico, the 15th in a family of 18 brothers and sisters Ordained May 14, 2005 for the Archdiocese of Miami Archdiocesan Director of Campus Ministry since June 2008 Favorite quote: “Do this in memory of me.” CLICK HERE to go to The Gathering Place, the Facebook page for St. Thomas University’s campus ministry (You must have an account with Facebook in order to log in to the site)

Father Harry Loubriel's Blog Archive

Pastor, Immaculate Conception, Hialeah Ordained a priest: May 11, 2002 Has served as archdiocesan vocations director; parochial vicar at St. Agnes, Key Biscayne; Mary Help of Christians, Parkland, and St. Gregory, Plantation; and administrator, Our Lady of Divine Providence, Miami. "We love because he first loved us." — 1 John 4:19

Father Roberto Cid Parochial vicar, St. Gregory the Great, Plantation A native of Buenos Aires, Argentina, ordained a priest for the Archdiocese of Miami on May 12, 2007 Obtained a degree in accounting from the Universidad de Buenos Aires and a doctorate in economics from the University of Miami Currently serves as parochial vicar at St. Gregory the Great Parish in Plantation Favorite quote: “Christ, the final Adam, by the revelation of the mystery of the Father and His love, fully reveals man to man.” (Gaudium et Spes, 22)

Father Roberto Cid's Blog Archive

Rector, St. John Vianney College Seminary Appointed rector, St. John Vianney College Seminary in July 2010. Archdiocesan director of vocations January 2009 - August 2010. Pastor of San Isidro, Pompano Beach, 2003-2009. Ordained in 1996 for the Archdiocese of Miami, has served at St. Mary Star of the Sea in Key West and Corpus Christi in Miami, and as director of mission for Catholic Charities.

Sister Mary Ann Walsh Sister Mary Ann Walsh Director Sister Mary Ann Walsh is Director of Media Relations for the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. First profession, June 1967 At USCCB since 1983, when assigned as a reporter to Rome bureau of Catholic News Service Favorite quote: Praise God for His wonderful deeds. (Psalm 150)

Sister Mary Ann Walsh Blog Archive

Co-Director, John Paul II International Film Festival Born in Elizabeth, N.J., moved to Miami at age 13. Currently completing his Bachelor of Fine Arts in English and literature with a minor in theology. Felt a strong calling to the art of film during his freshman year of high school; began writing, directing, and producing his own work alongside his fiancé, Laura Alvarado. Together, they began a production company called 7eventhDay Films. After rediscovering his faith during college, he felt the need to give back to God the talents God had bestowed upon him. “I plead with you. Never doubt. Never tire and become discouraged. I plead with you. Do not sever those very roots from which you spring.” – John Paul II Born in Baltimore, Md., earned a B.A. from St. Mary's Seminary and University, Baltimore, and an M.A. from the University of St. Michael's College, Toronto. Author or editor of 21 books including “Witness to Hope: The Biography of Pope John Paul II.” Recipient of 15 honorary doctorates, the papal cross Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice, and the Gloria Artis Gold Medal by the Republic of Poland. Serves on the boards of directors of several organizations dedicated to human rights and religious freedom; member of the editorial board of First Things. Currently serves as Distinguished Senior Fellow of the Ethics and Public Policy Center. His weekly column is distributed by the Denver Catholic Register, official newspaper of the Archdiocese of Denver (

www.archden.org/weigel.)

Gloria Luna Director of Social Advocacy, Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Miami 2 years at the Office of Social Advocacy Favorite quote: “The whole idea of compassion is based on a keen awareness of the interdependence of all these living beings, which are all part of one another, and all involved in one another.” — Thomas Merton

Gloria Luna's Blog Archive

Pope Francis announced an Extraordinary Jubilee Year, the Holy Year of Mercy, on March 13, 2015, with these words: “… I have decided to announce an Extraordinary Jubilee which has at its center the mercy of God. It will be a Holy Year of Mercy. We want to live in the light of the word of the Lord: “Be merciful, even as your Father is merciful” (cf. Lk 6:36). And this especially applies to confessors! So much mercy! “This Holy Year will commence on the next Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception and will conclude on Sunday, 20 November 2016, the Solemnity of Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe and living face of the Father's mercy. I entrust the organization of this Jubilee to the Pontifical Council for Promoting the New Evangelization… “I am confident that the whole Church, which is in such need of mercy for we are sinners, will be able to find in this Jubilee the joy of rediscovering and rendering fruitful God’s mercy, with which we are all called to give comfort to every man and every woman of our time. Do not forget that God forgives all, and God forgives always. Let us never tire of asking forgiveness…” Born and raised in Miami, Ion is the youngest of seven brothers born to Nicaraguan parents. He attended Miami Coral Park High school, graduated in May 2009, and entered the seminary that August; he is currently finishing his senior year at St. John Vianney College Seminary. He enjoys playing sports, especially basketball and fishing. He has gone on mission to Mexico twice and spent two months this summer studying Creole in Haiti. His home parish is St. Michael the Archangel in Miami. "To love another is to see the face of God." (Victor Hugo, Les Miserables) Born in the Bronx, N.Y., married to Alma Nelly; four children. Graduated from St. Thomas University in 1987 with a bachelor’s in athletic administration; earned master’s in theology (1995) and Doctor of Ministry (1999) degrees from Barry University. Teaches religion at Christopher Columbus High School in Miami, where his students know him as “Doc Dugard”. Serves as deacon at St. Louis Parish in Pinecrest and for the Respect Life Ministry.

Jane Radetsky Vice-President, Archdiocesan Council, St. Vincent de Paul Society Involved with the St. Vincent de Paul Society for more than 25 years President of the Central Miami-Dade District Council and former president of the Archdiocesan Council of Miami which covers Miami-Dade, Broward and Monroe counties Director of “Vincentians” magazine; director of the Radio Paz program of the St. Vincent de Paul Society which is broadcast every Sunday, 3-5 p.m., on 830 AM. Favorite quote: “Since I am retired now, all my time and efforts as a volunteer are dedicated solely to the St. Vincent de Paul Society. My only desire and aspiration is to always be on the side of the poor and marginalized.”

Jane Radetsky's Blog Archive

Born in New York City, she made her religious profession July 2, 1966. Worked in the Archdiocese of Miami for 24 years, including serving as principal of St. Mary Cathedral School from 1988 to 2008. Elected General Superior of the Sisters of St. Joseph of St. Augustine July 31, 2010.

Virtus training coordinator Safe Environment Coordinator, Archdiocese of Miami, since 2008. Previously worked as a freelancer for the archdiocesan Communications Department. Married, two children, parishioner at St. Rose of Lima, Miami Shores. "I will both lie down in peace, and sleep; for You alone, O Lord, make me dwell in safety." — (Psalm 4:8)

Founder/superior Franciscan Brothers of Life Has a background in spiritual theology and psycho-education; prior to embracing the consecrated life, he was a widowed dad of a son and daughter. Formerly a Capuchin-Franciscan missionary in the Caribbean; served as director of Pastoral Care at the Kennedy Institute of the Archdiocese of Washington; has served persons with developmental disabilities for over 40 years. Came to the Archdiocese of Miami in 2002, after a three-year mission in Guayaquil, Ecuador, where he served as the founding dean of the first college of human ecology in South America. Founder and director of Project Joseph, an apostolate under the auspices of the Respect Life Ministry which provides education, counseling and material assistance to fathers in crisis and dealing with unexpected pregnancies. The Franciscan Brothers of Life is an emerging Franciscan community in the Archdiocese of Miami. The brothers have a two-fold mission: to proclaim the Gospel of Life in the manner of St. Francis of Assisi and to do penance in atonement for those who embrace the culture of death. Quote: "Deus eligit stultus." (God chooses the foolish).

Director, Archdiocese of Miami Respect Life Ministry Involved in archdiocesan Respect Life Ministry, serving as associate director, since 1984, as director since 2006. Married, mother of 4 daughters, grandmother of 2. Member of St. Bernadette Parish, Hollywood. "Why has such privilege been granted to us - to defend Him in His least ones!"

Editor, Miami edition, Florida Catholic newspaper Born in Spain, ordained June 24, 1962 for the Archdiocese of Madrid. Came to South Florida as a missionary in 1964, as part of the Spanish bishops' organization, the Obra de Cooperación Sacerdotal Hispano Americana (OCSHA). Served at a number of parishes throughout South Florida, including as administrator of St. Ann Mission in Naranja and St. Benedict Parish in Hialeah. Taught at St. John Vianney Seminary, served as director of Cursillo, the Permanent Diaconate Office and Pax Catholic Communications. Became pastor of St. Agnes Parish, Key Biscayne, in 1993. Named chaplain to His Holiness, with the title of Monsignor, in January 2013. Retired from active ministry July 1, 2014.

Teacher, Principal and Superintendent of Schools. Born in Pittsburgh; has spent her entire career in Catholic schools, working as a teacher, principal and superintendent of schools in Gary, Ind., and most recently in Monterey, Calif. Obtained a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Pittsburgh, and a Master of Science and Ph. D. in Educational Administration from Purdue University. Married to David Pryzbylski; two sons, David and Michael. "Always look forward, never back." (Junipero Serra)

Member of St. Gregory Parish, Plantation Born in from Long Island, N.Y., has lived in South Florida for more than 30 years and raised four children; member and spiritual director at St. Gregory Parish, Plantation. Received certification in spiritual companioning from St. Thomas University in Miami and certification in spiritual direction from Steubenville University. Christian artist/ speaker/retreat director; founder and lead singer for evangelistic ensemble Linda Rose and Company; author of The Keys to Freedom retreat; representative of non-profit ministry, Answered Prayers Cross; author of "Strength for Your Journey Devotional Companion" and its Spanish translation, "Fortaleza para el Viaje Compañero Devocional", both of which have received the "imprimatur" from Archbishop Thomas Wenski. “I have promised the Lord to use my God-given talents of creativity, art and music to create programs for the purpose of allowing people to experience God in their lives.”

Advertising Sales Executive Has a degree from Marymount Manhattan College and worked as an advertising sales executive. Currently serves as Director of Programs with Schott Communities. Before that, worked with Schott, and also with Best Buddies, as a volunteer. "As a parent of a daughter who is developmentally disabled, I have a particular passion and desire to serve organizations that provide programs, services and opportunities for the special needs community."

Director, Family Life Ministry Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico; obtained a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration in 1986, a Juris Doctor in 1990, and is currently completing her Master in Practical Theology at Barry University. Practiced law for 20 years, 18 of which she has served in the ministry of evangelization, marriage and family life. Collaborates with the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops as Content Development Editor for www.portumatrimonio.org and as consultant to the Ad Hoc Committee for the Promotion and Defense of Marriage. Appointed archdiocesan director of Family Life Ministry in July 2011; married to Ricardo Luzondo; one son, Sebastian. “The Lord is the owner of time, but he has no time to waste time.”

Maria Jerkins Director, archdiocesan Office of Black Catholic Affairs Born in Miami, mother of two young men, grandmother of one grandson, member of Holy Redeemer Parish in Liberty City Taught English, reading, social studies and typing to students in junior high school; served as principal of Charles Drew Middle School for five years, and Allapattah Junior High/Middle School for 12 years Has served as director of the Office of Black Catholic Affairs for the past 16 years

Maria Jerkin's Blog Archive

Born in Cuba, exiled to New York at age 2, moved to Surfside for work at age 37. Member of St. Patrick Parish, Miami Beach, where she was a team leader for the Emmaus retreat group and founded the Flowers for Mothers ministry. Has a bachelor’s degree in psychology and master’s in business administration as well as certificates in Clinical Pastoral Education, Spiritual Direction (St. Thomas University) and Catholic Studies (Archdiocesan Office of Lay Ministry). Most recently worked at chaplain/director of spirituality at Signature Healthcare Center of Waterford in Hialeah Gardens. Currently studying fulltime for a Master’s in Practical Theology at Barry University while working as a graduate assistant in the Campus Ministry office.

Director, Archdiocesan Religious Education Department Earned certification as master catechist in the Archdiocese of Los Angeles. Obtained Bachelor of Arts in Religious Studies and certification in Hispanic Pastoral Ministry from Mount St. Mary's College, Los Angeles; Master of Arts in pastoral ministries from St. Thomas University, Miami Gardens; and is in the process of obtaining a doctorate in ministry from Barry University, Miami Shores. Served as director of religious education at St. Dominic Parish in Miami and San Isidro in Pompano Beach. Joined the staff of the archdiocesan Religious Education Department in 2003; named director in 2008.

Vice-President of Public Relations, Catholic Health Services Is vice-president of public relations for Catholic Health Services, the largest sub-acute continuum of care organization in the southeast US, and a healthcare and social services ministry of the Archdiocese of Miami. She has been with Catholic Health Services nearly 12 years and in marketing, advertising and public relations over 25, including running her own business for six years. She lives in Coral Springs and has two sons.

Maria Teresa Perez Principal, Blessed Trinity School, Miami Springs Born in Perth Amboy, N.J., Maria Teresa Perez attended Our Lady of the Most Holy Rosary Elementary School there; she then obtained a degree in elementary education from Florida International University, a master’s in primary education from Nova Southeastern University, and a certificate in educational leadership and administration from St Thomas University Taught in the public school system from 1989 to 2000, when she started at Blessed Trinity School in Miami Springs as an English and history teacher; she is beginning her seventh year as principal Is a member of Blessed Trinity Parish, where she lectors and is part of the Emmaus Women’s Group Has been married for 23 years and has two daughters at Our Lady of Lourdes Academy in Miami Favorite quote: “Give thanks in all circumstances” (1 Thessalonians 5:16-18)

Maria Teresa Perez's Blog Archive

Family Program Coordinator, Family Enrichment Center Began her “great adventure” of service in the Archdiocese of Miami in 2005, serving as campus minister for Broward College and Nova Southeastern University until 2008. Now serves as family program coordinator for the Family Life Ministry. Greatly enjoys sharing God’s love and hope through words and songs via her music ministry. One of her many favorite saints: St. Therese of Lisieux. “We love because He first loved us.” (1 Jn 4:19)

Mary St. Pierre A native of Green Bay, Wis., immersed in the world of communications since college at the University of Wisconsin Joined the U.S. Navy and was assigned as the photojournalist for the Blue Angels Flight Team Worked at secular newspapers for 15 years before becoming Orlando diocesan reporter for the Florida Catholic in 1990. She also served as special sections editor, associate editor and managing editor before assuming her current position as parish services manager. Married to Dan, a graduate of Sts. Peter and Paul School and La Salle High School in Miami, they have four children and four grandchildren, and are members of St. Stephen Parish in Winter Springs.

Mary St. Pierre's Blog Archive

Born in Croydon, England; attended Jesuit High School in New York City, then served in the U.S. Army for three years. Obtained a bachelor’s in sociology, with a focus on the family, from St. Michael’s College in Vermont; a master’s in social work from St. Louis University; and a doctorate in sociology, with emphasis on the family, from St. John’s University, New York. Taught at Fordham from 1958 to 1965, when he moved to Miami to open Barry University’s School of Social Work; in addition to teaching at Barry, he also has taught at the University of Houston; St. Leo College, Tampa; Biscayne College/St. Thomas University; and St. John Vianney Seminary. Taught the four-evening Pre-Cana classes for the Archdiocese of Miami from 1975 to 2000, during which time he also was in private practice as a marriage and family counselor. Has been married for 52 years to his second wife, Lucille; his first wife died after 10 years of marriage. They have five children and nine grandchildren and attend St. Malachy Parish in Tamarac and St. Gregory the Great in Plantation.

Pastor, Little Flower, Coral Gables Born in Hamilton, Ohio. Studied at the Pontifical College Josephinum in Columbus, Ohio; the North American College in Rome; and St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary in Boynton Beach. Ordained a priest for the Archdiocese of Miami in May 1990. Pastor of Little Flower Church, Coral Gables, since June 2011. "Sometimes I feel like Obi Wan or Luke Skywalker with the light saber, battling the forces of evil." Born and raised in Fort Lauderdale; graduate of St. Anthony School and St. Thomas Aquinas High School; Earned bachelor’s in philosophy (St. John Vianney College Seminary, Miami); masters in divinity and theology (St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary, Boynton Beach); licentiate in canon law (Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C.); doctorate in canon law (Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome). Ordained for the Archdiocese of Miami, May 21, 1988. Has served as parochial vicar at Holy Family, North Miami, and St. Rose of Lima, Miami Shores; as priest-secretary to Archbishop John C. Favalora; and as archdiocesan chancellor. Currently pastor of St. Andrew Church, Coral Springs, and adjutant judicial vicar, Metropolitan Tribunal. Native of Nicaragua; moved to Miami as a young adult. Founded the Servants of the Pierced Hearts of Jesus and Mary 25 years ago; it is the first order to be instituted in the Archdiocese of Miami. The order embraces the maternal love of Mary, trusting that through her heart people will be led to the heart of Jesus. Quote: "For love, nothing is impossible. Love can triumph. Love can build a home, simply if we?re faithful."

President, St. Thomas University Ordained May 1967, received title of monsignor in 1979. Has served as president of St. Thomas University since 1994. "And he gave some as apostles, others as prophets, others as evangelists, others as pastors and teachers, to equip the holy ones for the work of ministry, for building up the body of Christ" - (Ephesians 4:11-12)

Pastor, St. Augustine Church and Catholic Student Center Ordained a priest for the Archdiocese of Miami on May 11, 1991. Served as priest-secretary to Archbishop Edward A. McCarthy and Archbishop John C. Favalora. Has a degree in exceptional student education, with a specialization in autism, from Florida International University. Appointed rector of St. John Vianney College Seminary in 2005. Named pastor of St. Augustine Church and Catholic Student Center in August 2010. "Trust Him when dark doubts assail thee; trust Him when trust is small. Trust Him when simply to trust Him is the hardest thing of all." -Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen

Director, Office of Worship and Spiritual Life Ordained for the Archdiocese of Miami Oct. 18, 1980. Obtained a doctorate in liturgy from the Pontifical Institute of Liturgy, Rome, in 1996. Became rector of St. Mary Cathedral in 1999 and director of the archdiocesan Office of Worship and Spiritual Life in 2002. Serves as North American chaplain to the Patrons of the Arts in the Vatican Museums, a group dedicated to the preservation and perpetuation of the Vatican's vast and unique collection of art.

Priest of the Diocese of Cleveland Msgr. Richard Antall is a priest of the Diocese of Cleveland who spent the past 20 years as a missionary in El Salvador. He has written about his missionary experience for the national Catholic weekly, Our Sunday Visitor. He also has written three books of theological reflections rooted in his work among the poor, "The Way of Compassion" (1997), "Witnesses to Calvary" (2000), and "Jesus Has a Question for You" (2002). This is the first in a series of blogs on the new English translation of the Roman Missal which are also being published each month in the Florida Catholic newspaper. Born and raised in Bogotá, Colombia, now a member of Nativity Parish in Hollywood. Married to Maria Jose Mitsoulis, proud parents of a three-year-old daughter. Works as a theology teacher at Cardinal Gibbons High School in Fort Lauderdale. Serves as Hispanic Community Liaison for Catholic Climate Covenant. “God looked at everything he had made, and he found it very good.” (Genesis 1:31)

Director, Office of Catechesis Born in Lima, Peru; served in ministry in Peru, Chile, Brazil and the United States. Earned a Master of Arts in Theology in 2005 and a Master in Divinity, with specialization in the Bible, in 2015 at the Catholic Theological Union, Chicago; currently finishing his doctorate degree at Barry University. Served in the Archdiocese of Chicago for approximately 12 years as coordinator of Hispanic Ministry, director of Religious Education, and Evangelization. Currently serves as member of the Standards and Certification Committee for the National Conference for Catechetical Leadership (NCCL); co-chairman of the V Encuentro Committee of the U.S. bishops' Secretariat of Cultural Diversity, representing the nation's catechetical leaders. Appointed archdiocesan director of the Office of Catechesis in August 2011. Married to Diana, father of Peter, Annette and Gustavo. Favorite quote: “The Lord is my Shepherd, there is nothing I shall want” (Psalm 23)

Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Miami Works as Special Projects Coordinator for Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Miami. Has worked in the field of parish social ministry for 10 years. Serves as diocesan representative for Catholic Relief Services and the Catholic Campaign for Human Development. "Be the change you want to see in the world." (Mohandas Gandhi) Executive director, Catholic Legal Services of the Archdiocese of Miami, since the agency was founded in 1998, supervising a staff of 32, including nine staff attorneys. Catholic Legal Services is one of the largest providers of immigration services to the Haitian migrant community in the country; more than 1,000 individuals each month seek the agency’s services. Received his bachelor’s degree from Harvard University, magna cum laude, and his juris doctor, as well as master’s in social work, from the University of Wisconsin. Frequent speaker on asylum issues and immigration law; recipient of the Adalsinda Lomangino Award for outstanding contributions to the field of immigration law; of the St. Vincent DePaul Award from the Archdiocese of Miami “in recognition of … faithful and compassionate service to those who seek sanctuary, shelter and security in a new land;” and of the Community Advocacy Award presented by Legal Aid of Broward County, Inc. Entered the Congregation of Christian Brothers in 1958. Former president of Iona College in New York. Former principal of Archbishop Curley-Notre Dame High School in Miami (1993-1998). Former superintendent of Schools for the archdiocese and executive director of the Ministry of Christian Formation (1998-2010). Currently living in a formation community in Nairobi, Kenya, assisting a number of ministries in Kibera slum, teaching and tutoring at Tangaza University College and editor of the Tangaza Journal of Theology and Mission. "One prayer of thanksgiving when things go badly is worth a thousand when things go well." Born in Cuba, studied philosophy and theology in the seminary of San Carlos y San Ambrosio in Havana and in the Instituto Superior de Teología y Pastoral in San Juan, Puerto Rico Obtained a master's degree in pastoral theology from Barry University in Miami Shores Worked for many years at the Southeast Pastoral Institute (SEPI) in Miami, the archdiocesan Office of Worship and currently the Office of Lay Ministry, as associate director for Hispanic formation Has taught at The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C., and St. John Vianney Seminary in Miami, as well as conducting workshops on liturgy in various dioceses throughout the U.S., Central and South America and the Caribbean Member of the Instituto Nacional Hispano de Liturgia (National Hispanic Institute for Liturgy) and of the U.S. bishops' Subcommittee for Hispanic Liturgy Received the "Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice" medal from Pope Benedict XVI in 2008.

Director, Office of Youth and Young Adult Ministry Born in Miami Beach and raised in Miami Shores; graduate of St. Rose of Lima School and Archbishop Curley Notre Dame High School. Obtained a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of South Florida and a law degree from the University of Miami. Moved to California, where she took up teaching, eventually becoming fulltime director of religious education and youth and confirmation ministry at her parish. Married, with one son; members of St. Rose of Lima, Miami Shores. Served as director of the Synod Office from April 2012 to October 2013. Named director of the Office of Youth and Young Adult Ministry in November 2014. "The Lord is my light and my salvation; whom should I fear." (Psalm 27:1) Served as a congregational rabbi for over 30 years. Hosted "To Life, L'Chaim," a weekly news magazine seen on Jewish Life Television. He is also the producer of the documentary series "Reliving the Holocaust: Through Their Eyes." His personal blog of Jewish content can be found at

yaakovthompson.blogspot.com.

Died July 6, 2016, of a sudden heart attack. Director of communications for the Little Sisters of the Poor, an international congregation of Roman Catholic women religious founded in 1839 by St. Jeanne Jugan. Mission: to offer the neediest elderly of every race and religion a home where they will be welcomed as Christ, cared for as family, and accompanied with dignity until God calls them to himself. Currently serving the elderly and poor in over 30 countries around the world. Successfully fought the HHS mandate (on providing contraceptives to employees as part of the Affordable Care Act) all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court in Little Sisters of the Poor v. Burwell (see:

thelittlesistersofthepoor.com).

Born in Queens, New York, but her family has lived in Miami-Dade County since 1958 Entered the Dominican congregation in Adrian, Michigan, in 1962, and made her final profession in 1968; served on the community’s leadership team from 1986 to 1992 Earned a bachelor’s degree in elementary education from Barry College (now university) in 1962; a master’s degree in guidance and counseling from Siena Heights College (now university) in 1969; a doctorate degree in higher education administration and leadership from Michigan State University in 1980 Served as president of Gwynedd-Mercy College in Gwynedd Valley, Pennsylvania, from 1993 to 2002 Served at Barry from 1969 to 1978 (student affairs); 1981 to 1986 (dean of the School of Professional and Career Education); and became the university’s sixth president in 2004.

Instructor, Religious Studies, St. Thomas University Professed as a Claretian religious in 1981. Became coordinator of Youth Ministry in Miami-Dade County in 1990; headed the archdiocese's Office of Youth and Young Adult Ministry until 2009. Currently serves as an instructor in Religious Studies at St. Thomas University. “The truth will set you free.” — (Jn. 8:32)

Religious sister of the Servants of the Pierced Hearts of Jesus and Mary First Professions made on February 2, 2007. “For I know the plans I have for you says the Lord, plans for your welfare and not for your woe, to give you the future that you hope for. If you seek me, you will find me. If you seek me, with all your heart, you will surely find me says the Lord, and I will restore you.... " — Jeremiah 29: 11-14.

Servants of the Pierced Hearts of Jesus and Mary Born in upstate New York, spent most of her childhood until college in Marion, Iowa. Graduated from Creighton University in 2008. Entered the Servants of the Pierced Hearts of Jesus and Mary that same year and made her first profession of vows July 11, 2011. Currently serves her community by working with pre-postulants and young women who are discerning their vocation to religious life. “‘My grace is sufficient for you, for power is made perfect in weakness.’ I will rather boast most gladly of my weaknesses, in order that the power of Christ may dwell with me. Therefore, I am content with weaknesses, insults, hardships, persecutions, and constraints, for the sake of Christ; for when I am weak, then I am strong." (2 Cor 12:9-10).

Sister Grace Marie Heinrich Servants of the Pierced Hearts of Jesus and Mary Born in upstate New York, spent most of her childhood until college in Marion, Iowa Graduated from Creighton University in 2008 Entered the Servants of the Pierced Hearts of Jesus and Mary that same year and made her first profession of vows July 11, 2011 Currently serves her community by working with pre-postulants and young women who are discerning their vocation to religious life Favorite quote: “‘My grace is sufficient for you, for power is made perfect in weakness.’ I will rather boast most gladly of my weaknesses, in order that the power of Christ may dwell with me. Therefore, I am content with weaknesses, insults, hardships, persecutions, and constraints, for the sake of Christ; for when I am weak, then I am strong." (2 Cor 12:9-10) Sister Grace Marie Heinrich Blog Archive

Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., a member of the Sisters of St. Joseph. Has a doctorate in Sacred Theology from the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome and a licentiate in Sacred Scripture from the Pontifical Biblical Institute. Studied one year in Hebrew University, Jerusalem, focusing on biblical languages, history, geography and archaeology. Has taught at St. Joseph's Seminary, Yonkers, N.Y., the Seminary of the Immaculate Conception, Huntington, N.Y., St. Peter's College, Jersey City, N.J., and for the past 12 years was professor of biblical studies at the University of San Diego, where she founded the Center for Catholic Thought and Culture. Her research focuses on earliest Christianity and the texts produced by and for the first believers, with special attention to Paul's letters. Appointed dean of the School of Theology and Ministry at St. Thomas University in August 2012.

Sister Mary Ann Walsh Sister Mary Ann Walsh Director Sister Mary Ann Walsh is Director of Media Relations for the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. First profession, June 1967 At USCCB since 1983, when assigned as a reporter to Rome bureau of Catholic News Service Favorite quote: Praise God for His wonderful deeds. (Psalm 150)

Sister Mary Ann Walsh Blog Archive

Vicar for Religious, Archdiocese of Miami A native of Managua, Nicaragua, who came to Miami in 1981, at age 18. Attended Miami-Dade College; worked as a supervisor for a chain of jewelry stores, managing outlets in South Florida, Memphis, and Toledo, Ohio. Entered the Servants of the Pierced Hearts of Jesus and Mary at age 21, one of the first three women who entered the community. Worked as director of religious education at St. Raymond Parish, Miami; as novice mistress for the Servants, and vicar general of the community since 2000. Appointed Vicar for Religious in the Archdiocese of Miami in December 2010.

Cabinet secretary of Parish Life Native of Boston who most recently served as assistant director of the Office for the New Evangelization in the Archdiocese of Boston Earned an undergraduate degree in philosophy from the University of Southern California; a master's in theology, with a concentration in ethics, from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary; post-grad MBA courses in Leadership and Quality Systems Management Previous experience as manager of Boston's Annual Catholic Appeal; coordinator of training and formation for youth ministry; parish coordinator of youth ministry; high school ethics teacher, campus minister and soccer coach Appointed cabinet secretary of Parish Life in July 2014; the department oversees the archdiocesan offices of Evangelization and Parish Life; Marriage and Family Life; Youth and Young Adult Ministry; Missions; and Campus Ministry South Florida-based freelance writer and photographer, native of St. Louis, Mo., 1991 graduate of the Catholic Volunteers in Florida. Member of Holy Name of Jesus Parish in West Palm Beach. Hold's a bachelor's degree in print journalism from University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo. Joined the staff of The Florida Catholic/Palm Beach Diocese in 1992 and served as reporter-editor there until 2000, when he left to focus on state-wide reporting and private event photography. Has been a regular contributor to Our Sunday Visitor, Catholic News Service, The Sun-Sentinel's religion section and Columbia Magazine of the Knights of Columbus. "Be not afraid." Began in mission work in 1989 with Amor en Acción, serving in the Dominican Republic and Haiti. Received a bachelor's and then a master's degree in social work at Barry University; served as a social worker in healthcare for 10 years. Became executive director of Amor en Acción in 1999, working with the lay missionary group in mission preparation and formation, in deepening the relationship of solidarity with communities in the Dominican Republic and the archdiocese’s sister diocese of Port-de-Paix, Haiti; also working to promote mission in parishes and schools in the archdiocese. Currently serves as president of the Washington-based U.S. Catholic Mission Association. Currently serves on the steering committee for the Mission Network of the Archdiocese of Miami which gathers parishes, groups and other entities in the archdiocese that are working in missions at home and worldwide. Appointed director of the Archdiocese of Miami Mission Office, Sept. 1, 2011. Internationally syndicated social justice and peace columnist. Currently ministering as pastoral associate for faith formation and parish outreach ministries at Immaculate Heart of Mary in Baltimore. Previously served as director of Christian Formation at Lancaster Catholic High School in Pennsylvania; special assistant for Public Policy at Catholic Charities in the Diocese of Wilmington, Delaware; assistant director of Emergency Food Services for Associated Catholic Charities in the Archdiocese of Washington; and director of religious education for two Maryland parishes. Author of “Moonlight Miracle,” a children's book on global solidarity published by Paulist Press, and “Cracks in the Sidewalk,” a children’s book highlighting God’s many blessings, published by Eastern Christian Publications. Married to Denise; two sons and a granddaughter. Available to speak at diocesan or parish gatherings about Catholic social teaching. Contact [email protected]

Vice-President, Archdiocesan Council, St. Vincent de Paul Society Involved with the St. Vincent de Paul Society for more than 25 years. President of the Central Miami-Dade District Council and former president of the Archdiocesan Council of Miami which covers Miami-Dade, Broward and Monroe counties. Director of “Vincentians” magazine; director of the Radio Paz program of the St. Vincent de Paul Society which is broadcast every Sunday, 3-5pm, on 830am. “Since I am retired now, all my time and efforts as a volunteer are dedicated solely to the St. Vincent de Paul Society. My only desire and aspiration is to always be on the side of the poor and marginalized.”

World Youth Day Blog - Brazil 2013 Members of two of the Miami groups going to World Youth Day are blogging about their experiences while in Rio July 23-28. Those primarily responsible for the blogs are: Ronald and Maria Rivas, a brother and sister who are part of a five-member group from Prince of Peace Parish in Miami; and Laura López, director of New Evangelization at the SouthEast Pastoral Institute, who is traveling with a 20-member group of Hispanic young adult leaders from South Florida.

ect Life State Conference Prayer Vigils Project Rachel Upcoming Events

Where to seek help Project Rachel is a post-abortion counseling and reconciliation program open to anyone who is experiencing the negative effects of an abortion. The program is free of charge, and all information is kept strictly confidential.

More Info Project Rachel Program, please call us: 954-981-2984 (local) and 888-456-4673 (toll-free).

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Ministry RCIA RCIA FAQs Upcoming Events Español

DOCS & FORMS RCIA Dates Adult Intake Form Marriage Follow up form Child-Teen Intake Form

RCIA (the Rite of Christian Initiation for Adults) is the process the Catholic Church uses to help non-Catholics learn more about the Church and, if they desire it, actually become Catholic. In the Archdiocese of Miami, we offer RCIA classes at various parish locations to help you explore the Church, her teachings, and the profound meanings behind everything we do as Catholics.

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Archdiocese of Miami During the season of Lent, we encourage and welcome you to come to the Sacrament of Reconciliation at one of the parishes listed below. Friday, March 27: 7:00 p.m.– 9 :00 p.m.

Saturday, March 28: 9:00 a.m.– 3:30 p.m.

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Northeast Broward:

West Dade:

St. Anthony, 901 N.E. 2 Street, Ft. Lauderdale St. Paul the Apostle, 2700 N.E. 36 Street, Lighthouse Point St. Elizabeth of Hungary, 3331 NE 10 Terrace, Pompano Beach St. Pius X, 2511 N. Ocean Blvd. (A1A), Fort Lauderdale

Good Shepherd, 14187 S.W. 72 Street, Miami St. Agatha, 1111 S.W. 107 Avenue, Miami St. Augustine, 1400 Miller Road, Coral Gables St. Dominic, 5909 N.W. 7 Street, Miami

Northwest Broward:

East Dade:

St. Andrew, 9950 N.W. 29 Street, Coral Springs San Isidro, 2310 Martin Luther King Blvd, Pompano Beach St. Malachy, 6200 N. University Dr., Tamarac

Gesu, 118 N.E. 2nd St., Miami St. Patrick, 3716 Garden Ave., Miami Beach St. Michael the Archangel, 2987 W. Flagler St., Miami St. John Bosco, 1349 W. Flagler St., Miami, FL 33135 Shrine of Our Lady of Charity, 3609 S. Miami Ave., Miami

South Broward:

Northwest Dade:

Little Flower, 1805 Pierce St., Hollywood St. Bartholomew, 8005 Miramar Parkway, Miramar St. Mark, 5601 S. Flaming Rd., Southwest Ranches St. Stephen, 6044 S.W. 19th St., Miramar

Immaculate Conception, 4497 West 1st Ave., Hialeah Our Lady of the Lakes, 15801 N.W. 67th Ave., Miami Lakes St. John the Apostle, 475 E. 4th St., Hialeah St. Monica, 3490 NW 191 Street, Carol City

Northeast Dade:

South Dade:

St. Mary Cathedral, 7225 N.W. 2nd Ave, Miami Notre Dame d’Haiti, 110 N.E. 62nd St., Miami St. Rose of Lima, 415 N.E. 105 Street, Miami St. Lawrence, 2200 N. E. 191st St., N. Miami Beach St. Joseph, 8670 Byron Avenue, Miami Beach

Our Lady of Lourdes, 11291 S.W. 142nd Ave., Miami Sacred Heart, 106 S. E. First Drive., Homestead St. Louis, 7270 S.W. 120th St., Pinecrest Epiphany, 8235 S.W. 57 Avenue, Miami

Monroe:

Additional resources

St. Mary Star of the Sea, 1010 Windsor Lane, Key West San Pablo, 550- 122nd Street Ocean, Marathon San Pedro, 89500 Overseas Highway, Tavernier

Reconciliation Video English Spanish How to go to Confession: English Spanish Creole

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e of Ministry to Priests Deacons Necrology of Priests Office for Religious Retired Priests Seminaries Vocations CONTACT INFO Director for Religious

Sr. Ana Margarita Lanzas, SCTJM [email protected]

Administrative Assistant

[email protected] Office for Religious

305-762-1082 305-754-7762 [email protected] Commission Members

FORMS Community Form Update Form from Directory of R…

The Office for Religious works in conjunction with the Commission on Religious Life and Ministry. They offer programs which seek to aid members of religious families and consecrated persons live their vocation. We invite you to learn about the priests and religious brothers and sisters serving in the Archdiocese of Miami by visiting their website through the links below: Religious Communities for Men Religious Communities for Women Secular Institutes

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h Ministry Young Adult Ministry World Youth Day March for Life Resources Upcoming Events Catholic Scouting

Work in progress

ect Life State Conference Prayer Vigils Project Rachel Upcoming Events CONTACT INFO Respect Life Ministry

4747 Hollywood Blvd Suite 103 Hollywood Fl 33021 954-981-2922 954-981-2901 www.respectlifemiami.org www.pregnancyhelp.me Director

Joan M. Crown [email protected] Education Coordinator

Sandi Le Bel [email protected] Administrative Assistant

Jacqueline Debs [email protected] Project Rachel

954-981-2984 (local) 888-456-4673 (toll-free) Pregnancy Help Centers

www.pregnancyhelp.me South Broward 954-963-2229 Central Broward 954-565-0229 North Broward 954-977-7769 South Dade 305-273-8507 North Dade 305-653-2921 786-452-0266

DOCUMENTS Abortion Facility Prayer and Guidelines

English Catholic Living Wills

English Spanish

The Respect Life Office exists to uphold the sanctity of each human life from conception to natural death. A ministry of the Archdiocese of Miami, we are faithful to the Holy Father and the Magisterium of the Catholic Church.

We seek to implement the National Conference of Catholic Bishops' Pastoral Plan for Pro-Life Activities: “Our goal is to eliminate violence against unborn children, their mothers, and those who are dying. We unalterably oppose the use of violence in any form to achieve this objective, and we condemn the actions of those few who advocate otherwise. […] It is our hope and expectation that in focusing on the need to respect and protect the lives of the innocent unborn and those who are disabled, ill, or dying, we will help to deepen respect for the life of every human being. […] This pastoral plan calls upon all the resources of the Church its people, services, and institutions to pursue this effort with renewed energy and commitment in four major areas. 1. Public Information and Education to deepen understanding of the sanctity of human life and the humanity of unborn children, the moral evil of intentionally killing innocent human beings whether at the beginning of life or at its end and the mission of the Church to witness to and serve all human life. 2. Pastoral Care for women with problems related to pregnancy; for all who have been involved in abortion; for those who are disabled, sick, and dying, and their families and caregivers; for those who have lost loved ones to violent crime; and for those in prison sentenced to death. 3. Public Policy efforts directed to restoring legal protection to the lives of unborn children and those vulnerable to pressures to end their lives by assisted suicide, and to providing morally acceptable alternatives to abortion and assisted suicide. 4. Prayer and Worship directed to participation in the sacramental life of the Church and in programs of communal and individual prayer, that the culture of death that surrounds us today will be replaced by a culture of life and love.”

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e of Ministry to Priests Deacons Necrology of Priests Office for Religious Retired Priests Seminaries Vocations

Any correspondence can be mailed to Archdiocese of Miami C/O: Chancery Department, 9401 Biscayne Blvd, Miami Shores, FL 33138

Father Martin Adu Father Miguel Gómez Father Patrick Murnane Msgr. Andrew Anderson Father Sergio García Miró Father Jorge Noda Father Joseph P. Angelini Msgr. John W. Glorie Father Ronald Noguera Father Pedro Lleo Father John Gubbins Father John O'Leary Father Raúl Angulo Msgr. William Hennessey Father Patrick O'Neill Father Emmanuel Bastien Msgr. Jose Luis Hernando Msgr. Emiliano Ordax Father Jorge Bello Father Roger Holoubek Father Sean O'Sullivan Father Ronald Brohammer Father Thomas Honold Msgr. James Parappally Father Sergio Cabrera Father Omar Huesca Father Rafael Pedroso Father Federico Capdepón Bishop Fernando Isern Msgr. Juan José Quijano Father George Cardona Father Daniel R. Kent Father James Quinn Father Sergio Carrillo Father Michael Kish Father Dennis P. Rausch Msgr. Martin Cassidy Father Daniel Kubala Father Mark Reeves Father Charles D. Clements Father Peter Lambert Msgr. James Reynolds Father James Connaughton Father Pedro Lleo Father David G. Russell Father Andrés E. Coucelo Father Michael Lynch Father Phillip Scheiding Msgr. John W. Delaney Father Lawrence Lyons Father Brendan Shannon Father Arthur Dennison Father Joseph Maroor Father Antonio Silio Msgr. Seamus Doyle Msgr. Emilio Martin Father Jeremiah Singleton Father George E. Duffy Father Anthony Massi Father Fermín Solana Archbishop John C. FavaloraFather Rolando A. Medina Father Richard Soulliere Father Guy Fenger Father Cdr. James J. MelleyFather Michael P. Sullivan Father John Fink Father Carlos J. Miyares Father Juan R. Torres Father Joseph Fishwick Father Sean C. Mulcahy Father Joseph Valoret Father Thomas Foudy Father Thomas Mullane Msgr. John Vaughan Father George Garcia Father William Muñiz Father Hernando Villegas Msgr. Pedro García Father Thomas Wisniewski

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e Health Plan Job Openings Retirement Plan DOCUMENTS New Retirement Program

VIDEOS English Spanish Creole

The Archdiocese of Miami introduced a new Retirement Program for Lay Employees effective Jan. 1, 2013. This new program represents a significant change in the Archdiocese of Miami's approach to helping its employees save for retirement. The new program aims: To be financially sustainable in a changing economy. To share responsibility between employees and the Archdiocese To offer real value To be competitive with other dioceses and not-for-profit institutions.

CONTACT INFO 3225 N.W. 8 Ave. Miami 33127 305-635-1331 [email protected]

Casa Chali A retreat facility on the campus of Corpus Christi Church in Miami. Una casa de retiros en el campus de la iglesia Corpus Christi en Miami.

CONTACT INFO Director

Father Marcelino García, SJ 12190 SW 56th St Miami 33175 305-596-0001 305-596-9655 ceimiami.org/casa-manresa

Casa Manresa / Ignatian Spirituality Center Our location in South Florida provides a great place with wonderful weather year-round to host local, national and international events. We are located approximately 12 miles from Miami International Airport. In addition to providing Spiritual Exercises, family retreats, and other activities, Manresa Retreat House is the perfect location for weekday meetings, retreats, workshops, conferences, general chapters, and organizations that sponsor their own retreats. The facilities and grounds are available throughout the week for nonprofit organizations to rent for their day, evening, or overnight meetings and events. Our overnight facilities can accommodate up to 68 guests in 34 private rooms, all of which have double beds, private bath and individual climate control. Our quality meeting spaces range in capacity, starting with the St. Ignatius Auditorium for groups of up to 300, and various other meeting rooms accommodating 100, 80, 32 and 25 persons. Projectors and screens are available in most meeting rooms. WiFi is within reach of all of our conference rooms and most common areas. Our spacious dining room accommodates up to 70 guests in 10 tables, with full food service. We have two separate chapels with capacity for 25 and 54 guests respectively. Our St. Ignatius auditorium can be converted into a chapel to accommodate larger groups. Most outside groups make their rental arrangements several months ahead of time, since space is limited to the times we do not have activities scheduled. We are open to all faiths and non-profit organizations hosting programs with a spiritual dimension. Services are provided in both English and Spanish.

CONTACT INFO Director

Father Wilfredo García-Tuñón, SJ 720 N.E. 27 St. Miami 33137-4610 305-576-2748 [email protected] www.estovir.org/

John Paul II Retreat House The Juan Pablo II (John Paul II) Retreat House holds weekend spiritual retreats throughout the year. Retreats are known as "Spiritual Exercises". Facilities are available for use by other organizations interested in holding conferences and seminars. The site overlooks beautiful Biscayne Bay in Miami. The original House provides 20 individual, private rooms. Each room has its own lavatory with accessible, dormitory style, restrooms and shower facilities. The newly constructed Residencia Jesus Maestro is a modern six story structure with 30 additional rooms (18 Single; 12 Double or Single Occupancy). Each room in Jesus Maestro has its own private bathroom. Amenities at RJM include a large Conference Center, smaller conference rooms, a library and dining facilities. The Agrupación Católica Universitaria holds the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola, one or two weekends each month. This leaves other dates open for religious organizations willing to rent the facilities, dependent on availability.

CONTACT INFO Administrator

Donaida Lashbrook 3600 SW 32 Blvd. West Park, FL 33023 305-762-1101 (Dade) 954-525-5157 ext. 1101 (Broward) [email protected]

Madonna Retreat Center The Madonna Retreat Center can house up to 100 people in 5 large rooms. It has a large Conference Center (100+), and a small one for about 40 people. The kitchen is fully equipped, and dining room sits 90 people. Meals are not included. There is a beautiful chapel honoring our Lady, with all the necessary items for liturgy. There is a basketball court and facilities for volleyball.

CONTACT INFO Facilities Site Administrator

Maria Haugland 3333 S Miami Ave. Miami, FL 33133 305-854-2334, ext. 114 [email protected]

Miami Youth Center The Archdiocese of Miami Youth Center is located on Biscayne Bay between Vizcaya Museum and Immaculata La Salle High School. The Miami Youth Center provides retreat space for many Emmaus groups, Catholic high schools, parish ministries, and support groups. It is also the home base of two archdiocesan youth movements: Encuentros Juveniles (Youth Encounters) and Amor en el Principio (Love in the Beginning), a movement for couples who are starting to date.

CONTACT INFO 7275 SW 124 Street Miami, FL 33156-5324 305-238-4367 305-238-4766 [email protected] www.morningstarrenewal.org

MorningStar Renewal Center MorningStar Renewal Center is the Archdiocesan spiritual renewal center set up to provide spiritually enriching programs seven days a week for people of all ages and all stages of life. The center seeks to be a place where members of organizations connect; where people of different faiths can share their commonalities; where retreats can be held; where clergy and lay ministers can come to be refreshed; where ongoing faith development opportunities are offered to excite and equip the people of God for action within their home church and the community at large.

CONTACT INFO 15710 N.W. 44 Ct. Miami Gardens 33054-6017 305-816-6468 [email protected] www.carmelitasdescalzosmiami.org

Our Lady of Mount Carmel House of Prayer Our Lady of Mount Carmel House of Prayer is open to the public. The mission of Our Lady of Mount Carmel House of Prayer is to promote Carmelite spirituality in all its expressions and to accompany the different groups that come to the house searching for God in their lives.

The house offers the following services in Spanish: Courses in Christian and Carmelite spirituality for prayer groups, leaders of Christian communities, clergy, and religious; Guided individual and group retreats; Group retreats with their own guide; Sacrament of reconciliation and spiritual direction (by appointment only); Mass on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday at 8 a.m.; Mass with adoration of the Blessed Sacrament on Thursdays at 7 p.m.

CONTACT INFO For reservations

Leida Sosa 7700 S.W. 56 St. Miami, FL 33155 305-279-2333 www.sepimiami.org

SEPI El SEPI (Instituto Pastoral del Sureste/Oficina Regional del Sureste de los Obispos Católicos para el Ministerio Hispano), tiene salones y habitaciones que se pueden alquilar para retiros.

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Introduction This policy governs the recording of sacraments and the issuing of sacramental certificates in the Archdiocese of Miami, supplementing the general norms found in the Code of Canon Law and the Pastoral Manual of the Archdiocese of Miami. It also serves as a guide to those who are seeking a sacramental certificate for themselves or their child. This policy should be read carefully before contacting a parish or mission or the Archdiocese of Miami to request a sacramental certificate. Roman Catholics have a right to receive their sacramental certificates whenever they legitimately request them. When preparing for the sacrament of Matrimony, for example, the parties are required to present a recently issued baptismal certificate. Every effort is made to fulfill these requests in a timely manner. Given the important nature of the information in sacramental registries, pastors have a special obligation to ensure that sacramental records are accurate and carefully preserved. Special care must also be taken to safeguard the personal and private information contained in sacramental records. Sacramental certificates will only be issued to those who legitimately request them.

Recording of Sacraments The reception of the sacraments is recorded in the parish or mission where the sacrament was received. Whenever a sacrament is legitimately administered outside a church building (e.g., an emergency baptism in a hospital), it is recorded in the local territorial parish where the sacrament was celebrated. The pastor is to see to it that the sacramental registers are accurately recorded and carefully preserved (cf. c. 535). Sacramental records are kept permanently at the parish or mission.

Requesting a Sacramental Certificate Sacramental certificates are issued by the pastor of the parish or mission where the sacrament is recorded. Requests for sacramental certificates are to be made by contacting the parish or mission directly. To view a list of the parishes and missions in the Archdiocese of Miami and their contact information click here. Only the person who received the sacrament or the parent or legal guardian of a minor child may request a sacramental certificate. Certificates are not issued to third parties. Requests are made of the parish or mission either in person (after presenting a government-issued photo identification) or by a signed letter. Requests are not accepted by phone. Certificates are not issued for genealogical purposes. The sacramental records from merged parishes and missions are retained at the receiving parish. The pastor of the receiving parish issues the sacramental records. The following table lists the parishes and missions involved: For sacraments received at:

Contact this parish:

Divine Mercy Haitian Mission (Fort Lauderdale)

Saint Clement Parish

Our Lady of Perpetual Help Parish (Opa Locka)

Saint James Parish

Our Lady Aparecida Brazilian Mission (Hollywood)

Saint Vincent Parish

Resurrection Parish (Dania)

Saint Maurice Parish

Saint Bede the Venerable Parish (Key West)

Saint Mary, Star of the Sea

Saint Charles Borromeo Parish (Hallandale)

Saint Matthew Parish

Saint George Parish (Fort Lauderdale)

Our Lady Queen of Martyrs Parish

Saint Francis Xavier Mission (Miami)

Gesu Parish

Saint Joseph Haitian Mission (Pompano Beach)

Saint Elizabeth of Hungary Parish

Saint Luke Parish (Coconut Creek)

Saint Vincent Parish

Saint Robert Bellarmine Parish (Miami)

Corpus Christi Parish

Saint Vincent de Paul Parish (Miami)

Saint Rose of Lima Parish

Searching for Sacramental Records If the specific parish or mission where the sacrament was conferred is not known or the pastor cannot find the record, the Chancellor will undertake a search. The person requesting the sacramental certificate is to complete a Sacramental Records Release Request (found here) and send it to the Chancellor. Requests are not accepted by phone. Every effort should be made to provide as much information as possible. This will increase the chances of a successful and timely search. Parents, godparents and/or sponsors – especially in the case of baptism or confirmation – should be consulted to obtain as much information as possible before sending the written request. Even supplying a photograph which shows the interior of the church can help identify where the baptism took place. Complete information leads to a quicker and more successful search. A minimum of two months should be allowed to conduct the search and obtain the requested sacramental certificate. If the search was unsuccessful, the Chancellor will send a written reply with further instructions. There is no fee to obtain a sacramental certificate, either directly from the parish or mission or with the assistance of the Chancellor's office. However, due to administrative expenses, a donation of $25.00 is welcome.

Changing the Sacramental Record Any request to correct or otherwise amend a sacramental record must be submitted in writing to the pastor by the individual who received the sacrament or, in the case of a minor, by his/her custodial parent or legal guardian. Original or certified copies of relevant civil documents (e.g. birth certificate, final decree of adoption, etc.) must accompany this and will be returned. Except for a custodial parent in the case of minors or other legal guardians, a third party may not request the change of a person's sacramental record. Since part of their role is to serve as a witness of the fact that the sacrament was received, godparents or sponsors cannot be removed from the sacramental record. However, in the judgment of the pastor and for a truly serious reason (e.g. death of the godparent, his/her rejection of the Catholic faith, etc.) another suitable Catholic can be substituted to fulfill the duties of the godparent or sponsor. In the case of a minor, this request is made in writing to the pastor by the parents (or at least the custodial parent). With the approval of the Chancellor, the additional godparent or sponsor is added to the sacramental register and can be noted on the sacramental certificate. The pastor must obtain the written permission of the Chancellor before any change is made to the sacramental records of the parish. All subsequent sacramental certificates will reflect the approved changes. A minimum of three weeks should be allowed to obtain the amended certificate from the date the original written request was received by the pastor. There is no fee to amend or otherwise correct a sacramental record. However, due to administrative expenses, a donation of $10.00 is welcome.

In a decree dated March 15, 2010, Archbishop John C. Favalora established this Policy as particular law in the Archdiocese of Miami.

an Center Schott Communities CONTACT INFO Executive Director

Ileana Ramirez-Cueli 6591 S Flamingo Road Cooper City, FL 33330 954-434-3306 954-434-3307 [email protected] www.schottcommunities.org Mass for Deaf, Blind & Disabled

Every Sunday, 9:30 a.m. St. Jude Chapel, on the grounds of Schott Communities

Located on a 27-acre campus in Cooper City, Schott Communities is unique in that it strives to create an environment of dignity and care in which persons who are deaf or disabled are encouraged and challenged to grow in self-acceptance and independence. A number of programs and services are offered including art classes for disabled adults; socials for the blind, deaf or disabled; Sign Language classes; counseling services and Welcome to My World, a sensitivity training program. The community also has two residences on the grounds: a group home and apartments for the deaf or disabled. Schott Communities is a Community Impact Partner with United Way of Broward County.

e of Ministry to Priests Deacons Necrology of Priests Office for Religious Retired Priests Seminaries Vocations CONTACT INFO Rector

Father Ferdinand Santos 2900 S.W. 87 Avenue Miami, Florida 33165 305-223-4561 305-223-0650 www.sjvcs.edu

St. John Vianney College Seminary St. John Vianney College Seminary has for over 40 years provided quality education in priestly formation. St. John is the only bilingual college seminary in the United States, a factor which reflects the rich cultural diversity of the church in South Florida. The seminary provides an academic setting which is challenging and a pastoral setting which is multicultural. St. John's is a place where young men not only grow spiritually but also pastorally in order to preach the Gospel of Jesus Christ to all the people. Video on St. John Vianney Seminary

What does SJVCS mean to you?

CONTACT INFO Rector/President

Msgr. David Toups 10701 S. Military Trail Boynton Beach, Florida - 33436 561-732-4424 561-737-2205 www.svdp.edu

St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary was opened in 1963 and serves not only the North American communities but also the Caribbean and South and Central America. Because of its location and history, St. Vincent de Paul is the only bilingual and multicultural theologate in the United States.

CONTACT INFO Rector

Father Emanuele De Nigris Vice Rector

Father Iván Rodríguez Spiritual Director

Father Antonio Vicente 1040 W. 29th Street Hialeah, FL 33012 305-882-1728 305-883-0041 www.rmmiami.org

Redemptoris Mater Archdiocesan Missionary Seminary Archbishop Wenski officially opened the Redemptoris Mater Seminary on December 11, 2011 with a first group of 12 men. Once ordained, they will be incardinated in the Archdiocese of Miami and work in the parishes of the Archdiocese or any other place in the world where the Archbishop may decide to send them. The seminarians receive their academic formation at St. John Vianney Seminary or at St. Vincent de Paul, according to their level of studies. These men came to discover their vocation through the Neocatechumenal communities in their home parishes. The Neocatechumenal Way, which was defined by Pope John Paul II as "an itinerary of Catholic formation, valid for our society and for our times," is an essential ingredient in the formation of these seminarians. The RM Seminaries are a fruit of the Second Vatican Council and an inspiration of the Blessed Pope John Paul II. The first RMS was opened in the Archdiocese of Rome in 1987. Today there are 100 seminaries throughout the world. Currently in the US there are eight RM seminaries: Boston, Brooklyn, Dallas, Denver, Miami, Newark, Washington D.C., and the territory of Guam.

CONTACT INFO Executive Director

Father Rafael Capó Office

Southeast Pastoral Institute 7700 SW 56 Street Miami, FL 33155 305-279-2333 305-279-0925 [email protected] www.sepi.us

*Not administered by Archdiocese of Miami

The Southeast Regional Office for Hispanic Ministry The Southeast Regional Office for Hispanic Ministry is the organization of the U.S. Catholic Bishops of USCCB regions V and XIV, with headquarters in the Archdiocese of Miami, that coordinates and assists Hispanic ministries in the 30 dioceses of the southeastern United States, collaborating in the Catholic Church's evangelization efforts of the growing Hispanic/Latino communities.

The Southeast Pastoral Institute (SEPI) The Southeast Pastoral Institute is the educational branch of the Regional Office, established in 1979 as a recommendation of the II National Encuentro of Hispanic Ministry. SEPI provides theological, pastoral, and ministry formation services and programs, as well as leadership formation programs for Hispanic lay-ecclesial ministers, youth, and young adults. Through its three pillars of Evangelization, Formation, and Communion, SEPI strives to facilitate the full participation of Hispanics/Latinos in the mission of the Church and society as authentic missionary disciples.

Our Mission Provide evangelization services and programs to communities and dioceses. Provide formation and leadership empowerment programs for Hispanic/Latino lay ministers and young adults. Foster bridge-building efforts with multicultural and Hispanic Ministry offices and ministries in the Southeastern dioceses.

Why we do it To transform the lives of Hispanics/Latinos in our Church and society. To foster and create communion in Hispanic/Latino Ministry in the Southeastern dioceses, region, and wider Church in the United States. To better serve the mission of the multicultural Church in the United States. To train and empower a new generation of Hispanic/Latino leaders for the dioceses in Southeastern US.

How we do it By providing and coordinating services, programs, and resources. By strengthening ecclesial structures for Hispanic/Latino ministries. By offering integral Pastoral Leadership and Pastoral Juvenil formation services and programs.

English

Pasos A Seguir Para Recibir El Sacramento Del Matrimonio En La Arquidiócesis De Miami: Paso 1: Contactar a Su Parroquia y Coordinar Reunión Con Su Sacerdote:(ANTES de concretar una fecha para su boda o iniciar cualquier otro paso) Cuando una pareja se compromete para casarse, su primer contacto después de compartir y celebrar con seres queridos debe de ser su parroquia, su hogar de fe. Son ellos quienes guían a la pareja a través del proceso de preparación complete de principio a fin, aún si la boda se celebrará en otra parroquia. Este es el momento para separar una fecha para conversar y comenzar esta gozosa jornada recibiendo el acompañamiento y asesoramiento necesarios para completar los pasos 2-7, teniendo en cuenta que la parroquia bien podría tener recomendaciones específicas en cuanto a cuáles de los cursos y herramientas son los mejores para cada pareja. También es recomendable crear un plan de acción con fechas para completar cada paso al igual que otros trámites necesarios en la planificación de la boda.

Paso 2: Inventario Matrimonial y Evaluación El inventario matrimonial es una poderosa herramienta diseñada para ayudar a la pareja a conocerse mejor a la vez que revela en que áreas de la relación hay mayor compatibilidad y que áreas podrían necesitar atención antes de que se transformen en problemas. Este paso se completa en su parroquia, de modo que el Paso 1 tiene que ser completado antes de tomar este paso. La parroquia se hará cargo del proceso y asistirá en el proceso de evaluar los resultados que a su vez se utilizarán para ayudar en la dirección, preparación y acompañamiento que ellos les brindarán.

El inventario que la parroquia utilizará para ayudar a la pareja a completar este paso será uno de los siguientes tres, teniendo en cuenta que algunos inventarios son para uso en circunstancias especiales, y siempre con aprobación previa de la parroquia. Todos los inventarios se ofrecen en Inglés y Español Fully Engaged (Completamente Comprometidos, Inglés y Español) Este es el inventario principal, con las otras opciones siendo usadas solo en casos en que este inventario no esté disponible. Para completar este inventario, la parroquia proveerá los formularios/datos necesarios para la pareja, y una vez sean evaluados los resultados, uno o más facilitadores asistirán con los resultados y proveerán la dirección correspondiente. (Parroquias que necesiten hacer arreglos para entrenar a sus facilitadores y comenzar a ofrecer Fully Engaged favor de contactar a la Oficina de Matrimonio y Vida Familiar a [email protected] The Catholic Couple Checkup (Evaluación de la Relación para parejas Católicas, Inglés y Español) Utilizado en circunstancias en que la parroquia aún no tiene acceso a facilitadores entrenados en Fully Engaged o decide que usarán este inventario en lugar de Fully Engaged en casos de parejas aprobadas para completar su curso de preparación en línea a causa de sus circunstancias especiales que no les permiten tomar su curso en vivo, ya que el curso en línea incluye acceso a Fully Engaged como parte del paquete. Se completan los cuestionarios en línea, los resultados son evaluados automáticamente, y un reporte detallado es producido para que la pareja lo imprima y lleve a quien les esté preparando en su parroquia para evaluación y dirección, quienes también lo pueden recibir directamente si la pareja provee su correo electrónico al final de su inventario. FOCCUS Inglés y Español: Antiguo inventario en proceso de ser sustituido por Fully Engaged. Algunas parroquias pueden aún estar usando FOCCUS en lo que completan su transición al inventario nuevo, lo cual es aceptable.

Paso 3: Inscribirse en Un Curso de Preparación Matrimonial En vivo o en línea, existen varios programas en Inglés y Español, teniendo en cuenta que la parroquia podría tener recomendaciones específicas a seguir en cuanto a cual curso seleccionar entre todos los que han sido aprobados en la Arquidiócesis de Miami.

Paso 4: Instrucción En Planificación Natural Familiar La preparación matrimonial es una oportunidad perfecta para recibir el gran regalo de aprender sobre lo que muchos dicen es una de nuestros tesoros especiales: Planificación Natural Familiar (PNF). La PNF combina la ciencia con la fe permitiendo a las parejas planificar su familia en unión al plan de Dios, y de forma 100% natural. Existen diferentes maneras de aprender en vivo o en línea.

Paso 5: Sacramento de la Reconciliación Que mejor bendición que llegar a ese día tan especial preparados espiritualmente habiendo recibido este gran regalo y la gran fuente de gracia que nos brinda? Pero para que esperar hasta justo antes de la boda cuando está a nuestra disposición siempre? Todo momento es un gran momento para darnos la oportunidad de recibir esta maravillosa bendicón que nos ofrece Dios y nuestra Iglesia.

Paso 6: Reuniones Finales Con Sacerdote A medida que continúan manteniéndose en contacto con su parroquia y colaborando juntos en preparación para su Matrimonio, también se reunirán con el Sacerdote que celebrará su boda unas 4-6 semanas antes de la boda, aproximadamente. Aún si la boda se celebrará en otra parroquia, manténganse en contacto cercano con su parroquia y aprovechen toda oportunidad que ahí se les ofrezca para recibir dirección espiritual, ideas para su boda, y maneras de mantenerse unidos para recibir las grandes bendiciones que conllevan ser parte de una comunidad de fe después de su boda. Ellos son su familia en la fe!

Paso 7: Manténganse Conectados! Esta jornada es solo un comienzo. Hay cantidad de recursos y oportunidades disponibles para continuar enriqueciendo sus vidas y su Matrimonio. A más se mantengan conectados e involucrados, primero con su parroquia y si desean también con algunos otros ministerios en la Arquidiócesis, se regalan la oportunidad de recibir uno de los más grandes y maravillosos recursos: una gran familia en la fe con quienes andar y hallar mutuo apoyo, inspiración, ánimo, mientras se hacen amistades bellas y duraderas en el proceso. Entre estos amigos, cuentes con la Oficina de Matrimonio y Vida Familiar como otra fuente de apoyo y acompañamiento, o hasta para servir y así ayudarnos a servir y bendecir más parejas y familias como familia. Estamos aquí para servirles! Les deseamos una vida juntos llena de amor, felicidad, y bendiciones!

e What is the Synod? Focus Teams Focus Team Resources The Synod Snapshot FAQ's Closing Assembly Photos Videos October 18, 2013

FAQs about Synod closing assembly The closing assembly of the Second General Synod of the Archdiocese of Miami will take place on Saturday, Oct. 26, beginning at 9 a.m. Archbishop Wenski has extended an open invitation to all the faithful of the Church in South Florida. He would like to see every parish well represented. In fact, some parishes are organizing buses for their parishioners. If your parish is organizing a group, please, kindly let us know ahead of time by calling Jacqui Debs at 305-762-1088. There will be no registration, tickets or special group seating. The day's events will be held mainly in English. The keynote speaker, His Excellency, Cardinal Rodriguez Maradiaga, will give his address in English and Spanish. Please plan on arriving well before 9 a.m. The event ends at 1 p.m. (We do not recommend coming mid-morning as there will be no seating available.) There will be a ministry fair showcasing the work of the various Archdiocesan ministries. Discounted parking rate: $9 for self-park and $12 for valet parking. Please, bring ticket to assembly for validation. Entrance to the Ballroom level is through the 7th floor of the parking garage. Continental breakfast will be served right after Mass. There will not be food or beverages available before Mass. Location: The Ballroom at the Miami Hilton Downtown, 1601 Biscayne Blvd, Miami FL 33132 And for those who are unable to attend the assembly, please tune in to Radio Paz (830 am) to listen to the events on the radio, or watch a livestream by Radio Paz, which will be available on the Archdiocese website. You will also be able to watch the Mass and portions of the assembly on EWTN. The Synod team asks for everyone's prayers during the upcoming days as we make our final preparations for this historic day. Rosemarie Banich Synod Director

Related Articles 05/25/12

Synod Snapshot #1 Welcome to the first edition of The Synod Snapshot.

06/01/12

Synod Snapshot #2 We are now just two weeks away from the first Synod listening session!

06/08/12

Synod Snapshot #3 As I discussed in last week's Synod Snapshot, when you attend a listening session you will be asked to write down your responses to three key questions on a Feedback Form.

06/15/12

Synod Snapshot #4 Tonight is the first of the Archbishop's listening sessions, at which participants will be asked to communicate their joys, concerns and dreams for the Archdiocese of Miami.

09/23/13

Synod Snapshot #5 On Saturday, Oct. 26, at the Synod closing assembly, the new strategic plan for the Archdiocese of Miami will be presented to all.

10/11/13

Synod Snapshot #6 In 2012, for only the second time in its history, the Archdiocese of Miami convened a Synod;

10/18/13

Synod Snapshot #7 The closing assembly of the Second General Synod of the Archdiocese of Miami will take place on Saturday, Oct. 25, beginning at 9 a.m.

The Office of Social Advocacy promotes social justice and anti-poverty initiatives through legislative advocacy, and seeks to connect the works of faith and justice throughout the Archdiocese of Miami. The local home to the Catholic Campaign for Human Development and Catholic Relief Services, the Office of Social Advocacy coordinates the Archdiocesan response to emergency needs both at home and abroad.

CONTACT INFO

Office of Social Advocacy : 9401 Biscayne Blvd. Miami Shores, FL 33138 Email: [email protected] Fax: 305-762-3011 Website: www.justicecorner.org Director: Brian Stevens [email protected] Phone: 305-762-1338 Program Coordinator: Rachel Ramjattan [email protected] Phone: 954-778-0573 Program Coordinator: Gloria Luna [email protected] Phone: 305-762-3006 Associate Program Coordinator: Linda Coughlin [email protected] Phone: 305-235-3353

The Office of Social Advocacy promotes social justice and anti-poverty initiatives through legislative advocacy, and seeks to connect the works of faith and justice throughout the Archdiocese of Miami. The local home to the Catholic Campaign for Human Development and Catholic Relief Services, the Office of Social Advocacy coordinates the Archdiocesan response to emergency needs both at home and abroad.

CONTACT INFO

Office of Social Advocacy : 9401 Biscayne Blvd. Miami Shores, FL 33138 Email: [email protected] Fax: 305-762-3011 Website: www.justicecorner.org Director: Brian Stevens [email protected] Phone: 305-762-1338 Program Coordinator: Rachel Ramjattan [email protected] Phone: 954-778-0573 Program Coordinator: Gloria Luna [email protected] Phone: 305-762-3006 Associate Program Coordinator: Linda Coughlin [email protected] Phone: 305-235-3353 School of Ministry Registration Name:

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Email:

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Phone:

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Parish:

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Archbishop Statements Columns Homilies Podcasts Building the City of God English

Picture: Archdiocese Archive Archbishop Thomas Wenski

El Arzobispo Wenski nació en West Palm Beach el 18 de octubre de 1950 y se crió en Lake Worth, Florida donde asistió a la escuela Católica de su parroquia, Sacred Heart. Estudió en Miami, en el Seminario San Juan Vianney, después en el Seminario Mayor San Vincent de Paul en Boynton Beach, y se ordenó sacerdote de la Arquidiócesis de Miami el 15 de mayo de 1976. Obtuvo el título (B.A) de Filosofía (1972), y la Maestría en Divinidad (1975) del Seminario de Boynton Beach, y en 1993 la Maestría de la Escuela de Sociología de la Universidad de Fordham en Nueva York. También ha tomado cursos de verano en la Universidad Católica de Lublin (en Polonia). Sirvió tres años como pastor asociado de la Iglesia de Corpus Christi, una parroquia predominantemente hispana en Miami. En 1979, después de un breve ministerio en Haití, fue asignado al Apostolado haitiano recientemente creado en la Arquidiócesis. Fue sub-director y más tarde director del Centro Católico Haitiano Pierre Toussaint en Miami desde ese tiempo hasta su nombramiento como Obispo en 1997. El Centro Católico Haitiano Pierre Toussaint, además de cubrir las necesidades pastorales y espirituales de las comunidades haitianas del sur de la Florida, también proporcionó numerosos servicios sociales, educativos y legales a inmigrantes haitianos recién llegados. Al mismo tiempo también sirvió como pastor de tres misiones parroquiales haitianas en la Arquidiócesis - Notre-Dame d'Haití en Miami, Divine Mercy en Fort Lauderdale, y San Joseph in en Pompano Beach. En la década de los 80's el Obispo Wenski realizó un ministerio ambulante que culminó en la creación de comunidades Católicas haitianas en áreas desde Homestead en el sur, hasta Fort Pierce en el norte, Immokalee al oeste y Fort Lauderdale al este. Su asistencia hacia la comunidad haitiana también se extendió a Wachula, Winter Haven, y Ruskin en la costa oriental de la Florida. Celebró la misa televisada semanal en inglés para los incapacitados en el canal local afiliado con ABC, durante 1992-1997. Dirigió el Ministerio de Grupos Étnicos no hispanos de la Arquidiócesis de Miami. En Enero de 1996, todavía siendo "Padre Wenski", lo designaron Director Arquidiocesano de Caridades Católicas, una de las agencias de servicios sociales Católicos más grandes en los Estados Unidos. En esta capacidad ayudó a facilitar una colaboración con Caritas Cuba, el servicio social de la Iglesia Católica en Cuba. Desde el 1996 ha viajado a Cuba a nombre de la Iglesia en innumerables ocasiones. A fines de 1996 encabezó una operación de ayuda que entregó más de 150,000 libras de alimento a Caritas Cuba para su distribución a personas que perdieron sus hogares debido al huracán Lily. Esta fue la primera vez que los cubanos en Miami tomaron parte en un esfuerzo humanitario dirigido a Cuba. En años subsiguientes, esfuerzos similares fueron dirigidos también a Haití, a la República Dominicana, Colombia, y países de América Central. Designado Obispo Auxiliar de Miami el 24 de junio de 1997, el Obispo Wenski fue ordenado al episcopado el 3 de septiembre de 1997 junto con el Obispo Gilberto Fernández en el estadio de Miami. Además de sus responsabilidades en la Arquidiócesis de Miami donde sirvió en numerosos comités, tales como el Hospicio Católico, Caridades Católicas, Servicios Legales, y la Universidad de Santo Tomas, y luego como Obispo Coadjutor y Ordinario de Orlando, también sirvió como Presidente del Comité de Migración de la Conferencia de Obispos Católicos de los Estados Unidos (2001-2004), miembro del Secretariado para América Latina de dicha Conferencia y de CLINIC [Red Católica Legal de Inmigración] (1998-2001); y presidente del Comité de Política Internacional de la Conferencia (2004-2008) del cual continúa activo como consultor al Comité de Migración, y miembro del Secretariado de la Conferencia para la Iglesia en América Latina, el comité de Justicia y Paz Internacional, y CLINIC (Red Católica Legal de Inmigración). Su trabajo en estos comités, lo ha llevado a viajar al Congo y a la región de los Grandes Lagos de África, al Caribe, Centro y Sur América, al igual que a Israel y Palestina. También ha servido en un sinnúmero de organizaciones cívicas en la comunidad, incluyendo la fundación para personas sin hogar del condado de Miami-Dade, la junta Coordinadora del condado de Broward; y en 2001 el Gobernador Bush lo designó miembro de la junta a cargo de los desamparados en el estado de la Florida. Actualmente, es el Moderador Episcopal de los Servicios Católicos para la Salud de la Conferencia de Obispos Católicos en la Florida. El Papa Juan Pablo II designó al Obispo Wenski como Obispo Coadjutor de la Diócesis de Orlando el 1º de julio, 2003. En Agosto 2004, el Ministro de Justicia de los Estados Unidos designó al Obispo Wenski para formar parte del Grupo de Trabajo del Tráfico Humano. En Septiembre 2004, el Gobernador Jeb Bush designó al Obispo Wenski para formar parte del Equipo Operativo del Gobernador en Haití. El Obispo Wenski asumió el cargo de cuarto Obispo de la Diócesis de Orlando el 13 de Noviembre, 2004. El Obispo Wenski fue elegido presidente del Comité de Política Internacional de la Conferencia de Obispos Católicos de los Estados Unidos el 16 de Noviembre del 2004. En Octubre del 2007, el Obispo Wenski fue seleccionado para servir en la Junta Directiva de The Florida Specialty Crop Foundation (La Fundación de Cultivos Especializados de la Florida), una caridad pública sin fines lucrativos que responde a los retos que confrontan los fabricantes de cultivos especializados y sus depositarios. En Marzo del 2009, el Obispo Wenski se une al consejo de asesoría nacional del Instituto de Líderes Católicos (Catholic Leadership Institute) por su programa "Buenos Líderes, Buenos Pastores". En Junio del 2009, el Obispo Wenski fue electo a un término de cuatro años a la Junta de Directores de La Universidad Católica de América. El 20 de abril del corriente año, el Papa Benedicto XVI lo designa como cuatro Arzobispo de Miami y la Provincia Metropolitana de Miami (la cual incluye las siete diócesis del Estado de la Florida). Será instalado como Arzobispo de Miami el 1ro de junio, 2010. En adición a Inglés, el arzobispo Wenski haba el Creole Haitiano y el Español con fluidez y predica y celebra la Misa regularmente en ambos idiomas. Aprendió el español cuando era aún seminarista y trabajó con varios grupos hispano parlantes incluyendo Cubanos, Puertorriqueños y Mexicanos durante su entrenamiento en el seminario y sus primeros años de sacerdocio. También tiene conocimiento limitado del polaco, el idioma de su padre inmigrante y su madre Polaco/Americana. Sus padres se mudaron a la Florida desde Detroit, Michigan poco después de su matrimonio en el 1947. Ambos han fallecido. Su hermana y su sobrina residen en Lake Worth. Es el único obispo nativo de la Florida. El lema episcopal del arzobispo es "Omnia Omnibus", lo cual quiere decir todo para todos". El texto viene de la carta de San Pablo a los Corintios, Me he hecho todo para todos con el fin de salvar, por todos los medios, a algunos. (9:22)

e What is the Synod? Focus Teams Focus Team Resources The Synod Snapshot FAQ's Closing Assembly Photos Videos English

Preguntas más frecuentes sobre el Segundo Sínodo General de la Arquidiócesis de Miami ¿Qué es un Sínodo? En un sínodo, el obispo hace un llamado a los fieles para avanzar juntos sobre un sendero. El objetivo del sínodo es establecer prioridades pastorales para el futuro e inspirar e involucrar al Pueblo de Dios en la proclamación de la Buena Nueva de Jesucristo.

¿Por qué convocó el arzobispo Wenski este Sínodo? El arzobispo Wenski considera que para que la iglesia pueda afrontar los desafíos de este tercer milenio del cristianismo, es absolutamente vital la planificación pastoral, y que esta planificación debe tomar en cuenta el aporte de los fieles de la Arquidiócesis. El Arzobispo aprecia mucho la sabiduría y el talento del Pueblo de Dios y espera con entusiasmo la acción del Espíritu Santo a través de cada católico en Miami en nuestro llamado a ser " Discípulos en la Fe, Misioneros de Esperanza.

Este es el "Segundo Sínodo General" ¿Cuándo fue el primero? El Primer Sínodo General de la Archidiócesis de Miami fue convocado por el Arzobispo Eduardo McCarthy en 1985 y concluyó en 1988.

¿Qué esperamos lograr con este proceso? Como resultado del Sínodo se espera lograr un plan de acción para la iglesia local, que consista en objetivos específicos y alcanzables que serán puestos en práctica durante los próximos tres a cuatro años. Este plan pastoral será publicado y promulgado en la conclusión del Sínodo, en otoño del 2013.

¿Quién puede participar en el Sínodo? Todos los católicos están invitados a participar en el Sínodo. Pulse aquí para ver como puede participar.

¿Que significa el lema: "Discípulos en la Fe, Misioneros de Esperanza"? Durante su homilía en la Misa Crismal, el arzobispo Wenski hizo referencia al reto al que cada uno de nosotros se enfrenta. Este reto consiste en discernir lo que se espera de nosotros, tanto en nuestra vida dentro de la Iglesia como en el mundo. El arzobispo Wenski considera que este es el tiempo propicio para lograr grandes cambios y oportunidades, y que nuestra respuesta a este reto debe estar siempre arraigada a nuestra fe profunda y credo en nuestro Salvador Jesucristo. De esta manera podremos llevar adelante nuestra fe hacia lo que nos depare el futuro, aportando la esperanza a nuestro propio futuro como Pueblo de Dios. La frase "Discípulos en la Fe, Misioneros de Esperanza " también se une al tema de la Quinta Conferencia General de los Obispos de América Latina y el Caribe que tuvo lugar en Aparacedia, Brasil en el 2007. El tema de ese congreso fue "Discípulos y misioneros de Jesucristo, para que nuestros Pueblos tengan vida en El."

¿Con quién me puedo poner en contacto si tengo preguntas sobre el Sínodo? El personal de la Oficina del Sínodo puede contestar cualquier pregunta que usted tenga sobre el Sínodo. Para más información por favor envíe un correo electrónico a

[email protected] o póngase en contacto con Rosemarie Banich en la Oficina del Sínodo al

305-762-1189.

¿Quién está invitado a las Sesiones de Opiniones? Todos y cada uno de los católicos en la Arquidiócesis de Miami. Pulse aquí para el Calendario de Sesiones de Opiniones del Sínodo.

¿Y si no puedo llegar a la Sesión de Opinión prevista para mi área? Usted está cordialmente invitado a participar de una o de todas las Sesiones de Opiniones, no obstante el área o el condado en que se realicen.

¿Realmente será usada esta información? ¡Absolutamente! El Arzobispo, el Equipo de Liderazgo del Sínodo y los Equipos de Enfoque están ansiosos por conocer sus necesidades y expectativas para nuestra Iglesia. No podemos planificar sin saber lo que la gente necesita. De hecho, los Equipos de Enfoque serán creados basados en los temas comunes y las necesidades que se identificarán a través de estas sesiones.

¿Y que hago si tengo más sugerencias que las que caben en el formulario de encuesta? Por favor someta a la Oficina del Sínodo tantos formularios e ideas como usted tenga.

¿Si hablo en una Sesión de Opinión todavía tengo que entregar un formulario de encuesta? Le pediríamos que lo hiciera. A pesar de que los voluntarios del Sínodo estarán tomando notas ágilmente, dando sus respuestas por escrito asegurará que sus ideas y comentarios se capten con veracidad en el proceso de planificación.

Si no puedo asistir a ningunas de las Sesiones de Opiniones, ¿cómo puedo proporcionar mi aporte al Sínodo? Al concluir las Sesiones de Opiniones con el Arzobispo, habrá una oportunidad para dar su opinión por vía electrónica. Visite la página web del Sínodo para el enlace a esta opción que comienza en julio del 2012.

¿Puedo participar en el proceso de planificación? ¡Sí! Los que están interesados pueden ser potencialmente miembros o servir como recurso en uno de los 15 Equipos de Enfoque. Para más información por favor envíe un correo electrónico a

[email protected] o póngase en contacto con Rosemarie Banich en la Oficina del Sínodo al

305-762-1189.

¿Qué pasa después de las Sesiones de Opiniones? After the conclusion off the Archbishop's Listening Session, there will be an online opportunity for submission of feedback. Check the Synod webpage for the link to that online feedback option beginning in July, 2012.

Can I participate in the planning process? Todos los Formularios de Encuesta así como los comentarios hechos durante las Sesiones de Opiniones serán recogidos y registrados. El Equipo de Liderazgo del Sínodo y los Equipos de Enfoque repasarán entonces sus observaciones para discernir el mejor plan de acción posible.

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Léalo/Suscríbase INFORMACIÓN DE CONTACTO Editor

Emilio de Armas [email protected] Gerente de Producción

Manuel Villaverde Escritor de Personal

Rocío Granados 305-762-1130 305-751-6227 [email protected] Publicidad

Maritza Álvarez 305-979-9603 [email protected] Media Kit La Voz /Rates

REFERENCIAS STU Archives

LA VOZ CATÓLICA 2017 Publication deadlines 2018 Publication deadlines

La Voz Católica fue el periódico en español de la Arquidiócesis de Miami de 1958 a abril del 2009. Se reanudó la publicación con una distribución limitada a las parroquias predominantemente de habla hispana en septiembre del 2013. Ver los links abajo de las últimas ediciones. La Voz comenzó con dos páginas en español en la publicación en inglés "The Voice", se extendió a cuatro páginas y en 1982 se lanzó como un periódico independiente, distribuido mensualmente en las parroquias, en los mercados y tiendas hispanas, y por suscripción. En el período 2003-2005, se insertaba cada primer domingo en El Nuevo Herald. Su circulación llegó a 160,000 ejemplares en los condados de Monroe, Miami-Dade y Broward. La Voz Católica dejó de publicarse en abril del 2009 debido a los recortes presupuestarios de la arquidiócesis, pero muchas de sus ediciones se han conservado en la Web y en los archivos de la Universidad de St. Thomas. La circulación actual es de 4.000 ejemplares distribuidos en más de 35 parroquias de la arquidiócesis. Lea aquí la columna inaugural del editor de La Voz Católica, segunda época>>

e of Lay Ministry School of Ministry Fountain of Grace English

CONTACT INFO Director

Florángel M. González Associate Director

Rogelio Zelada, M.A. Administrative Assistant

Fiordaliza Ramirez 9401 Biscayne Boulevard Miami Shores, FL 33138 305-762-1184 305-762-1086 305-762-1298 [email protected]

Los Caminos de la Fe Stay tuned new workshops coming soon...

Próximas Fechas Marzo 7, 2015

Oficina De Mnisterios Laicos Día de Enriqueciniento PDF

Type the shortcut: www.miamiarch.org/layministry on your browser to come back to this page on the web site.

e of Lay Ministry School of Ministry Fountain of Grace English

FORMULARIOS Escuela de Ministerios Brochure Recomendación Laica Recomendación Párroco Plan de pago (2016-18) Plan de pago (2017-19) Inscripción (2017-19)

CONTACT INFO Director

Florángel González Associate Director for Hispanic Formation

Rogelio Zelada, M.A. Office Assistant

Fior Ramirez 9401 Biscayne Boulevard Miami Shores, FL 33138 305-762-1184 305 762-1086 305-762-1298 [email protected]

¿Qué es la Escuela de Ministerios? La Escuela de Ministerios forma hombres y mujeres laicos/as que desean crecer en la comprensión de la fe católica y discernir su habilidad de servir a la Iglesia. En el transcurso de dos años, los participantes desarrollan conocimientos en espiritualidad, teología y ministerio pastoral. Al completar el programa de certificación, los graduados señalan sentirse más cerca de Jesús y mejor preparados para servir en sus parroquias y comunidades.

¿Cuál es el Formato del Programa? Existen dos formatos diferentes. Escoja el formato que más le convenga. Formato de Clase Tradicional: se ofrece en inglés, español o creole. Esta clase se reúne una vez a la semana durante un período de dos años. Programa "Online": se ofrece en inglés o español e incorpora 8 cursos "online" con reuniones en persona durante un período de dos años.

¿Qué tipo de certificado recibiré al final? Existen dos programas de certificado dentro de la Escuela de Ministerios. Certificado de Estudios en la Fe Católica disponible para católicos interesados en conocer más sobre la fe y que no están seguros a qué ministerio están llamados. Certificado de Ministerio Pastoral es para personas que deseen ser comisionadas para servir en un área ministerial específica. Todos los participantes disfrutarán el conectar con una comunidad de creyentes adultos provenientes de diversas parroquias de la Arquidiócesis. Esto conduce a diálogos enriquecedores y amplía la noción de Iglesia.

Requisitos de la Escuela de Ministerios: Completar Materiales de Inscripción: Llenar Formulario de Inscripción, $25.00 no reembolsable por cuota de inscripción ($50.00 si se recibe el 1 de Agosto o después.) Dos recomendaciones personales (una de su párroco y otra de una persona laica), y el formulario de Plan de Pago. Excelente asistencia y participación en clase. Asistir a un retiro de fin de semana (incluye noches) y un Día de Enriquecimiento. Costo de Matrícula 2016-2018: Solo $28.00 al mes por 20 meses (más pago inicial noreembolsable de $100.00 en septiembre) o ($51.00 al mes por pareja) (más pago inicial no reembolsable de $200.00 en septiembre.)

Los Candidatos para el Certificado de Ministro Pastoral llenarán los requisitos señalados más lo siguiente: TIENEN QUE ser recomendados por el párroco. Ser católicos plenamente iniciados en la Iglesia. Completar un Proyecto Ministerial en los últimos 6 meses de formación. Estar dispuestos a servir a la parroquia por un período de cinco años y a comprometerse a continuar su formación en la fe. Fecha tope de Inscripción - 31 de Agosto de 2016. Se aceptarán formularios después de esa fecha si hay espacio disponible. Algunas clases se llenan rápidamente, inscríbase lo antes posible. Puede bajar del internet el formulario de inscripciónque se encuentra arriba.

ral Policy Employees Parish/School Carnival Policy Requirements Volunteers English

La Política de la Arquidiócesis para crear y mantener un ambiente seguro para los niños y los adultos vulnerables dicta que todos los voluntarios en los carnavales parroquiales están obligados a pasar con éxito el Antecedentes de Nivel 2, entrenamiento de Virtus completar y firmar un Acuerdo Voluntario, voluntarios Código de Conducta y Declaración Jurada de buen carácter moral. A los voluntarios menores de 18 años no se les permite tener acceso no supervisado a los niños, jóvenes o adultos vulnerables. Esto incluye a los ministros de jóvenes, los entrenadores, los consejeros, los dirigentes de niños o niñas exploradores (scouts), las niñeras, etc. Estas personas que pueden ayudar con los niños, jóvenes y adultos vulnerables, deben ser supervisadas por un voluntario o empleado que haya recibido el cursillo de entrenamiento del programa VIRTUS y que haya pasado satisfactoriamente una Verificación de Antecedentes de Nivel 2. Como a los voluntarios menores de 18 años no se les permite tener acceso no supervisado a los niños, jóvenes o adultos vulnerables, no se les verifica para detectar antecedentes penales. El cursillo de VIRTUS para los voluntarios menores de 18 años es opcional.

English

Procedimiento General Para Hacerse las Huellas Digitales Personal de la Iglesia y Voluntarios Cubiertos deben registrarse en línea accediendo a:

www.fieldprintflorida.com y siguiendo estas instrucciones.

Seleccionar "Haga una cita" (la inscripción se puede realizar en Inglés o Español) Crear un nombre de usuario y una contraseña segura y entrar en el sistema de Fieldprint Al ver "Motivo por el cual necesita que se le tomen las huellas digitales", seleccionar el enlace web: "I know my Fieldprint Code". (Para obtener este código de acceso, por favor comuníquese con su parroquia o escuela de antemano.) Por favor, tenga en cuenta que el código de acceso es sensible a mayúsculas y minúsculas. Proporcionar toda la información solicitada. El FDLE / FBI requieren esta información para procesar la búsqueda criminal. El sitio web le proporcionará al solicitante la información necesaria para hacer una cita y tomarse las huellas dactilares en un centro cercano. Todas las instrucciones, direcciones, mapas y fotos se le proporcionarán directamente en línea. En caso de preguntas o problemas, comuníquese con Fieldprint llamando al: 1-800-799-1067 o por correo electrónico: [email protected] O bien, seleccione la sección "Contáctenos" (Contact Us) que aparece en el sitio web.

IMPORTANTE Todo este proceso tiene que completarse antes de acudir a la cita.

Proveedores independientes Ningún proveedor independiente, aparte de los proveedores aprobados por la Oficina de Ambiente Seguro, puede ser utilizado por ninguna entidad de la Arquidiócesis para la realización de las verificaciones de antecedentes y / o la aprobación del personal verificado. Los resultados de todos los controles de huellas y de antecedentes se procesarán por medio de la Oficina de Ambiente Seguro.

Procedimientos especiales para el personal de instrucción El personal de instrucción certificado por el Estado de la Florida será reexaminado cada cinco años en relación con el proceso de certificación del Estado (esto incluye una renovación de la verificación del FDLE / FBI). Todos los otros empleados escolares serán reexaminados cada cinco años de acuerdo con esta política. La aprobación de la certificación del Estado de la Florida y los resultados de los exámenes relacionados con el personal de instrucción serán revisados por la Oficina de Ambiente Seguro.

Renovaciones Todo el personal de la Iglesia debe volver a pasar el proceso de tomarse las huellas digitales y ser verificado de acuerdo con esta política cada cinco (5) años.

Delitos invalidantes Si se encuentran registros previos de culpabilidad, de declaraciones de culpabilidad o declaraciones de "no oposición a los cargos" (independientemente del fallo judicial) sobre ciertos delitos menores y delitos graves, se prohíbe que la persona sea empleada o que realice funciones de voluntario en una entidad de la Arquidiócesis. Consúltese el Apéndice A para ver una lista de los delitos invalidantes. Haga clic aquí para una lista de los delitos de descalificación CONTACT INFO Myriam Leinweber 305-762-1057 [email protected] Erica Gutierrez 305-762-1059 [email protected]

Mantenimiento de los registros Las imágenes digitalizadas de las huellas digitales se conservarán en una base de datos electrónica segura por medio de un proveedor aprobado por la Arquidiócesis de Miami. Todos los registros delictivos identificados, junto con las recomendaciones de la Arquidiócesis para la autorización o denegación, se conservarán en un lugar seguro en la Oficina de Ambiente Seguro. Si usted tiene alguna pregunta, con respecto a este proceso, por favor contacte al Departamento de Verificación de Antecedentes: Las personas que no tienen acceso a una computadora o necesita ayuda para registrarse debe ponerse en contacto con su parroquia correspondiente, en la escuela, entidad o de la Arquidiócesis de la Arquidiócesis de Miami directamente a su coordinador designado.

INFORMACIÓN ADICIONAL SPA Lista de Delitos Invalidantes SPA Instrucciones para inscripcion

English

CONTACT INFO Directora del Programa de Ambiente Seguro

Mary Ross Agosta Coordinadora de Capacitación Virtus

Jan Rayburn 305-762-1250 Línea de Abuso de la Florida (DCF)

1-800-96-ABUSE (1-800-962-2873) Línea Directa de la Arquidiócesis de Abuso

1-866-802-2873 Coordinador de Asistencia a la Víctima

Deacon Richard Turcotte 1-866-802-2873 Coordinadoras de Control de Antecedentes

Myriam Leinweber 305-762-1057 [email protected] Erica Gutierrez 305-762-1059 [email protected]

Reconociendo que cada persona ha sido creada por Dios, la Arquidiócesis de Miami está comprometida con la seguridad y el bienestar de sus niños y adultos vulnerables, y pone en práctica procedimientos para minimizar el riesgo y las barreras, y para crear y fomentar una cultura de ambiente seguro. La Arquidiócesis no tolera el abuso o la negligencia contra ninguna persona, y cumplirá con todas las obligaciones del derecho civil y canónico; fomentará la sanación cuando sea necesaria, proporcionará educación, formación y orientación cuando sea apropiado, y tratará de evitar cualquier abuso contra menores o adultos vulnerables, con justicia firme y misericordia para todos. La Arquidiócesis de Miami mantiene una línea telefónica especial, 1-866-802-2873, que ha sido ampliamente publicitada y puesta a la disposición del público, con capacidad para recibir mensajes de voz durante las 24 horas de los 7 días de la semana (24/7), para recibir llamadas de las víctimas. Una llamada recibida a través de la línea directa se registra de acuerdo a la política y de inmediato se refiere al Coordinador de Asistencia a las Víctimas, para que se ponga en contacto con la víctima y le ofrezca asistencia. El registro de llamadas se comparte con el Coordinador de Asistencia a las Víctimas y el abogado de la Arquidiócesis.

ARCHDIOCESAN POLICY Política de la Arquidiócesis para crear y mantener un ambiente seguro para los niños y los adultos vulnerables Estatuto para la protección de niños y jóvenes de los obispos de los EE.UU. IMPORTANTE Para reportar el abuso sexual a la Arquidiócesis de Miami, rellene el siguiente formulario: English Spanish Creole Para reportar sospechas de abuso a las autoridades civiles, llame al: Línea de Abuso de la Florida

ral Policy Employees Parish/School Carnival Policy Requirements Volunteers English

Sólo para los efectos de esta política, el Personal de la Iglesia incluye a todos los individuos que ejercen un ministerio, trabajan o prestan servicios voluntarios en cualquier escuela, parroquia o ministerio de la Arquidiócesis, cuyo propósito es el cumplimiento de esta política. El término no tiene significado o importancia legal fuera del ámbito de aplicación de esta política, y no es indicativo de un empleo o relación de agencia.

Personal de la Iglesia se refiere a todo lo que sigue: Clero: Se entenderá por tal a todos los sacerdotes y diáconos que tienen facultades de la Arquidiócesis.

Empleado: Cualquier persona laica que está empleada o comprometida en el ministerio, y a la cual se le paga por los servicios prestados (con cualquier forma de compensación, ya sea monetaria o de otra manera), siempre que exista la obligación de descontar impuestos sobre el salario (FICA, Medicare y retención de impuestos), ya sea a tiempo parcial o a tiempo completo. Esta definición deberá incluir a todas aquellas personas que sean empleados de la Archidiócesis, parroquias, escuelas, centros de primera infancia, hogares de ancianos, hogares de grupos, o cualquier otra entidad de la Arquidiócesis que sea controlada u operada por el Arzobispo. Esta definición no incluye a los contratistas independientes, consultores, proveedores u otras personas que no están sujetas a la supervisión de la Arquidiócesis, y para las que no existe la obligación de retener impuestos sobre el salario.

Hermanos religiosos y hermanas religiosas: Se entenderá por hermanos religiosos y hermanas religiosas a quienes participan habitualmente en el ministerio en nombre de una entidad controlada u operada por la Arquidiócesis.

Seminaristas: Se entenderá por tales a los hombres matriculados en un seminario como seminaristas de la Arquidiócesis de Miami, o a quienes participan regularmente en el ministerio en una entidad controlada u operada por la Arquidiócesis.

Voluntario Cubierto: Se entenderá por tal a toda persona no remunerada que se dedica o que participa en cualquier institución de la Arquidiócesis, y que Tiene a su cargo el cuidado o la supervisión de niños o de adultos vulnerables, o Tiene contacto regular con niños o con adultos vulnerables.

Contratista Independiente: Cualquier laico no empleado que sea contratado para prestar servicios (bajo cualquier forma de compensación, ya sea monetaria o de otra manera) en nombre de la Arquidiócesis, incluyendo cualquier parroquia, escuela, centro de primera infancia, hogar de ancianos, hogar de grupo, o cualquier otra entidad de la Arquidiócesis que sea controlada u operada por la Arquidiócesis.

ral Policy Employees Parish/School Carnival Policy Requirements Volunteers Español

La siguiente es la Política de la Arquidiócesis para crear y mantener un ambiente seguro para los niños y los adultos vulnerables. Todo el personal de la Iglesia, mayores de 18 años, incluidos los solicitantes le ofreció un puesto, contratistas independientes y voluntarios que trabajan con personas vulnerables estarán obligados a: Completar el proceso adecuado de antecedentes penales y recibir el visto bueno de la Oficina de Seguridad de Ambiente. Completar el código estándar de conducta del empleado, la declaración jurada de buen carácter moral y entrenamiento de Virtus. Voluntarios de las cubiertas son necesarios para completar el Acuerdo Voluntario, Código de Conducta voluntario, la declaración jurada de buen carácter moral y entrenamiento de Virtus. No hay ningún costo para el individuo para estos requisitos, siempre y cuando la persona está afiliada a una entidad la Arquidiócesis.

ral Policy Employees Parish/School Carnival Policy Requirements Volunteers English

DOCUMENTS Promesa del Voluntario para Promover el Ambiente Seguro

Spanish

Un Voluntario Cubierto es toda persona no remunerada que se dedica o que participa en cualquier institución de la Arquidiócesis, y que tiene a su cargo el cuidado o la supervisión de niños o de adultos vulnerables, o tiene contacto regular con niños o con adultos vulnerables. Si se asignan a cualquier voluntario deberes que incluyan el cuidado o la supervisión de niños o adultos vulnerables, o que de cualquier otra manera incluyan el contacto regular con niños o adultos vulnerables, el voluntario se clasifica entonces como un Voluntario Cubierto, y se le exigen los requisitos para los Voluntarios Cubiertos, tal como se definen en esta política, incluyendo las huellas digitales, la investigación de antecedentes y la capacitación. A no todos los voluntarios se les deben verificar los antecedentes penales. Los voluntarios que no tienen contacto regular con niños o adultos vulnerables, y los voluntarios que no tienen a su cargo el cuidado o la supervisión de niños o adultos vulnerables, no tienen que someterse a una verificación de antecedentes penales. Algunos ejemplos de voluntarios que no tienen que someterse a verificación para detectar antecedentes penales son:

Funciones parroquiales voluntarias que no requieren huellas digitales (el cursillo de VIRTUS es opcional): 1. Funciones de sacristán 2. Aparejadores del altar; las personas responsables del lavado y mantenimiento de los manteles del altar 3. Lectores 4. Miembros del coro de adultos 5. Cantor Ministro Extraordinario de la Eucaristía (si lo es sólo en las Misas) Director del Grupo de Luto Los miembros del Consejo Parroquial; los miembros del Consejo de Finanzas Cofradía de Damas, Consejo de Mujeres Católicas, Grupos de Estudios Bíblicos, grupos de Ministerio que no tienen contacto no supervisado o regular con niños Organizaciones de adultos para hombres y mujeres que no tienen contacto sin supervisión o regular con niños

Funciones de voluntarios o de proveedores de servicios a las escuelas que no requieren de verificación (si van acompañados de un empleado o voluntario cubierto todo el tiempo): Presentador en una reunión o evento Eventos del tipo del Día de las Profesiones (como participante o encargado de un quiosco) Personal de reparaciones

ral Policy Employees Parish/School Carnival Policy Requirements Volunteers English

En un esfuerzo para proteger la seguridad de las personas vulnerables bajo el cuidado de la Arquidiócesis, todo el personal de la Iglesia, de 18 años de edad en adelante, deberá presentar un Formulario de Antecedentes Penales, así como un juego completo de huellas digitales, con el fin de facilitar una investigación de antecedentes penales. La elegibilidad para el empleo, el trabajo voluntario o el ministerio, estará supeditada y condicionada a una investigación satisfactoria de antecedentes. Esta investigación de antecedentes se actualizará cada cinco (5) años. Esta política se aplica incluso si una persona ha sido aprobada a través de una verificación del FBI o del Departamento de Policía de la Florida (FDLE) realizada por su empleador u otra entidad. A los voluntarios menores de 18 años no se les permite tener acceso no supervisado a los niños, jóvenes o adultos vulnerables. Esto incluye a los ministros de jóvenes, los entrenadores, los consejeros, los dirigentes de niños o niñas exploradores (scouts), las niñeras, etc. Estas personas que pueden ayudar con los niños, jóvenes y adultos vulnerables, deben ser supervisadas por un voluntario o empleado que haya recibido el cursillo de entrenamiento del programa VIRTUS y que haya pasado satisfactoriamente una Verificación de Antecedentes de Nivel 2. Como a los voluntarios menores de 18 años no se les permite tener acceso no supervisado a los niños, jóvenes o adultos vulnerables, no se les verifica para detectar antecedentes penales. El cursillo de VIRTUS para los voluntarios menores de 18 años es opcional. Política de la Arquidiócesis para crear y mantener un ambiente seguro para los niños y los adultos vulnerables

English

CONTACT INFO Coordinadora de Capacitación Virtus

Jan Rayburn 305-762-1250 [email protected]

La Arquidiócesis ha identificado el Programa de Seguridad en el Contacto como su programa para niños. El Programa de Seguridad en el Contacto fue desarrollado por las mismas personas que desarrollaron Virtus. Entre los puntos fuertes de este programa se destaca su adecuación a las distintas edades, o estar dirigido a los distintos niveles en la educación de los niños. Los maestros que lo enseñan conocen también el nivel de capacidad de los niños en su salón de clases. Además, los padres pueden optar por que sus hijos no participen en el programa. A los niños no se les enseña nada sin la aprobación de los padres. El Programa de Seguridad en el Contacto también incluye un componente educativo para los padres. El Programa de Seguridad en el Contacto es un programa de ambiente seguro desarrollado para los niños de distintos niveles educativos, en un esfuerzo por protegerles del abuso.

English

Las sesiones de entrenamiento de Virtus duran aproximadamente tres horas. Debido a la naturaleza del tema que se trata, no se permiten niños en las sesiones. A los participantes no se les permitirá entrar si llegan tarde, y su asistencia no se contará si salen antes de que la sesión finalice. Para inscribirse en una de las sesiones de Virtus para adultos, "Para Proteger a los Niños de Dios", visite www.virtusonline.org y oprima donde dice "Acceso o inscripción", al lado izquierdo de la página. Escoja "Miami, FL Archidiócesis" y luego siga las indicaciones. Formación Virtus: Calendario de sesiones

Cómo Imprimir Su Certificado de Entrenamiento de Virtus Para obtener un certificado, es necesario inscribirse para la sesión. Si no se ha inscrito con anticipación, puede hacerlo en www.virtusonline.org Haga clic en “Acceso o Inscripción”, en la columna de la izquierda, y siga las instrucciones. La persona encargada de la sesión de su entrenamiento enviará por fax las hojas de asistencia a la Oficina de Ambiente Seguro. Una vez su firma esté en el expediente, su cuenta estará activada, y recibirá un mensaje automático de Virtus por correo electrónico que le indicará el estado de su cuenta al momento de activación. Cuando esté activada, puede visitar www.virtusonline.org y utilizar su identificación y contraseña. Haga clic en la pestaña verde de la parte superior de la página. Luego, haga clic en “live training”, en la columna verde, a la izquierda, donde encontrará la opción para imprimir su certificado. También puede tener acceso a los boletines mensuales al hacer clic en la pestaña “Training”. Si tiene problemas con este procedimiento, comuníquese con la Oficina de Ambiente Seguro, a la siguiente dirección de correo electrónico,

[email protected]

Ministry RCIA RCIA FAQs Upcoming Events English

DOCS & FORMS Adult Intake Form (Spanish) Marriage Follow up form (Spanish) Child-Teen Intake form (Spanish)

El RICA (Rito de Iniciación Cristiano para Adultos) es el proceso que usa la Iglesia Católica para ayudar a los no-católicos aprender más sobre la Iglesia, y si lo desean, hacerse católicos. En la Arquidiócesis de Miami, ofrecemos clases de RICA en varias parroquias para ayudarte a explorar a la Iglesia, sus enseñanzas, y los significados profundos detrás de todo lo que hacemos como católicos.

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e What is the Synod? Focus Teams Focus Team Resources The Synod Snapshot FAQ's Closing Assembly Photos Videos English

COMMUNICATE CON NOSOTROS Síguenos por Facebook

Información para los medios de comunicación

Mary Ross Agosta 305-762-1043 [email protected] Información general

Sr. Elizabeth 9401 Biscayne Blvd Miami Shores, FL 33138 [email protected]

El Segundo Sínodo General de la Arquidiócesis de Miami Gracias a todos los que asistieron a la Asamblea de Clausura del Segundo Sínodo General de la Arquidiócesis de Miami el sábado 26 de octubre. ¡Fue un día verdaderamente memorable para nuestra Iglesia! En la Clausura de la Asamblea, se distribuyó el nuevo Plan Estratégico Pastoral de la Arquidiócesis. Además, se entregaron los informes de los diversos Equipos de Enfoque sinodales.

Usted puede ver y descargar estos documentos en este link: 2014-2016 Plan Estratégico Pastoral (En español) Synod Summary Report and Focus Team Recommendations (Sólo disponible en inglés)

e What is the Synod? Focus Teams Focus Team Resources The Synod Snapshot FAQ's Closing Assembly Photos Videos English

Arzobispo de Miami nos cuenta sobre su vocación, su vida y su familia Arzobispo de Miami nos cuenta…

Primer Conversatorio sobre el segundo Sínodo Primer Conversatorio de la Arq…

Segundo Conversatorio sobre el segundo Sínodo Segundo Conversatorio de la A…

Tercer Conversatorio sobre el segundo Sínodo Tercer Conversatorio de la Arq…

e What is the Synod? Focus Teams Focus Team Resources The Synod Snapshot FAQ's Closing Assembly Photos Videos English

La palabra sínodo viene del griego y significa unirse para avanzar juntos por el sendero. En un sínodo, el obispo convoca a los fieles para caminar juntos por la senda de la vida eclesial. Desde el primer consejo de Jerusalén hasta el presente, el pueblo de Dios, guiado por sus pastores, ha crecido a través del diálogo y la consulta sobre los asuntos que pertenecen a nuestra vida dentro de la Iglesia y en el mundo. Desde Vaticano II, el sínodo ha sido utilizado como el instrumento principal de renovación espiritual y pastoral. El Beato Juan Pablo II alentó el uso del sínodo como el medio para la renovación interna de la Iglesia universal. Nuestro segundo Arzobispo, Eduardo J. McCarthy, convocó el Primer Sínodo General en Miami en 1985 en respuesta al llamado del Beato Juan Pablo II a un renacer en la Iglesia. Los fieles de la Arquidiócesis de Miami se enfrentan a numerosos desafíos y oportunidades en el tercer milenio del cristianismo; unos son tan antiguos como la Iglesia misma, mientras que otros son producto de muchos cambios en nuestro mundo. El objetivo del sínodo es establecer prioridades pastorales para el futuro e inspirar e involucrar al Pueblo de Dios en la proclamación de la Buena Nueva de Jesucristo. El trabajo del Sínodo será logrado por un grupo diverso de voluntarios que incluye a personas del clero, congregaciones religiosas y líderes laicos de la Arquidiócesis. Miles participarán en las sesiones de opinión que tendrán lugar a través de la diócesis o en los equipos de enfoque que se conformarán para tratar los temas relevantes que surgirán en las sesiones de opinión. Las sesiones de opinión son centrales al proceso sinodal. Estas son reuniones generales a la que todos los católicos están invitados. Los participantes serán invitados a reflexionar sobre tres preguntas, primero individualmente, luego en pequeños grupos, y finalmente, tendrán la oportunidad de compartir sus comentarios con toda la asamblea. Los resultados de estas encuestas serán recopilados para proporcionar la base de trabajo de los Equipos de Enfoque.

Por favor pulse aquí para ver el Calendario de Sesiones de Opinión del Sínodo. El último paso del proceso sinodal es integrar toda la información proporcionada por los fieles y el trabajo de los diferentes equipos para convertirlos en un plan de acción que guíe el trabajo del Arzobispo y de la iglesia durante los próximos tres a cuatro años. Las prioridades y objetivos establecidos como consecuencia del proceso sinodal serán anunciados formalmente durante la conclusión del Sínodo en octubre del 2013.

Horario de Sínodo Junio 2012 – Sesiones de Opinión con el Arzobispo Julio - Septiembre 2012 – Sesiones de Opinión Parroquiales Septiembre 2012 - Febrero 2013 – Reunión Equipos de Enfoque Marzo 2013 - Junio 2013 – Fase de Integración Otoño 2013 – Clausura del Sínodo y Asamblea

h Ministry Young Adult Ministry World Youth Day March for Life Resources Upcoming Events Catholic Scouting English

Pastoral Juvenil Hispana El Consejo de Pastoral Juvenil Hispana está constituido por jóvenes adultos hispanos identificados y comprometidos con la Iglesia Católica, líderes de diferentes grupos parroquiales y movimientos de la Arquidiócesis de Miami, que se reúnen con el deseo de fomentar la unidad e integridad de los jóvenes adultos a nivel Arquidiocesano. La misión de este Consejo es impulsar procesos de evangelización que permitan al joven adulto hispano de la Arquidiócesis de Miami encontrarse con Cristo y que lo lleven a su desarrollo integral, a través de la formación, la capacitación, la animación y la celebración de nuestra fe en una espiritualidad de comunión[1] y compromiso apostólico. www.facebook.com/PJHMIAMI www.pjhmiami.org www.youtube.com/user/pjhmiamiVideos

e What is the Synod? Focus Teams Focus Team Resources The Synod Snapshot FAQ's Closing Assembly Photos Videos Welcome to the first edition of The Synod Snapshot. This is such an exciting and holy experience for our church, and it is our desire that through this weekly update you will have a greater understanding of the Synod. Archbishop Wenski convened the Synod at the Chrism Mass at St. Mary's Cathedral on April 3, 2012, and since then, the Synod office has been hard at work getting things ready for the first phase of the Synod: the listening sessions. These sessions are being held throughout the archdiocese beginning June 15th, and are an opportunity for all Catholics to share their opinions about the local church, as well as their hopes and dreams for her future. (Here are the dates of the Archbishop's listening sessions)

This week we also held the first meeting of the Synod Leadership Team, a group of twelve individuals selected by the Archbishop to serve throughout the entire Synod process, supporting and assisting the Archbishop in the creation of the Synod Priority Plan. In addition to meeting once per month as a group, the Synod Leadership Team will also work closely with the Synod Focus Teams that will begin working on goal-setting in October 2012. The Synod Leadership Team members are an incredible group of people from very diverse backgrounds, all of whom share a deep love of Christ and a desire to strengthen His church here in South Florida. To see a list of the Synod Leadership Team members, check out the article about the Synod in this month's issue of The Florida Catholic.

Please continue to pray for the work of the Synod. Next Friday look for the Synod Snapshot with more information about the listening sessions and the feedback we are asking for from all Catholics in the archdiocese. For more information about the Synod, please visit our website at www.synodmiami.org.

Rosemarie Banich Synod Director

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e What is the Synod? Focus Teams Focus Team Resources The Synod Snapshot FAQ's Closing Assembly Photos Videos Friday, June 1, 2012

We are now just two weeks away from the first Synod listening session! There are many answers to your frequently asked questions (FAQs) about the Synod on our website, but I would like to use this edition of The Synod Snapshot to discuss what you can expect to happen at a listening session. The purpose of the listening session is to rejoice in the blessings that God has given to this local Church, to envision the future of this great Archdiocese and to surface potential areas of focus that our Archdiocese should address in the next three to five years.

In order to accomplish this, each person in attendance will be asked the following three questions: What does the Archdiocese of Miami do well in serving and ministering to God's people? What could the Archdiocese of Miami do to improve upon its service and ministry to God's people? In the next 24-36 months, what 3 priorities should the Archdiocese of Miami name and fulfill for more effective service and ministry? After time for prayerful contemplation of these questions, you will be asked to write down your responses on a Feedback Form. Once the Feedback Forms are completed, those who wish to share their response to one of the questions with the Archbishop will have that opportunity. The Feedback Forms will be collected and all of the data collected will be recorded and provided to the Synod Leadership Team and the Focus Synod Teams as they begin the process of discerning goals for the Synod plan. A few other things about the Listening Sessions: You do not have to make a reservation to attend, and you can attend any session that is convenient for you. The Archbishop will not be able to respond to specific questions at the listening sessions, and we do ask that you keep your comments within the parameters of the three questions being asked. Here are the dates of the Archbishop's listening sessions. Many of you have told me that the Synod is in your prayers. Please know how much that is needed and appreciated. Coming next Friday in the Synod Snapshot, learn more about the Synod Focus Teams. Rosemarie Banich Synod Director

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Synod Snapshot #2 We are now just two weeks away from the first Synod listening session!

06/08/12

Synod Snapshot #3 As I discussed in last week's Synod Snapshot, when you attend a listening session you will be asked to write down your responses to three key questions on a Feedback Form.

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Synod Snapshot #4 Tonight is the first of the Archbishop's listening sessions, at which participants will be asked to communicate their joys, concerns and dreams for the Archdiocese of Miami.

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Synod Snapshot #5 On Saturday, Oct. 26, at the Synod closing assembly, the new strategic plan for the Archdiocese of Miami will be presented to all.

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Synod Snapshot #7 The closing assembly of the Second General Synod of the Archdiocese of Miami will take place on Saturday, Oct. 25, beginning at 9 a.m.

e What is the Synod? Focus Teams Focus Team Resources The Synod Snapshot FAQ's Closing Assembly Photos Videos Friday, June 8, 2012

As I discussed in last week's Synod Snapshot, when you attend a listening session you will be asked to write down your responses to three key questions on a Feedback Form. If you attend a listening session hosted by your own pastor, the same Feedback Form will be used and collected. Finally, after July 1st, the Feedback Form will be available both in hard copy and online for those who were unable to attend a listening session. The Feedback Forms will be collected and all of the data collected will be recorded and provided to the Synod Leadership Team and the Focus Synod Teams as they begin the process of discerning goals for the Synod plan. This week I would like to go into a little more detail on the Synod Focus Teams. The Synod Focus Teams will consist of between eight and ten members each, and we expect there will be between ten and fifteen Focus Teams in total. Each team will be assigned to develop SMART goals for a specific area of ministry. What are those specific focus areas? They haven't been determined yet! As we receive feedback from the listening sessions, we will identify your priorities, and those will become the Focus Areas. Now you probably have another question: "What is a SMART goal?"

SMART stands for: Specific Measurable Attainable Realistic Timely The Focus Teams will begin their work by studying the feedback that was collected in their specific area. They will also review current research on their Focus Area, including best practices from around the country. With that foundation, they will collaborate for five months in order to produce a set of SMART goals for that ministry area. In the upcoming weeks I will write about the next steps in the Synod process; in other words, what becomes of the SMART goals developed by the Focus Teams. Serving on a Focus Team requires a six-month commitment, including an orientation session in September and monthly meetings from October 2012 through February 2013. There will also be substantial reading and other work to be completed during that time. This is a rare opportunity to serve the church in such a historic undertaking, and although the work will be considerable, surely the return to the Focus Team members will be just as great. If you are interested in serving on a Focus Team, please complete the application found here. As you can see, your attendance at a listening session and your written feedback is critical to the success of the Synod. (Here are the dates of the Archbishop's listening sessions.) Your continued prayers are also needed! In next week's Synod Snapshot we will take a little walk down memory lane and look back at the first Archdiocesan Synod convoked by Archbishop McCarthy. Rosemarie Banich Synod Director

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Tonight is the first of the Archbishop's listening sessions, at which participants will be asked to communicate their joys, concerns and dreams for the Archdiocese of Miami. The question I have been asked most frequently this past week has to do with what, exactly, the Archdiocese is. In other words, most of us could list all of the ministries and services offered by our local parish, but what is the role of the archdiocese in our lives as Catholics here in South Florida? I am going to use the next two editions of The Synod Snapshot to answer that question. First, a brief history of our beloved local church. Bishop Coleman Carroll took charge of the newly-created Diocese of Miami on October 7, 1958, serving a local Catholic community of fewer than 200,000 Catholics spread over 16 counties, exactly half of the state. In 1968, due to the tremendous influx of new residents from the northern United States as well as the Caribbean, and also in recognition of Bishop Carroll's dynamic leadership, the 10-year-old Diocese of Miami was made an archdiocese and named Metropolitan See for all of Florida. Bishop Carroll became an Archbishop, losing eight counties to the newly-created Dioceses of Orlando and St. Petersburg. Archbishop Edward McCarthy succeeded Archbishop Coleman in 1977. Soon after arriving, he reorganized the chancery staff into seven ministries and announced plans for the construction of a permanent chancery-what we know today as the Pastoral Center, located in Miami Shores. More growth led to more change, and by 1983, the archdiocese numbered about one million Catholics spread over 135 parishes in eight counties. A long-rumored archdiocesan split finally took place in July, 1984. Bishop Nevins was appointed to lead the newly-created Diocese of Venice, which includes Collier, Hendry and Glades counties. The archdiocese also lost Palm Beach and Martin counties to the newly created Diocese of Palm Beach. Our Third Archbishop, John Clement Favalora, was installed on December 20, 1994, and presided over another period of change and growth. Archbishop Favalora was succeeded by Bishop Thomas Wenski of the Diocese of Orlando, who on June 1, 2010, was installed as Miami's fourth archbishop. Please continue to keep us in your prayers. Rosemarie Banich Synod Director

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Synod identifies three priorities On Saturday, Oct. 26, at the Synod closing assembly, the new strategic plan for the Archdiocese of Miami will be presented to all. The culmination of the work of the more than 800 Synod volunteers over the past 18 months, this plan begins with three pastoral priorities that Archbishop Thomas Wenski has discerned. These pastoral priorities are those initiatives that become the driving forces for action and leadership throughout the archdiocese for the duration of the life of the pastoral plan. In other words, of the many concerns, dreams and hopes of the people, of the diverse areas of ministry in which the Church serves the faithful of South Florida, these are the areas where the greatest effort must be placed (not the only effort, but the greatest). The Synod Leadership Team began the process of discerning three priorities in the spring of 2012, carefully and prayerfully reviewing the feedback from the listening sessions. After several months of work, they were ready to make their recommendations to Archbishop Wenski.

The archbishop, in turn, has spent many months in discernment as well, ultimately declaring what he has chosen as the three archdiocesan priorities: Priority: Deepening our Discipleship through Faith Formation and Support Providing a consistent invitation and diverse opportunities to all Catholics, especially adults, to grow in understanding of their faith to be better prepared and equipped to invite others to know Christ. Providing coordinated, proactive support to all of the priests in the archdiocese to deepen their discipleship and strengthen their ability to form and lead the people of God. Priority: Expanding Our Missionary Outreach to Youth and Young Adults Investing the human, financial and spiritual resources necessary to help both youth and young adults cultivate a personal and life-long relationship with Christ and to ensure that the Archdiocese of Miami becomes a model church in outreach to the Church of today and tomorrow. Priority: Establishing Our Parishes as Centers of Hope and Evangelization Supporting parishes in embracing the missionary call of Christ to "Go and make disciples of all nations" through creating a welcoming and vibrant experience of parish life. These priorities will be implemented throughout the entire archdiocese by several SMART goals, which will be shared in next week's Snapshot. Creating these specific expectations and concrete goals gives a clear vision for the future of our local Church, and as Archbishop Wenski shared with the priests of the archdiocese at their annual convocation this week, these SMART goals can serve as a report card for the archdiocese, allowing for a heightened level of accountability. Rosemarie Banich Synod Director

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Closing assembly includes talk by Cardinal Rodriguez Maradiaga In 2012, for only the second time in its history, the Archdiocese of Miami convened a Synod; that is, a process by which Catholics in South Florida gathered and told Archbishop Thomas Wenski about their concerns, what the Church does well and what their dreams are for their local Church. On Saturday, October 26th, this 18-month Synod will conclude with the strategic plan being presented to Archbishop Wenski by representatives of the 800-member focus teams. The Closing Assembly will begin with Mass at the Miami Hilton Downtown, 1601 Biscayne Boulevard Miami, FL 33132, at 9 a.m. followed by the presentation of the Synod results. Beginning at 11 a.m., Cardinal Oscar Andrés Rodríguez Maradiaga of Honduras, who is one of the group of eight cardinals appointed by Pope Francis to help him reform the Vatican administration, will deliver a keynote address at the Synod Assembly. He will then join Archbishop Wenski for a press conference. What is the Synod? Synod (syn-od, pronounced sin'ud) comes from two Greek words, one meaning "to come together" and the other "to move forward on a path." The Synod is a process of listening to the people of God, followed by pastoral planning based upon what was heard. The work of the Synod will set the priorities for the archdiocese for the next 3-4 years. How did the Synod work? The work of the Synod included a diverse group of volunteers, comprised of clergy, religious, and lay leaders from across the archdiocese, and several listening sessions that were held throughout South Florida. The listening sessions were a centerpiece of the Synod process. These are large town hall-type meetings to which all Catholics were invited. Participants at the listening sessions were asked to individually reflect on three questions, then to further explore the questions in small groups, and finally, they were given the opportunity to share any comments with the larger group. The feedback gathered at the sessions was collected and recorded, and provided the foundation for the work of the Focus Area Teams. Everyone is welcome to attend the closing assembly. To R.S.V.P., click on the tab on this page, or contact Jacqueline Debs at

305-762-1088 or via e-mail to

[email protected] Rosemarie Banich Synod Director

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Synod Snapshot #4 Tonight is the first of the Archbishop's listening sessions, at which participants will be asked to communicate their joys, concerns and dreams for the Archdiocese of Miami.

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Synod Snapshot #7 The closing assembly of the Second General Synod of the Archdiocese of Miami will take place on Saturday, Oct. 25, beginning at 9 a.m.

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FAQs about Synod closing assembly The closing assembly of the Second General Synod of the Archdiocese of Miami will take place on Saturday, Oct. 25, beginning at 9 a.m. Archbishop Wenski has extended an open invitation to every faithful of the Church in South Florida. He would like to see every parish well represented. In fact, some parishes are organizing buses for their parishioners. If your parish is organizing a group, please, kindly let us know ahead of time by calling Jacqui Debs at 305-762-1088. There will be no registration, tickets or special group seating. The day's events will be held mainly in English. The keynote speaker, His Excellency, Cardinal Rodriguez Maradiaga, will give his address in English and Spanish. Please plan on arriving well before 9 a.m. The event ends at 1 p.m. (We do not recommend coming mid-morning as there will be no seating available.) Discounted parking rate: $9 for self-park and $12 for valet parking. Please, bring ticket to assembly for validation. Entrance to the Ballroom level is through the 7th floor of the parking garage. Continental breakfast will be served right after Mass. There will not be food or beverages available before Mass. Location: The Ballroom at the Miami Hilton Downtown 1601 Biscayne Blvd. Miami FL 33132 Rosemarie Banich Synod Director

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Synod Snapshot #7 The closing assembly of the Second General Synod of the Archdiocese of Miami will take place on Saturday, Oct. 25, beginning at 9 a.m.

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St. Agnes Church respects your privacy and will not release or sell your name or email address to outside parties.

St. Agnes Church will only send messages to you that are deemed to be of legitimate interest and such messages will contain an opt-out option. olic Charities Camillus House Missionaries of Charity St. Vincent de Paul & Thrift Stores Archdiocesan Council of Miami 9401 Biscayne Blvd. Miami Shores, FL. 33138 305-762-1124 305-762-1125 305-856-1010 305-474-9010 (Spanish)

Society of St. Vincent de Paul The Society of St. Vincent de Paul is a worldwide Catholic organization of laypersons, open to all who wish to live their faith by loving and serving their neighbor. Generally on a person-to-person basis, members of the Society help those in need, regardless of race, creed, sex, orientation, handicap or religion. The Society's work may encompass any form of aid that alleviates suffering, and it strives to discover and redress situations which cause suffering.

Location

Contact Info Archdiocesan President: Frank Voehl

305-762-1124

Coconut Creek

[email protected] Vice President Finance: Jim Wele

954-234-7986

Coconut Creek

954-965-6618 Vice President: Anthony Niosi

305-762-1124

Broward County

[email protected] President: Robert Tarquinio

305-762-1124

North Broward

[email protected] President: Terry Whalen

305-762-1124

Central Broward

[email protected] President: Ed Fitzwilliam

305-762-1124

South Broward

[email protected]

Dixie Highway Thrift Store

954-942-2242

2323 N. Dixie Highway Pompano Beach, FL. 33060

954-942-9257

Central Broward Thrift Store

954-462-0716

1211 N. E. 4th Ave. Ft. Lauderdale, FL. 33304

954-462-0559 Vice President: Victor Martell

Miami-Dade County

305-762-1124

P. O. Box 431232 Miami, FL. 33243

[email protected] President: Dennis Joseph

305-762-1124

Northeast Miami-Dade

[email protected] President: Nicolas Setrini

305-762-1124

Northwest Miami-Dade

[email protected] President: Manuel Armada

305-803-3426

Central Miami-Dade

[email protected] President: Maria Perez-Gonzalez

305-609-6222

South Miami-Dade

[email protected]

Ozanam Food Bank

Josie Flores

305-282-4253

North Dade- Mother of Christ

Frederick Ozanam Food Bank

Isabel Font

305-248-5355

North Dade- St. Martin de Porres Church

e What is the Synod? Focus Teams Focus Team Resources The Synod Snapshot FAQ's Closing Assembly Photos Videos Español

CONTACT INFO Follow us on Facebook

Media Inquiries

Mary Ross Agosta 305-762-1043 [email protected] General Inquires

Sr. Elizabeth Worley 9401 Biscayne Blvd Miami Shores, FL 33138 [email protected]

The Second General Synod of the Archdiocese of Miami Thank you to everyone who attended the Closing Assembly of the Second General Synod of the Archdiocese of Miami on Saturday, October 26th. It was a truly glorious day for our local church! At the Closing Assembly, the new Strategic Pastoral Plan for the Archdiocese was distributed. In addition, the reports of the various Synod Focus Teams were also handed out.

You can see and download them here 2014-2016 Strategic Pastoral Plan (English) Synod Summary Report and Focus Team Recommendations Cardinal Rodriguez Maradiaga's keynote Synod closing photos – Click here to view. Use the password: hilton Synod closing - Click here to view photo album.

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Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell Cell ral Info Non Parochial Collections Tamper Evident Bags ADOM Financial Report Spanish

A. Preparation for Bag Use The bookkeeper/head cash counter will place a sufficient supply of the tamperevident pre-numbered plastic bags in the designated area in the Parish prior to each week's services. Access to the bags should be limited to the ushers and the bookkeeper/head cash counter. At least one bag, of sufficient size, should be available for each collection at each Event. The bags should be labeled by the bookkeeper/head cash counter as to the Event time and the collection purpose (when there is to be more than one collection at an Event). The bag numbers should be recorded on the control log designating a specific bag number for each collection at each Mass. An example Tamper-Evident Bag Control Log (the "control log") is attached. The bookkeeper/head cash counter will keep a copy of the control log and place the original control log with the bags. A designated person, such as the head usher for each event, is responsible for obtaining the bag(s) and the control log before each Mass/Event.

Note A small emergency supply of extra, number-controlled bags can be on hand in case one of the bags malfunctions or in case another bag is needed because of collection volumes. These bags should be properly labeled with instructions as to their proper use. They should be accounted for each week by the bookkeeper/head cash counter at the time new bags are supplied.

B. Collecting Funds When the collection is finished, the ushers (more than one person) at each Mass/Event will empty the entire collection from the baskets into the numbered tamper-evident plastic bags. Each bag is to be signed and dated with a permanent marking pen by the two ushers (this may be done prior to inserting the money into the bags). To seal the plastic bag, remove the paper strip (liner) from the adhesive area at the top of the bag and fold the flap down and seal the tamper-evident plastic bag. Ensure that the contents are properly secured. If the bag is spoiled or un-useable the spoiled bag should be kept and not thrown away – it is to be put into the substitute bag that should be available. The paper strip is to be signed by the ushers and attached to the control log. The ushers will sign and date the control log for each bag they were given after comparing the serial numbers on the bags to the serial numbers listed on the control log. After the last service, the original control log will be put in the safe or other locked and secured area with the tamper-evident bags. The tamper-evident bag(s), once sealed, will be put into the safe or other locked and secured area by the ushers. If the Pastor's desire is for the collection to be brought forward with the gifts in the offertory procession, the entire collection from the baskets must be sealed as indicated in Steps 5 and 6 before it is carried to the altar. Immediately upon the exit of the Pastor at the conclusion of Mass, two ushers must retrieve the bag and put into the safe or other locked and secured area.

C. Counting Funds The bags will be retrieved by the Parish Business Manager/Bookkeeper and one member of the cash counting team from the safe or other locked and secured area. Before opening, the numbers on the bags shall be compared to the numbers on the control sheet and the paper strip liners by the members of the money counting team(s). The money counting team(s) will open the bag(s) with a pair of scissors. The bags should not be ripped open. After each bag is opened, a member of the counting team will sign-off on the control log. If there is a discrepancy with the control numbers or if the bag appears to have been tampered with, the counting team should contact the Finance Chair. The control log will then be given to an appropriate designee, someone who is independent of cash counting and record keeping functions. The money counting team is to prepare the deposit, deposit slip and place all funds in a sealed tamper-evident bag for transportation to the bank. No currency/coin/checks are to be removed from the collection by anyone for any purpose. All cash and checks must be deposited and should not be used to pay bills or other expenses.

D. Depositing Funds The money counting team should give a copy of the deposit slip to the appropriate designee. A member of the cash counting team and an additional representative (other than someone on the cash counting team) should immediately take the deposit to the bank. Upon returning from the bank, the validated deposit slip is to be given to the appropriate designee to compare to the copy given by the money counting team. If the slips agree, the appropriate designee will sign off on the control log. If the slips do not agree, the appropriate designee should contact the Finance Chair. The control log and validated deposit slip should then be given to the Parish Business Manager/Bookkeeper for filing. Completed control logs should be filed and kept for five years.

E. Monitoring: The Parish Finance Council should monitor and periodically review the procedures followed by the Parish for the tamper evident bags.

ral Info Non Parochial Collections Tamper Evident Bags ADOM Financial Report English

A. Preparación para Uso de Bolsas: El contable pondrá suficiente cantidad de bolsas (a prueba de manipulación) enumeradas en el área diseñada de la parroquia antes de la misa o evento de cada semana. Acceso a las bolsas será limitada a los ujieres y el contable. Por lo menos una bolsa de suficiente tamaño debe estar disponible para la colección de cada evento. Las bolsas deben estar marcadas por el contable con la hora del evento y el propósito de la colecta (cuando hay más de una colecta en un evento). Los números de las bolsas usadas deben ser documentadas en un registro indicando el número de cada bolsa por cada colecta en cada misa. Un ejemplo del registro de bolsas usadas (el "registro") esta adjunto. El contable se quedara con una copia del registro y pondrá el original con las bolsas. Una persona designada, como el director de los ujieres de cada evento, es responsable de obtener la(s) bolsa(s) y el registro antes de cada misa o evento.

Nota En caso de que una bolsa falle, se rompa u otra por el volumen de la colecta, deben de haber más bolsas de abastecimiento de emergencia. Estas bolsas deben ser marcadas propiamente con instrucciones de cómo se deben usar. Deben ser contadas cada semana por el contable o director de ujieres cuando lleguen bolsas nuevas.

B. Colecta de Fondos: Cuando la colecta ha terminado, los ujieres (más de una persona) de cada misa/evento pondrán la colecta entera de las cestas adentro de las bolsas enumeradas. Cada bolsa será firmada y fechada con una pluma de tinta permanente por dos ujieres (esto puede ser hecho antes de poner el dinero dentro de las bolsas). Para sellar la bolsa, debe retirar el papel de pegamento de la parte de arriba de la bolsa, doblar la solapa hacia abajo y sellar la bolsa a prueba de manipulación. Si la bolsa no es usable o esta estropeada, se debe guardar y no tirarla – y los contenidos se deben poner en una de las bolsas de abastecimiento de emergencia. El papel de pegamento debe ser firmado por un ujier y adjuntado al registro. Los ujieres firmaran y pondrán la fechara en el registro por cada bolsa usada comparando el número de la bolsa con los números en el registro. Después del último servicio, el registro original se pondrá en la caja fuerte u otro lugar seguro con las bolsas a prueba de manipulación. Las bolsas a prueba de manipulación, después de ser selladas, serán puestas por los ujieres en la caja fuerte u otro lugar seguro. Si el Sacerdote desea que la colecta sea colocada en el altar, la colecta entera de las cestas debe ser sellada como indicado en Paso 5 y 6 antes de llevarla al altar. Inmediatamente después del final de la misa, y el Sacerdote salga de la iglesia, dos ujieres deben recoger las bolsas y llevarlas a la caja fuerte u otro lugar seguro.

C. Contando Fondos: Las bolsas serán recogidas por el director de la parroquia/contable y un miembro del grupo de conteo de la caja fuerte o lugar seguro. Antes de abrir las bolsas, los números se deben comparar con los números listados en el registro y los papeles de pegamento por los miembros del grupo de conteo. El grupo de conteo abrirá las bolsas con tijeras. Las bolsas no se deben rasgar. Después que todas las bolsas se han abiertas, un miembro del grupo de conteo debe firmar el registro confirmando que todas las bolsas son iguales. Si hay cualquier diferencia deben contactar el Director de Finanzas. El registro después será dado a una persona designada, independiente del grupo de conteo y contabilidad. El grupo de conteo preparara el deposito, comprobante de deposito y pondrá los fondos en una bolsa (a prueba de manipulación) sellada para el transporte al banco. Ningún dinero/moneda/cheques será extraído de la colecta por ninguna persona por ninguna razón. Todo el dinero y cheques deben ser depositados y no usados para pagar ninguna cuenta ni gastos.

D. Deposito de Fondos: El grupo de conteo le dará la copia del comprobante de deposito a la persona designada. Un miembro del grupo de conteo y otro representante (que no sea parte del grupo de conteo) debe llevar el depósito al banco inmediatamente. Al regresar del banco, el comprobante de depósito se le entregara a la persona designada para comprobar la copia del banco con la que fue preparada por el grupo de conteo. Si los comprobantes están de acuerdo, la persona designada firmara el registro. Si los comprobantes no están de acuerdo, la persona designada debe contactar el Director de Finanzas. El registro y los comprobantes de depósito serán entregados al director de la parroquia/contable para archivar. Los registros deben ser archivados y guardados por cinco años.

E. Supervisión: El Consejo de Finanzas de la parroquia deben periódicamente supervisar y examinar los procedimientos seguidos por la parroquia para el uso de las bolsas a prueba de manipulación.

TV Mass in English

CONTACT INFO Veronica Fernandez 305-762-1045 [email protected]

Television Airs every Sunday morning (todos los domingos): 6:30 a.m. - Misa en español en Univision 23 WLTV 6:30 a.m. - English Mass on WPXM 35 (Ion Media Networks) 7:30 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. - Misa en español en Canal Sur

Readings / Lecturas Click here to for the Mass readings in English Haz clic aqui para las lecturas de la misa en Espanol

Request a Missal If you are interested in receiving the Missal either in English or Spanish, please contact us.

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WPXM CHANNELS AND LOCATIONS

AdelphiaChannel 12

Miami - Dade South

Adelphia Channel 35

Fisher Island

Atlantic BroadbandCh. 18

Miami Beach / South Miami

Bellsouth Entertainment Ch.14

Pembroke Pines

Comcast Channel 16

Key West, Davie, Pompano Beach, Margate, Coral Gables, Miami, Ft. Lauderdale, Ocean Reef Club, Key Largo, Islamorada, Marathon, Little Torch, Hallandale, Hialeah & Sweetwater

Comcast Channel 35

Key Biscayne

Comcast Channel 9

Deerfield Beach & Coconut Creek

Comcast Channel 12

Pembroke Pines

Schurz Communications Ch13

Coral Springs

Schurz Communications Ch12

Ft. Lauderdale

Schurz Communications Ch16

Homestead

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h Ministry Young Adult Ministry World Youth Day March for Life Resources Upcoming Events Catholic Scouting

Catholic Young Professionals Series

YA Men's Retreat

YA Haiti Mission Trip

CONTACT INFO Director

Rosemarie Banich 305-762-1189 [email protected] Like us on Facebook

Pastoral Juvenil Hispana Coordinator

Krysthell Aragon 786-975-7319 Pjhmiami.org/swapps

“Young adults have many gifts to offer the Church: their faith, their hope, their desire to serve, their spiritual hunger, their vitality, their optimism and idealism, their talents and skills. The world also looks with hope to young adults to bring about a better future…” (National Directory of Catechesis, Chapter 7: 48c) Young adulthood is both a time of great promise and great challenge, especially in today’s culture. The decisions young adults make made during this time could have long lasting or permanent effects on the rest of their lives: vocation, career, and choice of spouse are just some of the many possibilities. It is important we communicate to our young adults how valued they are to us, that as Saint John Paul II said in his Homily at Sunday Mass on World Youth Day 1993 in Denver Colorado "The Church needs your energies, your enthusiasm, your ideals, in order to make the Gospel of life penetrate the fabric of society, transforming people's hearts and the structures of society in order to create a civilization of true justice and love." The Young Adult Ministry of the Archdiocese of Miami seeks and strives to serve our young adults by offering support, resources and opportunities to discover and enjoy the limitless possibilities that can be ours when we make faith an integral and vibrant part of our daily life. We do this by: Creating and/or supporting quality programming designed to meet the goals and strategies of “Sons and Daughters of the Light” by helping young adults encounter and grow closer to Jesus Christ, His Church and Her Mission, as well as their peers in a vibrant community of faith through spiritual formation, service and fellowship opportunities. Building bridges of community, collaboration and lasting friendships between our various groups. Assisting new parish groups with their startup processes or the revitalizing of existing groups Supporting the many great young adult events provided throughout our Archdiocese and providing a forum for the sharing of these events. And much more.

Check our EVENTS SECTION in this web site for details and upcoming dates for the events listed below Contact our office for more information.

Programs & Events Illuminare la Notte (Italian for “Light up the night”) is our anchor event for young adults 18-39, as well as our ministry motto as we strive to grow together in faith to be Christ’s light for each other and the world. This multilingual evening of prayer, renewal and community begins with Mass followed by Adoration with Confessions and individual prayer, ending with fellowship. The Office of Youth And Young Adult Ministry hosts two Illuminare La Notte events, with parish young adult groups hosting their own “Neighborhood Editions” in between once trained and provided with tools for a successful event by our office.

Faith Uncorked Young adults in their 20s and 30s "uncork" conversations with dynamic speakers at local spots. Archdiocese of Miami YAM hosts one series each year, with parish young adult groups hosting their own events in between, once trained and provided with tools for a successful event by our office.

Inizio / Iniziare In its commitment to help young adults have vibrant communities to connect to and thrive in, the Office of Youth and Young Adult Ministry offers a process we’ve come to call INIZIARE (Italian for “beginning”), designed to help groups get started or re-started.

Trips & Pilgrimages There are plentiful opportunities for young adults to join pilgrimages or service mission trips with other young adults with our office or other hosting ministries. Below is a sampling, or check the events section of this website for more opportunities throughout the Archdiocese. World Youth Day March for Life Annual Rosary Pilgrimage Through The Florida Keys Mission /Service Trips with St. Augustine Parish and Catholic Student Center at UM Mission/Service Trips with Amor en Acción

Other events From sports outings like our annual Young Adult Night at the Marlins to so much more. In our widely diverse Archdiocese rich with groups and their corresponding events this is just a sampling of all that is available!

Retreats There are multiple retreat opportunities offered for young adults throughout the year.

Annual Saint Vincent De Paul Seminary Young Adult Retreat Join hundreds of young adults on February of each year for a day filled with learning, sharing, renewal and fellowship. This annual retreat is offered by the St. Vincent De Paul Regional Seminary

St. Augustine Parish and Catholic Student Center at UM Retreats From spiritual renewal to island adventures and mission trips for both college students and young adult professionals, the St Augustine Parish and Catholic Student Center at UM a multitude of amazing opportunities!

Retiro anual en Español Para Jóvenes Adultos Un tiempo de aprendizaje, crecimiento, renovación y mucha hermandad para nuestros jóvenes hispanos, abarcando temas diferentes cada año y como éstos se conectan con nuestra vida diaria y caminar espiritual.

More Retreats Additional spiritual growth and renewal opportunities hosted by various parishes and groups throughout the Archdiocese of Miami may be found on the events section of this website, with retreats more specific to young adults found in the “youth and young adults” category of the events section.

Other Ministry Support Services Training and mentoring of leaders or staff, assistance with young adult ministry staff recruiting and hiring, identifying and sharing resource and continuing formation opportunities, in addition to other support as needed. For upcoming training and support opportunities, visit the events section of this website under the “youth and young adults” category or invite us to conduct a session at your parish by contacting [email protected] or 305-762-1189. "It is Jesus that you seek when you dream of happiness; He is waiting for you when nothing else you find satisfies you; He is the beauty to which you are so attracted; it is He who provoked you with that thirst for fullness that will not let you settle for compromise; it is He who urges you to shed the masks of a false life; it is He who reads in your heart your most genuine choices, the choices that others try to stifle. It is Jesus who stirs in you the desire to do something great with your lives, the will to follow an ideal, the refusal to allow yourselves to be ground down by mediocrity, the courage to commit yourselves humbly and patiently to improving yourselves and society, making the world more human and more fraternal.” -WYD Rome,19 August 2000

Young Adult Groups Parish Groups for Young Adults College/University Catholic Campus Ministries in the Archdiocese of Miami

Pastoral Juvenil Hispana (PJH) The Pastoral Juvenil Hispana is a Young Adult Ministry Council composed of Hispanic young adults serving the Catholic Church as leaders in their diverse parish groups and movements of the Archdiocese of Miami. They serve as a connecting point between Young Adult groups to share events, information and resources, promoting unity and collaboration among young adults in our Archdiocese. The mission of this Council is to encourage and promote evangelization processes which will allow Hispanic young adults in the Archdiocese of Miami to encounter Christ and lead them to an integral development, through formation, training, and living and celebrating our faith in a spirituality of communion and apostolic commitment. The PJH also hosts various events throughout the year such as an annual young adult group leaders’ retreat, their anniversary gala celebration, and PASCUA JOVEN … and much more. www.facebook.com/PJHMIAMI www.pjhmiami.org www.youtube.com/user/pjhmiamiVideos

Links Illuminare La Notte (Facebook) Faith Uncorked (Facebook) Office of Youth and Young Adult Ministry (Facebook) Office of Youth and Young Adult Ministry (Twitter) Sons and Daughters of the Light USCCB Young Adult Ministry

Thank you for posting your comments about an article in our web site. Your participation is very important and we are happy that you are contributing with your thoughts in our community. The comments you submitted were forwarded to our Communications Department to be verified and authorized for publication. Please check back on the article soon to view your comments online. Click here to go back to the article you were reading.

Thank you for sending your prayer request. Once your entry has been reviewed it will be posted on the Archdiocesan web site and your request will be included in the prayers of our religious.

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He came from Pittsburgh, a tough-as-nails prelate in pre Vatican II mold: Bishop Coleman F. Carroll's wishes were everyone else's commands. When Bishop Carroll took charge of the newly-created Diocese of Miami on October 7, 1958, his flock numbered fewer than 200,000 Catholics spread over 16 counties, exactly half of the state. Born on February 9, 1905, he was the second of three sons of Irish-born parents. His father, a railroad brakeman and then a clerk for Carnegie Steel, died when Coleman was 17. Coleman was ordained for the Diocese of Pittsburg in 1930, and spent 23 years as a parish priest before being named auxiliary bishop of his home diocese. The years in Miami were turbulent ones: Black Americans' struggle for civil rights and the war in Vietnam shook and almost tore the country apart; Vatican II "opened the windows" and a storm of change engulfed the Catholic Church. South Florida struggled to cope while undergoing a crisis of its own: hundreds of thousands of Cuban refugees began washing up on its shores, fleeing a Communist dictatorship 90 miles south. The Church, the country and South Florida would never be the same. When he died in office 19 years later, the sleepy southern diocese had turned into a booming, bustling, metropolitan See with more than 700,000 Catholics in eight counties, approximately one quarter of the state. Future >> Español

He came from Pittsburgh, a tough-as-nails prelate in pre Vatican II mold: Bishop Coleman F. Carroll's wishes were everyone else's commands. When Bishop Carroll took charge of the newly-created Diocese of Miami on October 7, 1958, his flock numbered fewer than 200,000 Catholics spread over 16 counties, exactly half of the state. Born on February 9, 1905, he was the second of three sons of Irish-born parents. His father, a railroad brakeman and then a clerk for Carnegie Steel, died when Coleman was 17. Coleman was ordained for the Diocese of Pittsburg in 1930, and spent 23 years as a parish priest before being named auxiliary bishop of his home diocese. The years in Miami were turbulent ones: Black Americans' struggle for civil rights and the war in Vietnam shook and almost tore the country apart; Vatican II "opened the windows" and a storm of change engulfed the Catholic Church. South Florida struggled to cope while undergoing a crisis of its own: hundreds of thousands of Cuban refugees began washing up on its shores, fleeing a Communist dictatorship 90 miles south. The Church, the country and South Florida would never be the same. When he died in office 19 years later, the sleepy southern diocese had turned into a booming, bustling, metropolitan See with more than 700,000 Catholics in eight counties, approximately one quarter of the state. Future >>

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CONTACT INFO Miami International Airport Chaplain

c/o Blessed Sacrament Parish 954-564-1010 [email protected] Sunday Mass Vigil: 7 p.m. Saturdays Airport chapel, Lower level Concourse D next to International Arrivals Hall Fort Lauderdale Airport Chaplain

Deacon Chandy Luka 754-581-3615 [email protected]

Airport The Archdiocese of Miami provides a ministry to travelers and employees at both the Miami and Fort Lauderdale international airports. As of Aug. 18, 2012, a vigil Mass is celebrated every Saturday at 7 p.m. at Miami International Airport. The priests who celebrate this Mass also are available for confession.

The role of airport chaplains "Dear friends, always be conscious that you are called to embody in the world's airports the Church's mission of bringing God to man and leading man to the encounter with God. Airports are places that increasingly reflect the globalized reality of our time. Here one finds people of a wide variety of nationalities, cultures, religions, social status and age. One also comes across all manner of difficult human situations that demand increasing attention� In airports, moreover, you have daily contact with a great many men and women who work in an environment marked by continuous mobility and constant technological development, both of which tend to obscure the centrality of the human person. Often more attention is paid to efficiency and productivity than to the love of neighbor and the solidarity that should always characterize human relations. Here too, your presence is of great value and importance: it is a living witness to a God who is close to human beings, and it serves as a reminder never to show indifference to those one meets, but to treat them generously and lovingly. I encourage you to be radiant signs of this charity of Christ which brings serenity and peace�" Pope Benedict XVI, address to worldwide gathering of airport chaplains in Rome, June 11-14, 2012.

CONTACT INFO Port of Miami

Stella Maris Catholic Center Seamen's Center 1172 Florida Way Port of Miami, FL 33132 305-372-0250 Open Mon-Sun, 9am - 3pm Mass: Saturday, 12:30pm Chaplain/Director

Father Roberto Cid Port Everglades

Seafarers' House 1850 Eller Drive - #500 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33316 954-734-1580 Mass: Sat & Sun, 11am (Except first Sunday of the month) Chaplain

Father Peter Lin Volunteers

Deacon Mario Ganuza Deacon Clyde McFarland Deacon Scott Joiner

Apostleship of the Sea The Apostleship of the Sea is a ministry to seafarers that offers hospitality and pastoral care to the People of the Sea. For more information on this ministry,

click here

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CONTACT INFO ENAVE-USCCB Hispanic Affairs

3211 4th Street, NE Washington, D.C. 20017 202-541-3150 202-541-5417 [email protected] www.vencuentro.org/v-encuentro-… Rosemarie Banich 9401 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami Shores, FL 33138 305-762-1189 [email protected] Fernando Gomez [email protected]

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Fishers of Men DVD’s are available through the Vocations Office at no charge.

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CONTACT INFO 305-762-1046 [email protected]

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ral Info FAQ Seminarians Resources Events DOCUMENTS Vocation Blessing Cup English

Español

MORE INFO www.usccb.org/beliefs-and-teachi…

Click on the images below to enlarge View English Prayer

Please contact the Vocations Office to request poster or prayer card above for your parish community. *Available while supplies last!

View Spanish Prayer

ral Info FAQ Seminarians Resources Events Currently the Archdiocese of Miami has 64 seminarians who are studying both at St. John Vianney College Seminary in Miami and St. Vincent de Paul Major Seminary in Boynton Beach. For more information on the seminaries, click here.

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e What is the Synod? Focus Teams Focus Team Resources The Synod Snapshot FAQ's Closing Assembly Photos Videos Español

Video para la Asamblea de Clausura del Segundo Sínodo de la Arquidiócesis de Miami

Pastor Fr. Jaime Acevedo

Pastor Fr. Jaime Acevedo

Pastor Fr. Jaime Acevedo

NEWS COLLABORATON Click to submit an article to Archdiocesan News. Your article can be published here!

NEWS COLLABORATON Click to submit an article to Archdiocesan News. Your article can be published here!

ral Info FAQ Seminarians Resources Events CONTACT INFO Vocations Director

Father Elvis Gonzalez Administrative Assistant

Ileana Valecillos Roque 9401 Biscayne Boulevard Miami Shores, FL 33138 305-762-1137 305-754-7762 [email protected] [email protected]

The Vocations Office helps increase vocation awareness throughout the Archdiocese of Miami by encouraging people to seek God's will in their lives and to consider the possibility of priesthood or religious life. Discernment groups and seminary retreats are sponsored throughout the year to help individuals who are contemplating a Church vocation. This office plays an important role in helping, and assessing those who are making application to the Archdiocese of Miami for priesthood formation.

Type the shortcut: www.miamiarch.org/vocations on your browser to come back to this page on the web site.

La Voz Católica was the Spanishlanguage newspaper of the Archdiocese of Miami from 1958 to April 2009. It began as two-pages in Spanish within the English-language "The Voice," expanded to four pages, and in 1982 was launched as a stand-alone newspaper, distributed monthly in the parishes, in Hispanic markets and storefronts, and by subscription. At one point, from 2003-2005, it also was inserted every first Sunday in El Nuevo Herald. Its circulation reached 160,000 in Miami-Dade, Broward and Monroe counties. La Voz Católica ceased publication in April 2009 due to archdiocesan budget cuts but many of its issues have been preserved on the Web and in the archives of St. Thomas University. La Voz Católica was the Spanishlanguage newspaper of the Archdiocese of Miami from 1958 to April 2009. It began as two-pages in Spanish within the English-language "The Voice," expanded to four pages, and in 1982 was launched as a stand-alone newspaper, distributed monthly in the parishes, in Hispanic markets and storefronts, and by subscription. At one point, from 2003-2005, it also was inserted every first Sunday in El Nuevo Herald. Its circulation reached 160,000 in Miami-Dade, Broward and Monroe counties. La Voz Católica ceased publication in April 2009 due to archdiocesan budget cuts but many of its issues have been preserved on the Web and in the archives of St. Thomas University.

CONTACT INFO

Website: www.alexlib.com/vozcatolica/index.htm http://library.stu.edu/ulma/va/3004/

CONTACT INFO

Website: www.alexlib.com/vozcatolica/index.htm http://library.stu.edu/ulma/va/3004/

e What is the Synod? Focus Teams Focus Team Resources The Synod Snapshot FAQ's Closing Assembly Photos Videos Español

Synod (syn-od, pronounced sin'ud) comes from Greek roots meaning to come together in order to move forward on a path. In a synod, the bishop calls his people together in order to move forward on a pathway. Since the first council of Jerusalem to the present, the people of God, guided by the leadership of their shepherds, have grown by dialog and consultation about matters that pertain to our life within the Church and in the world. Since Vatican II, the synod has been revived as a major instrument of spiritual and pastoral renewal. Blessed John Paul II encouraged the use of synods as a means to carry out renewal within the universal Church. Answering Blessed John Paul II's call for revival, our second Archbishop, Edward J. McCarthy, convened the First First General Synod in Miami in 1985.

We have now entered into the 3rd millennium of Christianity, and the challenges and opportunities present to the people of the Archdiocese of Miami are numerous; some are as old as the Church herself, others are products of the many changes in our world. The goal of the synod is to set pastoral priorities for the future and inspire and engage the People of God to share the Good News of Jesus Christ. The work of the Synod will be accomplished by a diverse group of volunteers, comprised of clergy, religious, and lay leaders from across the Archdiocese. Thousands will participate in one of many listening sessions held throughout the diocese or on various teams sponsored to address a certain area of focus surfaced during the listening sessions. The listening sessions are a centerpiece of the Synod process. These are large town hall-type meetings to which all Catholics are invited. Participants at the listening sessions will be asked to individually reflect on three questions, then to further explore the questions in small groups, and finally, will be given the opportunity to share any comments with the larger group. The feedback gathered at the sessions will be collected and recorded, and will provide the foundation for the work of the Focus Area Teams.

Please click here for the Synod Listening Sessions Calendar The final step in the process is the integration of all the input from the people of the Archdiocese and the work of the various teams into actionable goals and plans to guide the work of the Archbishop and the church for the next three to four years. The priorities and goals established as a result of the Synod process will be formally announced and the Synod concluded in October, 2013.

Synod Timeline June 2012 - Archbishop's Listening Sessions July - September 2012 - Parish Listening Sessions September 2012 - February 2013 - Focus Team Planning March 2013 - June 2013 - Integrated Plannning Fall 2013 - Synod Closing and Assembly

ral Info Resources World Events Local Events

Year of Mercy International Calendar

Opening of the Holy Door of St. Peter's Basilica Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception, December 8th, 2015. All Cathedrals of the World Open Doors Third Sunday of Advent, December 13th, 2015. World Day of Peace January 1, 2016. Sending Forth of the Missionaries of Mercy Ash Wednesday, February 22, 2016. "24 Hours for the Lord" (Reconciliation Weekend in the Archdiocese) March 4-5, 2016. (Call for prayer and reconciliation by Pope Francis). Divine Mercy Sunday April 3, 2016. Jubilee for Deacons Feast of Corpus Christi, May 27, 2016. Jubilee for Priests Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, June 3, 2016. World Youth Day July 25-31, 2016. Jubilee for Workers and Volunteers of Mercy September 5, 2016. Solemnity of All Saints, "to pray for the living and the dead" November 1, 2016. Jubilee for Prisoners November 6, 2016. Closing of the Doors of Mercy Solemnity of Christ the King, November 20, 2016.

h Ministry Young Adult Ministry World Youth Day March for Life Resources Upcoming Events Catholic Scouting

Click here to download the flyer Young adults ages 18-29 who are not attending WYD with their parish are invited to join the Office of Youth and Young Adult Ministry’s group: Download Young Adult Flyer Register here: http://conta.cc/2oNxxyV

Over 500 pilgrims from throughout the Archdiocese of Miami traveled to Krakow in July 2016 to celebrate World Youth Day with Pope Francis and over 2 million other Catholic young people.

World Youth Day Resources Official WYD USCCB WYD

CONTACT INFO Director

Father Richard Vigoa 305-762-1104 [email protected]

Coordinator

Raul Panellas 305-762-1105 305-751-6227 [email protected] Administrative Assistant

María Isabel García 305-762-1104 305-751-6227 [email protected] Archdiocesan Musical Director

Gustavo Zayas 305-759-4531, ext. 111 [email protected] Worship Commission Chairman

Father Michael Greer Office

9401 Biscayne Blvd. Miami Shores, FL 33138

DOCUMENTS Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion

ADOM Extraordinary Ministers o… ADOM Normas para Ministros Ex… Recommendation Form Attendance Sheet Confirmation Liturgy

Preparation for the Confirmation …

UPCOMING EVENTS Click here or look for Liturgical Formation in the Events calendar.

The Office of Worship and Spiritual Life serves parishes, institutions, and agencies across the Archdiocese in their efforts at enhancing the spiritual and liturgical life of the Christian faithful within the universal law of the Church and the particular needs of the local Church. This Office provides information, consultation, evaluation, implementation and leadership to promote the understanding of liturgical celebration and spiritual life. It promotes and implements liturgical guidelines that serve the needs of parish liturgical life. Further, it serves as a resource center to the Archdiocese and to parishes regarding particular liturgical questions pertaining to special circumstances and ceremonies. The Office is served by an Advisory Committee - The Worship Commission - composed of clergy, Religious and laity competent in matters of sacred liturgy and spiritual life.

Training for Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion The Office of Worship holds regular training sessions for those wishing to serve as extraordinary ministers of holy Communion in their parishes. Following are the basic requirements: Candidates will register through their parishes and must be recommended to the Office of Worship in a letter signed by their Pastor. To be Commissioned as an Extraordinary Minister of Holy Communion a person must: Be designated by their Pastor or School Principal/Chaplain. Be a Catholic at least 18 year of age, who has been Confirmed and leads a life in harmony with the Faith and the Ministry to be undertaken. Holy Days of Obligation and Principal Moveable Feasts

2016 / 2017 Friday, January 1, 2016

Mary, the Mother of God

Tuesday, November 1, 2016

All Saints

Thursday, December 8, 2016

Immaculate Conception

Sunday, December 25, 2016

Christmas

Sunday, January 1, 2017

Mary, the Mother of God

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Assumption of the BVM

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

All Saints

Friday, December 8, 2017

Immaculate Conception

Monday, December 25, 2017

Christmas

Please schedule Vigil/Day Masses accordingly. With the exception of Christmas and the Immaculate Conception (national patroness), the holy day obligation is suspended in the USA when the solemnity falls on Saturday or Monday. In the Province of Miami, (Arch/Dioceses in the State of Florida), the Ascension is celebrated in place of the 7th Sunday of Easter.

A new event was created in our database, and needs your approval. Created by: rw_createby1 rw_createby2 Phone: rw_createby3 Cellular: rw_createby4 Email: rw_createby5 Event name: rw_event_name Category: rw_category When: rw_when Event Start: rw_date_event_start Cut Off Date: rw_date_event_over Location: rw_location Description: rw_description For more information about this event please contact: rw_moreinformation Click on this link to approve or decline publication of this event.

ral Info Resources World Events Local Events On May 15, 2015, Pope Francis announced an extraordinary jubilee, a Holy Year of Mercy from December 8, 2015, the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception until November 20, 2016, the Sunday dedicated to Christ the King.

Pope Francis invites us to think about mercy anew as the "act by which God comes to meet us" but also mercy as the "fundamental law that dwells in the heart of every person who looks sincerely into the eyes of his brothers and sisters on the path of life". He invites us to live by this mercy in our parishes and lives, to forgive others as well as to seek reconciliation. He challenges us to understand mercy and justice as "two dimensions of the same reality" on the way of conversion of the sinner towards love. -From BULL OF INDICTION OF THE EXTRAORDINARY JUBILEE OF MERCY

We are asked to proclaim and live by the word of God's mercy, to reach out to others, to help strengthen and accompany them through their struggles. Reflecting on the Corporal and Spiritual Works of Mercy can help us to find a starting point. Let us share the joy of the Gospel through our actions, our words and our prayers during this Holy Year of Mercy. The Office of Worship and Spiritual Life is pleased to support parishes and communities in the Archdiocese of Miami as they celebrate this sacred time. Please contact us if we can be of any help to you or your community in your ministry. For your Parish activities, we recommend the Pastoral Planning Guide for the Year of Mercy by Bill Huebsch, "The Medicine of Mercy". It is designed to help you as a Parish to think and plan for the Year of Mercy (You only need one copy for one Parish).

ral Info Resources World Events Local Events

Resources from the Vatican Announcement from the Vatican Bull of Indiction (Misericordiae vultus) Letter from Pope Francis Vatican website for the Jubilee Year Year of Mercy Logo Year of Mercy Hymn(score/audio) Year of Mercy Hymn on YouTube Prayer for the Jubilee Year (English) Prayer for the Jubilee Year (Spanish)

Resources from the USCCB, FDLC, other Dioceses USCCB Website Mercy and the texts of the Mass FDLC: Part I (Intro) FDLC: Part II (Holy Door)

h Ministry Young Adult Ministry World Youth Day March for Life Resources Upcoming Events Catholic Scouting CONTACT INFO Director

Rosemarie Banich 305-762-1189 [email protected] Coordinator

Michelle Ducker 305-762-1190 [email protected] Like us on Facebook

Pastoral Juvenil Hispana Coordinator

Krysthell Aragon 786-975-7319 Pjhmiami.org/swapps

“Young adults have many gifts to offer the Church: their faith, their hope, their desire to serve, their spiritual hunger, their vitality, their optimism and idealism, their talents and skills. The world also looks with hope to young adults to bring about a better future…” (National Directory of Catechesis, Chapter 7: 48c) Young adulthood is both a time of great promise and great challenge, especially in today’s culture. The decisions young adults make made during this time could have long lasting or permanent effects on the rest of their lives: vocation, career, and choice of spouse are just some of the many possibilities. It is important we communicate to our young adults how valued they are to us, that as Saint John Paul II said in his Homily at Sunday Mass on World Youth Day 1993 in Denver Colorado "The Church needs your energies, your enthusiasm, your ideals, in order to make the Gospel of life penetrate the fabric of society, transforming people's hearts and the structures of society in order to create a civilization of true justice and love." The Young Adult Ministry of the Archdiocese of Miami seeks and strives to serve our young adults by offering support, resources and opportunities to discover and enjoy the limitless possibilities that can be ours when we make faith an integral and vibrant part of our daily life. We do this by: Creating and/or supporting quality programming designed to meet the goals and strategies of “Sons and Daughters of the Light” by helping young adults encounter and grow closer to Jesus Christ, His Church and Her Mission, as well as their peers in a vibrant community of faith through spiritual formation, service and fellowship opportunities. Building bridges of community, collaboration and lasting friendships between our various groups. Assisting new parish groups with their startup processes or the revitalizing of existing groups Supporting the many great young adult events provided throughout our Archdiocese and providing a forum for the sharing of these events. And much more.

Check our EVENTS SECTION in this web site for details and upcoming dates for the events listed below Contact our office for more information.

Programs & Events Illuminare la Notte (Italian for “Light up the night”) is our anchor event for young adults 18-39, as well as our ministry motto as we strive to grow together in faith to be Christ’s light for each other and the world. This multilingual evening of prayer, renewal and community begins with Mass followed by Adoration with Confessions and individual prayer, ending with fellowship. The Office of Youth And Young Adult Ministry hosts two Illuminare La Notte events, with parish young adult groups hosting their own “Neighborhood Editions” in between once trained and provided with tools for a successful event by our office.

Faith Uncorked Young adults in their 20s and 30s "uncork" conversations with dynamic speakers at local spots. Archdiocese of Miami YAM hosts one series each year, with parish young adult groups hosting their own events in between, once trained and provided with tools for a successful event by our office.

Inizio / Iniziare In its commitment to help young adults have vibrant communities to connect to and thrive in, the Office of Youth and Young Adult Ministry offers a process we’ve come to call INIZIARE (Italian for “beginning”), designed to help groups get started or re-started.

Trips & Pilgrimages There are plentiful opportunities for young adults to join pilgrimages or service mission trips with other young adults with our office or other hosting ministries. Below is a sampling, or check the events section of this website for more opportunities throughout the Archdiocese. World Youth Day March for Life Annual Rosary Pilgrimage Through The Florida Keys Mission /Service Trips with St. Augustine Parish and Catholic Student Center at UM Mission/Service Trips with Amor en Acción

Other events From sports outings like our annual Young Adult Night at the Marlins to so much more. In our widely diverse Archdiocese rich with groups and their corresponding events this is just a sampling of all that is available!

Retreats There are multiple retreat opportunities offered for young adults throughout the year.

Annual Saint Vincent De Paul Seminary Young Adult Retreat Join hundreds of young adults on February of each year for a day filled with learning, sharing, renewal and fellowship. This annual retreat is offered by the St. Vincent De Paul Regional Seminary

St. Augustine Parish and Catholic Student Center at UM Retreats From spiritual renewal to island adventures and mission trips for both college students and young adult professionals, the St Augustine Parish and Catholic Student Center at UM a multitude of amazing opportunities!

Retiro anual en Español Para Jóvenes Adultos Un tiempo de aprendizaje, crecimiento, renovación y mucha hermandad para nuestros jóvenes hispanos, abarcando temas diferentes cada año y como éstos se conectan con nuestra vida diaria y caminar espiritual.

More Retreats Additional spiritual growth and renewal opportunities hosted by various parishes and groups throughout the Archdiocese of Miami may be found on the events section of this website, with retreats more specific to young adults found in the “youth and young adults” category of the events section.

Other Ministry Support Services Training and mentoring of leaders or staff, assistance with young adult ministry staff recruiting and hiring, identifying and sharing resource and continuing formation opportunities, in addition to other support as needed. For upcoming training and support opportunities, visit the events section of this website under the “youth and young adults” category or invite us to conduct a session at your parish by contacting [email protected] or 305-762-1189. "It is Jesus that you seek when you dream of happiness; He is waiting for you when nothing else you find satisfies you; He is the beauty to which you are so attracted; it is He who provoked you with that thirst for fullness that will not let you settle for compromise; it is He who urges you to shed the masks of a false life; it is He who reads in your heart your most genuine choices, the choices that others try to stifle. It is Jesus who stirs in you the desire to do something great with your lives, the will to follow an ideal, the refusal to allow yourselves to be ground down by mediocrity, the courage to commit yourselves humbly and patiently to improving yourselves and society, making the world more human and more fraternal.” -WYD Rome,19 August 2000

Young Adult Groups Parish Groups for Young Adults College/University Catholic Campus Ministries in the Archdiocese of Miami

Pastoral Juvenil Hispana (PJH) The Pastoral Juvenil Hispana is a Young Adult Ministry Council composed of Hispanic young adults serving the Catholic Church as leaders in their diverse parish groups and movements of the Archdiocese of Miami. They serve as a connecting point between Young Adult groups to share events, information and resources, promoting unity and collaboration among young adults in our Archdiocese. The mission of this Council is to encourage and promote evangelization processes which will allow Hispanic young adults in the Archdiocese of Miami to encounter Christ and lead them to an integral development, through formation, training, and living and celebrating our faith in a spirituality of communion and apostolic commitment. The PJH also hosts various events throughout the year such as an annual young adult group leaders’ retreat, their anniversary gala celebration, and PASCUA JOVEN … and much more. www.facebook.com/PJHMIAMI www.pjhmiami.org www.youtube.com/user/pjhmiamiVideos

Links Illuminare La Notte (Facebook) Faith Uncorked (Facebook) Office of Youth and Young Adult Ministry (Facebook) Office of Youth and Young Adult Ministry (Twitter) Sons and Daughters of the Light USCCB Young Adult Ministry

h Ministry Young Adult Ministry World Youth Day March for Life Resources Upcoming Events Catholic Scouting CONTACT INFO Director

Rosemarie Banich 9401 Biscayne Boulevard Miami Shores, FL 33138 305-762-1189 [email protected] Coordinator

Michelle Ducker 305-762-1190 [email protected] Administrative Assistant

Jorge Jimenez 305-762-1128 [email protected] Like us on Facebook

Pinterest

Retreat House Catholic Scouting Chaplain

Deacon Emilio Blanco, M.D. 305-762-1245 Chairperson

Lisette Reina-Naranjo 786-546-0689 [email protected]



Do you need to register for an event? Click here for a list of upcoming events and registration links>> Young adolescents, teenagers, college students, and young adults are the Catholic Church of today and the future. They are energetic, passionate, and ready for action. They have questions, want experiences of God and are searching for a path in life. They need support and direction. The Office of Youth & Young Adult Ministry trains, equips and supports parishes for the tremendous challenge of ministering to, with, by and for our young Catholics. The Office of Youth and Young Adult Ministry serves the 108 parishes of the Archdiocese in four primary ways:

Ignite Comprehensive youth ministry is a product of the parish, with a role for everyone in the parish. The Office of Youth and Young Adult Ministry offers the Ignite process to walk alongside a parish that is either launching or rebuilding its Youth Ministry. Want to know more about how to Ignite Youth Ministry at your parish?

Training There is a huge knowledge base, a large tool belt of skills, and a variety of experiences necessary for successful ministry today. Our team offers effective training opportunities, according to your needs. Here is our training calendar.

Ministry Support We assist in Youth and Young Adult Ministry recruiting and hiring, mentoring of staff, facilitation of volunteer certification for Steubenville and other events, in addition to other support as needed.

Events Most programs and events can be offered at the parish but there are some that can only reach their full potential when parishes come together through the coordination of the diocesan ministries. We run many events through the year. Please visit one of the event pages to view more information about the particular event. The March for Life World Youth Day Catholic Youth Night at the Miami Heat Catholic Young Adult Night at the Miami Marlins

Lay Movements for Youth Amor en el Principio Love at the beginning: this is a movement for youths. It is designed to help and guide teenagers in their friendships with teenagers of the opposite sex. They are taught to respect one another, to communicate in a respectful manner and to make them people of prayer. Its objective is to help teenagers to have God as the center of their relationships of friendship as well as develop knowledge and live by Catholic moral values. https://sites.google.com/site/amorenelprincipio

Encuentros Juveniles Encuentros Juveniles is a Youth Movement of the Archdiocese of Miami dedicated to the evangelization of the youth. Started in 1973, to promote the spiritual welfare of the Hispanic youth, Encuentros now caters to the spirituality of any young Catholic/Christian. We call out to all the young persons in the Archdiocese of Miami from the ages of 16 to 23. When you feel that you have reached a point where you must find Christ or want to deepen your relationship with him, we invite you to our movement. We are called to build the Civilization of Love. "How?" you may ask yourselves, by the evangelization of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. We attend weekly formation meetings, monthly service projects, and retreats every few months; all geared at the goal of creating Christian leaders for our workforce, schools, families, parishes, and communities. We are not a youth group, but a YOUTH MOVEMENT. www.encjuveniles.com/ www.facebook.com/encjuveniles

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OFFICES & MINISTRIES

CONTACT Archdiocese of Miami 9401 Biscayne Boulevard Miami Shores, FL 33138 (305) 757-6241 [email protected]

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