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C a n t o n (Dbscrucr Thursday, June 26, 1980

Volume 5 Number 95

Twenty-Five Cents

56 Pages

Canton, Michigan

I MHOSuburban < ••mmunu aU.m ( nrporalion All

Burglar strikes at night

Schools gulp at deficit as bills for lunch rise By T E R I BANAS The food p r o g r a m in the P l y m o u t h Canton schools is ending the school year with its largest deficit in the past 10 y e a r s . As of May, the y e a r ' s deficit had r e a c h e d $109,145, considerably higher than any r e c o r d e d annual loss in 10 years. It's expected the deficit will be m a d e up in s e v e r a l u p c o m i n g school years, says d i r e c t o r of f i n a n c e Dan White. To d e t e r m i n e a g a m e plan for absorbing the cost, as well as a l t e r i n g the p r o g r a m , the board of education will m e e t in a study session in e a r l y August. It's expected the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n will r e c o m m e n d price i n c r e a s e s for next year. This has been the first y e a r in which a p r i v a t e c o n t r a c t o r has taken over the responsibilities of the day-to-day operation of the lunch and b r e a k f a s t program

Director of the ARA p r o g r a m , Paul Seidel, a d m i t t e d t h a t the d e f i c i t a p p e a r e d "high" but said establishing a self-sufficient food p r o g r a m " t a k e s time. " T h a t ' s about n o r m a l in the first year or so.

" W E R E A L L Y didn't e x p e c t such a deficit when we s t a r t e d but s o m e t i m e s it t a k e s two y e a r s to get on your f e e t . " "We w e r e hoping to c o m e in at $56,000 loss," says White, "but a couple of things happened t h a t we couldn't foresee or avoid." In J a n u a r y , the district's a d m i n i s t r a tion r e c o m m e n d e d a 12 p e r c e n t cutback in m a n p o w e r hours (for c a f e t e r i a workers) in an a t t e m p t to c u r b the growing deficit. It's believed t h a t p r e s s u r e — f r o m a f f e c t e d school e m p l o y e e s - delayed the action for t w o months. Eventually, a limited version of t h a t

plan did reduce hours, which is one factor t h a t a t t r i b u t e d to the deficit, s a y s White. Other key f a c t o r s included: • Food prices skyrocketed this y e a r , p a r t i c u l a r l y in the Detroit a r e a . • For the first t i m e this year, the f e d e r a l and s t a t e g o v e r n m e n t s c u t back on their cash subsidies to school districts. Until this year, a district would r e c e i v e a cash r e b a t e for non-used c o m m o d i t i e s (contributed food supplies). "Before, the g o v e r n m e n t r e f u n d e d in cash w h a t we didn't use in c o m m o d i ties. This y e a r this didn't happen. It hurt us badly. - This spring a c o n t r a c t s e t t l e m e n t with the c a f e t e r i a w o r k e r s c a m e in at a higher r a t e than originally a n t i c i p a t e d by the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n . The s e t t l e m e n t included a 9 percent pay hike as comp a r e d to a n anticipated 7 p e r c e n t increase. (Continued on P a g e 3A)

A cat b u r g l a r r e p o r t e d l y snatched $1,200 f r o m seven homes over the weekend while residents of the dwellings w e r e asleep The b u r g l a r i e s in Canton's P a r k l a n e subdivision south of Ford and west of Lilley occurred late S a t u r d a y night and early Sunday morning The r e p o r t s bring the total n u m b e r of cat b u r g l a r i e s to 19 since mid-May, according to Lt. L a r r y S t e w a r t An est i m a t e d $2,500 in cash w a s stolen f r o m the 19 homes In all cases, b u r g l a r s e n t e r e d the homes through an unlocked doorwall or large, sliding window P u r s e s or loose cash w e r e lying on tables or other pieces of f u r n i t u r e in plain viewF i v e of the robberies o c c u r r e d in Windemere subdivision, four in Willow Creek and t h r e e in Sunflower S t e w a r t said Canton police a r e " r e l a tively c e r t a i n " that the s a m e person or group is responsible for all the robberies except those in Sunflower

Service club eyes parcel for kids' motocross track By T E R I BANAS A local s e r v i c e club, r e a c t i n g to an e m e r g i n g national interest in bicycle racing, has its eyes on Canton Township for t h e ^ i t e of a motocross t r a c k . The P l y m o u t h C o m m u n i t y Civitans, best known for its sponsorship of the annual Special Olympics, is now planning another v e n t u r e to involve children and their f a m i l i e s in the P l y m outh-Canton c o m m u n i t y . According to m e m b e r Mike C a f f e r y of P l y m o u t h , the group's negotiating with a local developer for land he owns in northern Canton Township. The f i v e - a c r e site on Joy Road n e a r Mettetal Airport is the latest p a r c e l to raise the group's interest.

Discussions h a v e also pointed to property owned by the Plymouth-Canton Schools, although school o f f i c i a l s say such a v e n t u r e a p p e a r s unlikely at this time. C a f f e r y says the club b e c a m e interested in building a m o t o c r o s s t r a c k because of the s p o r t ' s growing appeal to a r e a children. Many club m e m b e r s , t h e m s e l v e s , have children interested in m o t o c r o s s competition and presently m u s t t r a v e l miles to the n e a r e s t t r a c k .

MORE IMPORTANTLY, he says, the group w a n t s to build the t r a c k so t h a t p a r t i c i p a t i n g children will stay off neighborhood s t r e e t s and undeveloped

Attorney firms take slap as pay hike turned down "Like it or l e a v e us" s u m s up the view of the Canton Township board t o w a r d a request of two legal f i r m s for an i n c r e a s e in pay "I wouldn't even discuss an inc r e a s e . " said T r u s t e e Robert Greenstein of the f i r m s ' proposals. "I'd say t h e r e a r e at least 400 f i r m s out t h e r e who'd be happy to t a k e over our volume of cases at the c u r r e n t price " Bert Burgoyne, who has r e p r e s e n t e d Canton Township since 1975, proposed a 33 percent i n c r e a s e in his own pay.

The i n c r e a s e would hike Burgoyne's hourly r a t e f r o m $75 to $100, while other m e m b e r s of his f i r m would continue at $75. Cox and Hooth, Canton's labor negot i a t o r s for the past y e a r , proposed an hourly r a t e i n c r e a s e of $10 to $15 for each m e m b e r of the f i r m . The boost would hike hourly r a t e s f r o m the current r a n g e of $35 t o $65 to a new r a t e of $45 to $75. Both f i r m s cited inflation as the basis for the proposals. (Continued on P a g e 4A)

open a r e a s w h e r e a c c i d e n t s could happen. "We h a v e a lot of kids a r o u n d h e r e with nothing to do. We h a v e to keep t h e m busy " Motocross is a sport t h a t e m p l o y s small, non-motorized dirt bikes. Speed and skill a r e the n a m e of the g a m e a s c o m p e t i t i o n is held on a c i r c u l a r dirt c o u r s e t h a t ' s s t r e w n with o b s t a c l e s and elevated jumps According to the m a n a g e r of J e r r y ' s B i c y c l e Shop in P l y m o u t h , D a n Loiselle, m o t o c r o s s is a s a f e sport for children when they w e a r p r o t e c t i v e g a r b and use established t r a c k s . "You seldom see anyone get hurt on a t r a c k t h a t has a loose dirt s u r f a c e , which all motocross t r a c k s have. The stunts can be done safely — you just h a v e to get t h e m off the streets. " N e x t to soccer it's the f i r s t f a m i l y sport t h a t I've seen. Dad's the coach and the sons and d a u g h t e r s a r e players." S a n d r a Steed, a c t i v e in the local Civitans, is one m o t o c r o s s m o t h e r . Her 16year-old son r a c e s competitively. She says the n e a r e s t t r a c k is in Woodhaven. w h e r e one's o p e r a t e d by the J a y c e e s . " I t ' s been very popular in California. It's just s t a r t i n g up in Michigan "

ATTESTING TO the sport's f a r reaching appeal, she says those attending Woodhaven m e e t s t r a v e l f r o m such distances as Cleveland, (Continued on P a g e 3A)

In all 19 homes, nothing was damaged. Residents slept through the robberies. In the s u m m e r of 1978. 32 cat burglaries w e r e reported

T h e s e t y p e s of l o c k s a r e r e c o m m e n d e d by p a t r o l o f f i c e r J i m H a n n a h e a d of C a n t o n ' s - r i m e p r e v e n t i o n b u r e a u . ( S t a f f p h o t o by G a r y

L a r r y B o w e r m a n looks at things optimistically He d i s a g r e e s with the gloom-anddoom e c o n o m i c prophesies of s o m e Township Board m e m b e r s and the decisions m a d e on t h a t basis. The t r u s t e e c a n d i d a t e thinks the economy will improve, as it a l w a y s has in the past. Booming t i m e s will revive Canton's old p r o b l e m s of population growth and building complaints, he says. As " a n individual who r e s p e c t s the opinions of o t h e r people and weighs the pros and cons," Bowerm a n believes that he c a n help the Township Board solve old and new problems. At 32, he is m a k i n g a second try for a township t r u s t e e position. B o w e r m a n lost a D e m o c r a t i c nomination in 1978 by 184 votes. This election o f f e r s even tougher competition. A record 15 c a n d i d a t e s a r e c o m p e t i n g for four t r u s t e e seats. HIGH ON B o w e r m a n ' s list of needs is m o r e m o n e y for recreation. He criticizes the p r e s e n t Township Board for "pigeonholing r e c r e ation in a c o r n e r . " Golf c o u r s e profits, originally e a r m a r k e d for r e c r e ation, h a v e not been used for t h a t purpose, he says "I feel r e c r e a t i o n is a l e g i t i m a t e g o v e r n m e n t e x p e n d i t u r e . In these

Afraid of prowlers? Take some preventative steps By D A R L E N E STINSON You had a great t i m e at the movie t h e a t e r or a f r i e n d ' s house. It's p r e t t y late, and your only thought is to drop into bed But a n i g h t m a r i s h scene a w a i t s as you slip your key into the lock and swing open the f r o n t door. D r a w e r s a r e flung open, and your television and s t e r e o a r e gone. You quickly realize that your h o m e in the seemingly s e c u r e s u b u r b s has bec o m e the t a r g e t of c r i m e . The latest police statistics show t h a t 93 businesses and h o m e o w n e r s s u f f e r e d losses due to breaking and e n t e r i n g s in the first t h r e e m o n t h s of this y e a r . T h a t ' s a 132 percent i n c r e a s e over the s a m e period in 1979.

What the Canton Township Board needs is a good dose of c o m m o n sense, says full-time f a r m e r Duane Bordine. The lifetime township resident will c o m p e t e with five o t h e r Republicans for four t r u s t e e nominations this Aug. 5. Nine D e m o c r a t s a r e also vying for the t r u s t e e positions.

LARRY BOWERMAN times, people a r e looking for inexpensive m e a n s of r e c r e a t i o n and ent e r t a i n m e n t , " he said. i "We a r e in a recession. But I don't believe t h a t Canton Township will collapse in a y e a r or two. Our m a i n source of r e v e n u e is p r o p e r t y taxes." Despite his e n d o r s e m e n t of r e c r e ational e x p e n d i t u r e s , B o w e r m a n said the township should b a l a n c e its o f f e r i n g "so non-softball or Little L e a g u e persons c a n h a v e a r e c r e ational outlet." (Continued on P a g e 4A)

) R D I N E IS S E E K I N G his f i r s t - e l e c t i v e o f f i c e to give m o r e representation to the citizens west of Canton Center Road and to t a k e steps to keep t a x e s down. He m a i n t a i n s t h a t industrial development is crucial to the financial well-being of all h o m e o w n e r s - in subdivisions and on f a r m s . But Bordine believes t h a t township officials have c r e a t e d an adv e r s e c l i m a t e for industrial and commercial development. "They don't t r e a t people as

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P A T R O L O F F I C E R J i m Hanna is working full-time to prevent those kinds of n i g h m a r e s . He heads a new c r i m e prevention bureau, which kicked off o p e r a t i o n s in May. Among the b u r e a u ' s o f f e r i n g s a r e f r e e inspections of h o m e s and businesses to assess their susceptibility to thieves. The bureau also m a k e s presentations to h o m e o w n e r groups. "We need people's help to w a t c h out for their neighbors and t h e m s e l v e s , " Hanna said "If people really w a n t to break in, they can. We w a n t to delay and discourage t h e m . " A w a r e n e s s is the tool

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H o m e o w n e r s should realize that a door with an inadequate lock can quickly give way to a s h a r p kick of a t e e n a g e r . A sliding window can be lifted off the t r a c k and over the locking device. According to Hanna, m o r e B&Es occur in homes which back up to a park or wooded a r e a . B a c k y a r d fences often discourage thieves by preventing a quick g e t a w a y .

Duane Bordine

Bordine, 37, m a i n t a i n s t h a t bickering and an inability to m a k e decisions has c h a r a c t e r i z e d n u m e r o u s m e e t i n g s of the p r e s e n t Township Board. A similar decision-making process would f o r c e his f a r m into b a n k r u p t c y , he says. " T h e r e no rules. It's just like a children's playbox up there. I don't think y o u - h a v e t p h a v e a post-graduree to nave s o m e c o m m o n

As in the c u r r e n t string of cases, robbers entered the homes through an unlocked door or window But items, such as televisions and stereo sets, w e r e stolen in addition to cash

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Trustee hopefuls face issues Larry Bowerman

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Homes on c o u r t s see • m o r e susceptible to b u r g l a r i e s than houses on busier residential streets. Homes located n e a r s t r e e t lights a r e less susceptible than houses in d a r k e r a r e a s . Police statistics show t h a t m o r e B&Es h a v e occurred in colonial-style homes with a t t a c h e d g a r a g e s than r a n c h e s or quadlevels.

Most b r e a k - i n s o c c u r t h r o u g h doorwalls, the s e r v i c e door f r o m an attached g a r a g e to the interior of the house and through windows THOSE A R E T H E FOCAL points of H a n n a ' s individual home inspections He has conducted only two since the c r i m e prevention bureau began operations in May. Both h o m e o w n e r s w e r e women who live alone Hanna also inspected a Canton business to assess its susceptibility to thieves He views the inspections as the most e f f e c t i v e aspect of his work "You can show people what you're talking about.'' Hanna said "I had one lady lock her door, and I was in her house in a couple of seconds Hanna begins the inspections on the e x t e r i o r of the house He m a k e s sure that the view of the front door is unobs t r u c t e d by shrubbery and that the address is clearly visible f r o m the s t r e e t . Inside the home. Hanna checks a variety of possible access points, including • The lock and construction of the front door Hanna r e c o m m e n d s installation of a single-cylinder deadbolt lock, which allows inside opening of the door without a key • The sliding glass doorwall and slidjng windows. Hanna s a y s a wooden rod should be kept in the t r a c k s A lock should be installed at the top of the doorwall and windows to p r e v e n t lifting of the glass over the existing locking device. (Continued on P a g e 3A)

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Bordine brings up the c o n t r o v e r sial subject of Canton's s t r i c t sign ordinance as an e x a m p l e of a poor business c l i m a t e . He says the township should t a k e other steps to help businesses a d v e r t i s e their w a r e s if the ban on l a r g e f r e e - s t a n d i n g signs s t a y s in e f f e c t . Bordine suggests the publication of a business d i r e c t o r y which would be m a i l e d to homeowners. (Continued on P a g e 4A)

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Amusements 7-9B Clubs in Action 6B College News 10A Obituaries 2A Opinion. . . 14A Military News 7A Readers Write 11A Sports 1-4C Stroller 14A Suburban Life. . . 1-3B, 6B The View 1B Classified Sec. C-D LOOK FOR YOUR

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Thursday. June 26, 1980

House panel adopts PurselPs Svild' idea

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OBITUARIES BETTY J U N E Bl'TZKY Services for Mrs Butzky. 54, of Canton Township w e r e held r e c e n t l y at Lola P a r k L u t h e r a n Church. Redford. with Rev E d w a r d Zell o f f i c i a t i n g Burial was in Glen Eden C e m e t e r y . Livonia A r r a n g e m e n t s w e r e m a d e by Casterline F u n e r a l Home. Northville. Mrs. Butzky. who died J u n e 18. w a s a h o m e m a k e r Survivors include husband. Wilford sons. Karl of G a r d e n City. William of Belleville. David of Ann Arbor. Eric of Canton, sister. Dorothy Sweder of Westland. brothers. C h a r l e s B u t t e r m o r e of Northville. F r a n c i s B u t t e r m o r e of Redford. Alvin B u t t e r m o r e of Canton. Ralph Butterm o r e of P l y m o u t h , Victor B u t t e r m o r e of Lakeland. Fla . and four grandchildren L E O F . COONAN Services for Mr Coonan, 82. of P l y m o u t h w e r e held recently at Our Lady of Good Counsel Church with Rev F r a n c i s Byrne o f f i c i a t i n g Burial was in Holy Sepulchre C e m e t e r y . Arr a n g e m e n t s w e r e m a d e by S c h r a d e r F u n e r a l Home. Plymouth. Mr Coonan. who died J u n e 18. worked as a c u s t o m s o f f i c e r s of the US G o v e r n m e n t for 35 y e a r s Survivors include wife. Dorothy; d a u g h t e r s . Margaret C h u r c h m a n of Plymouth, Eileen F a u n c e of Canton. M a r y O'Sullivan of Warren. C a t h e r i n e Coonan of Plymouth. Alice F e d e w a of P l y m o u t h : 20 grandchildren, and 10 great-grandchildren

JOHN WILLIAM S C H A T T E N H E L M Services for Mr S c h a t t e n h e l m . 84. of Ypsilanti Township w e r e held recently at S c h r a d e r F u n e r a l Home with Rev G e a r y Bird o f f i c i a t i n g Burial was in Grand Lawn C e m e t e r y Memorial con-

tributions m a y be m a d e to the H e a r t Fund Mr Schattenhelm. who died J u n e 18. was a f a r m e r since 1920. He was a m e m b e r of the E v e r g r e e n L u t h e r a n Church S u r v i v o r s include: nieces. Ernestine Lunsford of Ypsilanti. Virginia Swieczkowski of D e a r b o r n Heights. Bettv J u d g e of P l y m o u t h . Agnes Dikem a n of Ann Arbor. Ruth Schettenhelm of Dearborn Heights; nephews, Myron S c h a t t e n h e l m of Milan. F r e d Schattenhelm of Milan, William Schettenhelm of Saline; and sisters-in-law, Marie Schattenhelm of Milan and F r a n c e s S c h e t t e n h e l m of D e a r b o r n Heights. "

thorough review of its i n f o r m a t i o n prog r a m s and r e c o m m e n d an improved s y s t e m in t i m e for funding in the 1982 budget

A key congressional s u b c o m i t t e e has adopted Congressman Carl P u r s e l l ' s proposal to s t a r t work on a p r o g r a m to unify and i m p r o v e g o v e r n m e n t information p r o g r a m s on e n d a n g e r e d species and wildlife p r e s e r v a t i o n

rior s u b c o m m i t t e e to lay a foundation for the' clearinghouse in the pending budget bill The aim is to m a k e a c o m p l e t e assessment of needs and costs and seek to i m p l e m e n t the improved p r o g r a m next year,

Pursell. R - P l y m o u t h , r e p r e s e n t s the 2nd Congressional District which includes Livonia, Plymouth, and p a r t s of Washtenaw and Monroe counties. He is a m e m b e r of the full a p p r o p r i a t i o n s committee

Pursell predicted the m o v e would lead to improved public a w a r e n e s s and renewed e f f o r t s to s a v e t h r e a t e n e d animal and plant species in the 1980s While considering the 1981 Interior D e p a r t m e n t budget bill, the House Subc o m m i t t e e on Interior Appropriations added l a n g u a g e to its report to lay the ground work for a wildlife i n f o r m a t i o n clearinghouse

Pursel particularly praised the help of Rep Clarence Long, D-Maryland, a senior m e m b e r of the s u b c o m m i t t e e , and Rep. Sidney Yates, D-Illnois, subc o m m i t t e e c h a i r m a n , for sharing 'his concern for broadening public education on e n d a n g e r e d species issues

P U R S E L L HAS B E E N seeking im proved public understanding of endangered species p r o b l e m s through his "WILD bill" the Wildlife I n f o r m a tion and Learning Development Act

Pursell's bill envisions a three-year, $10 million p r o g r a m to unify c u r r e n t information e f f o r t s and provide g r a n t s for innovative widlife education programs.

In recognition of current budget res t r a i n t s . Pursell successfully sought a g r e e m e n t with colleagues on the inte-

If given final approval, the proposal would direct the d e p a r t m e n t to m a k e a

He said the cost would r e m a i n rela tively small because existing personnel would be used r a t h e r than building a new b u r e a u c r a c y , and because the plan would m a k e c u r r e n t e f f o r t s m o r e efficient Most of the money would go for g r a n t s to educational or non-profit groups to develop i n f o r m a t i o n a l m a t e rials Pursell said he believes support for the proposal is sound and e x p e c t s no roadblocks on the l a n g u a g e adopted by . t h e interior s u b c o m m i t t e e Current predictions a r e that the Interior budget bill likely will c o m e to a vote on the House floor about the end of Julv

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ANNA E. ARTHUR F u n e r a l services for Miss Arthur. 99, of 10 Mile Road. Novi. w e r e held recently in S c h r a d e r F u n e r a l Home. Plymouth, with burial in Riverside C e m e t e r y Officiating was the Rev. Henry J Walch. D.I).

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DARYL L. HOWELL D.P.M.

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Medical & Surgical Foot Specialist




Miss Arthur, who died J u n e 20 in Whitehall Convalescent Home in Novi. was a longtime resident who moved here f r o m G e r m a n y . She is survived by a sister, several nieces and nephews.




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CABINETS

MANSFIELD

EMILY M. HOWARD F u n e r a l services for Mrs Howard. 76. of Newburgh Road. Westland. w e r e held recently in S c h r a d e r F u n e r a l Home with burial at Oakland Hills Memorial Gardens. Officiating was the Rev Leonard J Koeninger Memorial contributions m a y be m a d e to the Michigan Cancer Society. Mrs Howard, who died J u n e 20 in St. Marv Hospital. Livonia, was a receptionist in a medical office. She had moved to Westland in 1972 f r o m Elkin, N C. Survivors include: sisters. B e r t h a Schultz of P l y m o u t h , Agnes Speck of Livonia: brother. Richard Broese of Livonia; and s e v e r a l n i e c e s and nephews

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Thursday. June 26, 1980

Budget cuts clip service for handicapped children By TERI BANAS One of the first school services to be affected by recent budget cuts has struck a raw nerve with the parents of district handicapped childrenSchool administrators, anticipating a deficit of $447,000, recently began instituting cutbacks in about 42 school services. Among them are nine school programs, two of which involve mentally impaired children, both beginning this week The programs involve about 100 students who previously attended recreation facilities in several out-of-district locations Because the programs are not mandated by the state, the school adminsitration decided against paying for the busing, a service that had been in effect for at least three years. The parents Y
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Canton (Dbscrucr - Last modified

- • - - • • • - arc • » „i ;«• „v .»• C a n t o n (Dbscrucr Thursday, June 26, 1980 Volume 5 Number 95 Twenty-Five Cents 56 Pages Canton, M...

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