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Canton €>torber Volume 15 N u m b e r 81

T h u r s d a y , April 26. 1990

Canton, Michigan,.

100 P a g e s

Fifty Cents

Parents give 'suicide' film mixed reviews ~Bf Mary Weehko staff writer „ TVs reviews were mixed Tuesday when parents and residents in the Plymouth-Canton School district for the first time viewed the controversial film "Nobody's Useless." . The film has been blamed by the parents of 8-year-old Stephen N alepa for the child's March 24 hanging The youth's mother, Debbie Nalepa, has contended since viewing the film that her son was mimirfring a suicide attempt in the movie without realising the consequences. The couple has hired an attorney to investigate the death, and a law suit against the board could be filed. THE NALEPA family didn't attend the showing. They saw the movie shortly after the death.

One mother, who asked not to be identified because her daughter was in Stephen's second-grade class, said after seeing the movie: "I think it's a shame the teacher didn't discuss or explain what went on in the movie afterwards. "I have mixed emotions, though. I didn't like the suicide scenes but there's a lot of violence on cartoons and TV shows that kids always see." Now that she has seen the film, she Mid she will speak with her daughter about i t Julie Withrow, a Plymouth parent, said, "I think the age group was too young to see it and I think those suicide scenes should have been ex9 plained." Withrow said she believes it may have been possible a child would act out what he saw In the movie. Please turn to Page 2

Flooding not ducky for 1 man Construction adds to strain on sewer system

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By Diana Oats staff writer

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T h e c r o w d g a v e t h e film " N o b o d y ' s U s l e s s " a

m i x e d review.

Man faces murder charge for By Mary WaaMco staff writer Carlos Mayberry, 21, of Ann Arbor was bound over to Washtenaw County Circuit Court on a murder charge Wednesday after the beating death of 21-year-old Robert Moore of Canton Township. Ann Arbor Det Jerry Reynard said a date for an arraignment in circuit court has not been set

Moore died April 17 at the University of Michigan Hospital in Ann Arbor. He had been hospitalised since April 13 in critical condition with brain stem damage anda skull fracture. After doctors told the family be was brain dead, they agreed to removed him from lifesupport systems. Ann Arbor police said Moore was kicked in the head repeatedly by Mayberry after leaving Dooley's ba>

Moore and a group of friends were confronted by another group of young men, including Mayberry, while entering a parking structure after leaving the bar. Moore had reportedly gotten into an argument with Mayberry's younger brother, Christopher Mayberry, 21. Police speculated the attack may have been in revenge of that argument. Mayberry was originally charged with assault to commit great bodily harm less than

murder. -« Police reports said daring Mayberry's alleged attack on Moore, Mayberry's friends prevented those with Moore from helping h i m Mayberry, police said, then cornered Moore in a concrete wall and kicked him in the abdomen and bead. Moore a 1985 graduate of Plymouth-Salem High school, was an electronics student at Wayne County Community College..

Neighbors oppose plan to fence in By hLB. Dillon staff writer

Lori J o h n s t o n s a y s t h s $16,000 c h a i n link f e n c e t h a Kiwanis C l u b w a n t a t o p u t u p a r o u n d Millar W o o d a w o u l d d e t r a c t f r o m t h a a p p e a r a n c e of t h a i

No one disagrees that the Miller Woods, a 10-acre forest in Plymouth Township, should be preserved. But there's plenty of disagreement about a plan to accomplish that goal. Owned by Plymouth-Canton Community Schools, Miller Woods is a climax forest which includes plants ranging from young seedlings to flora dating back 500 years. Hundreds of students and teachers, including many from the University of Michigan botany department have visited the site off Powell Road Just east of Beck. The Colonial Kiwanis CTub of Plymouth and Friends of Miller Woods want to enclose the area with a 818,000 chain link fence to prevent motor vehicles from entering the area. Plant specimens have been ruined by youths on motor bikes and by people who've dumped appliances and garbage In the woods, said members of the Friends of Miller Woods. Founded IS years ago, the organisation has about 78 members. Bob Evans and Harold Fischer of the Kiwanis Club presented the

It should be preserved tor posterity. We don't went to restrict access, but knowing ett the development taking piece ell over, there will be kide who could damege this with wheeled vehicles. We'd tike to put up a six-foot chain link fence with a cable top for strength.' — Harold i Kiwanis Club j plan to school board members londay night Mont "The woods need to be protected, and fencing is the only way I see to do t h a t " said Evans. "It should be preserved for posterity," said Fischer. "We doot want to restrict access, but knowing all the development taking place all over, there will be kids who could damage this with wheeled vehicles. We'd like to put up s six-foot chain link fence with a

cable top for strength." Kiwanians and Friends of Miller Woods also want to construct s parking lot for visitor*. PEARSE AND LOfU JOHNSTON, whose backyard-^orders the woods,-strongly oppose the plan. Pearse~Johnston said he'd like time to gather the opinions of area residents. The board, however, voted unanimously to approve the fence. "We feel that l f s a natural area. Putting a chain link fence in sort of defeats the whole purpose of a naturalized area," said Lori Johnston. "We've left our backyard that way intentionally. I think it would be unsightly to have that type of chain link fence." Johnston said she understands the concerns about refuse, "but we've never seen vehicles in the woods. People enjoy walking in there. I would hate to see it locked up with limited access." Preliminary plans doot call for a locked gate. Instead, a baffle — metal poles placed at angles to prevent vehicles from entering — would be seed. Pearse Johnston said he's enjoyed the woods for 88 years, and would like his son and daughter to Ptesss turn to P a g e 4

After s few hours of heavy rain T.S. Malooey looks out his window and magically be has lake front property. Every couple of years the road in front of Malooey's bouse on Durham Drive in Carriage Hills subdivision floods past the curb sometimes as high as two feet after a heavy storm. The worse part is that his basement fills with water. "I never had t h e problem until six or seven years ago," said Malooey, adding that new construction limits the amount of space the water can be absorbed into the ground. "It creates additional runoff and all that water has to go somewhere," The solution is for the township to clean the drains so that they will be free to accept most of the excess water. But when township employees try to clean the drains some residents resist so vehemently that it stops them from doing the job. according to Aaron Machnik, municipal services director. Some of those residents want to save the habitat for a flock of ducks that live near their homes. "The last couple of times we've tried going in there we were booted out" said Machnik. He said he would send out a mail survey asking residents if they would be willing to participate in a drain ci the drain. A BIGGER problem behind flooded basements, though is insufficient sewer capacity, said Glen Roberts, of Wade It Trim, the engineering firm representing the township. "When the storm water gets into the sanitary system it becomes a major source in flooding homes," Roberts said. "TV long awaited sewer plan spawned by the Western Township Utilities Authority will take Canton, Plymouth and Northville townships sewage to an Ypsilanti treatment plant "The basement flooding occurs, because the storm waters are getting in the sanitary sewer, the programs going on now are addressing that very problem," Roberts said. The three communities will hookup to the plant In IMS and construction starts this summer, according to Tom Yack, Canton supervisor. Canton will pay about 888 million of the 8M million project _ Other programs are underway to help elevate the sewer problem. For instance, the township requires all homes that have been built since 1878 to have sump pumps. And the township is constderii* a pilot program for residents, in 1878, offering a turn to Page 2

Residents in financial need win tax breaks what's inside on Saxony argued that his tax assess ment went up 44 percent which was 88 percent higher than the 11 percent township average The petitioner provided the board with 1888 and 18M bouse sales la Us neighborhood that i

staff writer tax breaks^ this year for a lot of dal need tape the Bad ts, lack of sewers. i r a d n t t y to groop the most popular srlng this year's beard of revie w appeals heerd March 18-18. This year 2M W i n c e d IBs Board of Review tkatthey tested a break. And of tl pttcsats 188 app«mis were hard*ip cassa, according to board sf review e mads available The boerd of r

lowered his property valae. The argumeat convinced the three-member Canton Township Board of Review and the i on the Saxony Road 48.1M to 841.8M for 18M taxes A 87-year-old the board to

by m r e Greet •nd Toys

sewers, no peved roeds, a s and an old house

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Building s c e n e . Business. . . . Calendar. . . Classifieds. . . Auto Employment . Index Real e s t a t e . . Creative Hvtng . Crossword Entertainment Obituaries . . . upinKXi . . . . Sports . . \ . S u b u r b a n life Travel MEWBUNE . .

. . . 1H . . 1C 8C . C.E-M . . C.F . . C,Q . . 2G . E.F.H . . . 1E 2A 8E . . . 5C . . 8A . . 16A .10 . 1B . . 106 5*1-2)00

WEDDING PLANS IN T O O A V 8 I 8 I U I

OAE

T u e s d a y . April 2ft. 1990

Thursday. April 26. 1990 *

stereo equipment, tools from storage bins At least fix storage bins at America's Budget Storage oo Joy Road ware broken into last weekend, according to police reports. Om bio reportedly had 913,000 of goods Including Nintendo tools and and car equipment were stolen from other bins, police sakL

BAD TIMING: A 15-year-old Westland boy was picked-up by Canton police at 1140 a.m. last weekend for breaking a curfew ordinance. The boy waa taken home to his parents, police said. Canton's curfew ordinance says anyone under 12 years old, unless accompanied by an adult, must be off the streets by 10 pjn. and anyone un-

der 17 years old must be in by midnight BAD SHOT; A Canton officer suffered an Injured eye and strained shoulder after rcspcMlng to a family depute cn Applewood ust weekend. A woman called police and said: "Help me. Help me." Then the phone

When police arrived the woman, who was holding a baby, waa arguing with a man who refused to leave the home saying that it was his property. Police said the man had alcohol on hisbraatiL Afraid that the man was going to strike the woman, the officer stood between the couple. The man, who

Reactions m i x e d t o controversial film Michael Barnes, an elementary education student at Eastern Michigan University, said: "After I watched it I realized I saw it when I was about 14. But I don't know ESTHER STEVENSON has put five children through if it should have been shown to kids that young without the Plymuuth-Canton School district and said the school an explanation." board is "tettin* a bad ran." " "My heart goes out for the family, but I think it was a Helena Vak> doesn't have a child in school yet but positive movie oo dealing with a handicap," Stevenson wanted to see "Nobody's Useless." ' said. min Hi* film — floe except for the two suicide . scenes, and added: "It bothers me that it showed a said friend helping him and never showing the end result" But, she said, 'if we attack things like this why not or other shows that are violent?" School board candidate Diane Stamp attended the Elaine Attridge said she almost walked out on the showing and said, "I don't think they should have shown film when the boy started talking about "doing himself i t I feel it's totally inappropriate." to." Richard Egli, community relations director for the "I cannot believe how offensive this film was to me," district said afterwards, "The opinions seemed to vary. I beard people who had cooceras and others who didn't" she said. The film was shown again Wednesday at 7 p.m. and "An 1-year-old is not going to think of suicide to begin with (without) putting thoughts like that into their inno- will be shown tonight at 7 at Gallimore Elementary ' School cent minds." she said.

Residents win t a x breaks Continued from Page t PROPERTY TAX should reflect SO percent of true market value. The millage rate is applied to the assessment to arrive at the amount of taxes paid. A 51-year-old widowed Windsor Park resident complained that her taxes increased $717.59 during the past two years. * "Unfortunately my salary has, by no means, kept up with these in-

creases," she wrote in a letter to the board of review. A Holiday Park resident gave a shopping list of reasons why her tax assessment should be lowered. Her "backyard," she said, has "37 trains" going by carrying "dangerous chemicals;" an apartment complex abvtts her property, 1-275 is directly behind her tot;-her bouse is in the path of Mettetal airplanes and trees were taken down; which removes a noise barrier.

Neighbors like duck pond Continued from Page 1

sewer improvement plan.akmg Warren Road from Sheldon to Haggerty free samp pump to extract Storm using s low Interest state loan. water before it gets in the sanitary "This will insure the pipes are big system and floods basements. It enough and the flows are taken out would also reduce the amount of of the system and there won't be a sewage going to the Ypsilant] plant flooded basement" said Roberts and cut down on Canton's costs. adding thti »il| «njnilftw»nt th» Also, Canton recently approved a WTUA project

© b f i e r u e r (USPS 683-870) Published every Monday and Thursd a y by Observer & Eccentric Newsp a p e r s . 36251 Schoolcraft. Uvonia. Ml 4S150. Third-class postage paid at Uvonia. Ml 46151. Address all maH (subscription. Changs of a d d r e s s . Form 3569) t o P.O. Box 2428. Uvonla, Ml 46151. Telephone 5910500. HOME DELIVERY SERVICE Newsstand . . . . p e r copy. 50c Carrier monthly, $3.00 Man yeerty. $55.00 AH advertising published in the C a n ton Observer Is s u b j e c t to ths conditions s t a t e d in t h s applicable r a t e of which era available t h e advertising d e p a r t m e n t . C a n t o n O b s e r v e r , 4 6 9 S. Main. Plymouth. Ml 4 6 1 7 0 . (313) 450-2700. T h e C a n t o n O b s e r v e r reserves t h e right not to a c c e p t an advertiser's o r d e r . Observer & Eccentric a d t a k e r s have n o authority to bind this n e w s p a p e r a n d ortty publication of a n a d v e r t i s e m e n t shell constitute final a c c e p t a n c e of t h e

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had a cast oo his arm. struck the officer in the eye. The officer was treated for an injured eye and sprained shoulder. VEHICLES HIT: More than eight These are some of the iacideats trucks and cars parked in the Elan Engineering parking lot , , > f * Ham. recently reported to Canton police. aged by vandals last weekend caus- For police or fire emergencies dial ing an undetermined amount of 9-1-1; aad for basiaess related iaformatioa call 397-3000. damage.

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Irian Fotovich's T-shirt may look humorous but warming is a serious c o n c e r n of environmental s c e n t i s t s . Fotovich showed off his shirt and spirt at Lowell Middle School's Earth Day program.

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of this nation's organized attempt to Lowell students learned that they become more environmentally con- must be the ones to pick up the ball scious began when tbes and run when it comes to exerting parents were Just setting pressure oo businesses who use excessive ynounts of product packaging as well as non-biogradable items like plastic foam. The 900 member student body listened to a variety of speakers and then broke ap into small groups for reinforcement and discussion. Speakers included: Jan Hoffman. Solid Waste Disposal aad Recycling Center. Jim Anulewicx, Plymouth Township planner. Carol Scringer, Friends of the Rouge. Neil Chapin, Citizens Interested in the Environment-Groundwater, Paul Sincock, Plymouth assistant city manager and Les Vtlcone, Resource Recovery Coordinator-Wayne County DPW. "We're celebrating a day of the earth so in a sense, it is a birthday party," Hoffman said. She explained the environmental three R's: recycling, re-using and reducing with all grade levels. "We have had 20 years to try to get things cleaned up," Hoffman said. The formation of the Environmental Protection Agency was an instrumental first step but each individual must be willing to do his share, she said. It takes more than sympathy for highly visible environmental situaby an oil to do it, she said. Hoffman mentioned the Detroit Incinerator and its spewing of mercury into the air. "Can you imagine breathing mercury?" Hoffman asked. Then Hoffman delved into the nitty-gritty aspects of everyday household living and the adjustments each person can make like buying a single canister of Coffemate rather than an

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BH.L BRESLER/«t«ft photograph overwrapped cellophane-covered package with individually-wrapped servings. Or using cloth rather than paper towels. And, using Tupperware-style containers rather than plastic bags to carry a lunch. "It takes more energy to produce plastic than to reuse a plastic container, Hoffman said. "It takes 11 trees to make 500 paper bags." Hoffman called plastic foam "an evil commodity." She held up a plastic foam cup. "Even as we speak, this Styrofoam cup is releasing CFCs," Hoffman said. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are chemicals which destroy the ozone layer. "Styrofoam does not biodegrade which means it does not return to its natural state," Hoffman said. "CFCs

Americans everywhere are doing their part to protect the environment by conserving energy and natural resources and avoiding pollutants. Here are some tips. a Think about what you i^ant before you open toe refrigerator. a Turn off the lights when you leave a room. a Remind family members to let

dishes air dry in the automatic dishwasher. a Challenge drivers in the family to develop a weekly car-mileage budget, then stick to it a Give a prize to the family member who takes the quickest showers. a Run dishwashers and washing machines for full loads only. a Limit the number of cookouts using charcoal briquettes. Their fumes produce ground-level ozone

are like Pacman, only they love ozone. Birds and fish that eat Styrofoam, get poisooed. Don't support fast-food companies that use them." Eighth grade students had their own ideas about recycling, too. "Some schools have their own recycling area right inside the school," Suzanne Campagna said. Heather Millikin said that ber brother is participating in a contest to see who can use the same brown lunch bag the longest. "We learned that if we tarn off the water while we are brushing our teeth, we would have saved enough water for another shower, Rob Kowakyk said. "Laziness is the issue, isn't It?" asked Denise Falconer, an English teacher and group leader. "Are you as a group willing to make those changes?"

f p n r m y tO COOkOUtS.

e Send a letter to a local business requesting that it use washable mugs instead of throwaway cups. e Wrap s present in used wrapping paper or mail a letter in a used envelope. a Return wire hangers to a dry cleaner. a Encourage a gardener to pull weeds instead of using herbicides.

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COLLECTION

Ernie Archer h e l p s piani a tree in honor of AIDS victim Ryan White at Central Middie School. T h e youths in the b a c k g r o u n d a r e m e m bers of t h e s c h o o l ' s s t u d e n t council.

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Lea Vitcone, o n e of eight guest speake r s at Lowell M i d d l e School's Earth Day celebration, talks about recyclable materials and landfilta.

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an ugly part of European Intellectual tradition and. unfortunately, the Young Turks (who succeeded the Ottoman sultans who killed an estimated 300,000 Armenians some 20 years earlier) brought it to bear." Removal from home villages, Papzian said, was inspired by the

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Papazian, director of the University of Michigan-Dearborn's Armenain Research Center, links the violence to traditional cultural and religious differences. Intensified during the collapse of the Ottoman Empire "ARMENIANS WERE scapegoats," Papzian said. "Rascism was

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"This happened in Armenia, it happened again in Nazi Germany, it's happening today in Ethiopia, where people are starving to death," Zartarian said. "If the U.S. doesn't recognize these kinds of things are possible, It will happen again. Only somewhere else."

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but maybe instead of building churches we should have beaa building weapons." Still, Zartarian said, remembering the events of ltlS-23 should inspire peaceful solutions, rather than r a t h e r than more violence bloodshed.

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DESPITE FEARS, many Armenian-Americans are cautiously optimistic about Soviet Premier Mikhail Gorbachev and his proposed reforms. "Armenians were the first to take to the streets, when giasnost and peristroika were announced," Derderian said. Monitoring events in the USSR, with an eye toward peaceful resolution of the Armenian/Azerbaijan situation, is the next step. Derderian said, once this week's commemorations are complete.

Despite optimism over independArmenians cannot escape a past that makes them suspicious of any change. Priding themselves as the world's first Christian kingdom, Armenians faced attacks from Persians centuries before coming under the rule of Ottoman sultans and their successors. A post-World War 1 republic lasted a brief two years. "As a people, our luck has been bad," said Harry Zartarian, who administers the Michigan Home for the Armenian Aged in Livonia. "We're known for our beautiful churches,

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Scholar says racism was its cause Why did so many people — an estimated 1.5 million — die in an event recognized by many nations, though not by modern Turkey and its supporters? Dennis Papazian has devoted much of the last five years to answering that question.

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pazian said, is the first step toward preventing the same events from occurring again. Violence against Armenians in Soviet Azerbaijan — where many Armenians live as an outnumbered minority, hasn't gone unnoticed, Papazian said. Nor has the fact that Soviet Armenia^ neighboring Azerbaijan and other Soviet republics, including Balkan states such as Lithuania, could become independent nations with a foreign and domestic policy of their own. "If the Soviet Union breaks up the wrong way. who knows what could

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Bat others, including Michigan's forget this is something that oc- Carl Levin, said overlooking existing curred." documentation smacks of 1984-style Remembering is hard, even for politics. Armenian-American themselves. . "In a sense, we do feel distanced JS "ORWELL'S VERSION of history from it because it was something being rewritten for the convenience that happened a long time ago in a of current geopolitcal strategy has land far away," said Marilynn Var- become a modern-day reality," Lev•bedian of Bloomfield Hills, who just in said. completed her second term as that For Dennis Papazian, the Armenicity's mayor. "But we must remem- an genocide isn't.a matter of historiber this is an event on scale with the cal speculation, but of fact Holocaust and the Killing Fields (of "This has been one of the best docCambodia)." umented events of human history," Three-quarters of a century later, said Papazian, director of the Areven the events themselves are still menian Research Center at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. open to question. Some Senators, including Georg- "Even our own ambassador docuia's Sam Nunn, argued more histori- mented it as far back as 1920." Recongizing the deaths of Armenical data need be presented before ans at the hand of Ottman Turks, Pathe U.S.

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Slaughter of Armenians still a burning issue Continued from Page 5

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o*c Thursday. April 26. 1990

Madonna to honor union leader, college supporters

o b i t u a r i e s CLARA J. ZUBICK

Mrs Kirby is survived by four daughters Joyce Peer of Pinckney, Services were bekl for Mrs. Clara Sue Robinson of Tennessee, Helen J. Zubick, S5, of Canton oo Mooday, Clifton of Ypailanti and Mary MontApril 16, at Our Lady of Good Coun- gomery of Westland, two sons Eusel Church. Burial was at Hillside gene of Theodore, Ala., and Cloyd Cemetery in Belleville. Kirby Jr., 13 grandchildren, 31 Mrs. Zubick is survived by her BOO great-grandchildren, four greatThomas Zubick of Canton, six grand- great-grandchildren and a sister children and three great-grandchil- Bessie Shaw of Tennessee. dren. Mrs. Kirby was born Feb. 3,1907, Mrs. Zubick was born Dec. 2,1904, in Tennessee and died Friday, April in Detroit and died Thursday, April 13, at Hope Care Nursing Centre in 12. She moved to the Plymouth com- Westland. She was a cook and memmunity in 1959 from California. She ber of Plymouth Praise Chapel. was a member of Our Lady of Good Tbe Rev. Ron Trusty officiated the Counsel Church. service. The Rev. Matthew Ellis officiated MILDRED L TAPP tbe service. Local arrangements were , made by Schrader Funeral Hotbe. Memorial contributions may Services were held for Mrs. Mil'"be made in the form of mass offer- dred I. Tapp, 75, of Plymouth on ings. Wednesday c April 18, at the Schrader Funeral Home. Burial was in HELEN EGNER Parkview Memorial Cemetery, Livonia. Services were held for Mrs. Helen Mrs. Tapp died Sunday, April 15, Egner, 84, of Plymouth oo Monday, in Detroit. She was born July 17, April lft, at the Schrader Funeral 1914, in Murray, Ky. She was a Home. Burial was in Rural Hill Cem- homemaker. etery, North voile. Mrs. Tapp is survived by her two Mrs. Egner was born O c t 17,1905 sons, Phillip W. Tapp of Northville in Youngstown, Ohio and died Fri- and James F. Tapp of Livonia, seven day, April IS in Plymouth. She came grandchildren and two great-grandthe Plymouth community in 1962 children. X' irom Wyandotte and was a homePastor Jack R. Williams officiated -maker. the service. Memorial contributions £ Mrs. Egner is survived by her has- may be given to the Plymouth Unitband, Rudolph Egner, of Plymouth; ed Assembly of God Church. three sons, Rudolph Egner Jr. of Plymouth, Richard Egner of NortbWOOK K. SUNG •ville and Robert Egner of Riverview, five grandchildren; two greatServices were held for Mr. Wook grandchildren; a brother George K. Sung, 77, of Plymouth Township •Olah of West Bloomfield; and a sis- oo Saturday, April 21, at Lambertter Erma Olah of Sun City, Ariz. Vermeulen Trust 100 Funeral Home. The Rev. Kenneth F. Gruebel offi- Burial was at United Memorial Garciated the service. Memorial contri- dens. butions may be—made to the AlMr. Sung is survived by three sons, zheimer Disease Association. Ki S. Sung of Plymouth, Ki H. Sung of Germany and Ki Ho Sung of Ko•W' • rea, two daughters Ki S. Sub of JaRUBY M. KIRBY Services were held for Mrs. Ruby pan and Yang Neo Yoo of California, M. Kirby, 83, of Plymouth on Sun- eight grandchildren and one sister. Mr. Sung was born Nov. 24, 1912, day, April 15, at Lambert-Vermeulen Trust 100 Funeral Home. Burial in Korea and died Tuesday, April 17, was at Cobbs Chapel in Horn beak, in Plymouth Township. He was a drug store owner in Korea and a Tenn.

member of Sung Rak Baptist Church in Ann Arbor. Tbe Rev. Samrang Bae officiated the service ROBERT C. MOORE Services were bekl for Mr. Robert C. Moore, 23, of Canton on Mooday, April 23, at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church. Burial was at United Memorial Gardens. Mr. Moore is survived by his brother Davjd F. Moore of Canton, parents Robert L Moore and Linda L Moore, two uncles David Smith of Farmington Hills and Charles Moore of Troy, an aunt Bernice Hart wick of Bradenton, Fla., grandparents Frank Cerne of Dearborn Heights and Charles Moore of Florida, and a cousin Kelly of south Lyon. Mr. Moore was born Dec. 17,196«, in Detroit and died Tuesday, April 17, at University Hospitals in Ann Arbor. He was an electrician. The Rev. Robert C. Seltz officiated the service. Memorials may be given to the Michigan Cancer Foundation. Arrangements were made by Lambert-Vermeulen Trust 100 Funeral Home. BESSIE M. COX Services were held for Mrs. Bessie M. Cox, 81, of Wayne on Saturday, April 21, at Lambert-Vermeulen Trust 100 Funeral Home. Burial was at Parkview Memorial Cemetery in Livonia. Mrs. Cox is survived by three sons James Martin of Hersey, Mich., Robert Martin of Fowlerville and Richard Martin of Plymouth, three

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Lech Walesa, leader of tbe Polish trade union movement Solidarity, will be awarded aa booorary degree Saturday, May, 5, during Madonna College commencement ceremonies. Walesa will be honored for his "true Christian behavior in noo-violent pursuit of peace," a college spokeswoman said. There is no confirmation Walesa will attend tbe ceremonies, but Madohna spokeswoman Andrea Nodge said efforts are being made to contact tbe Nobel Peace Prize recipient. Other honorary degrees will be awarded to longtime Madonna supporter Michael Ditch, chairman and president of Li&eCasear Enterprises Inc., and the Most Rev Christian Wiyghan Cardinal Tumi, archbishop of Garoua, Cameroon. His nephew, Paul Kindong , of Cameroon, will receive a degree in business management from Madonna during commencement ceremonies Approximately 700 graduates will receive degrees during ceremonies

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Services were held for Mr. Elvis D. McCann, 73, of Canton do Monday, April 23, at Schrader Funeral Home. Burial .was in Knollwood Cemetery. Mr. McCann is survived by his wife Tommie L. McCann of Canton, daughter Charlotte McCann of Chattanooga, Tenn., three sons Wayne McCann of Portland, Ore., Wendel McCann of Farmington Hills and Jeffery McCann of Belleville, three grandchildren and half-brother Preston Skaggs of F t Smith, Ark. Mr. McCann came to the Canton community in 1956 from Pocahontas, Ark. He served with the VS. Army in WWII in Europe, worked for General Motors for over 25 years and retired from General Motors Hydromatic at Willow Run in 197«. He was a member of tbe Plymouth Church of Christ Mr. McCann died Thursday, April 19 in Ann Arbor. He ws bom April 11,1917 in Reyno, Ark.

13, at Botsford Hospital in Farmington Hills. He was born Nov.ft,1961, in the Philippines He waa a retired government supplies manager. Mr. Andrada is survived by two nieces Priscflla Malta re of Canton and Perlita Crisostomo of Houston, Texas. The Rev. Timothy Murray officiated the service. Arrangements were made by Vermeulen Memorial Trust 100 Funeral Home in Westland.

Services were held for Mrs. Alice E Preston,ft7,of Garden City. Mrs. Prestoo died Sunday, April 22 at Annapolis Hospital Mrs. Prestoo is survived by two sons. Sieve Prestoo of Canton *nd Chris Preston of Dearborn Heights; five daughters Julie Alcala of Westland, Joyce Blevins of Romulus, Andrea Depowski of Dearborn "freights, Laurie Davis of Garden City aad Lyn ! Gunn of Westland; and two sisters, EULAG.GYDE Lorraine and Gloria of Boston, Mass. Services were held for Mrs. Eula Mrs. Preston was born Feb. 1, G. Gyde, 78, of Canton on Saturday, 1923 in Boston, Mass. She came to April 21, at the Schrader Funeral the Garden City community in 195ft Home. Burial was in South Lyon from Escanaba (1952-195ft) and pre- Cemetery. viously Boston, Mass. (1923-1952). Mrs. Gyde is survived by four sons She was employed at Fisher Body GM — Livonia for 13 years and re- George Gyde of Utica, Gerald Gyde ..a^Ypsilanti, William C. Gyde of Ann tired in 1985. Artibr and Butch Gyde of Ypailanti. Arrangements were made by Har- one daughter Gladys Davis of Canry J. Will Funeral Home in Livonia. ton, 11 grandchildren and 12 greatgrandchildren. SALVADOR P. ANDRADA Mrs. Gyde was born O c t 12, 1911, Services were held for Mr. Salva- in East Bay Township and died dor P. Andrada, 88, of Canton on Wednesday, April 18, in Ann Arbor. Tuesday, April 17 at S t Thomas She came to the Plymouth communiA'Becket Catholic Catholic Church in ty in 1921 from Coldwater, resided Canton. in South Lyon 1985-1978, and in YpMr. Salvador died Friday, April ailanti 1979-1988.

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daughters Dorothy Howard o f Garden City, Ruth Randolph of Jackson and Lucille Rooee of Plymooth, 25 grandchildren and 21 great-grandchildren. Mrs. Cox died Wednesday, April 18, at S t Joseph Mercy Hospital in Superior Township. She was born July 15, 1908, in Pulaski, Tenn. She was a homemaker. Dr. Frederick Vosburg, of First United Methodist Church of Plymouth officiated the service. Memorials may be given to Michigan Cancer Foundation.

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the order for tanks and troops to be more visible, he began to show his other side." In talking with those in Lithuania, there is fear that there could be deportation of officials in Lithuania. And the people would be replaced by Russians, said Udrys. "It has happened in the past," she said. SINCE LITHUANIA declared independence on March 11, Washington's policy-makers and politicians have exercised a rhetorical restraint inconceivable in tbe past. Tbe Bush administration has received broad political support for sympathizing with the Soviet Union's dilemma and pressing for a settlement by negotiation, not by force or capitulation. After President Gorbachev ordered tanks into Vilnius to intimidate Lithuania's Parliament, Congress responded by passing resolutions condemning his action in surprisingly mild terms and avoid-

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ture, Udrys was among some 200 u protesters who picketed President George Bush's appearance at a GOP fund-raiser earlier this month at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel. The demonstrators urged Bush to show more support for the people of Lithuania. Udrys said she is disappointed in President Bush. 4— "I wish President Bush would be a little more forceful," said Udrys, adding that a verbal show of support would be a great help. "When people want democracy, you have to support tbem. When people want freedom, we have a moral obligation to support them," Udrys said. "We'd like tbe American people who are enjoying the fruits of democracy to share with those who have not had the privilege. "After perestroika, I thought the Soviet Union finally had a civil leader," Udrys said. "The minute he (Gorbachev) gave

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"OUR GOAL is to keep the issue alive until the people get their independence," said Udrys who still remembers leaving her homeland at age 3. * "It took nine months to get out," she said. "I remember the soldiers and hiding in bomb shelters." After leaving Lithuania, her family spent six years in Germany. "In the beginning, we lived in something like a refugee camp. It was very tough in Germany. The country was devastated," she said. In 1950, her family came to the United States and settled in Chicago where Udrys was very active in the Lithuanian community. At a youth camp in Michigan near Manchester for Lithuanian youth in 1963, she-met. her husband Narimantas who lived in the Detroit area. "We proceeded with tbe romance from two different cities," said Udrys. In the same year she met her future husband, Udrys received her bachelor's degree in mathematics from Loyola Univeristy in Chicago. Two years later she moved to Michigan and married. "When both people have the same heritage it makes it that much easier." Tbe couple has two sons, Gytis, 19 and Unas, 22, who both speak fluent Lithuanian.

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ing specific threats of retaliation. Modeled after the U.S. Declaration of Independence, Lithuania's movement to freedom has created a dilemma for the United States. U.S. poliUcians have demanded freedom for the BalUc states of Lithuania, Estonia and Latvia ever since Josef Stalin absorbed tbem info the Soviet Union in 1940. Resolutions condemning Soviet occupation of tbe "captive nations" are rituals in Congress. LITHUANIA'S FIGHT for independence seemed to satisfy those demands. as it fit into the pattern of what many see as tbe historically inevitable disintegration of Soviet empire. But tbe countries action also came at an embarrassingly inconvenient time for the Soviets and the West. Though there is much concern. Udrys is very optimistic about Lithuania finally receiving it's independence. "At worst in five years. At best, by the sumjner," she said. "The people have been oppressed for 50 years. How much oppression can people take?" All of her tasks — at Scboolcarft and for Ateitis — a c e handled, "with great difficulty," said Udrys with a smile and wink. "It's a lot of juggling. In tbe long run I feel enriched because of it," said Udrys, who holds a master s degree in arts and sciences from Wayne State University. Udrys, who teaches calculus and algebra has been on staff at Scboolcarft College for 17 years. She received a Presidential Recognition award for teaching in 1987 and an Excellence In Teaching award in 1989. And while she continues to work and enjoy ber life in America, the independence of tbe Lithuanian people is in ber thoughts each day. "We really live in two cultures. We are as American as you. and yet we are all Lithuanian.'

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"It seems like we're living day to day," said Janina Udrys, a mathematics instructor at Schoolcraft College. A native of Lithuania, Udrys has been keeping a watchful eye on the country's quest for independence. A Birmingham resident and president of an organizaUon called Ateitis, Udrys is working to keep the language and culture of her native land alive within the Lithuanian community in metropolitan Detroit. Ateitis, which means "the future." is an organization which was formed in Lithuania in 1920. The organization provides spiritual and intellectual development for children, teenagers and adults. And today, the organization is giving its support to those fighting for their independence in Lithuania.

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Local m a n ' s anti-drug film has reel i m p a c t staff w r i t e r

h • recant letter to Detroit police, an 11-year-old Detroit firl described life with ber dru*-addicted mother. Sbe told of ducking bullets fired by dope dealer*. She told of hiding dmgs for her mother when police were near. She told of how ugly ber mother looked after living ber life oo city streets. News accounts said tbe girl, who now lived with ber grandmother, wrote tbe letter after seeing a film about drugs at school. "I called to see what film it was, and found out it was mine," said Plymouth resident Tom Van Dyke, a producer of video films for industry. "You have no idea how that ma.de me feel When you have something that works, you hope the right person sees it, so that it can have tbe impact you intended. I made this film so that it would make a difference for young people." THE MOVIE tbe girl saw, "Are

'The movie shows that recognizing you have a problem is the key to being in control of yourself.' — Tom Van Dyke You Talking to Me?," was filmed two years ago in various spots throughout the metropolitan Detroit area. More than 300 local students from all backgrounds — suburban, innercity, black, Hispanic — act in the movie's 60 scenes. The movie opens and closes with big, bold words printed on the screen. "Think about i t Talk about it. Deal with it before it grabs bold of you." "The most important person in your life is you," Van Dyke said. "You can't save the country, tbe state or your friends. But you can save yourself. You have to maintain control. Tbe movie draws you in and makes this statement: You have to

take control of your life now." The first scene takes place in Westland's Maplegrovc Cemetery, at the graveside ceremony of Tony, a teen who has died from drug abuse. Tony's friends can't believe he's dead. "I'm going to miss you little brother," said Tony's brother Jack. The teenage actors (and a few adults) in the scenes that follow all tell tbe following story: e Alcohol and drugs is part of the lifestyle of some high school students. "Pass these out to your friends," says a crack pusher in a Jeep. • There's no one typical way students get involved with drugs. But, once involved, tbe one thing teens all

have in common is that they're no longer in control of their own lives. "What's tbe big deal, it's part of growing up," say* i Hcc at a beer party in a park. e Futures are set during high school years. "High school's tbe key, you can't replay i t " says Tony's brother. e Once students lose control of their lives, the quality of their life rapidly deteriorates. "It was one big lie. I lied all tbe time," says a boy in a wheelchair. e But help la there, if students want i t If students don't seek help, they face a bard life ahead, and maybe an early death. "Killer!" shouts a group of angry teens at a drug pusher. VAN DYKE bristles at the phrase. "Say no to drugs." "By the time a kid is Involved with drugs, there's no Instant fix. If you can 'just say no,' then why are there so many overweight people, or people who smoke? The kids who use

Short video draws widespread praise "Are You Talking to Me?", tbe 2 minute film that has won numerous awards at film festivals, also has won praises from educators, drug counselors, school districts and law enforcement officials throughout tbe country. One letter of praise came from the Wlite House, signed by Barbara Bdsh. Another came from the California-based Scott Newman Center, a drug abuse program set up when ador Paul Newman's son died from drfeg abuse. Jtmong the many accolades are these from the following: • Michigan Sheriffs Association

in Lansing. The film is one of the few realistic and street smart drug education films that I've had tbe opportunity to review," said Joseph Bohatynski Jr., public relations coordinator. e Novi Police Department "It's the best anti-drug film on the market" Officer Robert Gatt said. J • Boysville of Michigan. "It contains a clear and believable message about drug abuse that our youths need to hear," ?aid Gene Hausmann, director of values education. e Livonia's Holmes Middle School.

"Education, no drug use, healthy lifestyles, dealing with problems and planning for the future are all promoted in this video," said Cynthia Abbott, a teacher at the school. • Livonia's Community Commission on Drug Abuse. "I pointed out to a large audience of parents that every situation in Mr. Van Dyke's film, including incidents of violence and criminal activity, had taken place with families on our caseload, and our client population is basically middle class and suburban iiy composition," said John Farrar, executive director. • Michigan Police Chiefs Associ-

ation Newsletter. "Skillfully woven throughout the film is the underlying theme that education and today's choices are key to tomorrow's successes." e Michigan- Students Against Driving Drunk. "Tbe (student actors) perform real-life situations ranging from experimentation with alcohol and other gateway drugs to involvement with cocaine, crack and heroin," said director Larry Rotta • Wayne-Westland ivne-W Community Schools. "The message is in kids' language. It's hard-hitting, relevant to-tbepoint and timely. Tbe message is -»n unequivocal and emphatic missive to stay away from drugs," said Jim Couillard, a counselor.

drugs lack the confidence and security and self-esteem to be bigger than tbe drugs." Van Dyke sees tbe teenage years as years when kids, bent on experiencing something new, seek out new experiences. "They're changing every day, trying to discover who they are and .like themselves. They move in and out of groups that offer them a variety of personal experiences. "Drugs may initially be just another investigation. Some will try them and say, this is not forroe.They'll say they don't need this and move on to experience something else. Drugs don't necessarily evolve from bad situations. It's easy to get trapped in stereotypes, such as coming from a broken family." However, Van Dyke, in his talks with students, teachers, police and counselors before be made tbe film, did find one common denominator leading to teenage drug abuse. Parents today often aren't there to talk to their children when the use of drugs beckons. "They've loving, caring parents, but they're not spending time with their kids. Mom and dad are working to afford things that they think they want or they think they need. "Parents are not there today, they're not spending the time and their kids are undirected, unsupervised. Kids today are not being taught today by parents, but by oth-

Man critically hurt at plant

ers. This movie accurately portrays the social fabric that exists today * and allows drugs to continue." THE MOVIE also shows actions parents do which can lead to drug use by their children. For example, in one scene, two ~ girls watch their drunken mother. In another, a daughter helps herself to her mother's pills. "Substance abuse is a media event '• we don't get close to until it touches " us," Van Dyke said. "The drug commercials put us at ease because we *; see it as someone else's problem. *' "The film is dedicated to "Tony.' c At the end of the film, we ask, 'Does '• anyone know a Tony?' In tbe suburbs, one-half the class knows a Tony. In the inner city, 100 percent of the students know a Tony. * ' T o not talk about this is sense- less. The movie shows that recognii- • ing you have a problem is tbe key to 1/ being in control of yourself." Van Dyke,' who spent $100,000 of \ his own money to make the film, J would like to see it shown to young- » sters across the United States. "Many schools want one, but don't } have funds to buy it. It costs $195. If : a corporate sponsor would like to • adopt a school and buy one, I'd be happy to give them a name. My goal is to put this movie in every school in k America." Van Dyke can be contacted at 420- i 0200.

"

By J o e staff w r i t e r

A Union Lake man was critically injured Mooday after bring pinned between two pieces of equipment while working at tbe General Motors Delco Products plant In Uvonia. Alvin Walter Feole, 45, apparently was trapped for up to IS minutes before be was discovered by a co-worker at the Eckles Road facility. Investigators believe Feole was trying to free a jammed conveyor belt when he was struck in the back by a mechanical loader and pinned against a second machine. FEOLE SUFFERED severe cuts to the chest and shoulders, and had

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DETROIT SGT. Reginal Dozer, speaking to newspeople at a forum oo deteriorating police-media relations last month, tried tbe guilt trick. "Currently we have three fulltime police officers to handle Freedom of Information Act requests," said Dozer, who beads the FOI response section. "Each takes five to eight hours." Cops oo the line must provide reports to the FOI section "along with doing their regular duties — chasirg down murderers." Bis insinuation was clear: If tbe public didn't demand to know bow governmental agencies operate, cops would have more time to catch murderers and bust drug dealers. Dozer was less than complimentary to newspeople and civic leaders wbo make so much work for cops by holding seminars on bow to request public documents under the Freedom of Information Act "And I think the inmates might hold seminars, too," be said, lumping us in with the drug dealers and murderers. A LIVONIA cop, Tim Larion, wrote a letter to the editor on this topic, closing with "Get off their (police) backs" and reminding us: "We should never forget in our dealing with a police office, that he/she may have just spent an eight-hour day or more confronting drunks, thieves, drug users, suicide and accident victims." Southfield city administrator Robert R. Block gave tbe Observer L Eccentric staff tbe benefit of his thinking at an in-house seminar last week. 'Tve got a 165,000 officer tied up . . . to be a news reporter's valet" AS I INTERPRET these amazingly similar remarks, we the public are making trouble for our "men in blue" when we seek access to public records.

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down, supermarkets will go back to promoting double-coupons, politicians will renew their promises to make everything better without raising taxes and many of those seedlings that were distributed to help restore the Earth will end up in landfills somewhere, still encased in their little plastic h»g» Yet somehow I think life will go on and the Earth will keep on spinning.

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THAT FIRST Earth Day was ted by student activists and other leaders of the "Ecology Movement" While it did serve . . . particularly in tbe long run . . . to make us more aware of the limited resources of the planet not everyooe involved in it was so noble of purpose as we would like to remember. Some of the protesters just wanted to take another jab at the establishment.

Should parent tattle on teacher?

CyHDILLAC

from our readers

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and also gave away seedlings while another claims it sells more "Earth friendly" items than any other store on Earth. A car company offered free emissions tests to tbe first 300 customers and tree seedlings to everybody. It also took the opportunity to show off some of its new cars. What it all came down to, by tbe time April 22 actually arrived, was that Earth Day 1990 had become big business. "Earth friendly" and "green this" and "green that" were being used to sell everything from toilet paper to gasoline. That was the main difference between this Earth Day and the first one 20 years ago, which was as much a protest against the establishment as It was a cry to save tbe Earth Remember that the Earth Day demonstrations of 1970 came only five months after the massive antiVietnam War march on Washington in November 1969 and were followed two weeks later by the Kent State massacre during a student protest over the VS. invasion of Cambodia. Protests and marches were the order of the day in 1970 and "the. establishment" bad not yet figured out how to deal with tbem.

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quired. For more information, call the Michigan Cancer Foundation, 833-0710 Ext. 225. For information on Unique Boutique, call 370-4400.

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AT THE SHOW, a 45-dealer bourse will include material in a variety of price ranges from all over the world for both tbe new and experienced collector. Dealer* come from 10 states and from Can-

Post office substations from the United States, Canada and the United Nations will sell current stamp* at face value at the show. Tbe West Suburban Stamp Club win continue its support of the Shriners Crippled Children's Hospital rehabilitation program Dooors of stamps wiU receive a special souvenir card. Several philatelic societies will participate in tbe show. The Plate Number Coil Collector's Club, American Association of Philatelic Exhibitors and Peninsular State Philatelic Society will present programs. Junior stamp collectors win find many thing* of interest including stamp-related games, programs oo beginning stamp collecting a n ^ free stamps for each collector. Raffle drawings will be part of tbe weekend's fun. This year, the club wUl also offer a set of two covers saluting the Detroit Pistons. Each cover will have a separate cachet the 4 cent basketball stamp, and a cancel shaped like a backboard and basket Collectors may buy the set of two covers by sending $3, plus a No. 10 stamped, addressed envelope to: West Suburban Stamp Club, c/o Hal Williams, P.O. Box 843, Plymouth, Mich 48170.

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DURING THE April 19 meeting, group members learned about swim wear, prostheses and bras for women who've had breast cancer. The program was presented by Reglna Villemure, owner of tbe Unique Boutique, a hair salon in South Rockwood. "Their self-esteem, how tbey feel about themselves, is tbe most important thing in tbe world," said Villemure. "You lose your pride, you lose everything." -Villemure brought a number of prostheses and bras to the meeting, giving group members a chance to see what's available. She also brought a selection of swim wear designs created by Camp International.

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A woman who's had a mastectomy don't need to abandon all hope of ever wearing fashionable clothing again. "As women, we're very fashionconscious normally," said Annamay Morgan, coordinator of breast cancer support services for tbe Michigan Cancer Foundation. After surgical removal of a breast some women don't consider themselves attractive or worthy of wearing fashionable styles. Losing a body part that's often higbUghted by society is difficult. The Michigan Cancer Foundation, a United Way agency, sponsors a local breast cancer support group. Meetings are the third Thursday of each month at the foundation's Plymouth branch office.

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'Now they're trying to get back and live their 'life as fully as they

Applications

will be available through May 1. For PERENNIAL SALE A spring perennial sale will be more information, can Janet Voheld 10 a.m. to 4 p m . Saturday aad lante, 981-5900. Smday, April 28-29, at the Universiof Michigan Matthaei Botanical • GIRL S C O U T S Ar- —The P1ymoath.NorthvlUe-Cant« •

WORKING WOMAN'S SPECIAL

—The West Suburban Stamp Club wUl boat its 21st annual Plymouth show Saturday and Sunday, April 28-29. The show will be held 10 a j n . to 7 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 5 pm. Sunday at Central Middle School, Main at Church in downtown Plymouth. Admiasioo and parking are free of charge. Michigan Gov. James Blanchard has issued a proclamation declaring tbe week of April 23-29 Michigan Stamp Week. His declaration coincides with the show dates. The exhibit portion of the show win consist of a 2,800-plus page exhibit judged by a panel of judges accredited by tbe American Philatelic Society Tbe Plymouth show is a qualifying national show in tbe APS's "World Series of Philately." The grand award winner wUl compete against winners from the 33 other national shows this August for the 1990 championship in Cincinnati, Ohio. The grand award winner will also receive a framed duck drawing by wildlife artist Larry Hillard.

By Julie Brown

AT THE TIME her niece was diagnosed. Villemure was working as a hair dresser and teaching. She found there wasn't much available in the way of wigs for children who'd lost their hair due to anti-cancer treatments. Villemure works with many people who've lost their hair due to chemotherapy, radiation therapy or o * e r reasons. Wigs and hairpieces in synthetics and human blends are



Club to host

Styles can help boost self-esteem stamp show

THE SWIM suits cost $60 to |72, and coordinates — skirts and jackets — are available. An ensemble runs about |150, Villemure said. Tbe swim suits are designed to accommodate a prosthesis. Suits are available in a variety of styles and fabrics and don't look any different from those worn by women who haven't had surgery, she said. Villemure hasn't had cancer but has a niece wbo had leukemia. Her niece, who was 3 when she was diagnosed, is 10 and in remission. "That's how it got me involved in doing i t " Villemure now works with a number of people who've had cancer.



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Thursday. April 26. 1990 O&E

P r o g r a m By Carolyn DeMerco staff writer

O

N FIRST PASS It looks like the epitome of yupptedom — a workout place for Infants and toddlers. But Gymboree. it t u n a out, is mare than the Vte Tanny of the diaper s e t It's not another dropoff center for parents to liberate themselves temporarily from their offspring. It's a place for baby to play, develop and grow with mom or dad right there at his/her side. Jim and Kathy Cornell of Farmingtoo Hills opened their fifth Gym boree franchise earlier this month at the Orchard Mall in West Bloomfield. Tbe location features an open space with dozens of specially designed play equipment pieces. Child and parents) enroll in a 4 5-minute class once a week for 12 weeks to play on equipment, engage in activities, and sing songs and chants with 15-20 other youngsters in their age group and accompanying parents. Tbe Cornells also operate a Gymboree tn Plymouth, In the Lilley Executive Plaza, 9357 General Drive, Suite 195. Tbe facility opened In January 1989. "Plymouth has really done very well," Kathy Cornell said. The first

g i v e s

Gymboree session in Plymouth attracted 175 children. About 250 youngsters are- now enrolled at the Plymouth facility. • "So we're very pleaaed with the growth of the center," she said. "The of tbe community has been Many of the participants are working parents wbo bring baby in evenings after work. "We get a lot of suits and ties," Jim said. » Some fathers come in reluctantly, encouraged by their wives to take the baby just once during tbe 12 weeks, she said. They often become part of the workout threesome. A $75 charge for the 12 weeks Is for the child and either or both parents. Grandparents, often the daytime caregivers, are also Gymboree frequenters, as are other child care providers. CLASSES ARE offered for five different age groups: • Baby gym (3-12 months) — This is an introduction to colors, textures, sounds and rhythmic songs for baby, parent education for mom and dad. Gentle exercises are choreographed to music. • Gymboree I (10-18 months) is a time to explore. Top priority is developing balance and btfllding confi-

f a m i i i e s

dence in new-found mobility. • Gymboree U (10-30 months) — In this class, balance is practiced and body movement* refined. Weekly biemes like up, down, under and through teach coocepts. a Gymboree HI (2%-SVfc years) — Movement to music and activities with imagery is featured. Youngsters sing their own ^ n g s and take an active role in activities and games. a Gymgrad (3-4^ years)— Creative movement, pre-sport activities, special equipment and non-competitive games are designed to enhance skill development. Using special props, parents and kids explore creativity through movement. The Gymboree "play with a purpose" concept was created in California and spread to the Midwest. Kathy Cornell was a new mother when she first sought something the Cornells could do with Katie, now 4 years old, and found a local Gymboree. She and ber husband were retail managers for the Waterford Mei jer's store. "We were into the '80s style of parenting to the 'nth' degree," Jim said. "We were a threesome. We did it as a family."

boree area franchise was for sale in late 1987, she quit her job thinking she could take over the business and nin it two days a week. Since then they've taken over or established businesses in a church in Northville, tbe Mcrcy Center in Farmington Hills, the community room of Livonia Mall, and the Plymouth and West Bloomfield sites. At the same time, they've added Maggie, 2Vk, and Robbie, 1, to the family. "We had an office in the home and a computer. It just snowballed. It was more successful than anticipated," Jim said. Mostly tbe job is fun. "If you're going to start a business, make sure it's ooe you can wear tennis shoes and sweat suits to," Kathy said. The

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seminar series Several personal wellness semi- will be held 7-9:30 p.m. and particinars will be offered during May at _ pants will be eligible for continuing Madonna College, 30600 Schoolcraft education unit credit. in Livonia. Price is flO per session and adA seminar on "Growing Self-Es- vance registration is required. For teem" will be held Tuesday, May 8. more information, call the ContinuParticipants win leanT about Im- ing Education Department at Maproving self-esteem by physical, donna College, 591-5188. Registraemotional and spiritual means! tion may be completed by phone A second seminar, "How Can I when using a major credit card. Love Myself If I Don't Like My Body or My Appearance?," will be offered Tuesday, May 15. A seston oo "Beating the Blues; Overcoming Depression" will be held Tuesday, May 22. Sandy Baumann will be the instructor for tbe seminars. Each seminar will include a lecture and guidw h e n p h o t o g r a p h e d on ed small group discussion. Sessions

difficult part is hiring. Staff mem- which parents get to participate in bers don't have to have college de- activities with young children, she grees, she said, but eight of nine do said. "This is something the parents are have early education background. In addition, all receive a six-week on- out there together with their chilsite training which includes first aid dren." Children wbo take Gymboree classes have a chance to learn some and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. 'We look for a personality, a type socialization skills while having fun,_ that is warm and affectionate — she said. As a franchise bonus, enrolled vaparents look upon them as resource cationing families may attend a people." While the child is the main benefi- Gymboree in the spot they're visit-' ciary of the class, parents also bene- ing, if available. Day and evening classes are' fit at the Gymboree in "It's kind of a place for people to available connect I think," Kathy said. Partic- Plymouth For registration infor- • ipating in Gymboree gave her, as a motion, call 473-1845. . i first-time mother, a chance to meet Staff writer Julie Brown contrib- • other moms. There aren't a lot of programs in uted to this story.

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8 BLOOD DRIVE The Good Shepherd Church will hold a Red Cross blood drive 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 5, at the church, 6500 N. Wayne Road, Westland. Walk-in donors may participate. For information, call 326-5220. 8 PRAYER DAY Representatives of churches observing or interested in observing National Day of Prayer, Thursday, May 3, are encouraged to contact Christ Lutheran Church in Redford, 534-3462. President Q o r a e Bush has proclaimed that day as tbe National Day of Prayer for the year. e

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KITE FLYING DAY Good Shepherd Reformed Church, 6500 N. Wayne Road, Westland, will hold a "Kite Flying Day" 11 a.m. to 4 pm. Saturday, April 28, at the church. Complete kite kits will be available for a donation_of $3. For information, call 721-0800.

1

vices Sunday, May 4. Former cberet members are encouraged to attend For information, call 937-3170. The church is at 10000 Beech Daly. Redford. •

OPEN HOUSE Tbe Detroit First Church of the Naxarene, 21260 Hagferty, ington Hills, is botdtng a house, beginning at 830 a m . ; May 6. Holland Lewis's special message will be "Tbe Cross Leads the Way." •

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION Tbe Westland Full Goepel Assembly of God, 34033 Palmer, Westland, will present "Educating F o r Eternity." beginning at 7 p.m. Friday. May 4 Tbe program will train people to Please turn t o Paga 8

Rev. Lloyd Buss

Signs of strife start surfacing Recent reports from Eastern Euis an indictment of (he hamaa rope have included distressing! Not front page material, nor subfor failing to leant from the pe jects for evening newscasts. At least More than 48 years of Jota* i for tbe time being Bat the l a n e is by too important to ignore. It will not Eastern Barege to go away by thinking it tnconeeqnen prwaelnw of I tial. ated experiences of 1 Major religious groups in Eastern aace of one another la i Europe have reported incidents of tknal identity. Forty »«f*«a^fna^_ and even conflict, in fighting a < their anfokting relatiomhips with ed bonds of ooe another. The new experiences of easily d i a r t athefaceefi freedom in religious life I Some of conflicts directed by stronger personalities Some are pert of the position!^ for power within the new orders of public life. Some open wounds that go bock and cat lathe faith CON I EN HUMS AND strife within the faith iminiansltj of

9101

PENTECOSTAL

Wadneeday 9:30 A M . Holy Euchanst

P H CHURCHE ST. MARTHA'S EPISCOPAL E l i THENAZA

(at D r a k e ) P e r m H » s

J . Christopher loenogie Pastor David S Noraan P s ^ for Congregational Life

SAINT ANDREWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH

Uvonia • 591-0211

A Barrier Free Facility for the Handicapped

SPAGHETTI DINNER Tbe Ambassadors of Village Presbyterian Church, Redford, will serve a spaghetti dinner 4-7 p.m. Saturday, May 5, at the church, 25350 W. Six Mile. Admission price is 84.50 for adults, $2.50 for children. There will be an auction at 7:30 p.m. For information, call 534-7730.

moral perspectives

9083 Mewburgh Roed

Services 8:30 A M . Holy Eucharist 9:30 A M. Adutt Christian Education 10:30 A.M. Family Eucharist and Sunday School



SINGLE POINT Ward Presbyterian Church, in cooperation with Single Point Minis- • HOMECOMING' is hosting a 'Special Shuw- — T h e Aldersgate Uuiled Metbodlsr case" concert by soloist Penny Church, Redford, is having a "HomeStockwell at 8 p m Friday, May 4. at coming" at the 8:30 and 11 a m. sertbe church, 17000 Farmington Road, Livonia. For information, call 4226865.

EPISCOPAL

Brigbtnjoor Tabcrpaclc Assemblies of God 24555FrankHn Rd. • S o u t h f M d , Mi

352-

FAITH COVENANT CHURCH

CANTON FREE METH00IST

e GARAGE SALE SL Aidian's Church will hold a garage sale 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Saturday, May 5, at the church, Farmington Road north of Six Mile, Livonia. For information, call 425-9206 or 425-4995.

e

ASSEMBLIES OF COD

Jaafc R. W m

Nuraery ProvtdeO

Wednesday and Thursday, May 2-3, at tbe First United Methodist Church of Plymouth, 45201 N. Territorial, west of Sheldon in Plymouth Township. Hours will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday. 9 a m . to 5 p.m. and 6-8 p.m. Thursday.

M O R I W I Q W O R S M P 8 4 8 A J S . 8 11:00 A M . S U N D A Y S C H O O L HfcOO A J L CalabtaUaw al Pralaa - 8 3 0 P J t .

Rev. Roy Forsyth p r e a c h i n g

Dr. David E. Church, Rev. Roy Forsyth

Both t h e Rev. Michelle A. G e n t i l e a n d her h u s b a n d , t h e Rev. R a n d y W h i t c o m b , a r e c l e r g y s p o u s e e . S h e ' s p a s t o r of t h e D e n t o n Faith Unit-

Your Invitation to Worship

45301 M TarrHortal Rd.. Ptymooth 4&3-6380

IN SOME cases, both husband and wife are ordained. One such pastoral pair is tbe Rev. Randy Whitcomb and his wife, tbe Rev. Michelle A Gentile of Canton Both are United Methodist ministers. They have no children. Whitcomb is pastor of tbe 145-member Cherry Hill United Methodist Church in Canton. Gentile is pastor of the 124-member Denton Faith United Methodist Church in Belleville. ' ~t "The church doesn't have that many expectations ^ when tbe spouse is male," Whitcomb said. Nationally, some 2,300 women have been ordained in the United Methodist denomination. Gentile said. Many marry other ministers. While barriers are dropping, many people still expect more from the women. Gentile said. Gentile, wbo is from Rochester in Oakland County, met and married Whitcomb while tbey were in the seminary He's from Rochester too, but a different state — Minnesota.

ONE ISSUE that they must periodically grapple with is church assignment. In their denomination, it is customary for pastors to be ordained and assigned in a designated geographical area, called a conference. Whitcomb gave up his conference and relocated to Michigan to be close to his wife. . Pastors are reappointed each year. BILL BRESLER/staft photographer "Our bishop, Judith Craig, was wonderful and made e d M e t h o d i s t C h u r c h a n d h e ' s p a s t o r of t h e sure we had jobs together," Gentile said. "Tbe church C h e r r y Hill United M e t h o d i s t C h u r c h in C a n and the clergy couples are still learning — walking oo new ground." ton.

r

The church bulletin is published every Thursday in The Observer. Information must be received in the Livonia office by noon the Monday prior to publication.

Church

C o m e W o r s h i p In Our New S a n c t u a r y

SINCE COMING to Livonia, Susan Sanders has taken a full-time job in an insurance office to help meet family expenses. Although that limits ber free time, she is active in a church group that corresponds with missionaries. She also teaches Sunday school to preschoolers.

church bulletin

M E M O R I A L C H U R C H OF CHRIST I Christian CKurch) 3S47S FR* M M » School 4 BOW Pi OHM—'I School- Pra-Sehoot-ath P.aHa Carol H t m . Principal i37-22i

" C a n H e ? Will H e ? For M e ? '

(Activities lor All Ages)

W e art a c a n n g c o m m u n i t y , s h a r i n g t h e l o v e o l Jesus ana p r o v i d i n g o p p o r t u n i t i e s tor everyone t o t e a m a n d grow*

in

WORSHIP WITH US

April 29th

W e d n e s d a y , 7:00 p.m

S C H O O L O F CHRISTIAN EDUCATION

a

S u n d a y s 8 : 3 0 A 11.-00 A M M o n d a y EvaninQ 7 0 0 P . M .

9:40 A M Sunday School 11:00 A.M. Morning Worship

Sunday Service Broadcast 9:30 AM. WMUZ-FM 103.5 Nursery Provided at All S e r v i c e s

JO a 11:00 A M .

IBnOlrij rT8IOOin, A86OC r i J l O f

W a d . . M a y 2, 6 : 4 5 P.M. "Coping With S t r a t a . " Or. David M. Hurst

'

Sunday School a Teen a Adult i Studies 9*5 AM.

Provided

Paw TiwiAlhu Ua6i ntk

4 2 2 - 1 ISO

MAY 3 - NATIONAL DAY OF PRAYER SUNDAY. APRIL 29, 1990 6 00. 9 15. 10 45 A M and 12 05 P M Worship and Sunday School 8:00 and 9 15 A M "FAMILY LIFE IN WHITE W A T E R S ' Rev Brian Tweed« 10 45 A M and 12 05 P M "STRENGTHS OF STRONG FAMILIES' Di Richard J Alherta 7 00 p m FAMILY WEEK CONCERT S t e v e a n d Annie C h a p m a n

C h u r c h O f f i c e 453-S2S2

Rev. Victor F. Halboth, P a s t o r

10:46 A M . C h u r c h S c h o o l for All Ages

/-/«*• of Christ

46250 Ann A r b o r Road Plymouth 453-5252 T h e Rev. K . M . M e h r l . P a s t o r

Worship Services 9:15 & 11:00 A M Sunday School 9:15 & 11 0 0 A M Nursery

tbe

^ I S € D C h R i s r LUTHERAN CHURCH

GRACE LUTHERAN C H U R C H M I 8 6 0 U R I SYNOD 25630 GRAND RIVER et BEECH DALY 532-2266 REDFORD TWP

Radford Baptist Church 7 Mite R o a d a n d Grand R/ver R a d f o r d . Michigan 533-2300 April 2 9 t h . 9:30 A.M. Children s F o c u s Chiltfran H e l p With W o r s h i p

W £ A D E V A N G E L I C A L PR E S B Y T E K I A IN ' H U K C H F a r m i n g t o n a n d S i x M i l * Rd

1 4 1 7 5 F a r m i n g t o n R d . ( J u s t N. of J e f f r i e s X - W a y ) iia Phone: 522-6830 W.yMm L U T H E R A. W E R T H . P A S T O R S u n d a y W o r s h i p 8 3 0 6 11.-00 A.M. S u n d a y S c h o o l 6 Bible C l a a s 9:45 A.M. Woe*: Day S c h o o l , P r o - S c h o o l , K i n d e r g a r t e n .

1 1 : 0 0 A.M. " W e e p i n g a t J e s u s ' F e e t ' 6 : 0 0 P . M . G u e s t : Dr. D a v i d Alien

ABC/

By A r l s n e F u n k e

EVANGELICAL PRESBYTERIAN

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juggle various roles

special writer

LUTHERAN C H U R C H MISSOURI S Y N O D

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M e w H o n r o r a tor C h i d r e n Day C a r e

455-31%

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Thursday. April ac. 1990

Tburaday. APRS 26. 1900 04E

Tulips c h u r c h

festive s e a s o n

b u l l e t i n

Continued from P " B « 7

gogue, 31840 Seven Mile, Uvonia.

broaden their scope of teaching within Christian education.

call 425-9041 or 474-8940. •

RUMMAGE SALE SL Colette Church will hold a rummage sale 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 28, in tbe activity center, 17400 Newburgb. between Six Mile and Seven Mile, Livonia. There will be a $2 per bag sale starting at 1 p.m.



ALCOHOLISM WORKSHOP Christ Our Savior Lutheran Church, 14175 Farmington Road, Livonia, will boat an alcoholism April 24. Dorothy Miller, a specialist oo the topic, will be tbe speaker. For information, call 522-4830



CHANCEL CHOIR The Chancel Choir of St. Patil Presbyterian Church will present a concert at 7:30 pm. Friday, April 27, at the church, 27475 Five Mile, Livonia. Included in the evening's music

• JEWISH CONGREGATION The Livonia Jewish Congregation Sisterhood will have a motherdaughter luncheon and fashion show at noon Sunday, May 6, at tbe syna-

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will be Faure "Requiem" as well as of favorite choir will be under tbe direction of J. Scott Goble, with accompaniment by organist Walter Cory and University of Michigan musicians. •

RUMMAGE SALE SL Elizabeth Episcopal Church Women wfll have a rummage sale 9 a.m. to noon Friday, April 27, and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, April 28, at tbe church, 26431 W. Chicago, Redford Township. There also will be a bake sale on Saturday. a Christ Our Savior Ladies Parish Service Guild will hold a rummage sale 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday and Friday, April 24-27, at the church, on Farmington Road just north of 1-94, Livonia. A $1 per bag sale will start at 2 p.m. Saturday. a The Redford United Methodist Church will hold its spring rummage sale 10 a . m to 6 p.m. Friday, April 27, and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday,

April 28, at

the church. 22400



DO-IT-YOURSELF St Edith Church will have master handyman Glenn Haege and master gardener Ernie Bedard at a ' 7:30 p.m. house and garden do-it-yourself program Thursday, April 24. There is no admission charge. Prizes will be given away. The church is at 15089 Newburgh, Livonia. •

LIFE CARE MIHISTRIES People who have a problerrj and need someone to talk to can call a Christian telephone listening service operated by Life Care Ministries. Tbe service is operated noon to 11 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Tbe phone number is 427-LIFE•

A.C.T.I.O.N. MINISTRIES A.C.T.I.O.N. Ministries is an auxiliary of Single Point Ministries, a

Single Adult Ministry of Ward Pres- Thursdays in Fellowship Hall and 1 byterian Church, 17000 Farmington - p.m. Fiidays in Room A-5. Ward Road, Livonia. Tbe group is open to Presbyterian Church is at 17000 all single adults. It provides educa- Farmington Road, at tbe corner of tional and support services to meet Six Mile. For information, call 534the needs of individuals during ca- 6383. reer transitions. The group meets at Alcoholics for Christ is a Christian 7 p.m. tbe second and fourth Mon- fellowship and support group for aldays of tbe month in tbe Lighthouse coholics, their families and conof Ward Church. For information, cerned people. call 422-1854. The group also meets at 7:30 p.m. Fridays at Detroit First Church of the Nazarene, 21260 Haggerty, north • HOMECOMING of Eight Mile, Farmington Hills; at Aldersgate United Methodist 7:30 p.m. Fridays at Westland Full Church is planning a homecoming Gospel Church, 34033 Palmer, WestSunday, May 6. Former members land; at 6 p.m. Tuesdays at Church of can call 937-3170 for information. God in Christ, 3844 Harrison, Inkster, at 7:30 p.m. Mondays at Fairhaven Assembly of God, 876 • ALCOHOLICS' SUPPORT Beech.Daly, Dearborn Heights; and GROUPS Alcoholics for Christ, Alcoholics at 7:30 p.m. Saturdays at Fair lane Alliance Church, 905 Mason, north o f for Christ Family Group and Adult Michigan Avenue, Dearborn. For inChildren of Alcoholics meet weekly at Ward Presbyterian Church in formation. call 399-9955 between 9 a.m. and 1 p . m weekdays. Livonia. Groups meet at 7:30 p.m.

s e r v i c e

Michigan's Vietnam era veterans who need information or referral services on local, state and federal programs can now used a statewide hotline set up by the Michigan Department of Public Health and Michigan Agent Onnge Commission. The commission was established to review and make recommendations to the health department on the effects on human health of Agent Orange and other defoliants used during tbe Vietnam War ear.

' Its primary objective is to enroll Michign Vietname veterans for participation in four specific types of health studies, including a studies of the overall mortality, cancer incidence, birth and dioxin exposure. • Veterans and organisations that use the Agent Orange hotline can now call (800) MIC-VIET for direct assistance. Veterans seeking information about Agent Orange compensation can call tbe Agent Orange Payment Program at (800) 225-4712.

we volunteers Love Happy Campers!

Need who

Photo tour explores hills

S t .

• FOR THOSE of us wbo don't kneel to tbe biggest fish in the state, there are flowers, lots of tbem: tbe Blossom time Festival in Benton Harbor and St. Joseph April 29-May 6; the Trillium Festival at Hoffmaster State Park in Muskegon May 1213; the Lilac Festival on Mackinac Island June 1-10. Those of you wbo like to plan ahead, mark your calendar for the Frankenmuth Bavarian FesUval June 9-16; Valvoline Detroit Grand Prix June 15-17; International Balloon Championship in Battle Creek June 14-23; International Freedom festival June 22-July 4; National Cherry Festival in Traverse City July 7-14; Ann Arbor Street Fair July 18-21; U.S. Coast Guard Bicentennial in Grand Haven July 21-Aug. 5; Michigan Festival in East Lansing Aug 10-19; Renaissance FesUval weekends in Holly Aug. 18-Sept.

Photography experts will be sponsoring group tours through Scotland this summer. Photo enthusiasts are welcome to of Lewis where they will spend two join the group June 24-July 7 and days taking shots among tbe 3,000capture shots in the Western High- year-old Standing Stooes of Callanlands of Scotland. Tbe group will be- ish, which is considered to be the gin tbe excursioo In Girvan, Scot- finest stone circle in Scotland. land, a fishing village and photoBack to the mainland, the group graph several castles and an abbey will take a scenic route to Inverness ruin. A visit to the Robert Burns and spend a free day to sightsee, Center will also be made while in shop and relax. After two days in the Girvan area where photogra- Inverness, they will head south phers can shoot the bridge over tbe down tbe coastline of Loch Ness, River Doon (tbe Brigadoon of keeping an eye out for Nessie. Lerner and Lowe fame.) The photo tour is 91.950 and inThe trip includes a drive through^.-xlndes round-trip airfare, all transthe valley of Glencoe where ooe porta Lion within Scotland, 12 nights night, while tbey slept, the Mac- accommodations at bed and breakDonald clan was murdered by their fast establishments, all breakfast guests, tbe Campbells. The next stop and dinners and admission into hisis in F t William, the gateway to tbe torical sites. Western Highlands and in the mornThe trip also includes instruction ing the group will then head for the by photography experts such as Isle of Skye. Nancy Goff of Ann Arbor and Two days will be spent photo- Cheryl Hogue of Saline. For more information and resergraphing Skye, tbe rugged island, home of tbe Clan MacCleod. A ferry vations for the trip, call (313)9731251 or (313)429-0594. will then take the group to the Isle

c l a r i f i c a t i o n The April 12 travel story, "Stop over guide to Phoenix," stated the University of Arizona as being in

Tempe, Ariz. The University of Arizona is in Tucson and Arizona State University is in Tempe.

"MichiganLands"

r i v e r s i d e

Happiness is a cruise

women

men

ITS A PLEASANT walk through the rose garden, Japanese garden or English woodland. A bonus is the sculptures which grace the fountains (turned off during the winter) and grounds — including works by Alexander Calder, Henry Moore and Carl Milles. We were lucky to travel during tbe off-season because even Tony's, ooe of only nine Mobil Guide five-star North American restaurants had room for us on a Friday night with only an hour's noUce. If you go now, be sure to make reservations. The 94th Aero Squadron adjacent to tbe airport with a perfect view of landings and takeoffs was a great place for Sunday brunch • Begin with airfare: All year round. Southwest Airlines offers special rates to SL Louis. As long as you travel Mooday through Thursday, tickets are $19 each way with a 21-day advance purchase. Or you can get a 448 round-trip ticket with a seven-day advance purchase or a |78 round-trip ticket with a oneday advance purchase. That's for unreserved seating oo a number of conveniently scheduled cue-stop flights. • Rental cars: When you arrive at Lambert-St. Louis International Airport on a Friday morning, there are at least a half dozen rental car companies. A midsize car is $11.95 per day plus 17 cents a mile at Budget, $21.95 and 100 free daily miles at National.

CAKOCYN D6MAHCO Many r i v e r b o a t * a n d t o u r i s t a c t i v i t i e s rally a l o n g t h e r i v e r s i d e . T h e s e Civil War r e - e n a c t o r s b a r r e l u p in f r o n t of a f l o a t i n g McDonald's.

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Sun Deer * c a m p e r s a r e happy campers and its no w o n d e r Decausc rvyzt severely a s t h m a t i c kids a r e f o r c e d t o s p e n d their s u m m o a inooors. At C a m p Sun Deer ® a s t h m a t i c kidi a g e s 9-12 participate in a variety of o u t d o o r activities, b u t t h e y can t d o it w i t h o u t your help. The limitations a n d d o u b t s t h e y f a c e can b e diminished by a v o l u n t e e r w h o cares. Your participation a t Camp ^ i n

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I anrnomonmSS0 Tr—I Olaiauwr on our at-1 Z rtmrr Et«spa on Condor or I ATA RawicNona: thta cMhW raquwaa • |fmmtmnt mm a*gr«ir Nghar • mauwna mx*r m«wnumtarao assistance in receiving funding fentraining employees. For more information, call 462-

Chairman optimistic Continued from Page 1 A. "We're a mid western company." based in Michlsan and Indiana. Possibly Illinois and Ohio thrifts will be acqtaed "but not Arkansas or Texas or Florida." The credit card business will be housed in the Troy headquarters, not In a state where the usury interest rate limit is higher. Q. Your ownership of stock Is less

than 59 percent of your earnings ef 1600,900. A new member ef (he board owns 199 shares, less than S percent of a director's A. "Every penny I have in this world (other than home) is in Standard Federal Stock and CDs. I own no other stock." Historically, SF has paid low executive salaries. "We do not nominate directors on the basis of the amount of stock they buy," but for their services.

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Geroge ML Gurgauiaa, representative in the Garden City office of American General Life and'Accident Insurance Co., retired after a 33year career. Burganian began working for the company in September 19S7 as an agent at the Detroit West Central district office. He was promoted to sales manager in 1M1. Later that year, he transferred as sales manager to tbe new Detroit Central office. In 1977 be was named field training supervisor, then made district manager at the Cleveland North office and then an account representative. He was made district manager at the Flint Central office in 1978, transferring in that position to Redford in 1934. He returned to an agency there in 19M, promoting to sales manager at Graden City in 1987. Gurganian returned to an agency in that office last year. During his career be qualified to attend 17 of tbe company's annual national leaders conference, twice as a member of tbe President's Council, which is made up of tbe company's top producer. Dona R. Wilmot was named technical sales manager at AE Piston Ftojlhcli Inc. in Plymouth. Before joihiag AE Piston Products, Wilmot Was a sales engineer with Farnam TeaTTsg SyStams, a division of Colt Industries in Troy. He also spend more than, seven years as senior project engineer with Detroit Diesel Wilmot is a graduate of Iowa Oorp. W State University in Ames, Iowa, and the University of Michigan. Robert L. Bochenek of Livonia was named director of operations

& Cla

Gurganian Wilmot analysis with Lear Siegler Seating Corp in Southfield. Bochenek, who has been with the company since 1984, had been an accounting executive. He is a graduate of Wayune State University and Henry Ford Community College. He had also served as finance director of Lear's Fentpn and Romulus plants. Bochenek participated in 10 new plant start-ups. Jennifer R. Stansberry of Livonia was promoted from senior account executive to director of public relations services at tbe Bo-line Group Inc. in Birmingham. Stansberry joined tbe agency in December 1986. Sbe had been associate editor of the Tri-County News in Fen ton, Mich. A graduate of Michigan State University, sbe is a member of the Public Relations Society of America. Thomas Hitz of Livonia was promoted to vice president of tbe health/research group at Barton Malow Co. in Southfield. Hitz has more than 10 years of experience in tbe industry. He received a bachelor of science degree in Civil Engineering from Lawrence Technological University.

Bochenek

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Jeff Richards of Livonia earned a certificate of distinction in the professional goldsmith category of the Michigan Jewelers Association's annual design contest. His entry was an 18K yellow gold ring with a pink tourmaline and tri Ilium diamond.

Daa Williams of Livonia was appointed general assignment reporter for WKBD-TV's "Ten O'Clock News.'* Williams has been a freelance reporter for the station since June 1989. Before joining WKBD, Williams was a consumer reporter for WJBK in Detroit for more than four years.

Elise Benedict, owner of University Moving and Storage in Livonia; will participate in the President's Forum of NorthAmerican Van Lines Inc. Please submit black-and-white photographs, if possible, for inclusion in the business people col* umn. While we value the receipt of photographs, we are unable to use every photograph submitted. If you want your photograph re* turned, please enclose a self-ad, dressed, stamped envelope. Indicate in a margin on the front of the photograph that you want it returned. We will do our best to comply with your request. Send information to: Business Editor, 36251 Schoolcraft, Livonia 48150. Please include city of residence and a daytime telephone number where information can be verified.

The following local sales associates recently were made members of the Better Homes and Gardens Medallion Club. Sales associates from the Livonia office were Don Karnes, Linda Brtocat, Scots Casey, Bill Harrison, Kathi Lee Kobylarz, Faith McOormick, Fern McCortnick. Carol Martha, Ken Ray and Masrees Troost From the Plymouth office were Yvonne Teeveus, Barbara Crowley, Lynn DeJohn, Ruth Devine, Shari Johnston, Leon Kelly, Chris Kaight, See LeBlaac, Patsy Rollins, Judy Rumpel and Patricia Zubatch.

: tenninofoer sad principles wfll be discussed. • Additional information about Great Plains Software Co. wfll be presented. • Additional information about Accountasystems will be presented. WHO we are and WHAT we do. r you have experience or no experience with software or even ifjrou doot own a computer, this seminar can be of value to jou The seminar win be at the Uvonia Public Library (Civic Center Branch) In the Jenkfet Conference Boom on the third floor.

T h e s e m i n a r will b e h e l d

T u e s d a y , May 1, 1 9 9 0 a t 6 : 3 0 P.M. You may resenre your seats by calling Accountasystems at 737-0031. Space is limited so reserve your seats as soon aa possible.

GREAT PLAINS SOFTWARF

Marietta Harttay wants you to discover the explosive values on carpet in hundreds ot A*-American colors and styles at the one and-only Great American Carpet Sale

Dan McCosh press orders from GM, Ford and Chrysler have gone to Japan in the past decade or so, nearly bankrupting the US. industry, which likely will never recover since such orders only come every 25 years or so. The result, in the early appraisals, is a fine small car. Ford has proved to be the only company that seems to be able to embark on a hybrid development and produce a product argu-

a business can create serious financial problems for the business and for the estate and survivors of the deceased individual. Usually, the deceased's interest in the business is a dominant portion of tbe total estate. Tbe estate tax payable can place a substantia] burden on the estate and tbe business.. To meet expenses, the estate may be forced to liquidate the interest in the business. And, if it is sold under adverse conditions, substantial losses may be suffered as a result of a forced sale. Even more important, if corporate stock is sold to outsiders, the surviving shareholders' interests may be jeopardized. All of these problems can be handled with buy-sell agreements.

First of 3 parts In recent weeks I have seen national network commercials in which the viewers are asked to "keep New York Life." This is done presumably to earn respect of tbe general public for tbe insurance industry. • The ubiquitous apathy of the general public toward life insurance is most regrettable. I believe that life insurance is an extremely valuable financial planning tool. ' In a three-part article I will discuss some of the time-tested uses of life insurance. Bay-seU agreement

Sid Mittra which provide for the orderly transfer of tbe deceased's business interest to surviving partners, stockholders or key employees at fair values determined in advance. Life insurance is used to assure that the money will be available either to the business or to an individual when the business interests are to be transferred.



sr $9999 t SXm*.

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PLUSH 150 COLORS

focus: small business Mary DiPaolo Business owners often don't understand tbem or find them to be irrelevant When compared to a weekly cash flow management system, accounting merely tells firm management "what happened" as opposed to what will happen in the future. "ANYBODY CAN make money

The trick is being able to keep i t " As such, a weekly cash flow management system gives the decision makers the ability to predict tbe company's cash needs before they occur — and could potentially harm its financial position. Such systems are not meant to re* place a firm's current accounting

Do it for someone you love...

Stop smoking

procedures, he said. "The right system is simply a process that assembles the firm's financial information in such a way that it becomes understandable to company management and, as a result, -truly useful for short-term business planning purposes." As a management consultant working with small- to mediumsized companies, LeTourneau has found that cash flow-related problems prevent a majority of firms from dealing with issues requiring

$1A99 — $9199



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AMERICAN * LUNG •* » puOiic a*rv>c* tyy lh« publisher

Reg.

$514.95 -75.00

DuPont Stammasier carpet with a S year slam and 20 year wear guarantee Chocm at 30 sensational colors CO*OrsGreet O'eatlooks took* durable

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21-INCH, Vh HA, PUSH Reg. $389.95 Sale - 50.00

$

* - Sale Ends Soon!

CHOOSE FROM WEBER • • DUCANE • THERMOS AT SALE PRICES FROM >99.95

MOWERS SELF-PROPELLED, 21-INCH r

*1995

OVER 35 MODELS ON DISPLAY

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CARPET

MAOffCarCAilVBPUSt Oor very besT An ultra teaunous carpet m an elegant sculptured pattern OuPont Stammaster carpet m 20 *"ien smart cowl color* n ecause of the matching pieces of furniture in tbe two homes, the audience can be confused as to what is really going on.

Cafe Vi

DINING A ENTERTAINMENT

The Theatre Guild is , „ the First Michigan community theater production of "Steel Magnolias" It has all the ingredients to become very popular with amateur groups from coast to coast. Tbe guild sets a high standard that others will find difficult to duplicate.

O r i e n t a l

Detroit area with "Wok and Roll, An Asian Occasion," continuing through Saturday, June 23, as part of a nationwide food festival. The event features appetizers, soups, salads.

f o o d

ROBERTA. GREEN B U I L D I N G 14920

WE

DO

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at the same since 1957

COMPLETE

JOB"

Call: 422-7700 University of Detroit Jesuit High School and Academy

TRIPS TO TORONTO

CALL 3 5 3 - 9 7 4 0

C A H A M > { T R A V E L H DINNER FOR 2 C h o i c e Of:

FREE!

R A L L I E S

AND

CHAR-BROILED nte

^

CHICKEN BREAST MARINATE

'c^imore

R E S T A U R A N T

Includes Soup, Salad - and Potato or Rice Fry Chomtterol Frei

KMllihikI*Wl

IMM4I1MH

663-3636

549-6000

9 K

CrestaujSRTI

STEAK HOUSE

2 lor 1 PASTA DISHES

LOST & FOUND WEDNESDAY THRU SUNDAY

Monday

to

, S n r f k y B r o t h e r s Cinttrt* -tTMMtnMMMIMiew - t Only at Smiley's c a n y o u c o m p a r e these world class pianos

Grands and Consoles Bechsteln, Schlmmel, Kimball. WurlKzer, Sojin.

27189Grand W w

ONNTMfl

AtMK

—"""

FREE DANCE LESSONS

COUPON

Lsarn the latest Latin Steps Every Tuesday Night Starting at 10:00 p.m.

Buy On* Dinner or Lunch at Regular Price and Oat One Dinner or Lunch (of equai value)

"V f iIiUi a n rI tl fui fnt rui un fr M n IhItI " Ca J Lt R DA I T lI Y

Early Bird Dinners Available 4-7 p.m. Beginning at S3.95

A WIDE VARIETY Of WEEKENO SPECIALS

SUNDAY M U * | Mad a d m Be»_J-._ DINNER BUFFET...«6.50 Join us for Sunday Brunch from 10 a.m.-2 p.m «5.&5 TAKING MOTHER'S DAY RESERVATIONS NOW

HANDYMAN SATURDAY APRIL 28th 10:00 a.m.



HALF PRICE

UiM ana eaupan par MMa Good Sunday thiu SlrJa» En»a» 5-IO-SO

-

Lsam how to replace your windows at our FREE WMDOW INSTALLATION WORKSHOP. Discover the facts about virtualv maintenance free, vinyl d a d windows from our Anderson window expert. Rnd out loots and techniques thei make the Job easier. Bring ki your current window w a s fir FREE ESmMATES!

Wad. thru Sat WALLY GIBSON . Music and Song

Beck by Popular Demand:

FROG LEGS

CLUB HOUSE •6.95A STEAK

l lar ac CM 4 PJL)

»6.95

Thru Apr* 30, 1990

THE EAGLE'S NEST

O p e n i n g

21937 Warren Ave. Cardan City, Midiifan

Bom§a

522-2420

T r e a t Mom Royally at our

A TANOOOW MilAUIUNT

Mother's Day Brunch ALL YOU CAN EAT

Famty Dtntng ot India and America

BREAKFAST •LUNCH

COUPON — r s U b of Ribe For Two, l

cy^ST. • 8 at ParB 422^195

"

WE FEATURE

9fi'Ac* IN LIVONIA

979 Inkster Rd.

EMia nka>ar

WANTED

•STEAK • ORIENTAL FOOO

Roast Beef & Spirits

1aam.trni.mmm

BIRMINGHAM 647-1177

Sun thru Monday

AU. VOO CAM EAT O U t CEOS. .HUM

Ml VOW CM MT I

No reutoUaUun required. $9.00 testing fee. Cafl 862-5400tordeb

APPEARING

BILL KAHLER

WHOLE SLAB «f mes lor l l J 6

i saa'

5 MILE, Comer o f ^ \ InUMr • S37-SSOO

S W i S ^ . . . . . ' 7 "

Sunday, May 13th 1

{ Carry-Out or V Banquet raa—•'FKwTOaooeione

10-2 Now t a k i n g dinner reservations 3 - i O P.M. Complete Cany-Out Service -

To the 1st 1.000 Adults through the door! FOR EXHIBITOR SPACE. CALL

792-4563

"Great Gift {deas For Mother's Day" OTHER S H O W S • May 11 & 12 - Chesterfield Mai • New Baltimore • May 19 & 20 - 3rd Annual Metro Beach • ML Omens •June 14 2 Winchester Mai • Rochester

O&E Classifieds work!

SAVE

AND

FOR

BONUS

(1) -YES" YOU WILL BE HYPNOTIZED!( IT IS SAFE.ft EFFECTIVE. (2) "YES" YOU WILL WILLINGLY THROW YOUR CIGARETTES AWAY AT THE END OF OR KAHLftASSOCIATES PROGRAM (3) WITH DR. KAHL ft ASSOCIATES HYPNOSIS PROGRAM YOU WILL BE AWAKE ADN TOTALLY AWARE AT ALL TIMES YOU WILL REMEMBER ALL THAT IS SAID YOU WILL NOT LOSE CONTROL (4)SPEND ONE SESSION WITH US AND YOU WILL LEAVE FEELING REFRESHED. MOTIVATED. AND HAVE MORE CONFIDENCE IN YOUR ABILITY TO STAY A NON-SMOKER (5) DR. KAHL PH.D. IS AN EX-SMOKER HIMSELF AND HAS TAUGHT HYPNOSIS IN COLLEGE, WE ARE CONSIDERED ONE , OF THE LEADING EXPERTS IN THE U.S. ON STOP-SMOKING

Spaa* Ducourttora group ol Ian or mort. cai cAoatordaMs You «• amoha (wo Ltgawaaa wMa In hypnoao. Bring al you ugataow to daaa.

MAY 1,TUESDAY WARREN DAYS INN 30000 VAN DYKE AVE.

MORNING CLASS: 11:00 AM. -1:30 P.M. EVENING CLASS: 7:00 P.M. - 9.30 P.M. MAY 2, WEDNESDAY UVONIA HOLIDAY INN

30375 PLYMOUTH ROAD CLASS TIME:'7:00 P.M. - 9:30 P.M.

BUROEON GENERAL WARNING (Mg now g n burning smoking tucw riafc t o your Hjrf>MRtv S«H-tiypnoa*» I* laughl for r«nforc«m*nt

BE SMART COME TO HIS

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F O R

B O N U S

IF YOU LIKE COLORFUL COVERAGE

Saturday / April 28 / 8:30 am

Wed. & Thurs. Aft. 12:00-3:00 P.M. MOn and Tues Nights

G R E A T !

DETROIT •75-7100

SAT> & SUN. MAY 5th & Gth 10 am - 5 pm 15800 White ( A l l e n P a r k C i v i c A r e n a )

READ STREET SCENE THE P S Y C H I C S ARE HERE

T A S T E ' S

Every

ALLEN PARK CRAFT SHOW

STOP SMOKING

EXAM

for Seventh, Eighth, and Ninth grades

GREAT BANQUET BOOM - UP TO W PEOPLE • NO CHARGE 7 2 8 - 7 4 9 0

"SPECIALS

MONDAY (Dine-In Only). TVeSOAY...__ WEDMESOAY THURSDAY FRIDAY S SATURDAY „

Urcukfa*t Man ud Am Alter Trail. PlyamitK Mich*** Wl 70

PLAYFA1R Tuea thru Sat.

GARDENS

ruLLUQuoai

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5.95 Reservations Suggested 32030 Ptymouth Rd. • Uvonia 422-0770

Sunday brunch. The Mayflower is located in colonial downtown Plymouth, within walking distance of 1 SO unique shops, a park and a movie theatre. New! Double whirlpool rooms available at extra coat.

flMtftaMpaMI tGmr d MfeM: 361-3550 855-4600 Other Buddy's Locations WATERFORD ROYAL OAK mn i>aaai i w-aa a w » t

aa Aat Soum d Onna UVONIA REDFORD 427-1000 537-0740

PACKAGES AVAILABLE UVONIA

• fto«n Ey« Hound toor end ouMoer ton tor I14P4P Agss 3-up V

looks reel enough to btoei into space' Ages S-«s>.

HuHy

POWRGLAS

39" WORLD S BIGGEST

THE Q'*en>c*

This Event Is Offered Only Every Two Years. Trade Now and Save!

"FLM »-UO

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TOY STORE!

StM lOMRl iROMl MMMK wifoaulta

Sale ends April 28 Afl trade-in ttams i

|

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[ m t o a Men's Shop

Thafo a a "toys - R " Us Near

120 E. Main?

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3 4 9 - 3 6 7 7 Daily 9-6 Th. & Fri. 9 9 I «l mm USiitog (hoe Ca

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The following information will help you understand The Observer & Eccentric Newspapers. It is designed to help y^u sort out our various departments and locate / f S ? specific people. So feel free to snip, c l i p o r rip this page for future use. &

I " • *

1

ie Observer & Eccentric Newspapers are delivered twice e a c h week by carrier a n d mail. O u r c u r r e n t a u d i t e d circulation is 158.367 ( 9 / 2 9 / 8 8 ) . To begin receiving y o u r Observer or Eccentric, call: 5 9 1 - 0 5 0 0 in Wayne C o u n t y | 6 4 4 - 1 1 0 0 in Oakland 6 5 1 - 7 5 7 5 in R o c h e s t e r / Rochester Hills T h e s e also are the n u m b e r s to call if you experience a problem with delivery. Office h o u r s are from 8 : 3 0 a . m . until 5:15 p.m. To become a carrier, call 5 9 1 - 0 5 0 0 in Wayne C o u n t y or 6 4 4 - 1 1 0 0 in Oakland County. FRED WRIGHT is o u r Circulation D i r e c t o r — 5 9 1 - 2 3 0 0 ext. 500

ADVERTISING T h e r e are two basic t y p e s of a d v e r t i s e m e n t s in T h e Observer & Eccentric Newspapers:

• I 1

m • i T .fl r birds Nianbars 4:30am. G 4 E

711 Misc. For I Wsyns County

FURNITURE CompMM Houae. Mr •eeher 4 dryer. 4 5*2-4568

"SMS

HOUSEHOLD/ESTATE SALE Frt Sat. Apra 27-24. W a m - 5 p m

7M Household Qoods Wsyns County

Psrais. Pakistan.

Salectiona from Chma. MdM

QUEEN

(10 a.m. t o 4 p.m.) FURNITURE m Ci caaant condition. I k e new Very rsaannabla TOTAL LIQUIDATION OF CLASSIC CaB between 3-4pm. 447-4038 TRADITIONAL FURNISHINGS INGREAT BUYS' M i r r o r * 7 6 X4'. CUJOE STUNNING CHIPPENDALE DINING ROOM WITH CHINA CABI- 16X15' tan pluah carpel, neutral NET ON CABRIOLET LEGS. BUF- aofa. ne*t of FET. SERVER. TABLE 4 4 CHAIRS: LIVING ROOM HAS MARBLETOPPED TABLES. LAMPS IN HENREDON wea unh. pecan amah. WATERFORD STYLING. VENETIAN 11,050 Matching dmmg room tabM. GLASS LAMPS. FORMAL SOFA 6 ivom_l«tKX_phair*. (1.750. 2 ratw r m SILK COVERING: SMALL Ian bar atOOM 4220. Contemporary 442-3140 DESK. QUEEN MASTER BED- gMaa coffee tabM 4225 ROOM: R-WAY SET FROM 1940 s: HENREDON BRASS BED; JUNIOR DINING room o o d a r v ROOM SET IN DINETTE ANTIQUE 4480 Eve* BRASS 4 CRYSTAL CHANDELIERS, CHINA: CRYSTAL. COLLEC- HIOE A BED Sofa. I S inch, tan TiBLES. ANTIQUES; CLOTHIMG; corduroy Good condaton 4150 JEWELRY: 525-7826

(East of Woodward. N. of Big Beaver) reMurlng: Fine crystal. poreaMm. aterHng. CybM. Wadgewood. annqua American docks, oa patntlng*. Oriental rugs. Woodard wroogn; iron. O f g f i Deak. ThornaaiMa 244 CMka. off 14 Ml ) FrLSM.Sun. Apr 27.26.29. 9-6 DININO ROOM Sat (Baeeett) pecan, FULL HOU8E CONTENTS INtable with pad. 4 chair*, aghtad CLUOE: 4 piece tweed aectlonaM; hutch. $300 646-4928 Simmon* aofa-bed: 7 pMca dmetle; DINING ROOM SET. aold leak Bedroom aet; Bar atooM; Wood table. 4 chairs, matching 3 piece burning stove; Oraaeera. cheMa. china cabinet. $ 1000 979-7744 Smgar commercMI awning machine. Plan 4 Kanmors machines. Sewing DINING ROOM' Sat- W/table, 4 labrics 4 aupp4aa. Ceramic aupchairs, china cabinet Owha*. pots/ pk**. Bay Reuth 4 Schumann China: pans, kitchen utenels 354-1241 2 refngarator*. 2 Move* Bectrlc dryer, F r a e a r . Pota. pane; CryatM: DINING T A B L E no chairs, p a r t e d Storage cablnaC Ber atgn*. Bed 4 condKlon. 4 4 " round oakazlends lo tabM inana; DoBaa. M j cape: La120" with three 24 leevea. mduda* diea clothing. J e w e l ^ . Doa* Books: custom pad*. $750. Original $1200 Garage m a d . Thousands of a a » Antlqu* wtckar t a * cart 4 rocker. uonafiti BOlMr 851-0591 NO CHILDREN ADMITTED FRIDAY TERMS CASH

BROWNE

No Slgna Herat Entrance a weet off Greenffpto balw. M w a g n 4 Rotund s Take MMdMbury lo WoodMnd Or.

ESTATE SALE SAT . APRIL 24. 10-4 uonel dkang room tabla. per quel 1410 YorkaMra. Bkiianuri top. 2 arm chaks. 4 •da chMr* — »pm ISSS SDcMwid. W of Baattt Defy 4 N of Jfly Houaehoid. c o l l e c t i b l e * 4ome*. Lenoa tee eat depraaeaon glee* amad anbquea. plue a real ea• e r t m a n i of rMac

?

EDITORIAL O F F I C E S : i 3 6 2 5 1 Schoolcraft. U v o n i a . MI 4 8 1 5 0 8 0 5 Eas * ^ a p l e , B l r m l n g h a . MI 4 8 0 0 9 2 1 8 9 8 F a r m i n g t o h Rd.. F a r m i n g t o n MI 4 6 0 2 4 7 4 4 W i n g Street. P l y m o u t h . MI 4 8 1 7 0 4 1 0 Main. R o c h e s t e r . MI 4 8 0 6 3

BEDROOM SET - haw. 3 dreeeer*. vanity, gray 4 white, contemporary. 3 / y r * old. Hke new. $900 Ca> after 4pm 544-1938

•taad • - we've «ot a Morel FmrRuia. CM fMiaa.aaa.aaC»e.

S u b m i t all i n f o r m a t i o n to E t h e l S i m m o n s , e n t e r t a i n m e n t editor?

Steve B a m a b y is Managing Editor o f T h e Observer & Eccentric Newspapers; 5 9 1 - 2 3 0 0 ext. 3 0 0

BEDROOM aet. queen. 4 piece, quality wood. $500 or beel offer Dkvtm room aet. 17 5 0 / b e *t offer E Eve* 474-9405

TERRIFIC 3 DAY SALE

-*r

P l y m o u t h . 2 lamPy. prannova. Apr 24-27. 9-6; Sat . 9-1: 10667

BUILDING S C E N E 591-2300 ext. 302 C o n s t r u c t i o n a n d building n e w s a p p e a r s every M o n d a y a n d T h u r s d a y . All i n f o r m a t i o n r e l a t e d to t h i s s u b j e c t should b e s u b m i t t e d to M a r i l y n F i t c h e t t . editor, o n e week p r i o r t o p u b l i c a t i o n .

the following

LYMOUTM- Aweaoma 3 . Sal. « Sun. Apr 27-29. 12-5pm

PLYMOUTH

AINSLEY-PEN BROOK china 10 place aattmga + aervtng piece*, mint condition: atfvwr (Wabater 4 WSoox) coffee 4 tee aet • tr 4 other aervtng •wing machine w«h •ooden dreeeer. cheat. 4 3 mght at and* 737-

CALL 4 7 8 - 7 3 5 5

PLYMOUTH BKS SALE L o u of toy*, h m t u r e . anttQuaa. , lovefy glrta clothing Apr9 26 29 9am-4pm. 15147 Bradner i SchoafciaW 6 5mae

OBITUARIES We p u b l i s h o b i t u a r i e s of local r e s i d e n t s a n d former local residents. Most obituary information is received from a r e a _ funeral h o m e s . If a local funeral h o m e is not involved, please • call t h e c o m m u n i t y editor at t h e a p p r o p r i a t e telephone "5 n u m b e r . All o b i t u a r i e s a p p e a r at t h e discretion of the c o m m u n i t y editor. Obituaries are p r i n t e d without charge.

WESTLANO - Huge tale Baby lurrtiture. refrigerator, pool table, womene dothee. lot* of MMc Apr 24. 27. 4 3fl. end May 3. 4 4 5. lOerrv 4pm 1TTO W M e m . E of Merrtmen, 8 of Avondela 334-3181 WESTLANO MuftMemdy garage aate. Furniture, adult 4 children * ctothee. baby name. toy*, houaehoid Heme. 4 M a c Thur*-Sat 9-5 33051 YorkdM* Off Farmmgi Road, between Ford 4 Warren

708 lloiisohoM OuMwft Osklsnd County

707 Qsrags Ssiss: Wsyns

RELIGION Religious n e w s is published T h u r s d a y s . T h e religion c a l e n d a r is p u b l i s h e d o n t h e s e pages. C a l e n d a r deadline is Monday noon. All m a t e r i a l m u s t be in writing. For more information call your local s u b u r b a n life editor.

to appear

labia, coordtoabng chair* CMnaaa lacquer puMup chair wttti cuetom M Near chine, cryatel. art. accaa tee A l in aaca»ant condnxm C*a after 10AM

Real Estate

T N l d a s i M c a t t o n continued

Uems

G C-G

MORE



KITCHENAJOE 4150. atove - 4150 HarOy uaad. ExarcycM • ^ • ^ • • a n d a aet o f ^ ^ H - 440 3tame, - Tour Hwaca paean bound IBMUIJ or our Country Ev-I bedroom aet. 4200 AMo amad furmarythine muel go Caah only 14446 447-5077

BEAUTIFUL Baker Bombay chest. sorator sleep aofa. loveeeet. hand painted accent pillow*

W f —

PHOTOGRAPHS Reprints of p h o t o g r a p h s that a p p e a r In the p a p e r are not available. However, if a photograph is u s e d and not needed for o u r files, it will be made availble to t h e first person calling in. S u c h p h o t o g r a p h s will be held in a n y of o u r offices for two m o n t h s , awaiting pickup. To i n q u i r e a b o u t a photograph, please call t h e editor who r a n t h e picture i.e.: Sports. S u b u r b a n Life. E n t e r t a i n m e n t . Creative Living. News.

CHMA CABINET Pine dmmg M L Pine dry amfc. couch, ic — al. rac•32-3747

• Chart Large oriental painted break tront Lovely aaver tee aer»tca. inane, ledy-a dothee 14-20. costume l e e a k y k n d tor*

707 QarsgsSslos:

We p u b l i s h p h o t o g r a p h s a n d a n n o u n c e m e n t s of weddings, engagements and major anniversaries of local r e s i d e n t s or former local r e s i d e n t s . These a p p e a r a s soon a s possible, d e p e n d i n g u p o n available space. F o r m s for a n n o u n c i n g these events are available from any of o u r local offices, or you may model y o u r a n n o u n c e m e n t on a n e x a m p l e you've read in t h e newspaper. The best r e p r o d u c t i o n can be m a d e f r o m a 5" x 7" black a n d white photo, b u t o t h e r s are accepted. Please avoid regular or color Poloroid pictures.

A Wonderful Moving Sal*

Merchandise For Sale

Rentals

CREATIVE LIVING News of t h e a r t s a p p e a r s every T h u r s d a y . Notices of gallery s h o w s m u s t b e legibly w r i t t e n a n d s u b m i t t e d b y the 5 p . m . M o n d a y deadline. For m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n , call the a p p r o p r i a t e Creative Living e d i t o r .

Maple. 1 Canton 7 4 4 Wing. P l y m o u t h . MI 4 8 1 7 0 r F a r m i n g t o n 2 1 8 9 8 F a r m i n g t o n R d . . F a r m i n g t o n MI 4 8 0 2 4 G a r d e n City 3 6 2 5 1 S c h o o l c r a f t . U v o n i a . MI 4 8 1 5 0 Lakes 8 0 5 East Maple. B i r m i n g h a m . MI 4 8 0 0 9 Livonia 3 6 2 5 1 S c h o o l c r a f t . LivonTaTMl 4 8 1 5 0 Plymouth 7 4 4 Wing, P l y m o u t h . MI 4 8 1 7 0 Redford 3 6 2 5 1 S c h o o l c r a f t , Livonia. MI 4 8 1 5 0 Rochester 4 1 0 S. Main. R o c h e s t e r ! MI 4 8 0 6 3 Southfield 8 0 5 E a s t Maple. B i r m i n g h a m . MI 4 8 0 0 9 Troy 4 1 0 S. M a i n . R o c h e s t e r . MI 4 8 0 6 3 West Bloomfield . . 8 0 5 E a s t Maple. B i r m i n g h a m . MI 4 8 0 0 9 Westland. 3 6 2 5 1 S c h o o l c r a f t . Livonia. MI 4 9 1 5 0 SPORTS Each c o m m u n i t y h a s its own s p o r t s e d i t o r t o report scores, call t h e a p p r o p r i a t e e d i t o r

CF

Home & Service Directory

WEDDINGS. ENGAGEMENTS. ANNIVERSARIES TASTE 591-2300 ext. 3 0 5 This is o u r food s e c t i o n a n d a p p e a r s in the Monday paper. Any questions r e g a r d i n g recipes s h o u l d b e directed to E t h e l S i m m o n s , food editor.

701 Housshold Ooods Osklsnd County

Spectrum

Help Wanted

BUSINESS NEWS 591-2300 ext. 325 The b u s i n e s s section is published T h u r s d a y s . In addition to the story coverage a n d columns, the section contains several c a l e n d a r s : Business People covers promotions, internal a w a r d s a n d r e t i r e m e n t s for a n y o n e living or working in o u r circulation a r e a . We will print p h o t o g r a p h s if space permits. Datebook c o v e r s upcoming meetings a n d c o u r s e s of interest te b u s i n e s s people. MarketPlaeebriehy covers new businesses, new p r o d u c t s a n d other b u s i n e s s - r e l a t e d items. Submit i t e m s for these in writing by 5 p.m. Monday^ For these c a l e n d a r s call Barry J e n s e n . ext. 3 2 5 For all o t h e r items call M a r i l y n F i t c h e t t . 5 9 1 - 2 3 0 0 ext. 3 0 2

70S 'Household Oakland County

CONTEMPORARY FURNITURE . Friday 3 30-7 30. and Sat- • 0 * 4 0 gleea & mar Ota dmmg room urday K> am lo 4 pm Knob m ma H I pickled pine chaira Wooda A p t * 20713 Camden Square (2000 Sola tkbto to match MOO 7 ' 1 0 4 Enter oft of Lota L n S o l 11 placa aacttonal with recBner t hMaM M 4 E o l q o u f h — a and loo* tar ad $1200 2 J i i l i U MOO each AS furniture nautral oolor* Cocfcta* labia $200 Rot-toe daak CRYSTAL. CHINA. 4 COUECTI- $150 Tkkkwood entertainment canES LIMOGE BAVARIAN AND ter $1000 • cubic ft cKaet/treaaar STAFFOROSHfftE, maacuBna $50 Moving out of stete aalet CaBB-Wpm 683-7221 buried wood. bad. a n u r i a tabM . chair. $275 3 bar

SECTION

Auto For Sale

701 Ho w h o M Goods Oakland County By

CLASSIFIED DIRECTORY



CIRCULATION

I fl I 1

(P.C-13C.R.W.G-SQR11C I —

04E

Thursday. Aprtl 26. 1890

r 12C*(*,C-14C.R»W.a-10O

OtE

Thursday. April 26. 1SS0

728 Musical



738 Wanted To Buy

738 HousshoMPets

888

* Motors

814 Campars, TraAars L ' MCM 1—8 mkft.bow i SKI NAUTIOUE 10*4 MM aondl> Motorhomss •tar MoarH Cjica8.nl o 1076.

822 Trucks For Pais 46 s. Ota come*, carta. DOOOC 10M DIM - Cap 6 md. Ma . W W EMs. IliNl, now, M.OO* mMs. MOOO. ACROSOMC Bp Ca* E « ~ " k M1-01M 30 yrsoM. 877S s w . DOOOe MMstaaptahnp •UBftA R«5€R 1 9S2-013I II in all, onfy 88.9*6 BBt-1600 OUJB.. opan bow. m FOX HILLS CHMA DISHES- Fua/PWIM San. Cta) BUYING! SORRA SUNftPORT 10*5. 4*4. HUM,tomaoa.lacks, naw 30 gal-436*740 la *N Maaain ll*a— j BM a«ii - - - aw F O R O F ISO XLT LAMAT PICKUP keytward Maal lor smM dmrch. EARN UP TO S 1.000.000 10*7 - Air. onMs, power window* S wMaquSd «U500.baai .ZL2£ E t i i T •1.000 AMtarVirginia Ftapwtnck That * riant, being us a itMBon dollock*, caaaafta. 2 tana S mare • -- i KVPM ft 1 MM I lars worth of scrap end we wM pey CSC. 33ft. 10*6. good Clearance Price 67.9M . .. yaVAN 18FT.. daap V. Supar NOMAD. 1M7: x l youtarftOr. bring ua S5 aor«i ofWISH WOLFHOUND Mix. ama* 117 * opfton —. i odaal PIANO CABLE conoolo. InwanaoSnappw, l n . f t dapth flnoar. muon. ftaar badr we can hondto « . We buy tor TOP PRICES PAID CRESTWOOD old lamala. m ahota • wormad. 55P- " " " I oonaota. oarpatal 2Qhp mmyartraal WMBCO. MI-KOO c o n d i t i o n , f r u i f w o o d c e b l n e t •crap. recyclng: Aluminum, coppar braaa. mo PICK-UP CAMPER DOOOE 437-3444 Good wWiodtar doga. 129 368-0377CCLEWVTY. 1967. 16MM span bow.SYLVAN&18*6traMr1*S4200 720-3006 ft.M hp MarcuryMaapa 4. lacks Inckatad. MOO BALDWIN ACROSONIC ExcMsnl < 1 . 0 0 0 C M e v e s V-6, 20 hra, loadad. tr*tar, «M D 0 0 Atamtman canvaa. dowrwvoar*. raCal aftar Spm •ton. Asking •2230. -JBtaBLEftSCfrOftEXCHAMSsB P1ANO-GRINELL Concert Grand 421-5700 K I T T E N S Vat chackad 8 vaodnaiMota. 476-0714 dio. Icr. BMrte troina molar. traMr. HAGGERTY METALS. 14018 Hag- ad. HaaWiy mctataad babtaa rataad Upright Exodtant c o n d m o n 8125/mo. ta- tsndM books Cad IS*. TOO. 477-0361 PICK UP CAP M In. high, amaI SFORD 18*4 ha*ton.4*4, kom OA M Sd Schoolcraft wtai lowa. Alao; calico 1 yaar oM. Canaury 2 6 1 - 4 9 2 6 party Rd.. m To Marldtan W4 277 Aft CabBALDWIN ACROSONIC spkld p4- 8 4 6 » r 720-5202 490-09*0 aatad homaa onlyl 344-0181 m MO Ham kMdad,to*can-THOMPSON 10M aaa R^a^ttft.. S T FarmtagkonHM*.6t PIANO-Sankcfc consols. U k e now. 791-1206 cuddy cabta. 170 ^•taa. W o n d s r k i tone 10.000. 5*6-4216 FORO. 1073. F-100 Cuatom. Naw . 847-6IM imatalolo jood CENTURY ir 1079. maroon/whAa, PAID FOB USED ALBUMS - COlySA* whrtatamata T* whaal. al opUcna. Including gMa- tkao. 422-3*35 255-24 140 I.O. Marcury, low hourm. traMrTHOMPSON 18 ANO CASSETTES WILL PICKUP ouf room. 32 fl 10*7 Ford, craw cab totsd exiaa oneyeer. 1290. Cal ovea. SAMICK upright piano. b e o u M d •8700. Garaga Morad. 274-1804 LARGE QUANTITY atao a' r aMtila 522-3640 F ORO 1979 - pick up, F-1M. V-8. c o n d i t i o n , c h e r r y w o o d . 42- t a * . LAB PUPPIES, t S A M S J A M S automatic cap sicsl8nt condmon p o d d e d bench After Spm. 7 3 7 - 6 8 3 8 -V64679 PUNA POP UP CAMPER W78aaMhguar- CENTURY 1976. 1*H IL ata|MOFerndeto 547-7287 malaa * lamMaa. AKC. ham. •2500 or bed oBar. 647-9236 l/O. 168 hp 822-6296 ahora. a-z TRACKER 10M 522-3472 amaad 822-0231 - O n M t c o n d l - Lwonl* 40hpH ISS?*™ Sta^.tomaca.Varygoodo»h^ FORO 1M1 F150 Pickup, banc*. doHvory. tuned « warranty tSt oPrI tN E T1 PF Ir Ae nNcOhS. (2) ? 1-7*36 Won. •4.006 721 CANNON tor 630 1 Cont*nipor*ry. L A R G E D O G C R A T E Ai m na atyta W t Trolkno r ••00. MKNgon> Piano Co. 5*8-2200b o t h b t a c k . Y o u r c h o i c e M M I n orlglnd owner. >1300 or O P E N 7 D A Y S . •90. Good condition CENTURY 1970- T«*> anglnaa, 24 ww. ii r, powar SOUTHWMD 18*6 - 27 IL. Ctaaa ».oftar After 5:30PM. 70-2 c k x t a e delivery 647-4597 6*3-8736 R. Cabin Crulaar. Do avaryWng. »0«M.«T700 FANTASTIC TECHMCKSH » many axtraa 6. tuny sal cona tranar Taka ovar paymanta TROJAN - M IL Sadan.724-9006 Ksyboerd Digital sound Ongmeify STE1NWAY - 45 INCH CONSOLE, 4 KW Onanr-t3 5 ttk id. mlor FORO 1M2F1M O L D O R I E N T A L R U G S L H A S O APSO-blond. tamtaa 1 V 4 • 170 mo/baat534-0*07 261-3010 •8600. Ml tor 3 55hp. good oondtaan. S1900 Wesk-S U Z U K I I B M . 560CC. J t a c k . 3 6 0 0 CHEVY 1M7, CARGO VML M tan. LL AUT0B6 TRMCKS BOAT WELL. 40ft- Lake Erie. ands. 856-3743 Mon -Frt 538-8218" M a s . < 1 8 0 0 E r o M o m c o n d t a o n . .tank,Amocked, M. rsdywhads. running Top OoMr MLdn-taicMaano. •1600torajmmer. 02000tor• mtat oondmon. BBSBS. 421-1027 E6 M Auto Parts Aftar 5 3 0 M1-54M M1-2006 474-4429 w/Galor traMr"*" ff"h% D O O G E B150 C A R GO VAN 1*67 S U Z U K I I B M . 0 6 * 0 . Ex.c d t a n t o a n CHARLEVOIX - BeauUtol Round Lk. AutomsMC. power steering 61 ANY CONDITION boat sip 35 x 12. by tha aaeaon motor •2,490/oRar 501-2401 ( M a n . o n l y d r i v e n 2 m o n B t * . S t o r e d only 1 7 MO mMs. m Junk cars wantad 616647-01*0 PONTOON-10*7, Iwrtftop. 24 ft< 7 M n e g o t t a b t a 522-2*04 •AVE. M.4M Han's TaaMtg. Frea pick •«. 36kp Marc, mm 14. .Mooring . i Y A M A H A RAZZ 1 M 7 axcoBent C M Anytime 474-39*6 SUMMER BOAT DOCKAGE er. M M condmon 86.900 100. Mf-4 CRESTWOOD oonMtan. apttand radto chain ol mm within 1 hours JUNK CARS WANTED DOOGE drive of moat western suburbs. YouPONTOON, 24" Smokercreft. 19*4 A l t a r 8 p m *M^-8BM any oondBtan. Poykto up wf» 50 HP Mercury, good I Ml with luat on* lo S36. kM towtag YAMAHA-19*2, Maxim 421-5700 •4500/beM After 6 pm. 313-4864404 o o n d M o n , 10 0 0 0 m f t a o . 2 h e l m e t s ! DOOGE 6-250 M Tap CanverMon i PONTOON- 26ftCroat wMh SOMr w w r e e r B r a < l , 0 M . 466-7 I M IBM. AutnmsMc. M.kMMI MB. » 808 BeetsAMotora Mariner, good oondmon. «1800 822 Tracka For Sate •mi Cal Sandy M7-1236 ADVANCE 19*0. 16ft . day aaMr, w/ VCR. iwiniifdi. our prloa and rtng/brefce FORD EXP 1M7, euMmatlc. no air. S1.37S cxwmal a m clean. 46.000 mi.. TYME AUTO 347-4673

ESCORT. ISM. 2 door, sack shirt. CMOWN VICTOMA 18114 Uka naw. sMrao rassslts. 34.000 iMaa. ParlacL Oral S3.000 M1-S7M 476-1411 ESCORT 1968. 2 door. S . $3080 Mm . „ Daya 660-6430 ESCORT OL MAOON 1867 - Air. $1060. 661-4230 crulaa. n W I m caaaam priced lo M a at ( 3 > M ESCORT-1SM. S door hatcftback. Mr condMonlng. $2,250

Bob Jeannotte PONTIAC GMC

MO I9T9

FAIRMONT, parts $1.28!

SHADOW. 1*66, ES S pott s a n g * , tilde m sac. Mr. exiendr warranty. Exoelentl MuM aaM 421-6718

TS.L

473-8444

Ford

MUST AUG-1963. LX comnrtaMe. PROSE. I S M OT. crystal, many M 5 0L. S s e n a, rad. a M M top. ston ITM. 12.200 i M M $11,500 u * • M a r s . $7,900 346-67 M i l oondMon. 477-4672

1876. 127.000 (MMS. . brakaa 4 Mas. Oood MUSTANG c o n d M o n . * 160. 933-2427

flacd oondMon. $ m

ESCORT I S M - SlMQiwaaon. w a n flood. $1780 183 5 M 4

SMAOOW 18*8 ES Mrtoo. Had. $4,000 mlaa. toada ti luorool $7S00/tnM AIMrOpwi. $34-0*0*

mMe.S11.tOO

o

FAIRMONT 1878 - 6 cytoidn. autot

* 8 $2,400 Ask tor MMa.

421°5700

VILLAGE FORO 2 278-9700

446-2 IMFAMMONT

TSS4. 2 door. 8

ESCORT

SHADOW I S M E * |

m

FAIRLANE I S M - $2800 or baaL

477-• 125

sasas:

- CRESTWOOD

MS- $ M a d . M,000 iMaa. MOO.

FORO RANGE A I S M S h n p truck! S4.7M Uvonia Chryetor-Plymouth 526-7604

Hon $3,905

CRESTWOOD

MUSTANG 1967 spead. loaded, n n

GT. Rad. 5 Urea. $6500. 427-4 I M

MUSTANG 1M7 L X hatchback, M . auto, am/lm cessetta. $5700. Oaws421-9300 ext 210 8pm 462-1652

LTD T67S- F u l J

VILLAGE FORD LOT 2 279-9700

Conveniens

CRESTWOOD 421-5700

SAVE

SAVE

.-

Mnftm

v?-£n.

30,000

876 Otdemobito

•74 fttorcury ASC MCLAREN 1865- Low mMa.

VILLAGE FORD • LOT 2 279-9700

VILLAGE FORD LOT 2 279-9700 $5,555 Bob Jeannotte PONTIAC GMC Plymouth, Ml 453-2500

t ' J

CUTLASS. 1878 Salon. 4 Poor brown, beige Interior, smfm starao tape dack. M . crutoe. powar locka, raar delog. bast oftor 477-S4S4

at

CUTLASS-18*3. Supreme. 6 • dar. automatic. M . a M condMon $2,860

1

,

0

f J f j V Ip

n-

y

•12 m

HMop, loadM. leaffnr, color TV, VCR. Mntando, radar datactar, ISOO ml. factory oMdMa '2a,OOO

l A A V V

v

F1RENZA 1 9 M ponar steering atarao, Marm wheals. SHARPt

A A A BtoMH

S apesd. sir. sunroaT. powar windows 4 locks. top, law tri. Mine

M A Q C V

4 apaM. starao easaeoa. cap. 81.000 local en* a w n rrflee. A Honeyf

S

Spodsrs. whesls * 8tm. custom pemc 9000 mMs. ALoskerl

m

1 9 8 8 BRONCO II

4 x 4 , automade.pownstaeMn * b r * M . r e n

' / M M K I 9 « V | »^

a

4 M M

NElW 1! ii IRU SIED/l

1 9 8 8 BLAZER S 1 0 TAH0E

TORONAOO. 18*7. 41.000 mMa. $8600

Automatic, sir Mt 4 crulaa. starao. tu-torva paM.

ir

t5»

1 9 8 7 GMC CONVERSION Leaded. $.0. VS. 40.000 H

(/)

1 9 8 9 F150 XLT LARIAT

$7,000 toM Man nan. I H . 7 0 6 nsgollsBIs 8 3 J - 0 8 M or 468-1981 TROFEO. 18M. L o a d M MMa. r M . aapar clean BaaaBaM tdMon 814900 (

1989 AEROSTAR

•71

Aunmeac. nr, art 4


H O n e O N 1MB I860 - 4 doer, Mar. a t U n i t M M . I 1 . N 0 421-46*3

1 9 8 7 RANGER XLT SUPER CAB

l.

HORttON

18*4,

* speed, ek^tesnr iMsHru 6 brakM. s t n s o

x*

•i



'

-

4 door. 874 i S .

1 9 8 6 E150 XLT CLUB WAGON Li8611, w/4* spdana. aaM» m s p s i t M . r e M

8 4 2 5

11987 E150 XL CARGO VAN I Automnto, m , VS. dual tanks, M4ane, ton M M s . .

|

RELIANT LE 18S6 - « _ _ t h n p $5.8*8 TOWN 6 COUNTRY DOOQE * Grand W n f O M n i l L S M R 6 474-66M RBJANT I M S . Waaan topa, M . rack, r a n wton.

1 9 8 8 F 1 5 0 XLT LARIAT 4 x 4 , Wsstam pre p m . automatic. M , ML cmlse. pawn M n d m n 4 tocM. $.0 V-4. duMInn, i a » pent, 14.000 mi. Cmiparn truck.

1 9 8 8 E150 CARGO VAN

FOX H I L L S

M t a m M c . pawn stswrtnf 4 n n w s . 8 cyandn.

7 7 2 5

An ton'Mil. M . ML cnJwa. power A m e s n 6

ICONVERIION* 4

E G R A P H

of

the

Smilin'

Irishman

myri m m r t r n r r m w r n t t M w a n j z r m

~

A. X & Z P L A N HEADQUARTERS

255-3100

E

14.500

1987 BUICK RIVIERA T-TYPE Ak, l u B p o w n

5 ^ ^ * 1 0 , 9 0 0 1989 PLYMOUTH I VOYAGER

T H E S W I T C H I S O H

W

J O PAGE TOYOTA!

THE

C O M E IN & S E E WHY!!

DAZZLING

CHRYSLER PLYMOUTH

'5995

11990 RANGER XLT 14 M a . •

SthPrkx

'11,800

Automatic, air, power steering and brakes, low miles. Sale

VS. Mr. ftM p o w n

18*4 TURBO - AuScnaM. M M H A Ford Eagto 566-6826

$

Price

V A R S I T Y J
*a! drtvn. Stk. #3704.

90 MUSTANG "LX" 3 DOOR

9 0 BRONCO II SALE WO below Vfllifl *9190 *sonnn L U U U DEALER INVOIC L U U U DEALER INVOICE ** BEL0W

2-3 if I 0KC,5s*t. OXC.Ssxl.p4.. p4..pJb, pJx.pptrfndoto s M m Stod*,djd aMc. rrMon. 2J (JL ' AMftl Mamo/can/dock, cxatom itytad whaah. dr cond. nd. oormoi. AMfl aqi#i.. aMc. daL. PW6« MM. c*id mudi I MdaquM 9k. #3413.

1

• 9 0 T A U R U S S H O 4^> TA vt*M. DX»UC.. 6 *xl. Ml potnsr opt*, dr oond. Ngh tevd audo Sum antry. fit 4 rr mata. auto k*np *y«Mm. and much rr**s. i».$Sl MISS.

'90 T-BIRD SUPER COUPE S M V-6. a t p n r c h o r o a d . o u t o . . O / D . f u l p o n n r opto. P 2M O n f . . k MM u rnyo .g A r pM. P 2 8Ms in1 6m o / o a M . p M r M n a o t * * ! a * grp.. PZMstlS B q s M a l snoeoo. c a n d , m u c h m c M M d . e q u p . M*L # 4 I S * .

•90 CROWN VICTORIA

m

a n c c i WJS r s r t n n m pK c a p t a i n chdrs w/2 ramovtoobM bnrtchs. a t r o o n d . . p t t v a c y g t o u . IT n w l p M FT w a t i a r . DLX p d n t t t r t p n s . t p d . c o n t r o l , Mt, « t a c . d a f . A M - F M d t o r t o o / d o c k . c t y M d w h n n t o . P21&X14 A / S . S«c # 4 2 0 1 .

E.F.I.H.O

'8490

mcJnnr

plua m u o h

mora

'90 PROBE OL 2-2

srsossr

f k V P

30777 PLYMOUTH RD.. UVOWt

1989 CHEVY CORSICA -

SUNMRO BE. t $ * 7 - Auto. M . ad. mMa. EjiibMhiI c_ _ Hon $8,900 or b«M oftar. 786-2523

GRANO AM 18*6 LE. powar ing 4 brakaa, M . stereo 4 i $4000. 537

U'.'

Lease f r o m

.sc

110.1

r

ONLY AT P A G E T O Y O T A

m

STARCRAFT'M ClttmCStlB QT Interior, t k n and paint Fiberglass nmning boards

m

16,990*

m

12.990 ARST IYS ' LOW PRC I ES '90V RANGER PICKUP 2 . 3 E.F.I.. 6 n d . , p i D . . d u a l t o t d a w a y m i r r o r s , t - a k m , P 1 9 5 « 1 4 BSW. d o o r I g h t n r . I n s t r u m e n t a t i o n , Int. v i n y l P n r v c h » n a t . Stk. # 3 6 0 6 .

m

4 . 9 E.F.L, 5 * x l . P.O. p x , p b . , b r t . l o w r r t o , 4 9 EFJ.. 5 * > d I t / c o n v . g r p . . A M - F M s t o r n o / d o e f c . s p d . c o n t r o l , flt. Cte It/conv grp . A* i n f l o w t a c h . d o t h ttrim. O r o m s s t a p (5) iMhacta. rtdng d M v n k v L Slk. # 2 5 6 0 P 2 3 S x l 5 cS-tarrtc

11

wtonrv '90 F-150 4 x 4

•90 F-250 "XLT" 4X4 c o n d . , c h r o m a s t e p . SmttMct-aBp a t o a , a p d . c o n t / » t . 6.0 . .) pL iTx2 .1 6px. 1 w c u r vEf— rFr Ji .s. •t oe umtoo/ c•oo/ sda. . p ^( S 6 lSn d o w i A l o c t o . ak to, a p d . c o n t / « t . Stk. # 3 1 1 2 . ply*., a n d m o r a .

'90 RANGER "XLT"

chiomto atap

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0 W 8 O 18*2 automeuc. r a n da-tog. .ng • wwJows/braMa. saha. ana Maa. $1*80.

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Installation Available Installation Available! installed From $1195.00* Installed From . fOmaJ«ia Kozuch and Micheta L e e ) . "1:10.fc 2- Saiam. 114 2: 3 Adrian. I : l 5 . f c 4. Mercy, 1:16.1; 5. Franklin. 1:17.0; 6 Stevenson. 1:18.0 800: 1 Bishop Borgaas (Angle Ho«s. Chaquese Sears. Florence Pugh a n d Enca Srieperd). 1:50.0; 2 Salem. 1:53.5: 3. Adrian. 1:53.5: 4 Brighton. 1:55.1; 5 Canton. 1 56.5: 6 Mercy. 1:56.2. Distance medley: 1 Bnghton (Sriasey. Grimes. O MaAa a n d Wink), 3:14 9: 2. Canton. U 0 4 2: 3. Mercy. 14:05 0. 4 Divine Child. 14:10 8: 5 Redlord Union. 14:44.0;

While most high school boys track teams took the week off for spring vacation, Westland John Glenn used the time to get ready for the 25th Dearborn Elks Relays.

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Holme?, who issued seven walks and fanned eight in the nightcap. Jenny Sekovich had two hits and scored two runs for the Chiefs in the first game. Anne Hooper drove in three runs with a bases-loaded single, and Jennifer Vanootighem scored twice and stole two bases.

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FINAL RELAY RESULT8 12.800-meter (cross country): 1. Mercy ( J u d Rosowski. Heather Noi. Carrie Walton and Kathleen Gerigk). 20 points: 2. Stevenson. 26. 3. Canton. * 8 . 4 Brighton. 63. 5 Frank*!.'6a; 6 Salem. 75. 3,200: 1 Franklin (Dawn Harriaon. Dene t a Klebba. Jenny Hovarter a n d Katy Guetatson). 10 36 2. 2 Marcy. 10:39 7: 3. Canton. 10:41.1; 4. Stevenson. 10:47.8: 5. Brighton. 10 49.5. - , 6. Redlord Union. 1056 9 Long Jump: 1 OMne C h i d (Borieo. Man n and Lenaghan), 42 teat. 9*4; 2 Adrian. 42-4 h ; 3 Bishop Borgess. 42-1; 4. Canton. 4 1 - 5 * . 5 Franklin. 4l-2Vfc; 6 Saiam. 404V Shot put: 1. Stevenson (Krista Sachs. DebtM WroWewekj e n d Jeesann Martin). 95-v,; 2. Adrian, 91-7V4; 3. Marcy. 86-3*4. * Brighton. 6 5 - 1 1 * ; 5. Canton. 83-5W; 6. Radford Union. 7 9 - 5 * . Discus: 1. Steveneon (Krista Sachs. Debt t a Wrottawski a n d Jessarw Martin). 317ff Lewis, Strand and Kathy Cook won the 400 and 800 relays in 54.2 and 10:53.5 time. Harrison's Colleen Heinzmann 1:57.9, respectively. captured the 300 hurdles (51-5), Heather Sullivan Megan LombarHeather Conley the 100 dash (13.6) ds Kathleen Gerigk and Hood and Audra Cockerham the 400 run comprised the winning 1600 relay (1:04.4). team (4:30), and Judi Rosowski, Walton, Brooke Mansour and Cara The Hawks, 0-1 in the division, had McDonagh won the 3200 relay relay times of 53.7 in the 400, 1:53.1 (11:32.5).

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Thursday. April 26. 1990

T h o m a n n to stay,

Mercy's debut on

4

new field success

coach Rocks again Continued trom Page 1

By CO. staff writer Henry KUmes didn't like what be saw, but be wasn't completely surprised by i t The Farmington Hills Mercy soccer team, which Klimes coaches, hardly looked like tbe state's sixthranked Class A team during Mooday's match with Harper Woods Begins. Still, the Marlins did manage to win, posting a 2-0 victory. "We flat-out didn't play," said KUmes "We've played much better." There were all sorts of reasons why Klimes expected tbe poor showing, but the overwhelming cause was spring break. Tbe Marlins hadn't practiced In nearly two weeks; most of the team spent tbe break in Florida and didn't return until Sunday. Also, tbe match marked the grand opening of Mercy's new fiekt Indeed, the Marlins hadn't even practiced on it prior to Monday's game. Their previous home matches had been played at Pioneer Park in Farmington Win* on a field measuring 55-by-100 yards. Mercy's field is U-by-115. The bigger field and lack of practice bad tbe Marlins looking weary. "We were very lucky to get that outcome," said Klimes. 'Tor tbe first 60 minutes, Regina was taking it to us, but hick was with as." Tbe match was scoreless until midway through the secood half, when Kathryn Dudley, a senior forward, popped a shot over tbe Saddlelites' keeper and Into the n e t Carrie Bowler got the assist; the scoring play started with Kathy McDonald's superb throw-In to the front of the Regina net Carrie Dzaidosz, a freshman midfielder, got an insurance goal 10 minutes lata- when she regained control of a thwarted pass and bounced It into the Saddlelite goal. Dudley got the assist Zena Garmo got the shutout making an excellent save early in tbe secood half on a Regina breakaway. The victory left Mercy at S-0-2 overall, 2-0-1 in tbe Catholic League.

Si

key 2-0 girls soccer victory Mooday over visiting Livonia Stevenson. The Falcons are now S-l overall, while the Spartans fell to 1-1-1.

m

"We needed this ooe to stay in contention, both in the conference (Western Lakes) and tbe Division (Western),'' said Farmington coach Cathy Cole. "We played hard. There were moments wben both teams had an opportunity to put the ball in."

r ~

Both of Martin's goals — ooe off a restart and the other off an intercepted pass — occurred in the secood half. Farmingtoo outsbot Stevenson, 17-7. "I didn't think we played well, but they (Farmington) are a good team," said Stevenson coach Mary Kay Boots. "Their forwards ate us up." Both Farmington goaltenders, who split time in the nets, sophomore Mandy Cannon and junior Kristen So per, each stood out Cole also singled out the play of midfielder Amy Trunk. Stevenson's Alicia Smith also made several big stops. Both teams are at full strength, although Stevenson played without starter Shannon Wilkinson, wbo is out with a broken leg.

B I L L BRESLER/atafT p h o t o g r a p h e r

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White wins 2 for OCC

CHURCHILL 11, WJL WESTERN 0: Oa Mooday, Uvonia Churchill (J-0-1) blitzed visiting Walled Lake Western- as junior Mechelle Brazin and sophomore Carol Jackson each scored two goals. Other Churchill scorers include Shelly Hamby, Tracy Lingeman, Lori Place, Kristy Thurston, Marcy Woloch, Daniel Priebe and Nlkki Johnson. FRANKLIN 6, W i . CENTRAL 0:, Livonia Franklin earned its first victory of tbe season Monday, ripping bost Walled Lake Central. The Patriots, who jumped out to a 5-0 half time bulge, were led by sophomore Patty Shea, who scored twice. Sue Barooe, Jenny Whitfield, Jenny Rettiog and Keri MacKay also scored goals for the Patriots. Goalie Erica Sundeck, wbo faced only two sbots, posted tbe shutout

MARGARET MARTIN'S two goals carried Farmington High to a

Shannon White, a former Livonia Ladywood pitcher, won two games in relief Sunday for tbe Oakland Community College women's softball team. White raised her record to 3-0 as sbe guided the Lady Raiders to a double-header sweep of Southwestern Michigan Community College, 10-4 and 5-4, at tbe Orchard Ridge Campus. White relieved Amy Edward in the first game and pitched the final four innings. Amy Knapp and Jackie Patrick had two hits apiece for OCC, which has won its last eight games. Knapp also had two RBI, and Patrick scored two runs. Jenny Pichlik added a two-run triple. In the second game, White entered in relief of Pichlik and also had tbe game-winning hit, delivering a two-out single in the bottom of the sixth inning to drive in tbe deciding run. Edward had two hits, including a triple, three stolen bases and two RBI, and Kelly Koss contributed one hit, three walks and two base thefts. The Lady Raiders, the first-place team in tbe Eastern Conference, are 7-1 in tbe league and 14-5 overall. OCC plays Henry Ford Community College at 3 p.m. today at King Boring Field in Dearborn.

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said. "If a job comes along that piques my interest and presents a. challenge to me, I would apply for it,, but those jobs don't come along very often. "I have an interest to coach at the college level, but I've never been one to go out and politick for a job at tbe expense of not getting my neat team ready." In applying at WMU, Thomann had to weigh the appeal of that job against the time he has invested in his career as an educator. He has taught and coached for 25 years and can retire in five years with retirement benefits. "I would have been giving that up, but I also would be in a position to be doing what I want to be doing five years from now," he said, adding a teacher in that situation has the option to buy those remaining years. "MY LONG-range goal is to get those five years in and coach basketball somewhere. This job opened up unexpectedly. It took me by surprise, but it's also a job that has some untapped potential." Thomann added the WMU experience was good, because it helped him to prepare for that time when he, does look to coach full time. But he reiterated he is content with his present situation at Salem. "I feel good about what I have," he said. "We're going to have a helluva team next year."

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SOCCERTRYOUTS

The Northville Soccer Association will sponsor a team in tbe Western Suburban Soccer League's Select Division for boys born in 1978 beginning with the 1990 fall season. Tryouts will be on Friday, May 18. and Saturday, May 19. Individuals interested in trying out should call Larry Schlanser at 4200285. •

COLLEGE S P O R T S

Sophomore Tami Brozek of Canton. a graduate of Dearborn Divine Child and member of the Western Michigan women's track team, finished sixth in the 400-meter hurdles with a time of 1:07.8 on April 14 at tbe Miami-Reebok Invitational in Oxford, Ohio. She also was a member of the 400 relay team that placed fourth in 50.24. •

PHYSICAL EXAMS

Tbe registration deadline for the Plymouth-Canton C o m m u n i t y Schools pre-participation physical exams is Monday, May 7. TTie tests will be given at 6 p.m. Thursday, June 7, in the upper commons at Plymouth Salem High School. The fee is $12 per student-athlete Physical exam cards may be obtained through the middle and high school athletic directors or trainers. Tne cards must be filled

STEELER FOOTBALL

out and signed by a parent or guardian prior to tbe examination. The exams will be given by Tbe Center for Sports Medicine It Fitness It covers the athlete for every sport, including summer camps and fall, winter and spring seasons. Questions should be directed to Wendy Crummel at tbe Center (434-8334) or Canton High School after 2 p.m. (451-6600, Ext. 311) or Sharon Bouchard at the Center or Salem High School after 2 p.m. (459-6099).

non-profit event, which will benefit tbe Canton Community Recreation Department. Class C and D men's and women's qualifiers are eligible to compete. Games will be played from 9 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. each day. The tourney is sponsored by the ASA Qualifier, Canton Challenge Festival and Van Esley Real Estate. For information and registration call the Canton Recreation Department at 397-1000 or Van Esley at 459-7570.

Tbe Plymouth-Canton Steelers Junior Football League will register players and cheerleaders on Saturday, April 28, from 10 a m to 2 p.m. in tbe Canton High School cafeteria Boys and girls age 8-14 are eligible. The cost is $50 per player, $40 per cheerleader. There is a $135 family maximum. For information, call Sue Herman at 455-7299. A birth certificate, signed and dated by a parent or guardian, is necessary.







HOCKEY SCHOOL

The Kids For CATCH Summer Mite Hockey School will t a i e place in late July and August. All proceeds will benefit tbe charity Caring Athletes Team for Children's • and Henry Ford Hospitals. There will be one school for mini-mites (ages 5-6-7) and another for mites (ages 8-9). The fee is $65 for 12 skates totaling 24 hours. The schools begin Monday, July 23, and continues through Friday, Aug. 17, with sessions every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. The mini-mites meet at 6:30 p.m. at the Plymouth Cultural Center, tbe mites at 7:30 p.m. For information, call instructors Chuck Moore at 532-1887 or Harold Vella at 525-0335. •

SOFTBALL CHALLENGE

The Canton Township Challenge Festival Softball Tournament will take place the weekend of June 1-3. The cost is $125 per team for the

SWIM COACH WANTED

Ladywood High School is accepting resumes for the position of head swimming coach. Interested applicants should send their r e s u m e to: Kim Linenger, Ladywood High School, 14680 Newburgb, Livonia, Mi. 48154. For more information, call 5911544.

LIONS FOOTBALL The Canton Lions Football Club will r e g i s t e r p l a y e r s a n d cheerleaders for its 1990 season oo Saturday, April 28, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the McDonald's on Ford Road. Boys age 8-14 and girls age 9-14 are eligible. The Lions will have a football camp in June. Call Debby Bradley (397-1720) or Cindy Russette (981-4856) for information.





TENNIS L E S S O N S

Canton Parks and Recreation Services is offering six weeks of tennis lessons from April 30 to June 6. The sessions are open to children age 8 to adults and players of all ability levels. The fee is $23 for Canton residents, $25 for non-residents. The age groups are youth (8-12). juniors (13-18) and adult (18 and over). All class times will be in the early evening. once a week at the Griffin Community Park courts. Kristen Harrison, a certified pro-

GOLF LEAGUES A Tuesday morning seniors golf league begins play at 9 a.m. May 8 at Fellows Creek Golf Course. Tbe league is open to any area golfer age 50 or older.. The fee is $10 to register plus weekly greens fees. Registrations are being taken by mail or in person at Canton Parks and Recreation, 1150 S. Canton Center Rd., 48188 There will be a league meeting at 10 a.m. Tuesday. May 1. at tbe Canton Township Administration Building.

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to Madonna. After losing threestraight NAIA District 23 games in leas-than-ideal conditions Thursday and Friday, the Crusaders traveled to Aquinas College for a doubleheader on a bright, sunny Saturday — and lost two more. Against Aquinas, Madonna was beaten 11-4 and 6-5, with inconsistent pitching, ragged defense and a slow-starting offense all playing a part. Mike Hocking was hardly at his best, pitching innings in tbe opener and giving up all 11 runs. But four were unearned; the Crusaders committed four errors. "If we make the plays, they don't score three unearned runs in tbe first," said Madonna coach Mike George. The Crusaders never caught up. Aquinas added six runs in the fifth, all after two were out. Chris Sisler knocked in two runs for Madonna, and Sean Maloney had two hits and an RBI. Matt Jones. Dino Paganelli KEVIN O'CONNOR'S two-run and Paul Bastien each knocked in triple made it 4-0 in the fourth, and two runs for Aquinas, with Bastien Wozniak's grand slam iced it in the getting two hits. Steve Witt was the fifth. O'Connor and Bill Terski had winning pitcher. two hits apiece. Marty Moraniec had In the second game. Sisler slugged two of tbe Tartars' three hits. Rob a two-run homer in the first inning to Ognian (from Livonia Stevenson) put Madonna ahead, but the Saints was the losing pitcher. scored five runs in their half of the The second game was more dis- inning and added another in tbe sectressing. WSU scored three unearned ond to go up 6-2. Craig Karankiewicz runs off Madonna starter Bob El- was the Crusaders' pitcher who was liott, which proved fatal in the 5-3 victimized; he went the distance, loss. The Crusaders committed three giving up four earned runs (Madonna errors in the game and six in the made two errors) on six hits and a twinbill. walk, fanning four. The winning rally came with two out in the sixth. Ron Cortez (Livonia THE CRUSADERS made it close Franklin) broke a 3-3 tie, singling in with three runs in the fourth on sintbe go-ahead run, and Mike Ganfield gles by Pete Berrios, Wozniak and singled in another Chris Klock was Kevin Learned (scoring a run), a the losing pitcher in relief for Ma- ground out by Irwin (scoring a secdonna. ond run) and a grounder by Jeremy The Crusaders got a run in the Krol that was booted (scoring run first on a single by Rick Gierczyk, No. 3). Wozniak finished with two another in the second on a single by hits for Madonna. Irwin, and their third in the fifth on Rod Rojas was the winning pitchTerski's triple. Ganfield had three bits for WSU and Dave Mondoux had er for the first-place Saints, who imtwo. Darrin Clark (Garden City) was proved to 7-1 in the district. the winning pitcher, allowing seven Last Friday, the Crusaders manbits and two walks in six innings. aged to get in six innings before tbe The split left Madonna at 14-12 steady rain forced cancellation of overall. the second game. Maybe that was fortunate, considering Madonna fell THE WARM weather which final- 10-3 and committed nine errors on ly arrived last weekend was no help rain-soaked Ford Field.

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The five-game losing skid came to a halt for Madonna College's baseball team Tuesday in tbe opening game of a double-header at Wayne State, but many of tbe problems that plagued the Fighting Crusaders during the losing streak cropped up again in a second game loss. Madonna rolled in the opener, getting a grand-slam home run. a double and a single and five runs batted in from outfielder Mike Wozniak in a 12-0 romp. Wozniak's bat was all the support Rich Roy needed; Roy tossed a three-hitter, walking two and striking out three in improving his record to 2-1. Roy had a no-hitter going until the fourth inning, and he needed it. Madonna started slowly, leading 2-0 on a second-inning two-run homer by Kyle Irwin. The Crusaders collected three runs in the fourth, four in the fifth, two in the sixth and one in the seventh.



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"I FELT honored they even brought me in for an interview. It was good for me, because it forced me to prepare and put together a resume. I bad to be ready for questions like 'Why are you doing this?' and 'What do you like about this?' I had to think through a lot of things I haven't had to do in a long time." Thomann has been considered for other positions in the past. He was interviewed for the Eastern Michigan University men's basketball position in 1979 — a job eventually given to Jim Boyce. Thomann accepted tWathletic director's position at Ypsilanti High School two years ago but reconsidered a few days later. "I've been happy at Salem," he

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THOMANN. THE only male coach among tbe finalists, said there was initial disappointment when he learned Monday of WMU's decision, but be quickly put that behind him. "I was disappointed I didn't get the job, but I'm also comfortable with tbe job I have, the team I'm coaching and the players we have in the program "Yesterday, I was disappointed. Today, I'm elated." Elliott replaces Jim Hess, who resigned in March after compiling a 104-113 record in eight years as coach. Michelle Fortier, a former Plymouth Canton standout who played for Thomann's AAU team last summer, started at point guard for the Broncos as a freshman last season. "I was familiar with tbe program, and I thought I had something I could "ffor " Thomann said. "A lot of the kids who play there either played for me in tbe AAU program or played against my teams in high school.

Thuredey. April 26. 1890

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Thursday. April M M o r d Si A g « " « at Orc! * n l LaM Si M a r y * (2): Oakland CrvMMn at Lumaran WaaMnd. 4 30 p m ; uacomb O v « t » n al Huron Vaaay Luttiaran. 4 30 pm.. Daartxjm I m y w Fadana Omaaan » . PVnouHCTnla>ir al F M n AaM. 4 30 p m , : M U M L a M Waalatn al LMOraa CJiurcndl; Lr>onaa Franfcln al Mc»1ft»*a (2). 330 p.m.: North f a t m n y o n al Lworna Sla»anaon. MMad Laka Canwa) at WaaWnd Glarm. Plymouth Saiam al Farmmgkxv Farmington Harmon al Ptymou*t Canton Friday. Aprt 27: Huron Vaaay Lultwran al Taylor and Uta: Harpar Woods al Lr> Oaranca»«a. North Farmnglon al m o n * Church* iRadlord t ? ;pm..Unon al Gardan Cay. I M > r « j W al Radmro TTkvMon. Wayna Wamoriai al Daartorr Fordton Saturday. Aprt IS: Radlord Banop Borgaaa v* Caihokc Cantrai al CapNol Park (2). 11 •dtord St Apalha at Cantar Una St (2). 11 a m Plymouth Saiam, Ptymcwtn Lwona FranMn at Uonroa ToumaCamon 1and * n v . Oar dan O y al LMoraa Stavanaon If). 10 a m . Radford Union al Now (2). 11 am.. Ttuaton ai l>oom«ald H*» Cranoroo* (2). no n.: North Farmlnglanal WMtoC Laka Carv 11 a m . Farmnglon al Farmmgion HamW (21 11 am. •on (2)

GIRLS SOfTBALL •aa atari at 4 p.m. unlaai notad) Thursday. A p r t 2 * nadtord Bahop Borgaaa at Da«ro« OaPorraa Birmingham Uanan al U v o n * dtord St Si Agi (2): Hadiord Agatha at Hamtrame*. SL Rohan (2). Oakland Chrialian al Luffaran Waalland. 4:30 p a . Livonia Church* al Wa*ad Laka Wwlarn. Nortfi«*» at Uvon* F r * * l n . Lwona S»a«anaon al North Farmngiort Waatland at Wa*ad Laka Cantrat Radlord T t i u n o n at Taylor Truman; Plymouth Canton at Farmnglon llariiaon. Farmmgion at Ptymouth Saiam. Friday. Aprt 27: Radlord Si Agalha va Oakland Caftokc at nadtord 1 * Jayoaa Park. Huron Vaaay Lutharan al Tayka Ugh! and LSa. Uv Oaranoa.*a al liar par Wooda 4:30 p m . . Lnonia Church* at North Farmington. Radlord LMon al Qardan Oty Oardan Oty al Taylor Kannady. 8 30 p n : Radtord Thuraton at Ha» IT O H . J 3 0 p m . DaarOorn Fordna Uamonai A p r t 2 * LMoraa Frankln at Uonroa Toumamanr. UvonM Slaranaon al Qardan City (2). 10 am.. Wayna Uamonai at Waatland Glenn (2). 11 a m . Radtord Union, nadlord T h i m o n and Plymou*> SaMm at Now Tournament 1030 a m . Ptymoulh Carton. Waaed Laka Cantrai and Wfaatarn at UKord Lakaland irwMational. 8:30 p.m

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BOYS TRACK (al maata atari at 3 30 p j n . untaaa notad) Thursday. A p r t 2 * nadtord Si. Agatha va CanMr Una St Clamant al Birmingham Brothar Rica. S p.m.. kfcxrt Clemen* Lutharan North at Lutharan WaaOandL 4 30 p.m.. nymoulh ChrtatMn at Ann Arbor Oaanhfla 4 p.m . LNonM ChurcM at Livonia Frankln: LMmM Steveneon at Fanttngton: Waaed L M Cantrai al WaalMnd QMnn. Woodhavan al Qardan Oty. 4 p m : Oaarbom Edaai Ford al Radlord Union (HttMrt j m o r H ^ h ) . 4 p m : Radtord Thurwon at Oaarbom Hatghtt Annapoka Southgata at Wayna Mam on*. 4 p.m.. Ptymouth Canton al FariTaigton IMiilauii. North Farmmgion al Ptymouth Saiam: Walad Laka Waatam at Nonlv •aa Friday, Aprt 27 Radtord Calholc Cantrai at 4 pjn. A p r t 2 * W a n d QMm at Monro* 10 am..- Radtord Union, w a l a d Laka Cantrai and FaiitHrplon Harnaon al Now Rataya 10: IS a m . Plymouth Canton. Saiam at B a l a . 1 nna| i TEA: Radtord St. Agalha at Mad*on HalghM Bahop Folay R ol C Ralays. TBA.

GIRLS TRACK

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m maata atari at 3:30 p j n . unlaw notad) Thursday. A p r t 2 * Lmxsa Ladyhood at Birmingham MatMn. 4 p.m.. Radtord St. Agafta va Cantar Una SL Clamant at Birmingham Brothar Wea 6 p . m . Mount Oarnana Lutharan Nonh al Li»tharan WsalMnd. 4 30 p . m : Ptymouth ChriaUan at Ann Artmr QraanhMa 4 p . m Uvon* Frankln at UronM OiwchM: farmlrigton al Uvonia Slavanaon: WiMUnel Q M m M Walad Laka Cantrat Qardan CRy at Woodhavan. 4 p.m. Radtord Union at Oaarbom Eds* Ford. 4 p . m : Radtord Thurston al Oaarbom IMighM A/inapo*a. Southgata mortal. 4 p m : Plymouth Saiam at tore HorttWa M Walad Laka Waaiam Friday. Aprt 27: Farmington m m Marcy at Jackson MrtaaonaL 4 p . m Saturday. Aprt 21: UvonM Ladywood at Warran Ma«eon Hal#wa BMhop FoMy K ol C RaMya TBA; Uvon* Frankln. Radlord Union. Walad Laka Cantrai and Farmmgion Harnacm at Now RaMya 10 am.. UoonM Btovanaon at Waal Bloomlald RaMya TBA; Was Itand QMrm at Monro. kMtatanaL 10 am.. Qardan Cay. Ptymouth SaMm and Canton at B i l l — DSN, t. 9:30 a m

GIRLS SOCCER l a l matchsa atari M 4 p j n uraaaa notad) Thuraday. Aprt 2 » Madaon Haghis BMhop Folay M Uvon* Ladywood. S p.m.; Woodhavan at rarmmgmn M M Marcy. 5 30 pjn.; Radtord Union al Qardan Oty (Junior H W ) . Friday. ^Wrt 37: Radtord Union at Radlord £ 3 0 pm.. Walad Laka Waatam m BtoorrHMM Has Andovar. LMorta Frankln M Sagnaw IMrltaga. TSA. «aturda>. Aprt » Farmmgion H * i Marcy al Da*boiri Edaai Ford. 10 a m . : Lworaa Stavanaon al A m Arbor Huron. 1 p . m

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10,000 meters on the track.

Doug Kurtii of Northville and Laurel Park — not the shopping center in Livonia but the runner from Ann Arbor — each thought they'd use the 14 th annual West Bloomfield half-marathon as an easy training run. Each ended up racing to victory and walking out of the awards ceremony with the first prize of a color television. Park didn't even know till race day she'd be running in West Bloomfield. A friend called and asked her if sbe wanted to race, and since sbe was planning a long run, anyway, she figured why hot do It with plenty of company. It wasn't until the twomile mark that Park, 27, found out, much to her surprise, t h a t she was in the lead in the first half-marathon of ber career. Her time of 1:25:21 w a s good for a four-minute win o v e r - Maureen Carter, 25, of Brighton. Kurtis, who last year set the world record for most sub-2:20 marathons in a single year, 12, w a s hardly an upset winner. After all, he had set the course record here a y e a r ago, in 1:07:22. But with another marathon just a week away, Kurtis, a former standout at Livonia Stevenson, planned on a cruise-control run at 1:10 pace. Instead, he ended up in a heartstopping, crowd-thrilling, back-andforth stretch duel with Don Johns, 25, a one-time NCAA runner-up

KURTIS SURGED to a 10- to 15yard lead just after the 12-mile mark and seemed to have it wrapped up. But here c a m e Johns, churning furiously, and when be passed Kurtis at 12Vk, he had the look of a runaway winner. Kurtis, who won the Barcelona, Bangkok and Detroit Free Press marathons last year, knows how to find his way to the winner's circle. He used his superior strength to muscle up the last quarter-mile hill to the finish line, blowing past Johns and winning by 10 seconds as the crowd went wild. Tra]Iliig~lilm were 744 other entrants. Another 425 entered the inaugural E a r t h Day 3.5-mile walk. "I didn't want to run that hard. I saw Don at the starting line and I said, oh-oh," said Kurtis, wbo in tbe spirit of E a r t h Day wore a longsleeve T-shirt to the awards ceremony which declared on tbe back: "The answer is very c l e a r Stop polluting the atmosphere." Kurtis and Johns ran together till about 11 miles, acting more as if it were a training run than one of the top races in Michigan. But from 11 on, it was serious. When Johns went by him half a mile f r o m the end, Kurtis nearly packed it in. "I was almost ready to give up. I didn't want to kill myself. Then I thought, if I'm going to run faster than 1:10, I might as well make the effort."

The heart of Oakland Community College's men's basketball team last season will be pumping life into a lot of different programs next season. Three key m e m b e r s of OCC's team have received scholarships to continue their education, and three others a r e considering options. Toine Murphy was t h e top Raider prospect As OCC assistant coach Chris Peponis said, "All the coaches liked his versatility." They also liked his 6-foot-6 height, as well as his deft ball-handling and shooting (19 points a g a m e last season). The team that won out was Austin Peay, an NCAA Division I school in Clarksville, Tenn. Other finalists on Murphy's list

were Arkansas-Little Rock, L a m a r , Butler, Eastern Michigan and University of D e t r o i t Murphy also averaged 6.8 rebounds and 4.5 assists. Hell have junior eligibility. Austin Peay, a member of the Ohio Valley Conference, was 13-16 last season. There will be another addition to the Tennessee-based team. Peponis has accepted a graduate assistant coaching position. A MAJOR reason for OCCs success last season was Mike Bailey, a 6-3 forward who led the team in scoring (20.2 points) and rebounding (10.4). Bailey has signed with Norfolk State, an NCAA II powerhouse from Norfolk, Va. Bailey will have

M E N 17-UNDER: 1 Ban Goba. 17. Farmington, 1 23:23 ; 2 Eric Crawlord. 17. Farmington, 1 33 35. 3 Mike Richey 14. West BWomheKJ. 1 38 47

M E N 1S-29 YEARS: 1, D o n Johns. 25. Brooklyn. 1:07 55; 2 GeoM Ctoodening, 23. Troy. 1 12 03; 3 Mark Heal 28 Rochester. 1:12:17; 4 John Springer, 28, R e c o r d 1:12 33; 5 Date Mart, 28. Delrolt. 1:13:08. 6 Ken Osmun. 21. Davtstxjrg. 1:16:26: 7 J o h n Murphy. 29, Waterlord. 1 17 41. 8 J o h n Brick er. 21, GrandviHe. 1:17 45

M E N 30-39: 1 Doug Kurtis. 38. Northville. 1:07 45. 2- Alan VanMeier, 33 Southfield. i 14 06. 3 Jack Khne, 39. 1 16 23. 4 Terry Elsey. 36, Farmington Hiks. 1 16 39. 5 Ken Price, 32. Ml Clemens, 1:17:17: 6 G r e g GrUson. 30, Windsor. 1 17 37; 7 T o m Taylor. 35. Plymouth. 1 17:40; 8. Mark Weiltiausen. 30. Ml Clemens. 1 17 56. 9 Art George. 34. Ypsdanti. 1:16 20; 10 Scott Kuyawa. 31, Fen ton. 1 18:37; 11, Peter Wilson. 37, Lansing. 1 2 1 29; 12 Dave Lehto. 3 J Hart land. 1:21:34

M E N 4 0 - 4 9 : 1 Paul DeOdurantaye. 44 Riverview, 1 16 57; 2 Larry Hromek, 40. Lennon. 1 19:02; 3 Larry Oteewskl. 42, Detroit, 1:19:30; 4 BiW Benton. 40, West B l o o m f i e l d 1:19 59. 5. Jtm Huff. 42. Bloomfield HiHs 1:21:41. 6 Ellis Boai, 45. Detroil, 1:22 4 0 7, T o m Henderson. 41. St Clair Shores, 1:22 57 8 Al Gtnvack. 42, Bloomfield HiHs,

ways come as a rude awakening. "I always forget how hilly this course is," be said, moments after his 1:28 finish. Paul Deladorantaye, 44, of Riverview, easily won the master's division, with his time of 1:16:57 good for a two-minute win over Tarry Hromek of Lennon. June MacDonald, 41, of Detroit, topped the master's women in 1:33:10, beating Joan MurphyWalker of Windsor by nearly two

college sports two years of eligibility left for a team that went 27-2 last season and was ranked as high as second nationally. The third Raider to commit was Ed Pasque, a 6-3 off-guard who averaged 10.4 points, 5.2 rebounds and 5.3 assists for OCC last season.

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TO MAKE YOUR HOME WORK EASIER!

1 2 3 35, 9 John Wegrryn, 47. Marine City, 1:23 39 10 J i m Carter. 41. B r i g h t o n 1 2355

M E N 50-59 1 G e n e Reck 52. Franklin 1:33 02 2 Paul Falardeau 52 Sterling Hetghis 1.34 02. 3 Leo St A m o u r . 51 Birmingham. 1 36 04

M E N 6 0 - 0 V E R 1 John Kolmetz. 6 1 W a r ren. 1 30 03. 2 Jim Maganas. 6 1 SouthhekJ 1 46 ?4 3 Erwm BollreM, 60, Allen Pa>k 1 52 42

W O M E N 17-UNOER 17. Ml Pleasant 2 03 50

G r e t c h e n Dorns

W O M E N 18-29: 1 Laurel Park, 2 7 . Ann Arbor 1 25 21. 2 Michelle Groeches, 26, F Hills, 1 3 1 26 3 Kim Bruce. 27 Allen Park 1:31 54 W O M E N 3 0 - 3 9 1 Maureen Carter 35 Brighton. 1 2 9 33, 2 M c h e i i e Fields. 3 1 New Hudson, 1 31 45. 3 R o b y n Frankowicz 37 Westland 1 33 46

W O M E N 4 0 - 4 9 1 June MacDonald. 41 Deiroit. 1 33 10 2 Joan Mu.-phy-Wa!ke< 42 Windsor. 1 34 59, 3 Mary Wischusen. 4 2 St Clair Shores 1 39 4 2

The Raiders still considering their options are Bobby Dinges, a 6-4 shooting guard who averaged 12 -points and made 52 percent of his

!

229 M49

minutes. The sole wheeler in the race — a particularly tough race for wheelers — was Art Hope of Munger, in 1:28:09. The winning couple, with a combined time of 2:53:28, was Maureen and Jim Carter of Brighton. Winning the top raffle prize of a trip for two to Phoenix was Dick Kuhn, a former employee in the West Bloomfield parks and rec department.

10' CONTRACTORS

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If you want us to return a photograph, please indicate this on the back of the picture. Identify people in the photograph f r o m left to right and by their first names and surnames as well as by the towns in which they live. Send the informaUon to the Observer Newspapers, 744 Wing, Plymouth 48170.

CANTON T O W N S H I P NOTICE TO B I D D E R S NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Charter Township of Canton, 1150 S. Canton Center Road. Canton. Michigan will accept sealed bids up to 10:15 a.m.. May 14, 1990 for the following: BRASS GOODS Specifications are available In the Financial Services Dept. Tbe Township reserves the right to reject any or all bids LOREN BENNETT Clerk PubJuli

April i i

patio 4 ft. glider

6 ft. picnic table

,1h black

rough square edge 8' pine t r e a t e d landscape t i m b e r s

hardware 4" x 6" & pre-drllled lauan lumber 5 - x 5 $

7V4" TOP HANDLE Vk H.P. ROUTER Model 690 CIRCULAR SAW

8 8

M

Notice is hereby given that the City of Plymouth will be conducting a sale of surplus City owned property and unclaimed property confiscated by the Plymouth Police Department on Saturday. May 5, 1990 from 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. at the Plymouth Gathering. . ALL ITEMS ARE BEING SOLD AS IS WITH NO WARRANTY EITHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED April 26

IW0

A D V E R T I S E M E N T FOR BIDS CITY O F P L Y M O U T H , M I C H I G A N

*5.49 JERRY ZOLYNSKY/«taff photographer

Robert Pangborn, p r i n c i p a l percuaaioniat w i t h Detroit S y m p h o n y Orcheatra, drawa on a amazing variety of akilla to come up w i t h many unuaual sounds c a l l e d for in aymphonic scores. HE BEGAN STUDYING D R U M S at 9, played professionally i n high school and joined the DSO i n 1963. Through the years he has continued to l e a r n new i n s t r u m e n t s and techniques. " T o d a y , " he said, " m a n y composers are t r y i n g to use percussion instruments in a w a y to a f f e c t elect r o n i c sounds." I n the Schwantner composition f o r instance, be said, " W e resin the h a i r on the s t r i n g bass bows v e r y heavily, and, then, use the bows on the edge of the vibraphone bar. I t v i b r a t e s the bar, and i t gives almost a n electronic sound." The " r i n g i n g p i t c h e s " of the f o u r crystal glasses " f i t r i g h t i n w i t h outer space. " W h e r e they are not u t i l i z i n g instruments t h a t a r e already i n existence, many t i m e s they're c r e a t i n g instruments, and a l o t of percussion instruments a r e designed and created out of a composer's desire f o r a certain sound." This is where his " b a g of t r i c k s " comes in. F o r both studio and s y m phonic percussionists this repre-

sents their personal c o l l e c t i o n of instruments, their searches and successes over the years to play sounds and effects. I t holds t h e i r secrets. Pangborn remembered, ' " W h e n I recorded for M o t o w n years ago, and that was a v e r y basic k i n d of recording, I already had q u i t e a c o l l e c t i o n of d i f f e r e n t sounds. Some of the producers w e r e a l w a y s interested in some kind of new sounds to get something going. So I would b r i n g in w e i r d things. I remember m y f i r s t set of A f r i c a n log drums I bought in New Y o r k . I brought t h e m in. They used them. They w e r e fascinated . . F o r the symphony his " b a g " includes c h r o m a t i c scales of tuned stones, and " t h i n g s c a l l boobams, long tubular drums, w i t h a v e r y distinctive sound. Such i n s t r u m e n t s derive out of H o l l y w o o d studio orchestras. Somebody c a m e up w i t h a sound. They w e r e p l a y i n g around. A composer heard i t , l i k e d it, and w r o t e f o r i t , that's how a lot of percussion s t u f f we use today in

the 20th century music had its beginnings." He said that, w h i l e other musicans m a y dispute t h e i r v a l i d i t y , "they've found their w a y into tbe f a m i l y of percussion instruments, into our large bag of t r i c k s . " I N T H E B O X E S on his studio shelves are Balinese gongs, cup bells, Oriental bell trees, clay drums and m e t a l chains. One of John Cage's pieces calls for wood blocks — not Chinese, " W i t h the help of m y father, who had special equipment, I ended up m a k i n g blocks (in graduated sizes). Of course, they a l l bad a certain pitch. But where was I to get blocks that w e r e n ' t "Chinese?" What kind of blocks wouldn't be "Chinese?" So we designed and constructed blocks t h a t d i d n ' t sound "Chinese." So t h e y weren't Chinese. We d i d i t I t worked. To me it's one of the fun things about percussion, c r e a t i n g sounds, creating tbe instruments to p l a y some of these sounds. Y o u c a l l upon your

own abilities, to put some thing together. Sometimes they (the instruments) are a l i t t l e b i t crude look ing, but tbey w o r k . I always enjoy ed that p a r t of being an orchestra percussionist — the challenge." T H E P E R F O R M A N C E itself has b u i l t - i n pitfalls. He said, "One of tbe most d i f f i c u l t things about being a percussionist is to know w h e r e you are a t a l l times, because of tbe f a c t that you're not p l a y i n g that much. Yet, when you m a k e your entrance, it's d r a m a t i c — and i m p o r t a n t I t ' s an accent point i n the music — and i t had better be in the r i g h t place. So you've got to count The cannon e f f e c t for next year's p e r f o r m a n c e of T c h a i k o v s k y ' s "1813 O v e r t u r e " is already a concern. W i l l i t be the bass d r u m , a shotgun f i r e d i n t o a barrel backstage or Pangborn's "super huge bass d r u m — tbe k i n d they have to put on a c a r t w i t h wheels to take onto a f o o t b a l l field?" Stand by.

African-American quilts may steal the show By Corteme Abett staff writer Three outstanding local q u i l t collections w i l l be on exhibit at "Quilts! Quilts! Quilts!" 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and F r i d a y , M a y 3 and 4, a t E v e r g r e e n Center, 13 M i l e a t E v ergreen Southfield. The show, hosted by BASCC, B i r m i n g h a m A r e a Senior Coordinating Council and tbe Center, is coordinated by M e r r y Silber of B i r m i n g h a m , c u r a t o r of q u i l t shows throughout the country. I n addition to the q u i l t display there w i l l be a m i n i - m a l l , ongoing q u i l t i n g demonstrations, q u i l t i n g supplies and f a b r i c s , films, books, c r a f t s and appraisals. The a w a r d - w i n n i n g film, " H e a r t s and Hands," w i l l be shown several times d a i l y a t no charge. " B r i n g

"Magpie Roee" to ^ ^ • t t to I n H

Y o u r O w n Q u i l t " a lecture/appraisal, w i l l be presented at 2:30 p j n . both days. A new quilt, " I n d i a n Maiden," made especially for this show by members of tbe BASCC Quilt Club, w i l l be given as a prize at 5 p.m. F r i day.

" E v e r y a r t f o r m has its R e m brandt — M a r i e Webster was the R e m b r a n d t of q u i l t m a k i n g . Sbe created original designs a t M a r s h a l l F i e l d (Chicago) and w r o t e the first full-length book oo q u i l t i n g , 'Quilts: Their Story and How to M a k e Them.'" '

MOST O F the quilts to be displayed have not been shown before, Silber said. They are f r o m the Jean Conway, K e m p f Hogan and A l b e r t and M e r r y S i l b w collections. Silber discovered Conway's r i c h q u i l t treasure only recently when she was called in to appraise and date them, she said. The 10 quilts were made by Conway's t w o grandmothers f r o m o r i g i nal designs of M a r i e D. Webster, foremost q u i l t m a k e r and designer who reigned supreme during tbe earl y 1900s, she said.

Several of Conway's q u i l t s a r e i l lustrated in the book. Some of Webster's sample patches and h a n d - w r i t ten instructions w i l l be on d i s p l a y a t the show. A N O T H E R C O N W A Y q u i l t i n the show is one made b y her g r e a t grandmother, Sarah M o r r i s M c G r e -

of t h i s

gor of Springfield, Mo., w h e n she was 18. The needlework is e x t r a o r d i nary. Silber had Conway bold her q u i l t up before a w i n d o w and pointed out the cotton seeds l e f t in the f i l l i n g . "That's one w a y w e date q u i l t s — if they have seeds, they m a d e before the cotton g i n . " H O G A N , W H O M Silber described as " c o l l e c t i n g e v e r y t h i n g , " is now acquiring A f r i c a n - A m e r i c a n quilts, which Silber called " a phenomenon, the hottest new c o l l e c t a b l e . " The A f r i c a n - A m e r i c a n q u i l t s are reminiscent of slave-made quilts,

she said. Tbe quilts a r e the " compl et e antithesis of tbe q u i l t s in tbe Conway collection or Silber's quilts, which were recently in a M i c h i g a n State University t r a v e l i n g exhibition." HOGAN'S Q U I L T S are to Conway's and Silber's as jazz i s to Haydn, he said. The A m e r i c a n F o l k A r t Museum of New Y o r k C i t y recently had a slave q u i l t exhibition, but quilts such as those are e x t r e m e l y hard to find — for one thing, they w e r e made to be used u n t i l they w o r e o u t Silber said.

Tbey are not as finely made as others, doubtless because the m a k e r s had l i t t l e t i m e to w o r k on them, but they are highly expressive and exciting in content and originality. " U n t i l 1971, these quilts were not recognized," Hogan said. Silber w i l l have posters a v a i l a b l e at the show of the q u i l t i n g p a i n t i n g by R o m a r e Bearden that was used f o r a mosaic at D e t r o i t Institute of Arts. A d m i s s i o n to " Q u i l t s ! Q u i l t s ! Quilts!" is $3. Refreshments w i l l be available. P a r k i n g is free.

W X Y * A K Y / * * PHOTO*

fa

2E*

O&E

Thursday, April 26. 1990

Thursday, April 26. 1990

Monte Nagter used a telephoto lens to move In dose for impact. The use of a large aperture blurred an unwanted background.

I N I T I A L L Y , W H E N m y Chinese subjects held out t h e i r hands a f t e r being photographed, I thought they w a n t e d t o be paid. As I reached into m y pocket f o r some yuan (Chinese c u r r e n cy), they shook t h e i r beads. T b e y d i d n ' t w a n t

m o o e y — they w a n t e d tbe photograph. M a n y Chinese t h i n k t h a t a l l c a m e r a s are t b e P o l a r o i d v a r i e t y . Well, t h r o u g h sign language, body gestures, and d r a w i n g of p i c t u r e s , I let i t be known I wasn't shooting i n s t a n t f i l m w h i l e promising, t o send a p h o t o g r a p h t o those who gave m e an address. A t a l l times, I felt p e r f e c t l y safe a n d c o m f o r t able w a l k i n g tbe streets of China i n search of photographic m a t e r i a l . And a t t i m e s I had tbe l u x u r y of a t a x i d r i v e r who c o u l d be h i r e d f o r an a l l - d a y photo excursion f o r j u s t a f e w dollars. H e r e are some tips t h a t w o r k e d w e l l in China: • Wben photographing people t o show chara c t e r , use a telephoto lens t o get i n close. A l a r g e a p e r t u r e w i l l b l u r out a d i s t r a c t i n g backg r o u n d and a l l o w f o r a f a s t e r s h u t t e r speed. e Sneak some candid shots, but i f your subj e c t knows y o u ' r e there, ask p e r m i s s i o n to take a

symphony season

P V p photography Monte Nagier

The L i v o n i a Symphony Orchestra w i l l end i t s 1989-90 coobert season w i t h the appearance of guest soloist P i e r r e F r a c a l a n z a at the Y a m a h a m i d i - g r a n d piano. B i l l e d as " M u s i c Out of This W o r l d , " t h e p r o g r a m w i l l begin at 8 p j n . F r i d a y , M a y 4, in C h u r c h i l l High School, Joy and N e w b u r g h roads, L i v o n i a . The orchestra w U l be under tbe b a t o n of its director F r a n cesco D i B l a s i . F r a c a l a n z a w i l l introduce his audience to sounds of the 21st c e n t r y v i a the m i d i - g r a n d w i t h Beethoven's "Ode t o J o y " f r o m the " N i n t h Symphony," V a n g e l i s ' "Chariots of F i r e , " " P h a n t o m of the O p e r a " by Webber and selections f r o m " S t a r T r e k " by Goldsmith.

photograph. E v e n w i t h a language b a r r i e r , m o r e often than not y o u ' l l get the o k a y to take the shot. • L e a r n to change f i l m q u i c k l y i n a bus or on a busy s t r e e t A f t e r a l l , the next shot m a y be just around the corner. • Get o f f the tourist path. G o t o the out-ofthe-way places, explore, be adventurous. A l w a y s be on the lookout f o r photographic opportunities, e 1990, Monte N a g i e r

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Short shots M o n t e Nagler's e x h i b i t , " T h e F a c e W China: Tbe People and Tbe L a n d , " be at Somerset M a l l o f T r o y l y 10-20. T h e r e w m b e an opening

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T u r n L e f t , to Ra., T u r n R i g h t . O e

719 E G r a n d R/ver. B n g h t o n . P h 229-5722

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Canton Public Library

Canton €>torber Volume 15 N u m b e r 81 T h u r s d a y , April 26. 1990 Canton, Michigan,. 100 P a g e s Fifty Cents Parents give 'suicide' fil...

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