Handbook for English Majors - UConn's English Department

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Handbook for English Majors

Tree of Knowledge University of Connecticut Storrs, Connecticut Revised August 28, 2013

Welcome to the Department of English Table of Contents Advising and Registration………………………………………………………………………………. p. 2 The Advising System………………………………………………………………………………..…p. 2 Registration Information………………………………………………………………………………..p.2

Course Description Booklet………………………………………………………………………….p.3 The Plan of Study ………………………………………………………………………………………p.3 The Tentative Plan of Study………………………………………………………………………….p.4 The Final Plan of Study………………………………………………………………………………p.4 The Major and Related Courses……………………………………………………………………… p.4 Policy on Transfer Courses……………………………………………………………………………..p.4 Major Courses…………………………………………………………………………… …………….p.5 Related Courses…………………………………………………………………………………………p.5 The Honors Student Majoring in English………………………………………………………………p.5 Double Majors………………………………………………………………………………………….p.5 Additional or Dual Degrees…………………………………………………………………………..…p.6

Areas of Concentration for the English major………………………………………………………..p.6 Concentration in Creative Writing……………………………………………………………………...p.6 Concentration in Irish Literature …………………………………………………………………….…p.7 Concentration in Teaching English…………………………………………………………………..…p.8

Other Important Information…………………………………………………………………………...p.8 Writing Internships…………………………………………………………………………………...…p.8 The University Writing Center……………………………………………………………………….…p.9 Awards/Prizes………………………………………………………………………………………...…p.9 Department of Career Services …………………………………………………………………………p.9 Cooperative Education for English Majors……………………………………………………………..p.9

Department of English Faculty………………………………………………………………..……p.11

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Welcome to one of the largest academic departments at the University of Connecticut. You are joining approximately 750 other undergraduate English majors and 85 graduate students. The Head of the Department is Professor Wayne Franklin and the Associate Head is Professor Margaret Breen. In addition to the Storrs campus, we have English faculty at the five Regional campuses, Avery Point, Hartford, Stamford, Torrington, and Waterbury, to help meet the educational needs of all students. Your teachers are nationally and internationally recognized for their scholarship; many have won awards for their research and teaching excellence. Central to your academic life for the next few years will be our Undergraduate Advisory Office in CLAS 209. Inda Watrous is the Undergraduate Advisor for that office, and she is available from 8:00 to 11:30 and from 12:30 to 4:00 each weekday. Her telephone number is 486-2322 ; her email, inda.watrous @uconn.edu. Inda likes solving problems, and she will either answer your questions herself or direct you to the appropriate resource. Inda will send updates via email through the Department of English Undergraduate LISTSERV and post important notices on the bulletin board outside of the Advisory Office. A number of informational sheets are available in the Advisory Office with details for English majors interested in writing internships, law, publishing, business, education, and graduate school. You can also visit the Department of English web page at www.english.uconn.edu/ for more information. The following details are important to your academic career as an Undergraduate English major. All information applies to students at Storrs as well as the regional campuses.

Advising and Registration The Advising System Liberal Arts & Sciences students intending to major in English should declare the major and choose an advisor by visiting the department’s Undergraduate Advisory Office in CLAS 209. Your faculty advisor can help you select courses within the English major and must approve your choices for the Related Course Requirements. All students should keep in mind that while academic advisors endeavor to give proper advice, it is the student’s responsibility to understand and follow the academic requirements of the University and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Advising for English majors is mandatory and an advising bar/hold is placed on the student’s account each semester before registration. The advising bar on the PeopleSoft Registration System is lifted after you attend a scheduled advising session. Prior to registration, students should also check their Student Admin accounts for any other holds or restrictions. Each advisor’s class schedule and office hours are posted outside of the Undergraduate Advisory Office (CLAS 209) and on the Department of English web page at www.english.uconn.edu/ located under “Course Descriptions and Schedules.” Students schedule their own appointments directly with their advisors, except during the preregistration sessions. Preregistration is the 2-3 week period before registration for the semester begins. Registration Information Follow the schedule listed on the Academic Calendar found on the Registrar’s web page at www.registrar.uconn.edu/ to know when registration will begin. The Registrar sets an enrollment appointment for each student based on the number of credits earned. The enrollment appointment, which includes a specific date and time, is located in your Student Admin account on the right side of the page. Be sure to click on “details” to view the appropriate term and the registration end date.

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Prior to registration each semester, the Department will have two weeks of scheduled advising. You will find a sign-up sheet for appointments with your advisor on the bulletin board outside CLAS 208/209. Your advisor’s hours will be posted on this sign-up sheet. You must signup to schedule a specific fifteento twenty- minute appointment. Please note that if you wait until the last minute, courses may be closed and advisors fully scheduled. Once again, in order to have the advising bar removed, you must meet with your advisor during the preregistration period. It is important for you to prepare for your registration meeting with your advisor. Below are the steps you should take to prepare. 1. You should review your plan of study to see whether you have any questions about your credits or remaining requirements. It is best to view your academic requirements through the Student Admin system. Specific details on your academic progress are accessible under the “Academics” section > go to the drop down box> select “Academic Requirements” click the arrows to the right of the drop down box. The report can be viewed two ways. You will receive the most detail by selecting the “View Report as a PDF” option on the right side of the academic requirements page. 2. Read through the Department of English Course Description Booklet (see below for availability) to determine which classes most interest you and seem to fit your needs. 3. Access and review the schedule of classes via the PeopleSoft system on the UCONN web page at www.studentadmin.uconn.edu/ Course Description Booklet The Department of English Course Description Booklet provides section-by-section descriptions of the Department of English undergraduate offerings. Prepared by individual instructors, these descriptions are much more precise and detailed than those given in the University Catalog. The schedule of English courses offered for the semester is also outlined in the Course Description Booklet. Late changes to the schedule will be sent to advisors and updated on the University of Connecticut PeopleSoft web page at www.studentadmin.uconn.edu/. A new edition of the booklet is available before preregistration for each semester, in the Undergraduate Advisory Office, CLAS 209 and on the Department of English web-site at www.english.uconn.edu/. English 1004, 1010, and 1011 are not included in the Course Description booklet. Information about these courses can be obtained from the Freshman English Office, [email protected] . Information on graduate courses is available from Mary Udal, Graduate Program Assistant in CLAS 234.

The Plan of Study A Plan of Study lists the requirements a student must satisfy in order to graduate. Since those requirements change regularly, there is a different Plan of Study for each year. Students use the Plan of Study that is in effect the year they enter CLAS. UCONN Regional campus students that are following a CLAS plan of study will continue to follow the same plan if they change the campus of attendance. Transfer students use the Plan of Study for the year they are admitted to UCONN. If the student changes colleges within UCONN, he or she will follow the Plan of Study for the year declared with CLAS.

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Readmitted students use the Plan of Study in effect the year in which one is readmitted. If a student returns from a granted leave of absence on time, then he or she will follow the original (declared with CLAS) Plan of Study. A student who does not return on time must follow the Plan of Study in effect for the year in which he or she returns. The Tentative Plan of Study When a student declares English as a major and meets with the Departmental Advisor, he or she will receive the correct Plan of Study to follow. All students must consult with their faculty advisors in completing a tentative Plan of Study Form. The tentative plan is used to guide course selection. A copy of the form is kept in each student’s file and should be kept up to date. A good time to do this is during the pre-registration advising meeting when your advisor will have your file. The Final Plan of Study: In Order to Graduate You should apply to graduate the semester prior to graduation or by the 4th week of your final semester. You apply by logging into the Student Administration System and following this navigational path: SELF SERVICE > DEGREE PROGRESS/GRADUATION > APPLY FOR GRADUATION. In the first four weeks of your last semester, you must also complete three copies of your Final Plan of Study. The final Plans of Study are available in the Undergraduate Advisory Office in CLAS 209. Your faculty advisor must sign all three completed final copies and two of the signed copies must be returned to the Undergraduate Advisory Office. You should keep the third copy as a reference. In order to graduate, the Department Head or Associate Head must then approve your Final Plan of Study, certifying that you have met all requirements of the English major. Once approved, one copy is kept in your file and the other is sent to the Degree Auditors in the Office of the Registrar. The Departmental Advisor will contact you if there is a problem with the final plan.

The Major and Related Courses What is referred to as the major is, in the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences (CLAS), officially called your field of concentration. Your field of concentration is comprised of a certain number of courses in the major department and a group of four other courses completed in related disciplines. All of these courses must be 2000-level or above and officially approved by the major department. The courses you apply to these requirements must be entered on your temporary plan of study as you proceed through your major semesters, and of course on your final Plan of Study.

Policy on Transfer Courses Please note that only courses taken at the University of Connecticut shall apply toward satisfaction of the major and related requirements. This is a college-wide CLAS rule. Courses taken in the Department of English’s own Program in London are University of Connecticut courses, as are those in a small number of other UCONN departmental programs conducted at remote locations. Apart from these cases, study at other institutions, whether foreign or domestic, does not count toward the major, even if by administrative determination it brings UCONN grades and quality points to your transcript, and counts toward the 120 credits needed for the degree. Exceptions to this rule may be made by the Head of the Department of English or the Associate Head, but not by your advisor alone.

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Major Courses The Department of English major requirements prescribe a minimum of ten UCONN English courses, totaling 30 credits. The course requirements are distributed among several categories, some of which permit choices. These requirements are set forth in checklist form on your Plan of Study. You should discuss very thoroughly with your advisor how and when you plan to meet the requirements. A number of factors influence your selected coursework in English: your reasons for becoming an English major; your particular interest in literature and writing; your plans for a career or further study. All of these issues will help you decide which courses you wish to use to satisfy the requirements for the major. While each student’s interests, expectations, and goals may be unique, the majority of our majors will follow a general track of coursework. These tracks may lead to, but are not limited to, graduate school in literature or business, law school, teaching in secondary school, careers in or focusing on writing, or business-related careers. Related Courses Your related courses as an English Major must be no fewer than four UCONN courses (12 credits) representing a coherent area of study closely related to English. Related courses must be 2000 level or above, outside of the Department of English, and cannot be cross-listed with English. There are many choices, and the typical related fields are Communication Sciences, History, Journalism, Modern and Classical Languages, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, and Women’s Studies. Your related courses do not need to be in one field alone and may be Interdepartmental (INTD) courses with your advisor’s approval. Double Major students frequently interchange related courses within a Liberal Arts and Sciences Double Major. Some students select courses that will help them prepare for future career or academic interests. Your choice of related courses should be discussed with your advisor for guidance and approval. The Honors Student Majoring in English English majors in the University of Connecticut Honors Program may fulfill the requirements of the Honors Program and of the Department of English in several ways, but the central work specifically designed for such students is a sequence of courses, English 3800-3811W. Ordinarily, an English major in the Honors Program will enroll in one of these courses in each of his or her eight semesters. Titles and descriptions of these courses are in the University of Connecticut Catalog and in the Department of English Course Description Booklet. All of these courses are limited to 15-18 students in each section, and many are conducted in weekly seminars. They are not designed as surveys but as readings and discussions of selected representative works. In the eighth semester, Honors Students are required to write a senior honors thesis (English 4897). This is the normal pattern for Honors Students. More information about the Honors Program is available on the Honors web page at www.honors.uconn.edu/, and for variations to this pattern, students should consult with the departmental advisor for Honors students, Jonathan Hufstader, CLAS 211. Double Majors Double Major students in Liberal Arts & Sciences are those who plan to fulfill all of the major requirements of any two departments within CLAS. If you elect to pursue a Double Major, choose one of the two departments as your primary major and register for classes through that department. You will receive an advisor for both majors and must file Plans of Study in both departments. Students fulfill the major requirements for both majors and earn the degree associated with the primary major. Both majors will appear on the diploma. To declare the double major, complete the Double Major Declaration form. The form is available at the Liberal Arts & Sciences Academic Services Center located at 423 Whitney Road or online http://www.services.clas.uconn.edu/forms/doublemajor.pdf .

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An advisor or an approved departmental representative from each department must sign the Double Major Declaration form. Once the form is completed and all appropriate signatures obtained, it must be submitted to the Academic Services Center at the above address to be processed. Additional or Dual Degrees Some students choose to pursue an Additional or Dual Degree while working toward the first degree or after receiving another degree. You may earn degrees in two different UCONN Schools/Colleges or two degrees from the same School/College. Your first step is to complete an Additional Degree Petition, which is available at the Liberal Arts & Sciences Academic Services Center located at 423 Whitney Road or online at http://www.services.clas.uconn.edu/forms/additionaldegree.pdf . The Dean of each school or college in which you plan to enroll must sign the form. The Dean’s designee for Liberal Arts & Sciences is at the Academic Services Center located at 423 Whitney Road. You will receive an advisor for both majors and must file Plans of Study in both departments. To fulfill the requirements of the second degree students must complete a minimum of 30 additional 2000+ level credits, which are unique to the second degree (i.e. the courses applied to the second degree cannot be applied to the first degree). If a student elects to pursue a degree that requires more than 120 credits then s/he must take a minimum of 30 credits more than the minimum number of credits required for the first degree. The requirement of 30 additional credits is waived for students who complete the requirements of both a teacher preparation degree in the NEAG School of Education and a bachelor’s degree in another school or college.

Areas of Concentration for the English Major The Department of English offers three optional areas of concentration: Creative Writing, Irish Literature, and Teaching English. A student fulfilling the requirements for one of the areas of Concentration will receive a letter of acknowledgement from the English Department following graduation. Concentration in Creative Writing The English Department offers a Certificate of Concentration in Creative Writing to students who have completed fifteen or more credits in creative writing and/or related courses. The Concentration is open to students from any major. It is designed to give participants a firm artistic and critical foundation in one or more creative writing genres. The Concentration allows students to hone their writing skills closely over the course of several semesters with different members of the writing faculty. It is an excellent preparation for students hoping to pursue a Master of Fine Arts in writing degree. All students wishing to fulfill the requirements for a Concentration in Creative Writing must take English 1701 and a minimum of 12 credits from the following courses: At least six credits of the following creative writing workshop courses: ENGL 3701 - Creative Writing II ENGL 3703 - Advanced Creative Writing ENGL 3705 – Playwriting (ENGL 3701, 3703, and 3705 may be repeated for credit toward graduation and the concentration with a change in topic.) ENGL 3707 - 3709 - Film Writing

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ENGL 3711 - Writing for Child and Young Adult Audiences At least three credits of literature focused on the close study of a single genre: ENGL 2401- Poetry ENGL 2405 - Drama ENGL 2407 - The Short Story ENGL 2408 - Modern Drama ENGL 2409 - The Modern Novel ENGL 3403 - Modern Poetry in English Electives include ENGL 3003W - Advanced Expository Writing, ENGL 3011/W - Publishing, and ENGL 3713 - Literary Magazine Editing. Another course in Literature may be used as an elective with permission of the Creative Writing Program Director. English 3003W offers students an opportunity to write and analyze essays, usually on topics related to the students' individual interests and needs. English 3011/W is a survey of the magazine and book publishing industries. English 3713 is a practicum course in which students study a wide range of literary journals as models while editing UCONN’s own undergraduate literary journal, The Long River Review. Please note that there are some restrictions on the number of writing courses that can apply toward both the English major and the Concentration. For further information on restrictions, contact Inda Watrous ([email protected]) in the Undergraduate Advisory Office, CLAS 209. For more information about Creative Writing, please visit the Creative Writing Program website http://creativewriting.uconn.edu/. Concentration in Irish Literature English majors may pursue a Concentration in Irish Literature by taking four courses (12 credits) focusing or occasionally focusing on Irish Literature or Language* such as: ENGL 3120 - Modern Irish Literature ENGL 3120 - Contemporary Irish Literature ENGL 3509 - Studies in Individual (Irish) Writers ** ENGL 3627 - Studies in (Irish) Literature ENGL 4600W - Seminars in (Irish) Literature English Advanced (Irish Literature) Study: 4203W, 4301W, 4302W, 4401W, 4405W, 4407W HIST 3430 - History of Ireland *subject to the Director’s approval **Irish writers featured have included Yeats, Flann O=Brien, Joyce, Heaney, and Wilde. Fulfilling this concentration does not necessarily require taking extra English courses beyond the number required for the standard English major. For further information about the concentration in Irish Literature, please contact one of the following: Prof. Mary Burke (Storrs Campus); Prof. Rachael Lynch (Waterbury Campus); Prof. Thomas Shea (Hartford Campus); Prof. Stephen Jones (Avery Point Campus).

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Concentration in Teaching English The Department of English offers a Concentration in Teaching English to its majors who have taken four or more courses related to the teaching of English. The Concentration is specifically designed for those majors who plan to pursue a Master of Arts in Education and become secondary English teachers, or elementary school or special education teachers with a specialization in English. The Concentration provides students the opportunity to enhance their knowledge of several foundational elements of the field, especially composition, grammar, and literature for children and adolescents. Because the courses that make up the Concentration are required of the students pursuing a dual degree in English and Education through the NEAG School of Education, the Concentration presents students with an excellent opportunity to take courses along with Education majors and with English faculty members who are accustomed to working with students studying to become teachers. Please note: Fulfillment of this Concentration does not constitute state teacher certification. All students wishing to fulfill the requirements for a Concentration in Teaching English must take a minimum of 12 credits from select courses. The following nine credits are required: ENGL 3010W- Advanced Composition for Prospective Teachers ENGL 3422 - Young Adult Literature ENGL 3601 - The English Language These three courses are required courses for the dual degree students in English and Education. Enrollment in these courses will provide the students with the greatest exposure to other students in the field. At least three credits from the following: ENGL 3003W- Advanced Expository Writing ENGL 3420 - Children’s Literature ENGL 3603 - The History of the English Language These three courses offer students the opportunity for an emphasis within the Concentration (composition, language, or YA/Children’s literature). For additional information on the Concentration in Teaching in English, please contact Professor Jason Courtmanche.

Other Important Information Writing Internships The Department offers English 3091: The Writing Internship, which provides an opportunity for the student to work as a writer. The Department of English has revised The Writing Internship to make it more flexible, and it is now a variable credit course. Students may elect from one to six credits; however, only three credits may apply toward the major. Students may repeat English 3091 with no more than eight credits in the same placement. Grading for the internship is on an S/U scale. Among the participating agencies are the Mystic Aquarium, Curbstone Press, LIMRA, Mintz and Hoke Advertising, Radio Station WHUS, Connecticut Public Radio and Television, Wadsworth Atheneum, Mark Twain House, the State Museum of Natural History, Long River Review, Swordsmith Productions, the Windham Textile Museum, and the Women’s Center. Credits are arranged with the instructor of record, and students are selected by a department committee. Details are available on the internship web

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page (http://english.uconn.edu/internships/internships.html) and in the Undergraduate Advisory Office in CLAS 209. The University Writing Center The Writing Center is a campus-wide resource for academic writers of all abilities. The consultants are available to work with you on any aspect of writing and have experience with papers from a variety of disciplines. They can help strengthen your writing at different stages of the writing process, from refining ideas to thinking through a paper's structure and fine-tuning style. For more information or to schedule an appointment online at one of the three locations across campus (CUE 124, CLAS 159, or the Babbidge Library), please see our website: www.writingcenter.uconn.edu. Awards/Prizes Several prizes for excellence in writing are offered each year. The Wallace Stevens Award for poetry is awarded in the spring. The cash award is accompanied by publication and a ceremony featuring a distinguished literary guest. The Hackman Award of $1,000 is given for a short story written by a UCONN undergraduate. The Collins Literary Award is given for the best work published in the Long River Review, the undergraduate literary magazine. In addition, the best freshman essay is eligible for the $100 Ratcliffe Hicks Award. Additional information and the submission deadlines are posted on the Creative Writing website http://creativewriting.uconn.edu/. The Department of English offers several other scholarships. The Dave Sheehan '64 Endowed Scholarship is awarded to an English major who has an interest in the English language. The Kathleen Gibson McPeek Scholarship in English is awarded to a student majoring in English. There are no applications for these awards. A scholarship committee within the Department selects the recipients of these scholarships. Details regarding additional writing awards and prizes are available online at http://creativewriting.uconn.edu/contests.php . Department of Career Services The Department of Career Services can provide invaluable assistance to those wondering how a degree in English will translate to a career and how to make that happen. Career Services is located at the Center for Undergraduate Education (CUE) in room 217. There, trained counselors provide students with information and guidance to help make career decisions. Career Services offers a variety of important services and resources for students and alumni. Among the many resources available are a Career Resource Library, an on-line Resume Reference Database, on-campus interviews, job opportunity listings, career seminars, assistance with career exploration and instructional handouts covering such items as creating a resume and cover letter, interview skills, as well as other topics related to job hunting. They also have a Mentor Network to facilitate current students visiting alumni at their place of employment to discuss career plans, learn about a specific career, or become acquainted with a specific type of employer. Cooperative Education for English Majors Also offered through the Department of Career Services, Cooperative Education provides paid careerrelated opportunities. You can take a semester off from college to work in a full-time, paid, career-related position before graduation, and have a chance to explore career options while still a student. National studies show that 70-80% of all co-op students receive a job offer after graduation from their coop employers. Previous employers have requested English majors to work as editorial assistants, technical writers, promotion assistants, newspaper reporter, and management trainees, to name a few.

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Career Services has much to offer. It is recommended that you investigate Career Services before your sixth semester and not wait until your senior year to visit that Department. There is much you can do now to help connect your current academic choices to your future career options. For more information on how Career Services can help you, please visit their website at http://www.career.uconn.edu/, or stop by the Center for Undergraduate Education (CUE) Room 217, or call 486-3013.

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BARRECA, REGINA Storrs

Twentieth-Century British Literature, Women’s Writing and Feminist Literary Theory, The Novel, Creative Writing

BEDORE, PAMELA Avery Point

American Literature to 1900, Twentieth-Century American literature, Women’s Writing and Feminist Literary Theory, Rhetoric and Composition, the Novel (Popular Fiction)

BIGGS, FREDERICK Storrs

Medieval Literature

BLANSETT, LISA Assistant Professor in Residence Storrs

The Restoration and Eighteenth Century; Rhetoric and Composition

BLOOM, LYNN Storrs

Twentieth-Century American Literature (Autobiography; Women Writers), Rhetoric and Composition (Research; Style; Essays), The Novel (20-21st Century American), Creative Writing (Creative Nonfiction)

BREEN, MARGARET Storrs

LGBT Literature / Queer Theory, Women’s Writing and Feminist Literary Theory, The Novel

BROWN, PAMELA Stamford

Renaissance (Shakespeare, Popular Culture), Women’s Writing and Feminist Literary Theory, Poetry, Drama

BURKE, MARY Storrs

Irish Literature (J.M. Synge, the Revival, Irish Minority Identities), Drama (the Abbey Theatre)

CAMPBELL, SCOTT Hartford and Storrs

The Restoration and Eighteenth Century, Rhetoric and Composition, The Novel

CARILLO, ELLEN Waterbury

Twentieth-Century British Literature, Literary / Critical Theory, Rhetoric and Composition

CHANG, ALENDA Storrs

Environmental Literature, New Media and Film Theory, and Video Game Studies

CODR, DWIGHT Storrs

The Restoration and Eighteenth Century, The Novel

COMPRONE, JOSEPH Hartford

Twentieth-Century American Literature, Drama

COUNDOURIOTIS, ELENI Storrs

Nineteenth-Century British Literature (the Novel and nonFiction Prose), Postcolonial / World Literature in English (Africa), Literary / Critical Theory (Postcolonial Theory), the Novel, Third World)

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COURTMANCHE, JASON Storrs

American Literature to 1900 (Nathaniel Hawthorne), TwentiethCentury American Literature (William Faulkner), Ethnic American Literature (Latin- and African-American Lit), Rhetoric and Composition (The Teaching of Writing), Creative Writing (Poetry and Personal Essay)

CRAMER, MORGNE Stamford

Twentieth-Century British Literature (Virginia Woolf), LGBT Literature/Queer Theory, Women’s Writing and Feminist Literary Theory, The Novel

CUTTER, MARTHA Storrs

American Literature to 1900 (Women’s and Ethnic Literature), Twentieth-Century American Literature, Ethnic American Literature, Women’s Writing and Feminist Literary Theory

DEANS, THOMAS Storrs

Renaissance, Rhetoric and Composition, Non-Fiction Prose

DENNIGAN, DARCIE Storrs

Poetry, Creative Writing

DUANE, ANNA MAE Storrs

American Literature to 1900, Literary / Critical Theory (Disability Studies)

DULACK, TOM Waterbury

Renaissance (Shakespeare), Twentieth-Century American Literature (Hemingway), Drama

EBY, CLARE Storrs

Twentieth-Century American Literature (Realism and Naturalism), Ethnic American Literature (African-American), The Novel

EDWARDS , MARY K. BERCAW Avery Point

American Literature to 1900, Twentieth-Century American Literature, the Novel (Literature of the Sea)

FAIRBANKS, A. HARRIS Storrs

Nineteenth-Century British Literature (Blake), Rhetoric and Composition (Political Rhetoric), Poetry

FORBES, SEAN Storrs

Poetry (Prosody and Poetic Forms), Creative Writing (Creative Non-Fiction), LGBT Literature, Ethnic American Literature, Twentieth-Century American Literature, World Literature in English (Anglophone Caribbean)

FORD SMITH, VICTORIA Storrs

Children’s Literature and 19th- and 20th-century British Literature and Culture

FRANKLIN, WAYNE Storrs

American Literature to 1900, the Novel (American Fiction to 1900, Non-Fiction Prose (Nature Writing)

GORKEMLI, SERKAN Stamford

LGBT Literature/Queer Theory (LGBT History, Cyberqueer Studies), Rhetoric and Composition (Computers & Writing, Writing Centers) 12

HARRIS, SHARON Storrs

American Literature to 1900, Women’s Writing and Feminist Literary Theory

HART, ELIZABETH Storrs

Renaissance (Shakespeare and Non-Shakespearean Renaissance Drama), Literary / Critical Theory (Literature and Cognitive Science)

HASENFRATZ, ROBERT Storrs

Medieval (Old and Middle English)

HIGONNET, MARGARET Storrs

Nineteenth-Century British Literature (Women Poets, Hardy), Twentieth-Century British Literature (World War I), Women’s Writing and Feminist Literary Theory (19th Century, Comparative, Feminist Theory), Children’s Literature (War, Picture Books), Literary / Critical Theory (Romantic)

HOGAN, PATRICK Storrs

Postcolonial / World Literature in English (South Asian Culture / Arts), Literary / Critical Theory (History, Cognitive, Non-Western)

HOLLENBERG, DONNA Storrs

Twentieth-Century British Literature, Twentieth-Century American Literature, Women’s Writing and Feminist Literary Theory, Poetry

HUFSTADER, JONATHAN Storrs

Twentieth-Century British Literature, Irish Literature, Poetry

IGARASHI, YOHEI Storrs

Nineteenth-Century British Literature (British Romantic Writing), Poetry, Literary/Critical Theory (Media Studies)

JONES, STEPHEN Avery Point

Twentieth-Century American Literature (Literature of the Sea), Creative Writing

KING’OO, CLARE COSTLEY Storrs

Medieval (Late-Medieval Literature), Renaissance (Reformation Literature)

KNAPP, KATHRYN Torrington

Ethnic American Literature, Twentieth-Century American Literature (Suburban Literature, Cultural Studies, Urban and Community Studies)

KNEIDEL, GREG Hartford

Renaissance (Poetry and Prose), Rhetoric and Composition (History of Rhetoric)

LITMAN, ELLEN Storrs

Twentieth-Century American Literature, Ethnic American Literature (Russian; Immigrant), The Novel (20-21st Century Novel, Russian Novel), Creative Writing (Fiction)

LYNCH, RACHAEL Waterbury

Nineteenth-Century British Literature, Irish Literature (Contemporary Irish Women’s Fiction), the Novel

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MACLEOD, GLEN Waterbury

American Literature to 1900 (Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry James), Twentieth-Century American Literature (Literature and the Visual Arts), Poetry (Wallace Stevens, William Carlos Williams)

MAHONEY, CHARLES Storrs

The Restoration and Eighteenth Century, Nineteenth-Century British Literature (British Romantic Writing), Literary / Critical Theory, Poetry

MAKOWSKY, VERONICA Storrs

Twentieth-Century American Literature (Women’s Ethnic, Southern), Ethnic American Literature (Multi-Ethnic), Women’s Writing and Feminist Literary Theory (American Only)

MARSDEN, JEAN Storrs

The Restoration and Eighteenth Century, Women’s Writing and Feminist Literary Theory, Children’s Literature, Literary / Critical Theory (Reception Theory), Drama

PELIZZON, PENELOPE Storrs

Twentieth-Century American Literature (Film and Visual Culture), Poetry (Prosody, Poetic Forms, Elegy), Creative Writing (Creative Non-Fiction)

PETERSON, RICHARD Storrs

Renaissance

PHILLIPS, JERRY Storrs

American Literature to 1900, Ethnic American Literature, Postcolonial / World Literature in English, Literary / Critical Theory

PIERROT, GRÉGORY Stamford

American Literature, Ethnic American Literature (African American), Literatures and Cultures of the Black Atlantic

RECCHIO, THOMAS Storrs

Nineteenth-Century British Literature (Victorian Novel & Elizabeth Gaskell), Rhetoric and Composition, the Novel, Non-Fiction Prose (the Essay)

RODEN, FREDERICK Stamford

Medieval (Medievalism, Religion), Nineteenth-Century British Literature (Victorian, Religion), LGBT Literature / Queer Theory (Religious Studies)

SALVANT, SHAWN Storrs

American Literature to 1900, Ethnic American Literature (African American Literature)

SANCHEZ GONZALEZ, LISA Storrs

Twentieth-Century American Literature, Ethnic American Literature

SCHLUND-VIALS, CATHY Storrs

Twentieth Century American Literature, Ethnic American Literature (Asian American)

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SEMENZA, GREGORY Storrs

Renaissance (Shakespeare, Milton, Cultural History), Drama

SHAW, FRAN Stamford

Creative Writing (Business Writing, Teaching Writing)

SHEA, TOM Hartford

Twentieth-Century British Literature, Irish Literature (Modern Irish, Contemporary Irish), Twentieth-Century American Literature (Irish-American), The Novel (Modern Novel)

SHRINGARPURE, BHAKTI Storrs

Postcolonial Literature and Theory (Anglophone and Francophone), The Novel, Third World Feminism, Cinema, Conflict Studies, Globalization, Architecture, Space and Urbanism

SMITH, KATHARINE CAPSHAW Storrs

Twentieth-Century American Literature, Ethnic American Literature (African American Literature), Children’s Literature

SMITH, VICTORIA Storrs

Children’s Literature, Nineteenth & Twentieth Century British Literature and Culture

SOMERSET, FIONA Storrs

Medieval Literature, History of the Book, Digital Humanities

SONSTROEM, DAVID Storrs

Nineteenth-Century British Literature (Rossetti, Ruskin, PreRaphaelitism, Victorian Art), Rhetoric and Composition (Grammar, Usage)

TILTON, ROBERT Torrington

American Literature to 1900 (Colonial; Historical Romance), Ethnic American Literature (Native American Literature)

TONRY, KATHLEEN Storrs

Medieval (Fifteenth Century History of the Book), Rhetoric and Composition (Writing Across the Disciplines)

VERSTANDIG, DAVYNE Torrington

Creative Writing (The Litchfield County Writer’s Project)

VIALS, CHRIS R. Storrs

Twentieth-Century American Literature (1930s and 1940s); Ethnic American Literature; The Novel

WINTER, SARAH Storrs

Nineteenth-Century British Literature, Twentieth-Century British Literature, Literary / Critical Theory, Rhetoric and Composition, the Novel, Drama

15

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Handbook for English Majors - UConn's English Department

Handbook for English Majors Tree of Knowledge University of Connecticut Storrs, Connecticut Revised August 28, 2013 Welcome to the Department of En...

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