I N S U L A T I O N

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INSULATION A Guide to Insulating Your Home

Types of Insulation:

The Most Cost Effective Way to Save Money and Energy

Material

what it is Foam boards that go inside or outside of concrete blocks.

R value

where it goes

who can do it

1-2

Inside Unfinished Walls or Cavities

Trained Professionals

2.9-3.7

Ceilings or Unfinished Walls

5.5-6.5

Walls, Floors and Ceilings; must be weather or fire treated

per inch of thickness

Concrete Block Insulation made from fiberglass and rock wool.

Blanket

Foam Board

Panels made from foam. Expanded Polystryene (EPS) is the most common. Blown-in insulation can be made of foam or fiberglass. It expands to fill air leaks.

3.5-6.8

Attic, Cavities *Also strangely shaped places

Spray Foam

*Fill the walls fully to avoid leaks.

Homeowners *Check packaging for indoor/outdoor placement guide.

Trained Professionals Homeowners

Foil-wrapped sheets that reflect heat instead of absorbing it.

1-4

Cavities, Ceilings and Floors

Boards made of mineral wool and fiberglass. Can withstand high temperatures.

3.9-6.8

Attic, Floor

Reflective

Fiber

Homeowners

*See back for information on R-values in your region.

*Consult a professional for placing guidelines.

Trained Professionals

Steps forforSaving andEnergy Energy Steps Saving Money Money and

1.

Answer Insulation FAQs

2.

Learn about R-value

3.

Check Local Insulation Recommendations

Why should I worry about insulation? Insulation allows you to keep cold air inside your home during the summer and outside during the winter, saving both money and energy. Where should I insulate? Start by testing for air leaks by holding an incense stick by your windows, doors, ceiling fixtures, etc. When smoke flows horizontally, there is an air leak. Areas that commonly need insulation include: attics, floors, ducts, exterior walls, garages and basements.

R-value is a material’s resistance to heat flow. The warmth of an insulating material is measured by its R-value; the higher the R-value, the more insulation it will provide. Materials all have different R-values that correspond to the amount of warmth that 1 inch of thickness provides. You can compare the R-values of common insulators on the front page.

Suggested Insulation Values Based On Region and Room Type Zone

Attic

Cathedral Ceiling

Cavity

Insulation Sheathing

Floor

1

R30-49

R22-49

R13-15

None

R13

2

R30-60

R30-60

R13-15

None

R13

3

R30-60

R30-60

R13-15

None

4

R38-60

R38-60

R13-15

R2.5-6

R25 R25-30

5

R38-60

R38-60

R13-15

R2.5-6

R25-30

6

R49-60

R49-60

R13-21

R5-6

R25-30

7

R49-60

R49-60

R13-21

R5-6

R25-30

*Zone 1 includes Hawaii, Guam, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Alaska is in Zone 7. **Recommendations may vary slightly based on your heating and cooling system.

Insulation Worksheet

1.

Select the space in your home that you want to insulate.

2.

Using the map and chart on the previous page, find the recommended R-value for your location and room type.

Suggested R-value: __________________

3.

Measure the current thickness of your insulation in inches and multiply by 3.14.

4.

Subtract your Step 3 answer from your answer to Step 2.

5.

Check the first page to determine the R-value of the material you plan to use.

6.

Divide your answer from Step 4 by the average R-value found in Step 5 to get the number of inches of insulation you will need.

Current Inches of Thickness: ________ x 3.14 = __________

Step 3 Value________ - Step 2 Value __________ =________ Desired Additional R-Value

Average R-value: __________________

Step 4 Value________ / Step 5 Value __________ =________ Inches of Insulation Needed

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I N S U L A T I O N

INSULATION A Guide to Insulating Your Home Types of Insulation: The Most Cost Effective Way to Save Money and Energy Material what it is Foam boar...

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