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A G R E A T E R M EDIA N E W S P A P E R

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____________________ SERVING HOLMDEL AND MIDDLETOWN VO L. 2 3 N U M B E R 2 3

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C o m m e r c i a l f i s h e r m a n B o b B e s t, w h o s e S h o a l H a r b o r L o b s te r C o m p a n y h a s e x p a n d e d in to th e liv e - f is h m a r k e t , in s p e c ts a lo b s t e r p o t a t t h e C o m p t o n ’s C r e e k p o r t i n M id d le t o w n . P la n s t o r e v it a liz e t h e p o r t a re a — in c lu d in g a n $ 8 m illio n b r id g e a n d r o a d im p r o v e m e n t p r o je c t a n d d e v e lo p m e n t o f th e B a y s h o re F e rry a t P o rt M o n m o u th — a r e m o v in g f o r w a r d . S ee s to r ie s o n Page 10.

INSIDE

Keyport girl gets ready for West Point Page 7 100-year-old veteran finally joins VFW Page 22 Lions, Colts capture conference crowns

Rich Schultz

pages

3 8 ,3 9

C a le n d a r .......................................................................32 C la s s ifie d ................................... 45 E d ito r ia ls - ...................... 30 O b itu a r ie s ................................................................... 35 P o lic e B e a t ..................................................................34 R e a l E state ..................................................................3 6 S p o r ts ............................................................ *..............38

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THE INDEPENDENT, JUNE 9, 1993 3

\ d u l t s c h o o l g e t s h a r s h le s s o n b u d g e t c u tb a c k s lic in g o u rs e

in to o ffe r in g s

/ Lauren Jaeger Staff writer

ABERDEEN — The car broke down, ) S haron K ing w alk ed fo u r m iles to hool last Wednesday — just to hand in i assignment on time. King is a busy woman these days. Be­ des holding a full-time job, the 39-yeard Matawan resident is the mother of five id grandmother of one. And. today, she ill graduate high school. T he M a ta w a n -A b e rd e e n R e g io n a l dult High School class of 1993, which aduates today, is the smallest class the hool has had in a long time. T he M a ta w a n -A b e rd e e n R e g io n a l :hool D istrict’s budget, rejected again id again by voters, has tightened over ie years. As a result, the adult school has ;come more and more compact. Today, the school is open two nights a eek. Last year, it was open three nights, lany would-be students, who also work ill time, cannot fit the school’s schedule ito th e ir o w n , a c c o rd in g to M ary issane, a full-time English teacher at the :hool. Last year, 68 students graduated the dult high school. T his year, there are nly 40. The average annual num ber of raduates since the school began in 1981, ; 60 students. Much has changed in the 12 years the chool has o p e ra te d . S tu d e n ts in the :hool were required to receive 105 cred:s to graduate in the first year o f opration. Today, 120 credits are needed to raduate. There have been other changes s well, according to Kissane. “ Back then, there was no state profiiency te st,” K issane said. “ Now, they ave to pass that test.” But whatever the budget or enrollment, o one can convince the students that the chool that gave them a second chance oes not serve an important purpose. “ I think this program is fa n ta s tic ,” wing said. A nother am bitious student is Frank 'ernandez, 20, an exchange student from Ipain staying with a Middletown family, ■ernandez needs a few m ore credits to

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graduate high school, and he is planning to atten d the A m erican U n iv ersity of Madrid next year. And then there is Katrina Kent, 20, of M atawan, who hopes to be a registered nurse. A few years ago, she dropped out of high school. She said she left school because she was too impatient to start real life and hold down a job. Som e, like K ing, were rebellious in their youth and gave up on school. Others, like Fernandez, enjoy school but are just a few credits away from earning a diploma. Finally, th ere a re teen-agers who did not fare well in the regular, faster-paced, classroom atm osphere and use the adult high school as an alternative. At the adult high school, the youngest student is 16; the oldest one is 81. T he a tm o sp h e re at the a d u lt high school is dram atically different than the regular high school. For one thing, there is no classroom. And instead of desks, there are tables placed throughout a m odern, library-type setting. The building, too, is separate from the M atawan Regional High School on A t­ lantic Avenue. It is located instead in the district adm inistration building on Crest Way, tucked inside the quiet Strathmore development. Instead of facing a teacher and black­ b oard, the stu d en ts here are scattered about, mostly sitting by themselves, and getting individual attention. During a re­ p o rte r’s visit last w eek, the room was filled, but the atmosphere was exception­ ally quiet. Students say the atm osphere is con­ ducive to learning. “ R egular high school just didn’t work out for me,” explained Greg Burke, 18, of Holmdel, who eventually hopes to attend New York University. “I had a lot of per­ sonal problems and I wouldn’t have been able to graduate.” “They focused all their attention on the special education kids and those in the honors c la sse s,” G reg said o f Holm del High School. “But everyone else — or my crowd — they’ve been trying to get rid of all o f us. T hat’s why so many of us have left. In my crow d, four left school this year.” “I’m learning more here than I would have over there,” he said. “Here, you’re at your own pace and it really helps a lot.” Pat N athaniel, 33, o f M atawan, said she never would be able to change careers and b ecom e a nu rse w ithout her high

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S H E ’ S G R A D U A T I N G — S h a r o n K in g , 3 9 , o f M a ta w a n w ill re c e iv e h e r M a ta w a n -A b e rd e e n R e g io n a l H ig h S c h o o l d ip lo m a to n ig h t, a fte r c o m p le t­ in g re q u ire m e n ts at th e a d u lt h ig h s c h o o l. A lt h o u g h th e p r o g r a m h a s h e lp e d K in g a n d o th e r late b lo o m e rs , th e a d u lt h ig h s c h o o l h a s a lw a y s b een a s o u rc e o f c o n tro v e r s y . S o m e b e lie ve it s h o u ld b e tu rn e d o v e r to th e M o n m o u th C o u n t y V o c a tio n a l S c h o o l S y s t e m , w h ic h is c o m p le te ly fu n d e d b y th e s ta te ; o th e rs p ro te s t th a t the fa m ily a tm o s p h e re w o u ld be e lim in a te d if th is ro u te w e re ta k e n . (P hoto b y Lauren Ja eger) school diploma, and the adult high school is giving her that chance. Originally, she said, she was about one credit short of receiving her high school diplom a. C om pletely d iscouraged, she decided not to pursue it until recently. “ I t’s nice here because they make you feel co m fortable,” she said. “This was long overdue.” K in g ’s story is m arked by sadness. W hen she was 10, her grandfather, who was K in g ’s greatest source o f support, suddenly died. When she was 13, her fa­ ther left the family. “That was really the test,” she said, ex­ plaining that the double loss caused her to m iss a lot o f school in the ninth grade. Em barrassed by being left back a year, King dropped out altogether and earned a General Equivalency Diploma. B ut p assin g the G ED tests did not

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T he adult high school, listed by co n su ltan t John ABERDEEN — Because of a perpetual budget crisis, he fate of the Matawan-Aberdeen Regional Adult High Leazza as a $250,000 burden on the taxpayers, actually comes to only $45,000 after the funding, he said. ichool has been in jeopardy for years. Also, Mary Ryan, Adult High School coordinator, Most recently, a consultant suggested slicing the adult chool portion of the district’s budget after voters rejected feels that the “fam ily atm osphere” o f the adult high school would be lost if it were incorporated into the coun­ he spending plan. The consultant recommended turning the adult high ty-wide district. “The academic portion of the high school is better chool over to the Monmouth County Vocational School h andled in our own d is tric t,” she said. “ I ’m totally district. Dr. B rian M c A n d re w , s u p e rin te n d e n t o f the opposed to the transience o f the (vocational school) Monmouth County Vocational School District, said that teachers coming in and out. Our students face continuity lis district probably could absorb M atawan’s adult high of instruction and teachers who add stability to the pro­ gram.” ichool program easily, if the need came. She pointed out th a t the students receive a Matawan “There has been talk of it for several years,” he said. T here has been more speculation for the past two years.” Regional diplom a, as opposed to a vocational school However, local school officials are not happy about diploma. “There is a sense of belonging,” Ryan said. he idea. Students interested in vocation training can attend the Dr. Kenneth D. Hall, superintendent of the MatawanAberdeen Regional School District, said that the local county program, Ryan said. “ I think the vocational com ponent should be made savings would be minuscule because most of the adult ligh school is paid for by the state, not the local taxpay- available to all adult high school students, just as it is for our high school students,” she stressed. “I am 100 percent ;rs. . , u H > M M M M M H H i 9 > i * * a v f#/ ## # # # *$#*#r# #$ t . m # # t j 9 * • • v » * ♦ - 1 •j 4 * VM l ’ * *•* v• # # # * # • » # # ♦ # j * # * • u * ># » *

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teach her what she would have learned in high school. “Since then. I’ve learned the value of an education,” she said. “The majority of my life, I was in waitressing and in cater­ ing to support my family.” “The only thing you lack here is the social developm ent o f high school, but education-wise you learn a lot from this program,” she said. At the adult high school, King, who said she was always strong on numbers but very weak in English skills, surprised h erse lf by becom ing a strong creative writer. Her whole life she felt it would be bet­ ter to stay away from writing. Even in the first grade, King said, she lacked the con­ fidence to write freely. “ I lo v e E n g lish n o w ,” she said . “ Maybe I avoided it out of fear.”

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behind vocational training, too.” Four years ago, the vocational school began its adult high school in Long Branch with 25 students. Today, there are more than 425 students enrolled in th e p ro g ra m , w h ich h as e x p a n d e d to F re e h o ld , Middletown and Keansburg, McAndrew said. However, besides academ ics, students learn the trade of their choice such as auto mechanics, carpentry, elec­ tronics, plumbing, food service, building m aintenance, dental assistant, and more. “There is a whole host o f occupational program s,” McAndrew said. “And there is no difference in the equiv­ alency of academics.” The adult vocational high school is fully funded by the state and is open four nights a week . “We would consider (taking over Matawan),” he said. “It makes very little difference to me.” There are self-contained adult high schools run by local districts in Asbury Park, Freehold and Union Beach, McAndrew said. — L a u ren J a e g e r V *•#

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THE INDEPENDENT, JUNE 9, 1993 5

S a ilo rs honored by N avy B y M a r ily n D u f f

Staff writer

MIDDLETOWN — Last week, in the wake of the tragic May 26 bus accident which claim ed the lives o f three young sailors, the U.S. Navy honored two of its own for their heroic rescue efforts. The tw o sailors, one a passenger on the bus and the other, who responded from the pier, received m edals in ship­ board ceremonies June 2. Seaman recruit Michael Manuel, 19, of W a rre n , O h io , w as a w a rd e d th e Navy/Marine Corps Life Saving Medal. A passen g er on the bus, he was credited with saving several lives. The award, for acts of heroism not in­ volving actual conflict, was presented by Rear Adm. William E. Terry. M anuel is stationed aboard the USS Detroit, a fast com bat support ship and one o f fo u r ships w hose hom e port is Naval Weapons Station Earle’s Leonardo facility. P e tty O ffic e r 1st C lass V erlin W. Allen, 36, of Laona, W is., received the Navy C om m endation M edal for saving the life of a shipmate with complete disre­ gard for his own safety. A g u n n e r ’s m ate a b o a rd th e U SS Suribachi, an ammunition ship, Allen was not a passenger on the bus, but responded to calls of assistance form the pier. A three-m em ber Naval Board o f In ­ vestigation convened last week to deter­ mine the cause of the accident. The Naval Criminal Investigation Ser­ vice, the National Transportation Safety Board and the New Jersey State Police are also involved in the investigation. The M onmouth County Prosecutor’s O ffic e and M id d le to w n P o lic e Department are assisting with reconstruc­ tion o f the accid en t, acco rd in g to the Navy. The shuttle, owned and operated by Pat K e e le n ’s, M iddletow n, was taking nine passengers back to their ships when the bus careened off the pier about 4:30 a.m. The d riv e r was rescued, but his name has been withheld. As the bus filled with water, Manuel helped other passengers escape through front broken windows and broke several others to aid in the escape. The bus landed right side up in about 12 feet of water. U sing only a th ree-q u arter-in ch air pocket at the top o f the bus for survival, according to his citation, he also tried to push out and then kicked out vents in the roof to provide an escape. He fractured his hand trying to push the vents out. W ith th e v en ts out, he w as able to push the rem ainder o f the passengers to the top of the bus where they could stand with their heads above water. He pulled one individual floating in the water to safety. After realizing a ship­ mate was missing, he also attempted, but failed, to re-enter the bus to rescue him. Allen, responding to calls for help, got a ladder over the side of the pier and then clim bed down it into the water to assist five. He then supported an injured sailor, bracing him self betw een a barnacle-en­ crusted pylon and pier support for over 30 m inutes until a sm all boat reached the scene.

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THE INDEPENDENT, JUNE 9, 1993 7

K e y p o rt s e n io r W est P o in t b o u n d W ill b e a m o n g th e fe w

w o m e n

a t th e a c a d e m y By Lauren Jaeger Staff writer

_______________

anielle Notarcola cut off her long, w av y , g o ld e n -b ro w n h a ir on Friday. Danielle, took that first symbolic step before en terin g W est Point A cadem y, West Point, N.Y. Basic training, which begins on June 28, may be tough, but it is an experience that she is completely ready for, she said. “1 can grow it right back after the sum-

D

mer and tuck it in my hat," she said about her hair. “It’s not a big deal. It’s part of the discipline.” Danielle understands that the next four years at West Point, where she will major in engineering, will be a dramatic change for her. In Keyport, Danielle gets a lot of at­ te n tio n . A w eek ago, she w as elected Prom Q ueen by her p e ers. She ran k s fourth in her class and is president of the Keyport High School chapter of the Na­ tional Honor Society. A n y o n e w ho fo llo w s sp o rts in the Bayshore area is aware of Danielle’s ath­ letic ability. She’s been a key member of three of her school’s sports teams. In the winter she played an important part on the school’s very successful bas­ ketball team; in spring, she was the soft­

A S A C R I F I C E — D a n ie lle N o ta rc o la , a s e n io r at K e y p o rt H ig h S c h o o l, m u s t cu t her h air b e fo re e n te rin g W e s t P o in t A c a d e m y . T h e h a ircu t w a s g iv e n b y M a rilyn R ib e iro o f S h e a r P re c is io n in K e y p o rt. (P hoto b y R ich Sch u ltz)

G r a d u a tio n

tim e s , d a te s

s e t f o r a r e a h ig h High school seniors in the area are p re p arin g to g ra d u a te as the C lass o f 1993. Holmdel High School will graduate its seniors at 6 p.m. on Friday, June 25, at the high school football field. Awards cere­ monies will be held for seniors at 9 a.m. on M onday, June 14 and W ed n esd ay , June 16. Keyport High School will hold com ­ m encem en t e x e rc ise s at 6:30 p.m . on Thursday, June 24, at the athletic field. An academic awards presentation will be held for seniors at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, June 21, in the high school gymnasium. Parents and students are invited to this aw ards presentation. Matawan Regional High School grad­ uation will be at 5:30 p.m. on Friday, June 25, at the high school field. M iddletow n High School North will graduate its seniors at 2 p.m. on Thursday, June 24, at the Garden State Arts Center, Holmdel. Senior awards will be presented at 7:30 p.m., Monday June 21, at the audi­ torium, and a senior breakfast is planned -for. June 23 after fiftlvpefky^examinalions.

s c h o o ls

Middletown High School South grad­ uation will be at 4:15 p.m. June 24, also at the Garden State Arts Center. A student awards ceremony was held last night, at which seniors received scholarships and awards. A senior breakfast will be held at 9:35 a.m. on Wednesday, June 23, in the school cafeteria. Raritan High School will graduate its seniors at 1 p.m. on Monday, June 28, at the high school field. C om m encem ent for M ater Dei High School, Middletown, is set for 7:30 p.m. tonight at the sch o o l’s M em orial Hall. Graduation will be held after a mass. On M onday, June 7, a senior assembly was held where senior superlative awards were presented and the cla ss’s “last will and testament” was read. S t. Jo h n V ia n n e y H igh S c h o o l, Holmdel, will hold graduation at 10 a.m. on Saturday, June 12, at the school foot­ ball field. G ra d u a tio n at C h ris tia n B ro th e rs A cadem y, L incroft, took place at 6:30 p .m . on T h u rsd a y , M ay 27, at St. Catharine’s Church ia Holmdel.

b all te a m ’s c a tc h e r and in the fa ll, Danielle ran cross country. “ I like aerobics, lifting weights, and I like to water ski,” she said. “I also speed skate. I do other things, too, like sew, but most of my stuff is athletics.” H er a b ilitie s w ere n o ticed by Rep. Frank P allone, who nom inated her for Weist Point. Her father, Larry, said that he learned soon enough what kind of girl his daugh­ ter would turn out to be. “She got interested in basketball when she w asn’t even tall enough to bounce the ball,” he said. “Danielle is self-m otivated,” said her mother, Taffy. “I’ll be turning in at 10:30 at night and she’ll be doing 100 sit-ups. She’s an achiever.” Although West Point requires confor­ mity from its cadets, Danielle will stand out. She’s a woman, and women account for only 10 percent o f the acad em y ’s pop­ ulation. M r. N otarcola was told by West Point authorities what his daughter would be in for at the school. “They break them all down to noth­ ing,” he said. “They want them to know that they’re on the bottom of the barrel, and then they build them up.” “T h irty p ercen t d o n ’t m ake it,” he added. “They said, she’s definitely going to be crying home, but to keep encourag­ ing her.” In any case. Danielle said she chose to attend West Point because of its outstand­ ing reputation, not because it was a mili­ tary academy.

“I love the way they play,” she said. “It’s physical. I love physical stuff. I love adven­ tures. West Point will give me the opportuni­ ty to do things I wouldn’t normally do, like shoot guns. And after four years, I’m guaran­ teed a job in the field I study.” B arbara A ffeldt, assistant w om en’s coach for basketball at W est Point, said Danielle shares the fine character traits of all West Point students. “T hey a re very self-confident, m oti­ vated, focused and disciplined,” she said. “They know w hat’s im portant and they are thinking about the future. Also, they have an open mind.” D a n ie lle sp e n t a w eekend at W est Point, to find out whether it was a place she wanted to attend. “The dorms are all alike. Everything’s the same. Everything’s neat, and there’s no dust. The hangers in the closet have to be the same space apart, and the sheets are tucked in perfectly,” she said. Even the clo th in g at W est P oint is strictly uniform. Besides the clothes she’s wearing, Danielle is bringing only under­ w ear to the academ y w hen she arrives there on June 27. The rest of the clothing will be supplied by the academy. “A cadet will not lie, cheat, steal or tol­ erate those who do,” Mrs. Notarcola said. “They have to live up to this honor code. It’s something that nourishes the quality at West Point. It’s a quality which is rare in this world.” “It’s a good future,” Danielle said. “It will be a difficult world, but they’re trying to make you a leader and a better person. But it’s fo u r years. I t’s not th at m uch when you think about it.”

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Last week, Lois Barrett did what she had to do. “It was 8 p.m. and I hated to interfere, but he was trying to get out for over 24 hours and I couldn’t stand it anym ore,” said Barrett, director of the Maple Place Preschool. Because o f Barrett’s interven­ tion, the baby chicken was bom alive and healthy. The other chicks — two more black ones and one yellow one — hatched all by themselves, she said. The first one was bom on Memorial Day. The chicks are happily beginning their lives in the safe confines of a heated box which has been set in the hallway of the nursery school. During a visit on Thursday, the chil­ dren were too shy to speak to a reporter about their experience, but were excited and happy about the fluffy little chicks. T he a rriv al o f the chicks was a mira­ cle of sorts. It was one of the few success­ ful attem p ts fo r the M aple Place p re ­ sc h o o l w h ich has attem p ted to hatch chicken eggs by using an incubator for the last 24 years. O nly three tim es in that period was the experiment a success. “It’s very, very tricky,” Barrett explained. “It’s great if the children can see them hatch, but even if they d o n ’t, the effort is not wasted.” • Through a large, pictorial chart, the three- and four-year-old children learn how a baby chicken is formed inside the egg during its 27-day development, Bar­ rett said. Larger-than-life drawings illus­ trate the chick in every stage of develop­ ment. It begins as a small dot, gains eyes, turns into a fetal-like creature and then finally, sprouts wings and fills up the egg. “On the fifth day, I say, ‘Look-it’s got an eye’,” Barrett said. “I ask the children, ‘Do you want me to crack open the egg and show it to you?’ and the children say, ‘D on’t! Y ou’ll kill our baby chick.’ ” A t th e en d o f 21 days, the children learn that they were formed in 270 days inside their m other’s womb. The children find out that their m other’s egg is inside her tummy and not like a chicken’s, be­ cause moms are too busy during the day to sit on a nest. “Chickens don’t have to make beds,” Barrett explained. Last year, the experim ent was fairly successful; one chick resulted out of a few e g g s. T o d a y , th e g ro w n -u p c h ic k e n , Samantha, lays one egg a day, and lives w ith th e H a ith c o c k fa m ily o f U nion Beach. Samantha is domesticated, Barrett said, because she was held so often during her youth. This year, there are no plans for these chicks, but they may end up on a farm. There happens to be a little secret about this year’s success, however, which the director shared. You see, Barrett had the real incubator at home, safely in her house. An identical, in c u b a to r, also fille d w ith eg g s, w as p la c e d in the h allw ay s o f the school. W hen the chicks began to hatch in her home, Barrett placed them in the “impos­ tor” incubator. In the past, she explained, the 200 or so children who attend the school, overcome with enthusiasm, tend­ ed to shake the hallway incubator, which m ay h av e p re v e n te d the ch ic k s from hatching.- ' , ■

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THE INDEPENDENT, JUNE 9, 1993 9

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N I C E L I T T L E C H I C K — L o i s B a r r e t t ( r ) , d ir e c t o r o f th e M a p le P la c e P re s c h o o l in K e y p o r t, w a s th rille d th a t h e r c h ic k -h a tc h in g e x p e rim e n t w a s a s u c c e s s . T h e p re s c h o o le rs le a rn e d a b o u t th e fo rm a tio n o f th e c h ic k s in sid e th e e g g s w h ile th e y w a ite d n e a rly a m o n th fo r th e m to h a tc h in sid e an in c u b a to r. < (P hoto b y Lauren Jaeger)

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Nicole Lentini of Atlantic Street was ju d g e d B est O verall in the b o ro u g h ’s annual Baby Parade, held May 15. Candice Eve Tarallo of Green Grove Avenue came in second place overall, and Andrea Losito of Taylor Road, Matawan, and Daniel Straniero of Provost Avenue, Keyport took third place overall with a group entry. All the winners, by category: Float an d costum e, single e n tra n ts Infant-2 years — First place, N icole L entini, A tlantic Street; second place, Stephen M ontero, Roslyn Drive, Tinton Falls; and no third place. Age 3-5 — First place, Erice Dallas, Ideal Avenue, North Middletown; and no second or third place. C ostum e alone, single e n tra n ts , Infant-2 years — First place, Derick M oreira, A tlantic Street; second place,

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C a n d ic e E ve T a ra llo , G re en G ro v e A v e n u e ; and th ird p la c e , S a m a n th a Thorpe, Edmunds Avenue, Union Beach. Age 3-5 — First place, Christina Diaz, Edgem aar Road, Belford; second place, Crystal M arie Lum ley, Seabreeze W ay, K e a n sb u rg ; and th ird p la c e , S te v en Calabrese, Octavia Place, Keyport. Age 6-8 — First place, Amanda Hoff, 611 Second Street, Union Beach; and no second or third place. G ro u p them e float an d costum e, all age groups, infant-8 years First place — A ndrea Losito, Taylor R oad, M ataw an, and D aniel S traniero, Provost Avenue, Keyport. Second place — Dakota Nave Hurtt, Jo rd a n R. and J o e lle R. H e rn a n d e z , Atlantic Street, Keyport. T h ird p la c e — N ic o le and A sh ley Irving, Elizabeth Place, Keyport.

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C r e e k

B r id g e

B y M a r ily n D u ff

:__________

Staff writer

M IDD LETO W N — C om pton’s C reek is a port of dreams for many people, including fishermen, developers and even county officials. W hile the fisherm en dream o f a bustling port, the developers dream of an upscale seaside village and the cou n ty o ffic ia ls dream o f a busy w aterb o rne tra n s­ portation center — all joined by a new roadw ay and bridge network. The centerpiece of the area is the commercial fishing port, where the Belford Seafood Co-op is struggling to preserve its long tradition, and the independent Shoal Harbor Lobster Company has expanded into the new livefish market. T o th e w est is th e site o f the planned Spy House Harbor development, a 30-acre commercial and residen­ tial seaside village and approximately 700-slip marina. To the east, across the channel, is the location of the planned M onmouth County ferry terminal and a major activity stop along the Bayshore Trail System. At this stage, the terminal is being called the Bayshore Ferry at Port Monmouth. These three elements, existing and planned, are linked and will rely heavily on a series of county roadway and bridge improvements to make the area more accessible. “ I think it is going to happen,” Planning D irector Anthony M ercantante said last week about this m ajor bayfront revitalization — part of what long has been tout­ ed as “the Bayshore Renaissance.” H ow ever, M ercan tan te said, it is unfortunate that it takes so long to get the necessary permits to put every­ thing in place. County engineer Theodore A. Ginnechini said that the road and bridge project will cost in excess of $8 million. “It is the county’s biggest current project and is going to make a major difference,” said Ginnechini. The county road and bridge project includes: — two new bridges, one joining Port Monmouth Road across Pew s C reek and the oth er connecting C hurch

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an agreem ent w ith the tow nship for part o f the road improvement costs. T h e p r o je c t c o u ld go o u t to bid th is y ear, said Ginnechini; at the very earliest, early fall or winter. In the meantime, a separate contract will be awarded this summer for cleanup work at the site of another for­ m er area bridge, the form er C om pton’s Creek Bridge joining Main Street in Belford. That bridge, an old swing-span or rotating bridge, was removed several years ago and will not be reconstructed. The county plans to remove a leftover bridge pier and old

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T h e se fis h e rm e n d o n ’t b e lie v e in hooks. They trap their fish and market them liv e to an e x p a n d in g Ja p a n e se and Chinese restaurant market in New York and New Jersey. “I t’s something new,” at least in this area, explained Jack Baker, co-owner of Shoal Harbor Lobster Co., an independent commercial fishing operation adjacent to the Belford Seafood Co-op at the mouth of Compton’s Creek in Middletown. It’s also a growing market, he said. The longtime lobster fisherman, a resi­ dent of Staten Island, and his partner, Bob Best of Belford, expanded their business last year because o f concerns about in­ creasing government restrictions on fish­ ermen. “ Y ou’ve got to find something else to do,” said Best, saying the government reg­ ulations are “putting everybody out o f business.” As an exam ple, he said, the govern­ ment has increased its minimum-size law for lobsters and even changed regulations regarding net sizes. Catching live fish is similar to trapping lobster, the partners explained. They use

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fish traps similar to lobster pots, dropping them in select locations and then leaving them for three or four nights. Back at their attractive building, where they sell fish both wholesale and retail, they keep the fish in enormous, open salt­ water tanks. During a recent visit, one of the tanks was filled with sw im m ing blackfish, a friendly fish, according to Best, which tastes mild, like grouper. T he w ater is kept a t a certain temper­ ature; in the case of blackfish, 40 degrees. Because of the quick turnover, they don’t have to feed them. The previous day, they sold between 800 and 1,000 pounds, said Baker. They also market sea bass, porgies and other fish in the same manner. There’s also an enormous, tiered lob­ ster tank. The company was part of a recent Jer­ sey Shore seafood and aquaculture promo­ tional tour sponsored by the state Depart­ ment of Agriculture. The May 27 tour, to promote state fish­ eries, included a clam-depuration program and a new plant in Highlands. * * ' ------—Ma'rilyh Duff

THE INDEPENDENT, JUNE 9, 1993 1 1

M a y o r: N o

p e r m it s , n o r e e fs

B y M a r ily n D u ff

Staff writer

In n o v a tiv e , s ta te -fu n d e d p r o je c t h its

b a r r ie r

OMiddletown Mayor Anthony Musella took action Monday to shut down an artifical-reef manu­ facturing operation at the site of the planned Spy House Harbor D evelopm ent n ear C o m p to n ’s Creek. “They should not be operating without the necessary perm its," he said.

A cco rd in g to M ercantante, the property owners previously re c e iv e d P la n n in g B o ard approval for another temporary use, also related to artificial7reef building, but that operation never got under way. T hat approval does not authorize this operation, he said. Creter said his company has a one-year lease to use a portion of the site for the artificial reefs.

The mayor directed the con­ duction official, Frank Verange, to issue a summons and do what­ ever was necessary to stop the operatio n until the o w n ers go before the Planning Board and file the proper application. W hen photographs o f giant, concrete reefs began appearing recently in new spapers and on television, Middletown officials were surprised. ■ No one had told them about a p ro je c t to m a n u fa c tu re the reefs. A nd, to w n sh ip o fficials said, no one had applied for per­ mits to operate the outdoor plant. For approxim ately a m onth and a h a lf. B re a k w a te rs International Inc., Flem ington, has been using the site without the necessary perm its to m anu­ facture artificial concrete reefs to be used in a pilot project partially financed by the state. The artificial reefs have been hailed by state o ffic ia ls as an innovative way to reduce beach erosion. Richard Creter, the company ow ner, is leasing the site from S e a p o rt A s s o c ia te s , th e M iddletown-based developm ent firm headed by Walter Mihm and Jack Westlake. Creter said last week that any necessary permits were the prop­ erty owner’s responsibility. N e ith e r o f th e d e v e lo p e rs

The reefs are m anufactured on a large concrete slab at the site of a former fish-proecessing plant, slated under Spy House H arbor plans to be part of the parking area.

Each of the molded concrete reefs is 10 feet wide and weighs approximately 21 tons. T h e com pany is completing modules for a 1,000-foot, inter­ lo c k in g a rtific ia l re e f to be in stalled 250 feet o ffsh o re in Avalon. By last week, approxi­ m ately 70 o f the m odules had been completed. The work crew is able to complete three modules a day, according to a worker at the site. R E E F B U I L D I N G — J e ff R o y e , site s u p e r v is o r fo r B re a k w a te rs In te rn a tio n a l In c ., p re p a re s to m o v e a 2 1 -to n , c o n c re te a rtific a l-re e f m o d u le at th e c o m p a n y ’s te m p o ra ry o u td o o r m a n u fa c tu rin g site in P o rt M o n m o u th . (P hoto b y Rich Schultz) could be reached last week to comment on the situation or on the planned development. Asked earlier about the mat­ ter, Verange said that the area is not zoned for manufacturing, and neither the property owners nor Creter applied for the necessary permits. P lanning D irector A nthony Mercantante, who learned of the operation only through new spa­ per articles, said that they need to apply to the Planning Board for site-plan approval and a tempo-

rary-use permit. B ecause the operation is in violation o f zoning ordinances, V era n g e has the a u th o rity to issue a stop-work order. The Planning Board approved plans on March 6, 1991, for Spy H ouse H arbor, a co m b in atio n re s id e n tia l-c o m m e rc ia l de­ v e lo p m e n t and m a rin a . M e rc a n ta n te said th a t the approval is good for three years, after which the developers can apply fo r up to tw o o n e -y e a r extensions.

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The project includes 161 twoand three-bedroom tow nhouse units, a yacht club, restaurant and com m ercial-office center on a 3 0 -a c re site n o rth o f P ort M o n m o u th R o ad , b o rd e rin g Compton’s Creek. U nder the site plan, an addi­ tio n a l 35 acres so uth o f P ort Monmouth Road would remain wetlands. The site also includes a 160-acre riparian or underwater area extending into Raritan Bay, which would be used for a 700slip marina.

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T he sta te E co n o m ic Development Authority is fund­ ing 50 percent of the New Jersey Pilot Reef Project. Creter planned to use the Port M onmouth site for construction of a 900-foot reef for Cape May and another 1,100-foot reef for Belmar and Spring Lake. The site would also be good, he said, for a planned pilot pro­ gram in New Y ork, w here he hopes to install a 4,000-foot reef. Beach-saver reefs, as they are called, have been tested success­ fu lly at S te v e n s In s titu te o f T e c h n o lo g y , H o b o k e n , as a means of reducing beach erosion.

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Fromprevious page

C U T U P — B a rry D u b r o s k y , a w o rk m a n at th e B re a k w a te rs In tern a tion a l m a n u fa c tu rin g site in P o r t M o n m o u th , c u ts a n o p e n in g in re in fo rc e m e n t w ire in s id e a m o ld fo r th e g ia n t re e f m o d u le s . (P hoto b y R ich S c h u lz)

The m odules w ill be tra n s­ p o rte d fro m the site a b o ard barges.

bridge abutments. Henry Nicholson, the county’s assis­ tant transportation director and project manager, is excited about the plans for the Bayshore Ferry at Port Monmouth. Like the c o u n ty ’s en gineering arm , Nicholson is in the midst of waiting for permits. Plans for the ferry terminal are much more long-range and involve considerable site preparation. N icholson hopes to have perm its by fall to begin constructing a bulkhead at the east side of the channel. He hopes to see the ferry service start up in about two years, by the spring of 1995, he said last week. The county owns 268 acres east of the creek, purchased with funding from the Port Authority of New York and New Jer­ sey. About 80 acres will be used for the ter­ minal and adjacent water-dependent activ­ ities.

N icholson said that ev en tu ally , the county hopes to provide ferry service to 1,200 custom ers a day, not just to New York, but also to Jersey City and Staten Island. “ W e’re very excited about the pro­ ject,” he said. The county started the ap­ plication process last summer. The most important aspect of the ferry service, said Nicholson, is to get cars off the road; in others words, to encourage people to leave their cars at hom e and commute to work via the Bayshore ferry. Also, Nicholson said, the project will enable the Belford Seafood Co-op to ex­ pand by using the east bank of the creek. In conjunction with all of these plans, the Army C orps of E ngineers plans to dredge and widen the channel, which cur­ rently ranges from 130 to 170 feet, to 200 feet. D redging will probably begin in the fall o f 1994, said Nicholson, and will not affect the county’s schedule to construct the bulkhead at the east bank.

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JUNE 9, 1993, THE INDEPENDENT

S tu d en ts show p rin c ip a l he co u n ts P u p ils g iv e a d m in is tr a to r s p e c ia l f a r e w e ll B y M a r ily n D u ff

Staff writer

V incent M cCue was surprised when students invented a county, and named it in his honor. M iddle R oad School students have been studying the state and used the 21 counties as their field-day theme, with the extra county thrown in as a surprise for their departing principal.

3J o h n R . F io r in o , J r . 5 A ttorney P e rso n a l In ju ry W o r k e r ’s C om p. M u n ic i p a l C o u rt R e a l E s ta te R e a s o n a b le F e e s 14 Y rs . E x p e r ie n c e F R E E IN IT IA L C O N S U L T A T IO N 300 Hwy. 34 . A berdeen 5 6 6 -1 1 1 0

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The poster board depicting the fiction­ al M cCue County even had a M cC ue’s Dairy — a tribute to the Hazlet principal’s Long Branch roots. It was one o f several surprises stu ­ dents, staff members and parents had in store for McCue at the annual end-of-theyear field day at M iddle Road School, Hazlet. M cCue, who has been transferred to Union Avenue Middle School, and at age 64, is also considering retirem ent, even got a framed letter from the governor con­ gratulating him on his 36 years as an edu­ cator. Also, a senate resolution honoring him was personally delivered by state Sen. Joseph Kyrillos Jr., R-Middletown. McCue said he never planned to be­ come a teacher and never wanted to be a principal. M cC ue grew up in L ong B ran c h , where he still lives. The 10th of 11 chil­ dren, he now has his own large family, seven children and eight grandchildren. Following high school, he attended St. Charles Seminary, Philadelphia, and what was then Monmouth Junior College, West Long Branch. He then entered the Navy in 1951. It was a matter of joining the Navy or risk being drafted into the Army, he said. He and 25 to 30 others left college and signed up the same day. A fter his discharge, McCue worked in the insurance business, but eventually, with a grow ing fam ily, decided he was not making enough money.

A F u ll Service S a lo n For The W hole F a m ily

So, armed with an associate degree an e m erg en cy te a c h in g c e rtific a te — teachers were in demand at the time — he and a lifelong friend, Jim Robbins began their teaching careers at the old Florence Avenue School in Union Beach. Later, Robbins also taught in Hazlet. The area was growing fast, following the c o n stru c tio n o f the G ard en S tate Parkway, and the old Union Beach school was on split session. McCue and the other new teachers got the least desirable, noon-to-4 p.m. shift. Their inexperience made things tough for the emergency teachers, according to McCue, but they supported each other and learned the hard way. He said he took the advice of the prin­ cipal at the time: “ ‘You are the boss in your classroom ; if y o u ’re not, someone else will be.’ ” McCue remained there for six years, the latter two as a teaching assistant prin­ cipal. Over the next five years, he worked at three d ifferen t schools, T horne and Thompson junior high schools in Middle­ town and Cove Road School in Hazlet. During that period he learned he did not like teaching at the junior-high level. The problem with junior highs, he said, is the students are only one-seventh yours, since they have a different teacher for al-

most every subject. “ I like to w ork on values and a tti­ tudes,” something you can’t do with so lit­ tle contact, said McCue. While teaching, McCue continued his education. He acquired a masters degree and additional credits at Seton Hall Uni­ versity. In the late 1960s, he became assistant principal at Hazlet’s Beers Street School, at the time a K-8 neighborhood facility. He rem ained there for 16 years until it was changed to a middle school in 1983. A fte r 16 y e a rs it w as d if f ic u lt to change schools, but he adjusted quickly to Middle Road School. He first served as assistant principal •there and at a second elementary School and then became principal. “ I ’m not an office p erso n ,” M cCue said in explanation of why he never really wanted to become a principal. McCue believes strongly in discipline. Educators today are neglecting account­ ability, he said, while focusing more on students’ self-esteem. During his Navy years aboard the air­ craft carrier Franklin Delano Roosevelt, McCue’s captain instilled in him the phi­ losophy: “ ‘If you do the best you can, your best is usually good enough.’ ” Based on its recent show of affection for him, his Middle Road School family apparently feels Principal McCue did just that.

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E V E N T T he B rookdale C om m unity College Alumni Association will hold its ninth an­ nual Barringer Award Dinner Dance on Friday, June 18, at C hristie’s in Wanamassa. The Barringer Award is named af­ ter former Brookdale President Bob Bar­ ringer and is awarded for academic excel­ lence at Brookdale. This year, the award recipients will be West Long Branch resi­ dent Barbara Gonos, Brookdale professor of paralegal studies, and Lakewood resi­ dent Joseph K ing, learning assistant in paralegal studies. R eservations are $35 per person and must be made by Friday. The fee includes hors d ’oeuvres with a cash bar, dinner, Viennese table and danc­ ing. For reservations or information, call the Alumni Association at 224-2880.

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The Alumni Association of Brookdale Community College, Lincroft, announces the winners of its annual juried art show. Betsey Reagan o f Tinton Falls won Best in Show for her mixed media entry. Tiffany DeMott, Ocean Grove, won first place for photography. Linda S. Miner, Tinton Falls, won second place for oil painting. Mildred Ashendorf, Rumson, won third place for monotype print. Receiving honorable mentions were Dian Sirkin, Manalapan, silver print; Barbara M. Brennan, Lincroft, oil painting; Laura Poll, Navesink, pho­ tography; Ann Marie Frei, Freehold, fiber; and Tim Burke, Red Bank, combination oil/pastel. Honorable mentions also went to Elaina Kwok, Hazlet, oil painting; Joan Bausch, Rumson, photography; Mary Phillips, Matawan, pastel; Patricia Meko, Belford, oil painting; and Nancy Strauss, Marlboro, photography.

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M IDDLETOW N — Fifth-graders in Kathy Colmorgen’s class learned a bit of history recently and observed M emorial Day a few days early. The students, from Middletown Village School, visited the cemetery at Old First Church on Kings Highway May 28. They placed an American flag on the grave of Joseph Murray, a farmer and sol­ dier during the American Revolutionary War, according to Colmorgen. Students also read poetry near Murray’s grave and placed flags at the graves of his descendants. The visit ties in with the fifthgrade history curriculum on the Revolu­ tionary War and Middletown’s role in it. The students also learned about Murray through the fifth-grade science curriculum when, during the winter, they visited Poricy Park and saw M urray’s house and farm ­ house, Colmorgen said. Information from the Poricy Park Citi­ zens Committee illustrates the life of the local patriot. A bout 1767 M u rra y , a young immi­ grant from L ondonderry, Ireland, p u r­ chased a farm in Middletown. The farm he bought is now Poricy Park. He married an American-born woman, Rebecca Morris, and set about farming his land and raising a family. As opposition to British colonial poli­ cies grew, Murray enlisted as a private in the First R egim ent, M onm outh County Militia. The residents of Middletown were bitterly divided, the m ajority at first re­ maining loyal to the crown. The loyalists regarded those who favored the cause of independence as rebels and traitors. M urray w as c a p tu re d in a raid by British soldiers in 1779 when his house was attacked and looted, and personal property destroyed. He was transferred to prisoner-of-war facilities in New York. It is not known how' he escaped from prison, but in January 1780 Murray returned to Middletown and rejoined his unit. After taking part in a reconnaissance m ission at the B ayshore June 7, 1780, Murray was shot in the back the next day while tending his farm. Though wounded, he furiously fought his three attackers until stabbed repeatedly and shot again. His wife, Rebecca, and four young chil­ dren survived to carry on the family name.

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By Mark Rondeau Staff writer

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By Judy O’Gorman Alvarez Correspondent__________________ The Hispanic Alliance Team is trying to get a message about alcohol and drug abuse into the area Hispanic community. The team, called HALLT, is a countyfunded jo in t p ro ject by the New H ope Foundation Outpatient Services, Freehold, and the National Council on Alcohol and Drug Dependence of Monmouth County. “Alcoholism is two to three times more prevalent among Hispanics than non-Hispanics, and Hispanic elderly are twice as likely to die of cirrhosis than non-Hispanics,” said Mary Pat Angelini, HALLT co­ director. “Even though we have a lot of literature in Spanish out there, they’re not coming in for treatment.”

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A ngelini, who is director o f the N a­ tional Council on A lcoholism and Drug Dependence o f M onmouth County, said the H ALLT team has learned that drug and alcohol abuse runs in trends especially among cultures, and “Hispanic” covers a lot of different groups. So, the team is working to understand m ore clearly what the Hispanic com m u­ nity needs before developing and deliver­ ing programs or information. “The term Hispanic encompasses more than 20 different countries and cultures,” said Iris Gonzalez, executive director of H ispanic A ffairs and R esource C enter, Asbury Park, who is advising the HALLT project. “ You ca n ’t have a scholar who speaks



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perfect Castillian Spanish translate infor­ m ation using a high level o f S panish,” Gonzales said. “It will lose its effect and not reach the people it needs to reach the most. W hatever literature is designed and created needs to be culturally sensitive.” “Alcohol abuse manifests itself differ­ e n tly in d iffe re n t g ro u p s ,” sa id T ony Comerford, director o f New Hope Foun­ dation’s Outpatient Services and HALLT co-director. “W e’re trying not to bring in any predisposed ideas about alcohol and drugs.” R e ach in g th e H isp an ic co m m u n ity means overcoming particular roadblocks, including illiteracy and machismo, where because of a strong sense of m asculine pride, Hispanic men may refuse help. Comerford knows about the problems of literal translations. In a previous job, he helped m arket a cigarette advertised in Spanish to be “fresh and mild” throughout the Southwest. W hen the ad was marketed in New York City area, the same Spanish words translated into “all wet.” “ W ith H A LLT , a o n e-tim e p ro ject,

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w e ’re tak in g a m a rk etin g approach to what will best serve the Hispanic commu­ nity,” Comerford said. “Focus groups are a m arketing technique used m ore often than surveys and will work at identifying community issues and values.” T he g ro u p s will be made up o f His­ panics in the community, including high school students, adults studying English as a Second Language, and professionals and community leaders. Through the groups, HALLT hopes to learn about perceptions of alcohol and drug problems. Focus group members will review ma­ terial now available in Spanish and offer their opinions and insights. Later this year, the groups will receive the revised presen­ tation to take back to their community. “W e want them to help us and we also want to educate them in the process,” said Angelini. “The hope is that the message will be better received if it com es from within the community.” Hispanics interested in serving on the focus groups can contact Angelini at 576­ 1800, or Comerford at 308-0113.

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JUNE 9, 1993, THE INDEPENDENT

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N o rth b o o te rs ru le SCT fie ld , a g a in is another thing though. One-game elim i­ nation is pretty tough. But the girls have c h a ra c te r and they pushed straig h t through.” t h ir d s tr a ig h t After becoming the first team to win two consecutive S C T titles last year, the c o n fe re n c e title Lions suffered a setback by losing their Shore Conference A North Division title By Alan Karmin this season to M iddletown South High School when the Eagles handed the Lions Some high school sports teams come their only defeat of the season. and go - and are nothing more than a Sessa said his players showed a lot of memory once the season is over. • character coming back from what could But at Middletown North High School, have been a devastating defeat-. the girls' soccer team is assured of its “Soccer is a funny game. You can play place in the school’s sports tradition. well and still lose. And I kind of felt that The Lio n s ( l 7 - 1-2) won an unprece­ way in the games we tied and the one we dented third straight Shore Conference lost and kind of squandered the opportuni­ Tournament championship on June 2 with ties. 1 think you just have to try and pick a 3-0 win over St. Rose High School of up the pieces and go on from there and I Belmar (17-1 -1) at W all High School. think the girls did a great job of that,” the Ju n io r defender coach said. Dana White, a threeK e lly , th e s e n io r year starter, played a m idfielder who has key role in the win. been a leader for the W hite spent the L io n s du rin g her game m ark in g the fo u r-y e a r v a rs ity Purple Roses' junior career, said the loss m id fie ld e r M aura to Middletown South M cG hee - who has g ave her team a scored 82 goals over cause around which the last three years it could rally. and "was the Shore “ It got us mad Conference's second more than anything le ad in g sc o re r in e ls e ,” she said . “ It 1993 with 34 goals got us mad and it and then scored the made us fight even first goal o f the harder because we game with 19:00 left knew we had the in the first half. abi.lity to do it. We Ann Marie Sacco ju st had to get our headed in a pass heads together and from Cheryl Adrancome o ff a big loss o v itz to put the lik e that and com e L io n s up 2-0 w ith back and w in the 6:00 left in the half. Sho re C o n fe re n c e A dranovitz added a H A P P Y D A Y S — M id d le to w n N o rth Tournament and we goal h e rse lf in the g o a lie Je s s ic a Po rte lli (I) a n d te a m ­ did.” second h a lf o ff a m ate D e b b ie S m ith had s o m e th in g K e lly , who along pass from N ic k ie to sm ile a b o u t a fte r th e L i o n s ’ 3-0 w ith g o alk ee p e r Kelly. w in o v e r S t . R o s e in t h e S h o r e Jessica Portelli w ill L io n s ’ co ach C o n f e r e n c e T o u r n a m e n t c h a m p ­ continue her soccer M ark Sessa said he io n s h ip g a m e . c aree r at G eo rg ian w asn't surprised by (Photo b y Rich Schultz) Court College, Lake­ his te a m ’ s p e rfo r­ wood. next season, mance in the S C T . said winning the tournament title for the “ I thought we had a good team going in third straight year was very special. as 1 did the two years before.” he said. " It fe e ls g reat, e s p e c ia lly fo r me "Getting all the way through a tournament because as a senior it caps everything off,” said Kelly. "B er.g a part of all three cham pionship teams was great but this was more special beca ise what a way to end the season - your last high school game to win the big one is just great. “The girls all know we set some big records and it's something that may never be done again and if it is. it will probably be quite a while until it happens again. So everybody is excited. We all worked hard for it and we did it together as a team.” “I think they’ve all been great," said Sessa. "Each year w e’ve played against O O 4*S4.Lines ■ 2 Times great competition and some great players for eachadditional line 1 6 Pre-Paid ■Can be cancelled • Not refundable many of whom have gone on to play soc­ Private party merchandise only. cer in college. I think we can say the same thing this year. The girls worked hard and CALL CLASSIFIED they never gave up against some real 1 -8 0 0 -6 6 0 -4 A D S tough competition. “ I enjoyed every game, I thought they G reater M ed ia N ew sp a p ers played entertaining so ccer and I think News Transcript • Sentinel • Suburban they're going to be remembered for a long Bayshore Independent * Middletown Independent • Weekend News Transcript time.”

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C A G E D L I O N — W h il e g o i n g a f t e r a l o o s e b a ll d u r i n g t h e S h o r e C o n fe re n c e T o u rn a m e n t c h a m p io n s h ip g a m e , M id d le to w n N o r th ’s H e a th e r G o r d o n (c) is s a n d w ic h e d b e tw e e n a pa ir o f S t. R o s e p la y e rs . M id d le to w n N o rth w o n th e c o n fe re n c e c ro w n , 3-0 , o v e r th e P u rp le R o s e s . (Photo by Rich Schultz)

L A U N C H I N G A R O C K E T — M id d le to w n N o r th ’ s N ic k ie K e lly (16 ) b la s ts a s h o t p a s t K im G r o n a u o f S t . R o s e d u rin g th e J u n e 2 S h o r e C o n fe re n c e T o u r n a m e n t c h a m p io n s h ip g a m e . K e lly a n d th e L i o n s w o n th e ir th ird s tra ig h t S C T c ro w n w ith a 3-0 w in o v e r th e P u rp le R o s e s . (P hoto b y Rich Sch u ltz)

S P O R T S

THE INDEPENDENT, JUNE 9, 1993 3 9

C h a m p io n C o lts c o rra l SC T c ro w n

The Christian Brothers Academy base­ ball team won its first Shore Conference T ournam ent cham pionship and put the wraps on a 25-3 season with a 9-7 win over M anasquan at T om s R iver North High School on June 2. After spotting Manasquan (24-3) two runs in the top o f the fifth inning, the Colts came back in the bottom half of the frame. T hree M an asq u an e rro rs help ed to open the door for the C olts and senior centerfielder Brian M anning keyed the five-run outburst with a tw o-run bloop double to right field. CBA added four more runs in the sixth, the big blow com ing on a bases-loaded triple off the bat of junior pitcher Steve Skrocki. On the hill, Skrocki allowed only two hits and two runs over 6 1/3 innings. The junior lefthander was removed before the start of the seventh inning, only to have to return to get the final out when M ana­ squan rallied for five runs. Skrocki finished the year 7-1 through 60 1/3 innings pitched, with a 1.04 ERA. He struck out 53 hitters, w hile issuing only 13 walks. C BA co ach M a rty K enney said he was very happy with the C o lts’ tourna­ ment victory. “We had talked about it and said that was the one thing we w anted to do or ch ange from last y e a r,” he said. “ We didn’t want to just do well in the tourna­ ment. We wanted to win one. So it was a nice way to finish the year. “I feel great for the kids because I felt they worked hard during the course of the year and it was nice to see them get what I feel is a just reward. But this team was special for me - there’s no question about that. I mean win or lose - as far as that tournam ent - we had a good time. As a coach I had a good tim e and I think as players they enjoyed playing.” Looking back on a season in which his team also won the Shore Conference A North Division title, Kenney turns all the way back to the first game of the year as an indication of what the season would be all about. “ I th o u g h t one o f the m ost c ritic al gam es w as the very first g a m e ,” said Kenney. “We were struggling a bit against Howell and I could tell they were nervous. I was starting a number of juniors - they were talented but it was their first varsity game. “ W e w ere dow n tw o ru n s and we scored three in the seventh inning to go

ahead 6-5 and we held on for the win. I thought it was a critical game even though it was the first game of the year because it m ade the kids feel good being able to come back like they did and get a good win against a pretty good team. “ A fter th at I could see them settle down and get into a groove. They gained a lot of confidence and we put together a 14-game winning streak.” Shore Regional dealt the Colts their first loss of the season, 4-1, on May 8 in the first round of the Monmouth County T o u rn a m e n t. B ut C BA w as ab le to regroup and finish with an 11-2 run and the SCT title. The C o lts’ losses during that streak were to Ocean Township, 5-3, and to Holy C ross o f D elran, 4-0, in a South Jersey Parochial A state tournament game. • Kenney said a team effort m ade the Colts’ campaign the success it was. “Offensively, every hitter in the lineup hit well over .300 so we really didn’t have to look to one person to carry us,” said Kenney. “It was the same thing with the p itch in g . W e spread out the w ins and d id n ’t have to rely on ju st one or two arms. “ I thought the defense was solid all year and we had some great team speed. We really d id n ’t have a w eakness as a team.” In addition to Skrocki’s 7-1 record on the hill, Dave Lardieri sported a 6-0 mark (1.40 ERA, 40 2/3 IP), Ken Shaw was 4-0 (1.91 ERA, 22 IP), Joe Martin finished up 3-0 (1.67 ERA, 21 IP), Andy Kinsella was 4-2 (1.53 ERA, 32 IP) and Manning fin­ ished 1-0 (3.18 ERA, 11 IP). L ard ieri led the way at the plate and c lo se d o u t a stro n g fo u r-y e a r v a rsity career. The senior hit .494 w ith seven home runs (21 career HR) and 40 RBI. He has been chosen to play in the Ju n io r Olympic Festival in July in San Antonio, Texas. Lardieri, who has received a baseball scholarship to W ake Forest U niversity, will be one of 64 scholastic players from around the nation taking part in the Junior Olympics. A lso in the h ittin g d e p a rtm e n t, M a n n in g h it .447 in 1993 w ith tw o h o m ers, 34 RBI and 23 sto len bases; ju n io r o u tf ie ld e r C h ris R o m a g lin o checked in with a .384 average (2 HR, 22 RBI); Skrocki hit .440 (21 RBI); junior se co n d b a sem an C h ris K en n ey c o n ­ tributed 20 RBI and 30 total hits for a .319 average; junior catcher Bart East hit .400 (1 HR, 26 RBI); junior shortstop added 22 RBI to go along with his .325 average; junior third baseman Chris Farley checked in at .342 (1 HR, 26 RBI); senior first baseman Sean Economou hit .389 with 8 RBI; and outfielder John Sawyer made the most o f 13 at bats with 6 RBI. Rounding out the squad w ere R ob M arasco and Dayton Lonsdale.

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S k r o c k i, M a n n in g le a d 9 - 7 v ic to r y over M a n a s q u a n By Alan Karmin

O N T H E F L Y — C o lin W a ls h , 4 , o f M a ta w a n , c a s ts h is line w ith th e h o p e o f la n d in g “ th e b ig o n e ” at a fis h in g d e rb y fo r c h ild re n s p o n ­ s o r e d b y th e H a z le t R e c r e a tio n D e p a r tm e n t a n d h e ld S a tu r d a y at V e te ra n s M e m o ria l P a rk , H a zle t. (Photo b y Rich Sch u ltz)

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T he R ed B ank Y M C A sw im team established itself as the powerhouse of the East at the annual East Field Regional YMCA Championships held at Princeton University. Red Bank finished first out of 47 team s com peting from New Jersey, New H am pshire, R hode Island, M ass­ a c h u s e tts , P e n n s y lv a n ia , M a ry la n d , Delaware and Connecticut. In addition, 10 new team records were attained and four East Field records were earned. Tom Wilkens of Middletown won six medals and set three meet records to lead the w ay fo r the R ed bank sw im m ers. Wilkens won a bronze medal in the 15-18 age group 100-yard freestyle, a silver in the 200 backstroke, and four golds: 15-18, 100 breaststroke, 200 breaststroke, 400 in d iv id u a l m ed ley and S e n io r 1,650 freestyle. Wilkens set new East Field records in the 200 breaststroke, 400 IM and 1,650 freestyle and new team records in the 200 breaststroke and 400 IM. L in d a G a llo , J u lie t C h in . Je n n ife r Maloney and Katrin Stuehmeier teammed up to win the 15-18, 400 freestyle relay. C o n o r M a c D o n a ld o f M iddletow n lo w e re d th e tim e s on h is ow n team records in both the 11-12 age group 50 breaststroke and 100 breaststroke by win­ ning a gold medal in each event. His time in the 100 breaststroke also earned him an East Field record. M acD onald distinguished him self at the recent New Jersey Junior Olympics by winning the same two events and, in so doing, qualifying for the New Jersey AU­ , Star Zone,'t$am headed for Buffalo. N.Y. He also placed second at East Field in the

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200 IM and added gold medals in both the 1 1-12, 200 fre esty le relay w ith D aryl A lb e rt, K arl F ric k e r and M ich ael M cG o u g h and th e 20 0 m e d le y w ith Fricker, McGough and Adam Elzer. Both relays set new team records. M ichael M cGough and Karl Fricker, both of Middletown, added team records in individual events: McGough in the 11­ 12 age group 50 butterfly, and Fricker in the 11-12, 100 butterfly. McGough won silver medals in the 50 butterfly and 50 freestyle, and a bronze in the 100 butter­ fly. Fricker earned a silver medal in the 100 butterfly and a bronze in the 50 but­ terfly. Renee M cClelland joined team m ates Lauren Jennings, Liza Perrotta and Lesley Muldoon to set a team record in the 11-12 age group 200 medley relay, breaking a record that stood for over 10 years. A dditional medal winners for the Red Bank swim team included Chris Curcia ( f ir s t, 15-18, 200 b u tte rfly ); R ach el Shwartz (first, 13-14, 500 freestyle; first, 400 freestyle relay with A llison K elly, E rin M cG rath and L a u ra V o o rh ees); Colleen O ’Boyle (first, 15-18, 500 free­ style; fourth, 200 IM; second, 15-18, 200 m edley relay with Laurie Sim es, Juliet Chin and Linda Gallo); Kristen Szumera (second, 13-14, 200 breaststroke; fourth, Senior 400 IM); Ian King (third. Senior 1,650 freestyle); and Paul Pinther (third, 15-18, 100 backstroke; second, 15-18, 200 m edley relay with Tom W ilkens, Paul Florio and Rob Kelly). A silver medal was added by the 9-10 b o y s ’ 200 m ed le y re la y team w ith Jonathan Van Assen, Alex M iller, Matt Titko and Greg Elzer.

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Ellamony, with six consecutive victories top 10 eligibles list for the Sire Stakes final. in only seven career starts this year, heads a Ellamony was the only filly in the series field of 10 eligible for the $100,000 New to win three legs. Jersey Sire Stakes Championship Final for Other winners in the third and final leg of 3-year-old pacing fillies on Thursday at The the NJSS series on May 31 were Heavy Meadowlands. T hunder (A lbert A lbert) in 1:53.4 and The daughter of Cam Fella was the only Nuke’s Magic (No Nukes) in 1:54.4. Both New Jersey-sired filly in the three-leg series fillies are eligible to the championship final. Ellamony and Immortality also head a to go undefeated, including a victory over Immortality, the nation’s top 2-year-old pac­ list of 63 sophomore pacing fillies eligible to ing filly of-1992. ■ ■ ,i i . the $175,000 Miss .New, Jersey Pace, scjiedImmortality (No Nukes) did not make the . uled for Jilrid 24 at Thfc MeaddxVlands. _ _ J

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JUNE 9, 1993, THE INDEPENDENT S P O R T S

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T he D eS im one fam ily o f A berdeen Township didn’t win New Jersey’s Pick-6 Lotto drawing on Thursday, but they cer­ tainly hit their own version of the jackpot. Within the last week, Ray DeSimone, a sen io r at Long Island U n iv ersity , was selected by the Texas Rangers in the 40th round o f M ajor League B aseball’s am a­ teur draft. His sister, Marisa, a senior at Matawan R e g io n a l H igh School, earned a s c h o la rs h ip to play ten n is and so ftb a ll and M onm outh C ol­ lege, West Long Branch. “ I ’ve w aited a long tim e for th is o n e ,” Ray said. “ I t’s been four years since I left high school and I ’ve been p assed up in three drafts. This w as m y la st chance and I ’m ju s t g la d I ’m M a r is a D e S im o n e fin a lly g e ttin g the chance. “The last couple of years I put up some good num bers but I knew deep in my heart I wasn’t ready and it showed that in the (previous) drafts. The scouts are very knowledgeable about what they do and I think this was the first year I was ready to go, even though I w ould have liked to have gone earlier. But this is just great.” D e S im o n e w as n am e d th e 1993 Northeast Conference Player of the Year, hitting .375 with 10 doubles, 10 triples and one home run as the leadoff hitter for the Blackbirds. The 6-1, 190-pound short­ stop led the conference with 51 base hits and with his 10 triples. A fte r g ra d u a tin g fro m M ataw an

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Regional High School in 1989, DeSimone starred at Brookdale Community College in Lincroft and was selected as the 1991 P la y e r o f th e Y ea r in Ju n io r C o lleg e Region XIX. DeSimone said he expects to sign his professional contract with Rangers’ scout O m ar M in a y a to d a y . H e ’ll le a v e on Thursday and report to Erie, Pa., o f the Class A New York-Penn League. M a r is a , m e a n w h ile , a lso rec eiv e d good news, gaining a full athletic scholar­ ship to Monmouth College. Monmouth College softball coach Pat A d o rn o had b een in te re s te d in the Huskies’ standout centerfielder for a long time but was unable to offer DeSimone a full scholarship. After Long Island University offered DeSimone a full scholarship, Monmouth came back and offered her an additional tennis scholarship to make up the differ­ ence. “I’m very happy,” Marisa said. “I wait­ ed for so long and I thought I was going to end up going to B rookdale. I had ju st about given up.” DeSim one, a 12-letter winner during her scholastic career, capped her softball career for the Huskies by hitting .535 with five doubles, five triples, three home runs and 25 RBI along with 15 stolen bases in 1993. She said it sh o u ld n ’t be a problem playing two sports in college. “I love tennis and it will keep me in shape,” she said. “I ’m probably still going to get to play a little bit of fall softball. I really like tennis so I don’t mind it at all and it shouldn’t create any problems (with schoolwork) because I ’d be playing soft­ ball in the fall anyway. I’ll be putting in the same amount of time either way.” Ray and M arisa said they were happy for the success each has enjoyed. “It’s just great for M arisa,” Ray said. “She’s put up some awesome numbers the last four years. She got All-Shore honors this year and she deserves everything she gets. M onm outh was a great choice for her - that’s where she wanted to go from the start and that’s where she’s going.” “It feels great,” said Marisa. “I don’t know how it’s happened but things are just going right for us so far. We both got what we were hoping for and we couldn’t be any happier.”

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The Holmdel Stallions Soccer Club will hold open tryouts for travel teams that will begin play in the 1993 fall season. ' Teams will play five games at home (Thompson Park or Dorbrook Park) and five away games. The teams will also participate in tournaments. Players will be selcted based on skill. The tryouts are open only to Holmdel res­ idents. Teams will be formed only if coaches and enough players participate. Anyone interested in siging up as a player or volunteering as a coach should contact one of the following individuals for additional information: 1979-80 boys, coaches/players needed, call Daryl Cutillo, 946-7684; 1979-80 girls, players needed, Gene Luciani, 946-9246; 1980-81 boys, coaches/players needed, Dean Vlecides, 888-3330; 1981-82 girls, coaches/players needed, Frank Bacchus, 741-3101; 1981-82 boys, coaches/players needed, Frank Bacchus, 741­ 3101; 1982-83 boys, players needed, Paul Clayson, 946-1638; 1982-83 girls, coaches/players needed, Paul Clayson, 946-1638; 1983-84 boys, players needed, C harlie B ernoskie, 888-1689; 1983-84 g irls, coaches/players needed, Frank Bacchus, 741-3101; 1984*85 girls and boys, players needed, Ray Malapero, 946­ 0745; 1985-86 girls and boys, players needed, Ray Malapero, 946-0745. To qualify for an age group, players must be bom on or after Aug. 1 o f the team ’s year. For example, 1984-85 players would be from Aug. 1, 1984 through July 31, 1985 (or younger).

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One was the classic wait-your-turn suc­ cess story w hile the other cam e in and starred immediately. One has shown the ability to overcom e obstacles w hile the o ther has show n a knack for avoiding them. One is the leader of the team while the other is her successor. They are Kim Yale and Ann M arie Schw arz and they re p re se n t the past and fu tu re o f K ean College softball. It took a long time for Yale to get her m o m en t in th e su n . T he M id d le to w n North High School graduate stretched the anterior cruciate ligament in her knee and damaged some car­ tilage as a junior in high school. Y ale h ad s u r ­ g ery d o n e on th e knee and was ready to play softball for Kean in 1990. Dur­ ing w in te r b re a k , just before softball se a so n , Y ale to re the ligam ent in the same knee and had to h av e su rg e ry Kim Yale again. She m issed the 1990 season and wound up on the side­ lines in 19 9 1 as well when she failed her physical. “ I figured my career was d efinitely over,” she said. “I was upset but I wanted to wait and talk to the doctor. He was very positive about my chances of playing and then I figured I would be back in a year. W hen I failed the second tim e I really th o u g h t it w as o v er b u t (head co ach ) R enee C lark e co n v in ced me to tak e a retest and I passed. I was shocked but extremely satisfied.” W hen Y ale rejoined the softball team in 1992 she found herself behind Donna Nocera, the incumbent first baseman. Biding her time as a pinch hitter and p art-tim e sta rte r, Y ale fin ally got h er break three-quarters o f the way through the ’92 season when Nocera went down with an elbow injury. Starting the final third o f the season, Yale wound up third on the team in hitting with a .396 average. She had 19 hits and 9 RBI. As im pressive as her hittin g w as, it paled in comparison to her fielding. Yale was third on the team with 89 putouts to go w ith seven assists and tw o d ouble plays. The C ougars’ first baseman com­ mitted just one error as she boasted a .990 fielding efficiency. Yale was a huge rea­

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son w hen K ean fin is h e d 3 0 -1 2 and received a bid to the NCAA Regionals. “Kim did a superb job for us,” Clarke said. “She hadn’t played softball in over four years and had every excuse not to play well. She didn’t let anything get in the way of her determination to succeed. She had worked too hard to make it back to fail.” This season, there was no first base com petition. W ith eight starters having graduated from last y ea r’s squad, Yale found herself as the elder statesman and captain of the team. With those qualifications, she felt as if she was needed to become the leader. “I became a leader because I was the captain and 1 knew it was going to be my last y e a r,” Y ale said. “ I m ade m y self available for the younger players to talk to m e on and o ff the field . H o p e fu lly , I helped ease them into the college atmos­ phere.” O ne of the players Yale had an impact on was Schw arz. The freshm an at the Union Tow nship college, who is also a g ra d u a te o f M id d le to w n N o rth H igh School, had an outstanding inaugural sea- . son. Schwarz was third on the team with a .397 batting average, had 11 runs scored, 10 RBI and ended the cam paign with a six-game hitting streak. “ Kim was a really big influence on m e ,” S c h w a rz sa id . “ T he d iffe re n c e between high school and college was a lot tougher than I expected and she helped me get through it. She told me not to quit and was always there for me. She was a strong leader for the team.” Schw arz’s tim ing couldn’t have been better. W ith the entire starting outfield from the previous year graduated, she stepped right into the startng left field slot. “ I th o u g h t I w o u ld be a b ench warmer,” she said. “I was shocked when I found out I would be starting. I had a lot of people helping me adjust like Kim and (centerfielder) Terri Day. I was nervous but they relaxed me and just told me to do my best.” A fo u r-y ear starte r fo r M iddletow n N o rth in c e n te rfie ld and at c a tc h e r, Schw arz recorded 42 putouts and three assists this spring, and com m itted ju st three errors for a .938 fielding efficiency. “Ann Marie has the potential to be a great player in this league,” Clarke said. “She was outstanding as a freshman but could be even better over the next three seasons.” T h is a r t ic l e w a s w r it t e n b y th e K e a n C o lle g e S p o rts In fo r m a tio n D e p a rtm e n t.

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JUNE 9, 1993, THE INDEPENDENT S P O R T S shorts. No shoes or socks should be worn. R egistra tio n b eg in s im m ed ia tely al the Recreation Center for these classes which will be given by R ick's Gym at a cost o f $40. Details: 739-0653. Tryouts will be held for girls’ Division IV and Division V travel soccer teams. Players must be born Aug. 1, 1982 through July 31, 1984 or Aug. 1, 1984 through July 31, 1986. Tryouts will be held from 6-7:30 p.m. Monday and Tuesday at the H azlet United Soccer Complex, Green Acres Drive. Team candi­ dates should come ready to play. Details: John Lomicky, 739-4611.

Peter M asucci. 17, o f Aberdeen placed fifth in the Class 1 Division all-around competition al the 20th Boys" Junior Olympic Gymnastic National Championships held at the University of Michigan. Ann Arbor, on May 6-9. Masucci scored a total of 106.4 points in the all-around while finishing fourth on horizontal bar, fifth on pommel horse and 16th on still rings and parallel bars. His fifth-place finish qualifies him for the Junior Olympic National Team. George Beatty. 16, o f Aberdeen placed 63rd in the Class 1 Division all-around, with a 17thplace finish on parallel bars and a 24th-place finish on floor exercise. Tim Eisner, 16, of M iddletow n placed 12th in the C lass 2 Division with a seventh-place finish on paral­ lel bars, 13th-place showing on floor exercise and a 23rd-place finish on vault. The gym ­ nasts, w ho co m p ete for W orld Cup Gymnastics of Marlboro, are coached by Bill B a lo g h , M arek K u z d r a and A n d r ei Chermanko.

T he H a zlet R ec rea tio n C om m ission will sponsor a soccer camp July 12-16 from 9 a.m. to noon and held at the Hazlet soccer fields. The camp, for boys and girls ages 6-14, costs $ 8 5 , which includes a T-shirt and a ball. Registration begins immediately and can be co m p leted at the R ecreation C enter in Veterans Memorial Park. Details: 739-0653. The Hazlet Recreation Commission is spon­ soring a tennis program for beginners and intermediates ages 8-18 at the Raritan High S ch o ol ten n is cou rts. P re-registration is required for this program which will begin July 6 and continue for five weeks, with an additional week during which a tennis tourna­ ment will be held. One hour o f instruction will be given twice a week. Students must have their own racket and wear proper attire. The cost o f the program is $ 3 0 . Adult tennis lessons will be given if there is enough o f a response. Details: 739-0653.

D o u g o u t has ta k e n over the lead o f the Strathmore Men’s Softball League with a 9-2 record. In its most recent action, Dougout defeated the Hobby Shop. 6-2. Sitting one gam e out o f first place are T etros II and Tetros, both at 9-3. Tetros swept two games from Dan’s Lawn Service, 11-1 and 8-1: while Tetros II topped L&L Oil Co., 12-2 and 8-4. Four Seasons improved to 7-5 by splitting two games vs. Dougout Knights, winning 7-6 and losing 8-4. Rounding out the league standings are Dougout Knights (6-6), Hobby Shop (3-8), L&L Oil Co. (2-10) and Dan’s Lawn Service

A Pop W arner Football Camp sponsored by Keyport Recreation will be held from 2-5 p.m. July 19-23 at Keyport High School. The camp is open to all boys participating in Pop Warner football. The camp will be directed by former Keyport High School assistant varsity football coach and teacher Miguel Hernandez. This is a non-contact camp. Registration fee: $40. Applications accepted through July 5. Details: Miguel Hernandez, 264-9283 (leave message).

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H A Z L E T In Hazlet United Soccer Association action on May 22, the Bears beat the Warriors, 2-1. H erm an B arron scored both goals for the Bears. Patrick Coughlin, Michael Niedbala and Brian Murphy excelled for the Warriors. Mallory Sullivan scored her first goal of the season for the Warriors, with an assist from Jonathan Gliet. David Druckm an scored a hat trick for the Lightning in a 7-1 win over the Flames. Robert M iller and Greg Nuber also scored. In a game played May 26, the B litz beat the R enegades, 3-1. Goals were scored by Brian Scheller and Renee Driscoll. Good goalkeeping was provided by Colleen Grech and John Trela. Anthony C oppola, Juan A ran cib ia and D en n is C leary were cited for outstanding efforts.

Jefferson High School wrestling coach Mike R o sse tti, M iddletow n South High School coach Tom Erbig and Elizabeth High School coach Gerry Niscivoccia will be three o f the featured c lin ic ia n s at the seventh annual Husky Wrestling Camp. The camp will run from 6 -1 0 p.m . July 19-23 at M atawan R egion al High S ch o o l, A tlan tic A ven u e, Aberdeen. A lso ask about the Jersey Shore Summer Duals, team competition, (July 26­ 30). Details: Art Perri, 566-0154.

T he H azlet R ecrea tio n C om m ission w ill sponsor an Introduction to Karate program for children ages 5 and up from July 20 through Aug. 12. Six one-hour classes will be held on Tuesdays and Thursdays at the Recreation Office in Veterans Memorial Park from 1-2 p.m. Students are required to wear sweats or

The Husky W restling Club will run its work­ outs now through June 21 on Mondays and T hursdays from 6 :3 0 -8 :3 0 p.m . at the M atawan R eg io n a l H igh S ch o o l gym . Children in kindergarten through 12th grade are eligible to participate. Details: Art Perri, 566-0154, or Bob W ernersbach, 583-4088.

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The River Plaza Boys’ Club will hold tryouts for a 15-year-old summer league baseball team from 2-4 p.m. Sunday at Nutswamp Park. For more information, call Mike Hughes at 530­ 6897. The M iddletown R ockets, a 1983-84 girls’ travel soccer team, won its division at the Brick Township Memorial Day Tournament with a 4-0 record. During the MonmouthOcean Soccer Association Spring 1993 season, the Rockets won their (girls’ 1983-84) division with an 8-0-1 record, outscoring their oppo­ nents, 24-3. That followed an MOSA Spring 1992 campaign that saw the Rockets roll to an 8-1-1 record and a second-place division fin­ ish. In the fall of 1992, the Rockets won their flig h t at the L acey T ow n sh ip S o ccer T ournam ent. Team m em bers are: J illia n B u c h a n a n , K r iste n K n u d se n , W h itn ey B oglioli, C heryl W ittlieb, M egan V illane, C a itly n W o y ch , K r iste n M u s c a r e lla , C o lle e n D o b so n , K a tie S u p o n , E rin O sb o r n e , L o u isa F o ss, A le x a n d r a M acDonald, Sarah Cortese, Molly Gorman, K atie Y ahara, Erin Bedell and S tephanie Thompson. The Rockets are coached by Sam D eP aulis, M ike G orm an, Paul B uchanan and Brian Bedell.

R E G IO N A L The Hazlet 5K Rainbow Run/Walk for run­ ners, race walkers and health walkers will be held at 9 a.m. June 27 (rain or shine) at Hazlet Veterans Park and Swim Club. All proceeds will benefit the Rainbow Foundation for seri­ ously ill children. Pre-entry: $10 (by June 22); Post entry: $12 day o f race. Registration forms can be p ick ed up at the H azlet Library. Details: 671-4343. The 1993 077 Postal Bowling League began in earnest on May 11. Last year’s champion, Speedy Limo, got off to a slow start and is cur­ rently sitting in last place. The ’92 runner-up, Fire and Ice Press, is back with a revamped lineup. Only team captain Ed McDermott of Middletown remains from last year's quartet. He’s joined by Sue Braun of Neptune, Phyllis D e s id e r io and S h a r o n T u r n e r , both o f Manalapan. in an attempt to dethrone Speedy L im o. The peren n ial fa v o rite, H olm del Country Club, once again is laden with talent, Charles Castles Sr., Charles Castles Jr. and P a u l C a stle s o f M id d letow n , and P ete M cKeon round out a team that is strikingly similar to the aptly named Misfits. Not to be forgotten in the hunt for glory is a new entry: Those Guys!

Airport. Scott Strausbaugh, an Olympic gold medalist in whitewater slalom canoeing, will be among the athletes who will be conducting clin ics, presentations and dem onstrations throughout the day. Admission: $6 for adults, $3 for children 12 and under. Details: 1-718­ 946-4095. The Jersey Shore Summer Lacrosse League, which plays its games at the National Guard Training Center in Sea Girt, is accepting appli­ cations for the 1993 season. The campaign will run Sundays from June 20 to Aug. 22. There are three levels of competition - youth (grad es four through eig h t), high school (grades nine through 12) and open (college age and older). Fees are $65 for youth and $80 for high school and open. Pre-registration dead­ line is June 16. In-person registration will be held at 10 a.m. June 20 at the National Guard Training Center. Details: Roland G agne, 1­ 201-335-8057 or Mark Hellenack, 290-2914. Freehold Raceway Mall, Route 9, Freehold Township, will host East End Volleyball the week of July 8-11. The Diet Pepsi Beach Fest ’93 will feature events for players of all skill levels, from novice to experienced. At the Freehold Raceway Mall tourney, the EEVB will provide coaches who will conduct clinics on the basic skills of beach volleyball. Details: 1-516-728-0397. Seasons Resort at Great Gorge, N.J., will be the site o f the New Jersey State Elks Youth Tournaments in golf, bowling and tennis, July 18-20. The competitions in all three sports have both boys and girls senior (under 19) and junior (under 17) divisions. Participating Elks lodges among the 137 throughout the state are sponsoring student-athletes to these competi­ tions. For more information, interested appli­ cants should contact their local Elks lodge or Richard Pachucki at 647-1731 or 968-0414. Hills Soccer Camp will conduct two summer sessions at Thorne Middle School, M iddle­ town, from July 26-30 and Aug. 2-6. Boys and girls ages 5-14 (beginners, interm ediates, advanced) are eligible to enroll in the camp. A specialized goalie and striker camp is also being offered. For more information, call Joe LaSpada, 537-7248.

T he M onm outh C ounty Park System will conduct a “Baseball Basics” clinic for young­ sters entering first and second grade from July 12-16 at Dorbrook Park R ecreation Area, Route 537, Colts Neck. The sessions will meet from 1-4 p.m. Cost is $45 and pre-registration is required. Details: 842-1900. T he M onm outh C ounty Park'System will offer b oys’ and girls’ basketball clinics this summer. The boys' clinic, for youths in grades six through nine, w ill be held at St. John Vianney High School, Line Road, Holmdel, from July 5-9. The sessions will run from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Cost is $90. The girls’ clinic (same grade levels) will be held from July 12­ 16 at St. John Vianney High School. Sessions will run from 9 a.m. to noon. Cost is $55. Pre­ registration is required. Details: 842-4000.

t A Co-Ed Cross Country Clinic will be con­ ducted by the Monmouth County Park System at Holmdel Park from Aug. 9-13. Youngsters ages 13-18 may attend. The fee is $45 and pre­ registration is required. Details: 842-4000.

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Wall Stadium will host open cockpit ThreeQuarter M idget racing on Saturday. The midgets will race over 25 laps in their feature. Small-Block Modifieds, Pro Stocks and Street Stocks will also be on the card at the Route 34, Wall Township, speedway. Gates open at 5 p.m.; racing starts at 7 p.m. Details: 681-6400. Outdoor Quest ’93, the second annual New Jersey outdoor sports/adventure travel expo will be held Sunday from 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. at the Holiday Inn North adjacent to Newark

S U P E R , M A N — M a ta w a n R e g i o n a l H ig h S c h o o l s e n io r T y r o n e G a rla n d fo llo w s th ro u g h o n h is s h o t p u t e f f o r t a t th e J u n e 2 sta te M e et o f C h a m p io n s in S o u th P la in fie ld . G a rla n d w o n th e s h o t p u t ( 63 - 53/4) a n d d is c u s ( 1 7 6 - 1 ) c ro w n s . (Photo b y Bob Bruce)

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MEET YOUR MATCH Common Abbreviations M-Male F-Female S-Single D-Divorced C-Christian J-Jewish * A-Asian B-Black H-Kispanic W-White

5’2” EYES BLUE 52

DWF professional educator, size 10. Are you: SDWM, in­ telligent, fit, funny, sophisti­ cated. spiritual, well read, playful, good communicator., nonsmoker. 50-65. #2624

WWF. pretty, full figured. En­ joys dancing, dining & ro­ mance. Looking for caring, in­ telligent man. 40-50. with a great sense of humor. #2594

COMPUTER NUT

Seeks 50 something. Doctor, Lawyer or Indian Chief. I can be described SWF. blond, size 10, attractive, creative, cultured&romantic. #2700

FEMININE LADY

To Place An Ad 1-800-660-4ADS ADS FROMWOMEN

ADSFROMWOMEN LOOKIN' LADY

SWF 42. Lookin’ to leave job. housework-n-kids behind! Lookin' laughter, great times, &what­ ever withSDWM42+. #2668 LOOKING FOR MR. RIGHT SJF. 27, professional, petite, caring, honest. Enjoys com­ edy clubs, dining out, movies, sports. Seeks SJM. 27-33, for longtermrelationship. #2733

ahead to sharing

LOTS TO LOVE

Attractive, professional. Indian DF 42, European educated, myriad of interests. Seeks gentleman 40+, caring, funny, easygoing, romantic, pos­ sessesheart of gold. #2728

Plus size brunette. 37, pretty, affectionate. Enjoys board­ walk. movies, interesting con-, versation. Seeks caring, sta­ ble, 35 plus man for friend­ ship. possible romance. #2606

FOXY

■LOVE CONNECTION

Attractive WJF, 39, looking to SJF, 29, professional non­ meet gentfeman 40-45 who smoker. Brown hair eyes, ARE YOU LONELY would like to share exciting & slimwho enjoys dining, danc­ ing, comedy clubs & being WDF 34. fun loving, active funtimes. #2662 with that special someone. blonde, blue eyed, cute, per­ S eeks SJM, 29-40, non­ sonable. Enjoys dancing, GORGEOUS GIRL smoker, non-drugs for rela­ movies, dining, pets. Seeks tio health SDWM35-42, same in­ SBF. Professional, very attrac­ nship. #2611 ~ terests. #2639 tive, sensuous, fit, aplomb, UCKY LADY clectic, discerning, amiable, DWF 4L ATTRACTIVE BLOND e 3. If you enjoy beach, unencumbered. Seeking edu­ s Petite DWF, caring, active, cated. scrupulous. Congenial, wimming, theater, movies, sensuous, professional.loves $ secure, fit. affectionate. WM, dining out, family, friends, value class, intelligence, charmusic, theater, museums, professional, 34-41. #2740 acter-we have a lot in com­ dancing, dining. Seeks se­ cure, attractive, intelligent, HORSE &DOG LOVER mon. #2687 fun-loving nonsmoker, physi­ DCWF, 57. lonely, not desper­ ETALHEAD callyfit, WM49-59. #2658 ate, active horse/dog breeder. SWF 2M , quiet, blonde, blue Loves C/W, snowmobiles, pic­ eyes, a1ttra ATTRACTIVE ctive, shapely. En­ nics. trail rides. Smoke, drink SBWprofessional, aggressive, occasionally. No drugs. Com­ joys metal concerts, movies, independent. In search of patible gentle man. Love beach. Seeks SWM 21-26 who enjoys same. Middlesex SBM who is down to earth & takes time. #2667 County area. #2666 honest. Drugfree. #2752

&

PROFESSIONAL

DWF enjoys life, healthy bal­ ance of career and recreation. Seeks attractive, professional SDWM 48-56 to share laugh­ ter, quiet treasures. #2597

times, nature, life's

ADS FROMWOMEN WILLINGTO TRY

SAF, 18, 53", interested in meeting Mr. Right. Friendship, -efationship. Will this work? It's up to you. Respond seri­ ously, I'll listen. #2739

ready for you

SWF 36, 57", educated pro­ ADS FROMMEN fessional seeks her equal. Wishes a chivalrous gentle­ man, traditional values, must be emotionally available, no 1 ELECTRIC SLIDE game playing. #2694 Early riser, nice looking. Loves moonlight strolls, sim­ REWARD! le times, dressing up, New Seeking Mr. Right, 29-35, car­ p the Shore, ing, considerate, funny, hon­ Hope, S est. If you've seen this man, hakespeare, Country. Fears please call this SWF 29 for: no“C" words! #2688 your lifetime reward. #2697

SENSITIVE

A ROMANTIC

DWM 52, romantic seeks dy, 40's. Likes walks along SWF 50, Attractive, educated, la b each, holding hands with sense
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