monday, may 1, 2017 - Northeastern University

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NEXT GENERATION QUESTIONS FOR A JUST WORLD

MONDAY, MAY 1, 2017

PRESENTED BY

NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF LAW AND ITS CENTER FOR LAW, INNOVATION AND CREATIVITY (CLIC) SPONSORED BY NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY’S IP/Innovation Connection • Global Resilience Institute • College of Arts, Media and Design • College of Computer and Information Science D’Amore-McKim School of Business • College of Social Sciences and Humanities • Humanities Center

SCHEDULE M O N D AY , M AY 1 , 2 0 1 7

8:30 - 9:00 a.m. R E G I S T R AT I O N

10:45 - 11:00 a.m. BREAK

9:00 - 9:30 a.m. WELCOME

11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. PA N E L 2

Jessica Silbey, Professor of Law, Northeastern University School of Law

Ubiquity of the Copy: Impact of IP on Architecture and Urban Life

James Bean, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, Northeastern University

9:30 - 10:45 a.m. PA N E L 1

The Internet of Future Bodies MODERATOR:

Andrea Matwyshyn, Professor of Law, Northeastern University School of Law PANELISTS:

Phoebe Li, Senior Lecturer in Law, University of Sussex Jay Radcliffe, Senior Security Consultant and Researcher, Rapid7 Abigail Slater, General Counsel, The Internet Association Frank Pasquale, Professor of Law, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law Gretchen Stubenvoll, IP and Corporate Counsel

INTRODUCTION:

Elizabeth Hudson, Dean, College of Arts, Media and Design, Northeastern University MODERATOR:

Amanda Reeser Lawrence, Associate Professor, School of Architecture, College of Arts, Media and Design, Northeastern Univerity PANELISTS:

Ana Miljacki Associate Professor, School of Architecture, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Jay Wickersham, Partner, Noble, Wickersham & Heart Kevin Collins, Professor of Law, Washington University School of Law Cammy Brothers, Associate Professor, School of Architecture, College of Arts, Media and Design, Northeastern University

12:15 - 12:30 p.m. BREAK

12:30 - 2:00 p.m. LUNCH INTRODUCTION:

Carla Brodley, Dean, College of Computer and Information Science, Northeastern University

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Sarah Jeong, Journalist and Lawyer, Vice Motherboard

2:15 - 3:30 p.m. PA N E L 3

3:45 - 5:00 p.m. PA N E L 4

The Gig Economy: Algorithms and the Communities We Create

Renewable Energy, Resilience and Innovation

MODERATOR:

Uta Poiger, Dean, College of Social Sciences and Humanities, Northeastern University

Rashmi Dyal-Chand, Professor of Law, Northeastern University School of Law PANELISTS:

MODERATOR:

Jason Jackson, Future Faculty Fellow, Department of Political Science, Northeastern University

Lee Breckenridge, Professor of Law, Northeastern University School of Law

Veena Dubal, Associate Professor of Law, UC Hastings College of the Law

Jennie Stephens, Dean’s Professor of Sustainability Science and Policy and Associate Director, Global Resilience Institute, Northeastern University

Sushil Jacob, Associate, Tuttle Law Group Christo Wilson, Assistant Professor of Computer Science, College of Computer and Information Science, Northeastern University

2:00 - 2:15 p.m. BREAK

INTRODUCTION:

3:30 - 3:45 p.m. BREAK

PANELISTS:

Josh Castonguay, Vice President of Innovation and Generation, Green Mountain Power Jon Klavens, Principal, Klavens Law Group Ann Berwick, Director of Sustainability, City of Newton

5:00 - 6:30 p.m. CLOSING REMARKS AND RECEPTION Jeremy Paul, Dean, Northeastern University School of Law

ANN BERWICK

LEE BRECKENRIDGE

CAMMY BROTHERS

Director of Sustainability, City of Newton

Professor of Law, Northeastern University School of Law

Ann Berwick served as chair of the Department of Public Utilities (DPU) under Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick from 2010 until 2015. She was also president of the New England States Committee on Electricity from 2012 to 2015. She was previously the commonwealth’s undersecretary for energy and acting chair of the Energy Facility Siting Board. Berwick served as chief of the Environmental Protection Division in the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office from 1991 to 1996, where she exercised joint oversight of the Massachusetts Environmental Strike Force. She has been a legal services attorney and a partner in the litigation department at the Boston law firm Goulston & Storrs. In addition to her current post as director of sustainability for the city of Newton, she is a writer and consultant on energy issues and climate change, and serves on the boards of nonprofit organizations.

Lee Breckenridge specializes in environmental and natural resources law, land use zoning and planning, and administrative law. She coordinates Northeastern University School of Law’s dual-degree JD/MELP program and other interdisciplinary programs in environmental and natural resources law. She is an affiliated faculty member of Northeastern’s School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs. She has a particular interest in the evolution of property and regulatory systems to manage transboundary environmental conflicts and coordinate urban demands with the needs of healthy ecosystems. Previously, she served as assistant attorney general and chief of the Environmental Protection Division at the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office, and in other federal and state government posts.

Associate Professor, School of Architecture, College of Arts, Media and Design, Northeastern University

BIOGRAPHIES

Cammy Brothers is a joint associate professor between Architecture and Art + Design at Northeastern University. She previously taught at the University of Virginia, where she held the Valmarana Chair and was founder and director of the Venice Program. An art and architectural historian of the Italian Renaissance, she is the author of the prize-winning book, Michelangelo, Drawing, and the Invention of Architecture, in addition to numerous articles, book chapters and reviews. She is currently completing a book on Giuliano da Sangallo and the Ruins of Rome. Her other publications consider topics such as theories of imitation in Renaissance literary and architectural culture; Mediterranean artistic exchange; and architectural representations.

JOSH CASTONGUAY

KEVIN COLLINS

RASHMI DYAL-CHAND

Vice President of Innovation and Generation, Green Mountain Power

Professor of Law, Washington University School of Law

Professor of Law, Northeastern University School of Law

Josh Castonguay has responsibility for the power generation fleet and engineering team at Green Mountain Power (GMP) as well as GMP’s innovation and transformation. He graduated from the University of Maine in 2003 with a degree in electrical engineering technology and immediately went to work at Green Mountain Power as an electrical engineer. Prior to his role as vice president, Castonguay held various positions in the organization, including leading the field organization and the control centers. He is now leading efforts at GMP to transform the energy delivery system and customer energy experience, shifting from a large-scale power plant and transmission system to a distributed energy model that is much more home, business and community-based. He developed the country’s first energy company partnership with TESLA to deliver home battery energy storage directly to customers.

Kevin Emerson Collins is a professor of law and director of the Intellectual Property and Technology Law Program at Washington University School of Law in St. Louis. With an undergraduate degree from Yale in molecular biophysics and biochemistry, a JD from Stanford Law School and clerkships with Judge Sotomayor on the Second Circuit Court of Appeals and Judge Clevenger on the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, he writes regularly on patent protection for software and biotechnology inventions. Before becoming a legal academic, he earned a master’s of architecture from Columbia University and worked as a project architect with Bernard Tschumi Architects in New York and Paris. He is the author of a forthcoming book on the intellectual property of architecture.

Rashmi Dyal-Chand’s research and teaching focus on property law, poverty, economic development and consumer law. Her recent projects have examined the theory and practice of sharing in property law. Her article, “Human Worth as Collateral,” won the 2006 Association of American Law Schools scholarly papers competition for new law teachers. Her work has appeared in journals including the Cardozo Law Review, Fordham Law Review and Stanford Journal of International Law. She is also an editor of Northeastern University School of Law’s SSRN online publication, Human Rights and the Global Economy. She is currently completing a book on collaborative capitalism.

VEENA DUBAL

JASON JACKSON

SUSHIL JACOB

Associate Professor of Law, UC Hastings College of the Law

Future Faculty Fellow, Department of Political Science, Northeastern University

Associate, Tuttle Law Group

Veena Dubal’s research focuses on the intersection of law and social change in the work context. Within this broad frame, she uses empirical methodologies to study (1) the meaning of law in the lives of precarious workers, (2) the role of public interest lawyering in social change movements and (3) the normative social influences of the law for work, race and family. Dubal joined the Hastings faculty in 2015 after a post-doctoral fellowship at Stanford University (her undergraduate alma mater). Prior to that, Dubal received her JD and PhD from UC Berkeley, where she used historical and ethnographic methodologies to study workers and worker collectivities in the San Francisco taxi industry. The subject of her doctoral research arose from her own experiences as a public interest attorney and Berkeley Law Foundation fellow at the Asian Law Caucus, where she founded a taxi worker project and represented Muslim Americans in civil rights cases. Complementing her academic scholarship, Dubal’s legal commentary is regularly featured in the local and national media, particularly her current research on precarious workers in the “sharing economy.”

Jason Jackson is a Future Faculty Fellow in the Department of Political Science at Northeastern University and a lecturer at MIT. His current research focuses on the relationship between states and markets in contexts ranging from the politics of monopoly and foreign investment in India from the late colonial period to the present, to the “sharing economy” and urban transportation markets in contemporary cities in Asia, Africa and the Americas. He completed his PhD in political economy at MIT. He also holds an AB in economics from Princeton University, an MSc in development economics from the University of London School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) and an MPA from the Harvard Kennedy School.

Sushil Jacob represents business entities that are considering various strategies for increasing employee ownership, including employee and worker cooperatives, employee owned trusts and Internet-based platform cooperatives. He specializes in converting traditional business forms to cooperative ownership. He was a principal drafter of, and counsel to, the coalition that passed the California Worker Cooperative Act (AB 816), which went into effect on January 1, 2016. Prior to joining the Tuttle Law Group, Jacob worked with the East Bay Community Law Center, where he founded the Green-Collar Communities Clinic, a community economic development practice that assisted clients to create green, worker-owned businesses as a community empowerment strategy. Prior to attending law school at UC Berkeley, Jacob worked in India for two years on community economic development projects, including Just Change, a cooperative of small farmers and indigenous peoples groups in South India. Jacob serves on the board of the Cooperative Center Federal Credit Union, a 72-year-old financial institution in Berkeley that is owned by its 13,000 members. He also serves on the board of the Sustainable Economies Law Center, where he provides guidance to its cooperative legal programs.

SARAH JEONG

JONATHAN KLAVENS

AMANDA REESER LAWRENCE

Journalist and Lawyer, Vice Motherboard

Principal, Klavens Law Group

Sarah Jeong is a lawyer and contributing editor at Vice Motherboard. She is the author of The Internet of Garbage, and has written for The Atlantic, The Washington Post, The New York Times, The Verge, Forbes, The Guardian, Slate and WIRED, among other publications. In 2017, she was named one of Forbes’ “30 Under 30: Media.” Jeong graduated from Harvard Law School in 2014. As a law student, she edited the Harvard Journal of Law & Gender, and worked at the Electronic Frontier Foundation and at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society. She was a Poynter Fellow in Journalism at Yale in 2016, and is currently a fellow at the Internet Law & Policy Foundry.

Drawing on a diverse background in general corporate, securities, energy transactional, energy regulatory, project development, environmental and nonprofit matters, Jon Klavens founded Klavens Law Group in 2007 to help enable innovative ventures that have positive environmental or other social impact. His practice focuses on meeting the diverse legal needs of companies, investors, public entities and nonprofits in the areas of clean energy/clean technology, resource recovery, sustainable agriculture and food ventures, social enterprise and impact investment. He previously practiced law at BCK Law and Goodwin Procter, after serving as a law clerk for the US Court of Appeals for the First Circuit. He holds a BA from Columbia College, an MPP from the Harvard Kennedy School and a JD from Northeastern University School of Law.

Associate Professor, School of Architecture, College of Arts, Media and Design, Northeastern University Amanda Reeser Lawrence received her PhD in architectural history and theory from Harvard University, her M.Arch from Columbia University and her BA (summa cum laude) from Princeton University, with a major in architectural history. She is a tenured associate professor of architecture in the School of Architecture at Northeastern University, where she teaches courses on architectural history and theory. Lawrence is founding coeditor of the award-winning journal, PRAXIS. Her research focuses on a close reading of architectural form — contemporary and historical — with a particular interest in theorizing the role of influence. Her book, James Stirling: Revisionary Modernist, was published by Yale University Press in 2013. Her forthcoming book, Terms of Appropriation, co-edited with Ana Miljacki, will be published by Routledge in 2017. She is completing a manuscript, The Architecture of Influence, to be published by Princeton University Press. Her work has been supported by the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, the Graduate Society at Harvard University and the New York State Council on the Arts.

PHOEBE LI

ANDREA MATWYSHYN

ANA MILJACKI

Senior Lecturer in Law, University of Sussex

Professor of Law, Northeastern University School of Law

Phoebe Li’s research focuses on regulation and intellectual property of emerging technologies. Her work has been funded by the UK AHRC/Newton Fund, EPSRC, ESRC and BILETA. She is the principal investigator of the EPSRC project, “Mass customisation governance: regulation, liability and intellectual property of re-distributed manufacturing in 3D printing.” She is fluent in Mandarin Chinese, and conducts comparative empirical work in the UK, China and Taiwan.

Andrea Matwyshyn is an academic and author whose work focuses on technology and innovation policy, particularly information security, consumer privacy, intellectual property and technology workforce pipeline policy. She received a US-UK Fulbright Commission Cyber Security Scholar award in 2016-2017. In addition to her appointment on the law faculty, she is a professor of computer science (by courtesy), and co-director of the law school’s Center for Law, Innovation and Creativity (CLIC). Matwyshyn has worked in both the public and the private sectors. In 2014, she served as the senior policy advisor/academic in residence at the US Federal Trade Commission. She continues to maintain collaborative technology industry relationships and has authored articles for the popular business press.

Associate Professor, School of Architecture, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Ana Miljacki is a critic and curator in addition to teaching history, theory and design at MIT. She holds a PhD in the history and theory of architecture from Harvard University. Her work focuses on the relationship between politics and the products and circumstances of architectural labor. Her research interests range from the role of architecture and architects in the Cold War era in Eastern Europe through the theories of postmodernism in late socialism to politics of contemporary architectural production. She is the author of The Optimum Imperative: Czech Architecture for the Socialist Lifestyle 1938-1968 (Routledge, 2017). Her forthcoming book, Terms of Appropriation, co-edited with Amanda Reeser Lawrence, will be published by Routledge in 2017.

FRANK PASQUALE

JAY RADCLIFFE

JESSICA SILBEY

Professor of Law, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

Senior Security Consultant and Researcher, Rapid7

Professor of Law, Northeastern University School of Law

Frank Pasquale researches the law of big data, artificial intelligence and algorithms. He has testified before or advised a range of groups, including the US Department of Health and Human Services, the House Judiciary Committee, the Federal Trade Commission and directorates-general of the European Commission. He is the author of The Black Box Society (Harvard University Press, 2015), which has been translated into Chinese, Korean, French and Serbian. He has served on the NSF-sponsored Council for Big Data, Ethics and Society, and the program committees of the Workshop on Data and Algorithmic Transparency and the NIPS Symposium on Machine Learning and the Law. Pasquale has co-authored a casebook on administrative law and co-authored or authored more than 50 scholarly articles. He co-convened the conference, “Unlocking the Black Box: The Promise and Limits of Algorithmic Accountability in the Professions,” at Yale University. He is now at work on a book tentatively titled Laws of Robotics: The Future of Professionalism in an Era of Automation (under contract, Harvard University Press).

Jay Radcliffe has been working in the computer security field for more than 20 years and is currently a senior security consultant and researcher for Rapid7. Coming from the managed security services industry, Radcliffe has used just about every security device made over the last decade. Recently, he has presented groundbreaking research on security vulnerabilities in medical devices at Black Hat, BSides and other technology conferences. Having held an amateur radio license since the age of 12, he is equally comfortable hacking hardware and working a soldering iron as he is in front of a keyboard performing a penetration test. He holds a master’s degree in information security engineering from SANS Technology Institute as well as a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice/pre-law from Wayne State University. SC Magazine named him one of the top influential security thinkers in 2013.

Jessica Silbey is a leading scholar and nationally recognized expert on intellectual property and the use of film to communicate about law. Silbey has altered the national conversation about creativity and invention with her recent book, The Eureka Myth: Creators, Innovators and Everyday Intellectual Property (Stanford University Press, 2014). Silbey is co-editor of the book Law and Justice on the Small Screen (with Peter Robson) and author of numerous law review articles and publications in other venues. In addition to her research on intellectual property, Silbey writes about the use of film as a legal tool (body cams, surveillance video, medical imaging) and the representations of law in popular culture (courtroom dramas, reality television). She is an affiliate fellow at Yale’s Information Society Project and a faculty associate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University. In January 2016, Silbey was elected chair of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) national Section on Intellectual Property and appointed to serve on the AALS Presidential Conference Film Committee. She currently serves as co-chair of the New England Chapter for the Copyright Society of the United States.

ABIGAIL SLATER

JENNIE STEPHENS

GRETCHEN STUBENVOLL

General Counsel, The Internet Association

Dean’s Professor of Sustainability Science and Policy and Associate Director, Global Resilience Institute, Northeastern University

IP and Corporate Counsel

As general counsel at the Internet Association (IA), Abigail Slater is an advocate for members on public policy issues before the courts and regulatory agencies. She also works to build out the IA’s presence overseas, in particular in the EU and before Internet governance bodies. She previously spent 10 years at the Federal Trade Commission, where she worked as an enforcement attorney and as attorney advisor to Commissioner Julie Brill. She first qualified as a lawyer at Freshfields in London and also worked in its Brussels and Washington, DC, offices. She holds law degrees from University College Dublin and Oxford University, and is qualified to practice law in New York, England and Wales.

Jennie Stephens is Dean’s Professor of Sustainability Science and Policy and associate director of the Global Resilience Institute at Northeastern University. Her research, teaching and community engagement focus on social dimensions of the renewable energy transition, reducing fossil fuel reliance and strengthening resilience by integrating social justice with climate-energy policy. She received a 2017 Arab-American Frontiers Fellowship from the National Academy of Sciences and was a 2015-2016 Leopold Leadership fellow. Her co-authored book, Smart Grid (R)Evolution: Electric Power Struggles (Cambridge University Press, 2015), explores social and cultural debates about energy system change. Before joining Northeastern, she was on the faculty at the University of Vermont and Clark University. She earned her PhD and MS at Caltech in environmental science and engineering and her AB at Harvard in environmental science and public policy.

After graduating from Clarkson University (BS in mechanical engineering) and Northeastern University School of Law (JD), Gretchen Stubenvoll went on to become a registered patent attorney with the US Patent and Trademark Office. Throughout her law career, Stubenvoll has advised clients of all sizes on the many aspects of acquiring, protecting and defending intellectual property rights for a wide range of products. She gained her experience as a co-op student, an associate in two large firms, as in-house intellectual property counsel for Medrad, Inc. (a medical products company) and, most recently, as general counsel for Wowza Media Systems (a start-up video streaming software company). She has spent many, many hours prosecuting patent applications, negotiating technology license agreements and defending a multi-million dollar patent litigation to a successful result.

JAY WICKERSHAM

CHRISTO WILSON

Partner, Noble, Wickersham & Heart

Assistant Professor of Computer Science, College of Computer and Information Science, Northeastern University

Jay Wickersham, an architect and lawyer, is a founding partner of the Cambridge, Mass., law firm Noble, Wickersham & Heart, with a practice in architectural and environmental law. He is also the incoming president of the Boston Society of Architects. Wickersham served as assistant secretary of environmental affairs for Massachusetts from 1998 to 2002, and he taught architectural practice and ethics for 15 years at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. He is completing a biography of the 19th-century architect Charles Bulfinch.

Christo Wilson’s research focuses on algorithmic auditing, which is the process of examining black box systems to understand how they work, the data they use and ultimately how these algorithms impact individuals. To date, he has examined systems like personalization on Google Search, price discrimination in e-commerce and surge pricing on Uber. He earned his PhD from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and his research is supported by an NSF CAREER award, the European Commission, the Knight Foundation and the Data Transparency Lab.

northeastern.edu/law/clic

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monday, may 1, 2017 - Northeastern University

NEXT GENERATION QUESTIONS FOR A JUST WORLD MONDAY, MAY 1, 2017 PRESENTED BY NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF LAW AND ITS CENTER FOR LAW, INNOVATIO...

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