new yorker in tondo reaction paper - Larissa Vivien S. Lacar

Loading...
LARISSA VIVIEN S. LACAR

BSCS II-A

October 16, 2013

NEW YORKER IN TONDO REACTION PAPER Taking an opportunity may be the adversity of everything. This is one of the realization being portrayed in the play. There was a typical girl who lives in Tondo with big dreams named “Kikay”. She is a puto vendor who accidentally learned about a scholarship grant to New York from the Chismosa Ladies in the streets and tried her best to avail it. Fortunately, Kikay’s petition to study was approved. It only shows that there’s no harm in trying and in her case, it’s good because she made it. This means that when opportunity comes, grab it because it’s elusive enough to be wasted. Who knows? That certain opportunity may be our most-awaited time and way for making our aspirations come true. Living to other country with different culture like New York also attests how strong her personality is and her identity as a Filipino. Meeting and engaging with the local people there like Alexis, Coreen, Sophia Cassandra, The Image Stylist Gardo, The Happy Go Lucky Guy Henry and Isabel with other classmates do influenced Kikay’s view and way of life. She learned and adopted the New Yorker customs, behavior and lifestyle. This fact eventually turned her into a new person, far from what she used to be in Tondo. Considering this fact, the play implicit how can be a person change in the way she interact and react to an environment she was brought up from the new ones where many external factors will affect and influence her. This also shows that

Loading...

new yorker in tondo reaction paper - Larissa Vivien S. Lacar

LARISSA VIVIEN S. LACAR BSCS II-A October 16, 2013 NEW YORKER IN TONDO REACTION PAPER Taking an opportunity may be the adversity of everything. Thi...

59KB Sizes 0 Downloads 0 Views

Recommend Documents

Foster | The New Yorker
Feb 15, 2010 - Claire Keegan's short story about a child, sent to stay with foster parents in rural Ireland while her mo

Outsmarted | The New Yorker
Jun 1, 2009 - As Gillian Tett tells it in her book “Fool's Gold” (Free Press; $26), by the time of the Boca Raton of

Assimilation | The New Yorker
Nov 22, 2010 - After Ramon gave his answers, they talked among themselves. He heard harsh mouthfuls of words with deep n

Hiroshima | The New Yorker
The house next door, which its owner had been tearing down to make way for a fire lane, was now very thoroughly, if crud

Hell-Heaven | The New Yorker
May 24, 2004 - “You're making me fat, Boudi,” he would complain after gorging himself on my mother's cooking. He swa

Avenging Angel | The New Yorker
Aug 27, 2007 - In the summer of 1812, as the half million soldiers of the Grande Armée marched across Europe in Napoleo

Iphigenia in Forest Hills | The New Yorker
May 3, 2010 - Mazoltuv Borukhova and Mikhail Mallayev in Queens Supreme Court, where they were tried for the murder of B

In the Rough | The New Yorker
24 Dec 2012 - Its main line could be “We're beautiful like diamonds in the sky,” or it could be the background echo

The Collapse | The New Yorker
Oct 14, 2013 - On an April morning in Manhattan last year, Steven Davis, the former chairman of the law firm of Dewey &

Another Country | The New Yorker
Feb 9, 2009 - Wright helped him find a room, and while it is true that the two writers were not close friends—Baldwin