POSC 247: Comparative Nationalism - Carleton College

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POSC
247:

Comparative
Nationalism
 Carleton
College,
Fall
2010
 
 
 Professor:
 Office:
 
 Phone:
 
 Email:
 
 
 
 Office
hours:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Devashree
Gupta
 Willis
404
 x4601
 [email protected]
 
 
 
 Mondays,
12:00pm‐2:00pm
 Thursdays,
3:00‐5:00pm
 Wednesdays
(by
Skype),
7:00‐8:00pm
 ID:
devashree.gupta1



 
 Course
Description
 
 Nationalism
is
an
ideology
that
political
actors
frequently
harness
to
support
a
wide
variety
of
 policies
ranging
from
intensive
economic
development
to
genocide.

In
fact,
nationalism
is
 arguably
one
of
the
most
powerful
forces
shaping
modern
life.

But
what
is
nationalism?

Where
 does
it
come
from?

What
gives
it
such
emotional
and
political
power?

Is
it,
as
Albert
Einstein
 once
proclaimed,
merely
“an
infantile
disease”
that
humanity
will
eventually
outgrow,
or
is
it
 something
more
profound
and
intrinsic
to
human
society?

This
course
investigates
these
and
 other
questions
in
a
comparative
perspective,
drawing
on
both
theoretical
literatures
on
the
 sources
and
types
of
nationalism
as
well
as
case
studies
dealing
with
nationalism’s
political
uses
 in
state
building,
development,
and
conflict.

 

 Course
Materials
 
 The
following
books
are
required
for
the
course
and
can
be
purchased
at
the
Carleton
bookstore
 or
checked
out
from
closed
reserve
at
the
library.

All
other
readings
will
be
available
on
Moodle
 (M).

 
  Benedict
Anderson,
Imagined
Communities.

(London:
Verso,
2006).
 
  Ernest
Gellner,
Nations
and
Nationalism.
(Ithaca,
NY:
Cornell
University
Press,
2008).
 
  Eric
Hobsbawm,
Nations
and
Nationalism
since
1780.
(Cambridge
and
New
York:
Cambridge
 University
Press,
1992).
 
 
 
 




1


Assignments
and
Grading
 
 Your
grade
in
this
course
will
be
based
on
five
elements,
which
will
be
weighted
as
follows:
 
 Participation
 
 
 15%
 Debate
brief
 
 
 15%
 Mid‐term
examination
 
 20%
 Case
study
 
 
 20%
(4
wiki
entries
@
5%
each)
 Final
paper
 
 
 30%
 
 1. Participation:

your
grade
will
be
based
on
regular,
informed
contributions
to
class
 discussions.

This
grade
is
based
on
quality,
not
quantity
of
contributions,
and
thoughtful
 questions,
as
well
as
responses
that
further
our
discussions
about
nationalism
will
be
 counted
equally.

Students
who
are
perennially
late
or
absent,
or
who
come
to
class
 unprepared
will
receive
low
participation
scores.
 
 2. Debate
brief:

during
the
fourth
week
of
the
term,
we
will
have
an
in‐class
debate
in
 which
you
will
be
asked
to
apply
some
of
the
concepts
and
theories
we
have
discussed
 to
date
to
a
real‐world
case.

Prior
to
the
debate,
you
will
prepare
a
1‐2
page
(double‐ spaced)
brief
outlining
the
case
for
your
assigned
position,
which
will
be
due
the
day
of
 the
debate.

Following
the
debate,
you
will
submit
a
3‐5
page
(double‐spaced)
brief
 stating
your
personal
stand
on
the
issue,
with
evidence
and
reasoning
to
support
your
 position.


 Pre‐debate
brief
due:




October
7
(5%)
 Post‐debate
brief
due:


October
12
(10%)
 
 3. Mid‐term
examination:

there
will
be
a
take‐home
mid‐term
examination
handed
out
in
 class
on
October
19,
consisting
of
several
question
prompts.

You
will
select
any
two
 prompts
and
write
a
response
of
8‐10
(double‐spaced)
pages
drawing
on
the
readings,
 lectures,
and
class
discussions.


 Mid‐term
exam
due:

 
October
26
 
 4. Case
study:

because
the
literature
on
nationalism
can
get
a
little
theoretical
and
 abstract,
the
case
study
exercise
is
a
chance
for
you
to
relate
the
concepts
and
ideas
 from
our
readings
to
a
case
that
is
particularly
meaningful
or
interesting
to
you.

You
will
 set
up
an
online
“wiki”
for
a
nation
or
nationalist
movement
of
your
choosing
and
 conduct
periodic,
guided
investigations
of
the
case
based
on
a
series
of
prompts
that
 will
be
handed
out
in
class
each
week.

You
may
choose
the
prompts
to
which
you
 respond
and
write
an
entry
of
500‐1,000
words
(1‐2
pages)
each.

You
are
allowed
to
 respond
to
as
many
prompts
as
you
choose.

Your
four
highest
scoring
prompts
will
 count
towards
the
final
grade.
 
 5. Final
paper:

the
final
paper
for
this
class
will
be
either
a
research
project
of
your
own
 invention
(subject
to
consultation
with
me)
or
responses
to
a
take‐home
final
exam.

If
 you
choose
the
research
project
option,
you
MUST
get
your
topic
approved
no
later
 than
the
7th
week
of
the
term.

Thereafter,
only
the
take‐home
exam
will
be
allowed
as
 an
option.

The
final
research
paper
or
take‐home
exam
responses
will
be
12‐15
 (double‐spaced)
pages
in
length.
 


2


Final
paper
due:
 November
22
(5pm)
 Course
Policies
 
 Attendance
 You
are
expected
to
come
to
class
regularly
and
on
time.

If
you
are
unable
to
attend
due
to
 illness
or
some
other
personal
matter,
please
notify
me
in
advance.

A
pattern
of
unexcused
and
 unexplained
absences,
or
chronic
tardiness
will
affect
your
participation
grade.

If
you
miss
class,
 it
is
your
responsibility
to
come
see
me
in
office
hours
and/or
get
notes
from
a
classmate.

 Emailing
me
to
ask
“did
I
miss
anything?”
is
NOT
an
acceptable
substitute.
 
 Late
work
 Late
work
will
be
penalized
by
1/3
grade
per
day
unless
you
provide
documentation
of
 extenuating
circumstances
(illness,
family
emergency,
etc.)

Make
a
note:

computers
do
crash,
 printers
sometimes
jam,
and
files
do
occasionally
disappear
into
thin
air.

Plan
ahead,
make
 back‐ups
of
your
work,
and
do
not
count
on
technological
difficulties
to
excuse
late
work.
 
 Extensions
 Extensions
will
not
be
granted
unless
there
are
compelling
reasons
involving
unforeseen
 complications
or
obstacles
to
completing
your
work
on
time.

Simply
having
a
busy
week
full
of
 exams
and
papers
is
not,
in
itself,
grounds
for
getting
an
extension.

Please
make
note
of
 assignment
due
dates
and
plan
your
workload
accordingly.
 
 Plagiarism
and
academic
dishonesty
 Both
are
offenses
that
the
College
and
I
take
very
seriously.

Anyone
caught
cheating
will
 automatically
receive
a
zero
for
the
assignment,
and
will
have
the
case
referred
to
the
Dean’s
 office
for
further
investigation
and
possible
disciplinary
action.

To
avoid
landing
yourself
in
this
 kind
of
trouble,
please
take
pains
to
cite
your
sources
accurately
and
thoroughly.

You
are
also
 strongly
encouraged
to
keep
any
outlines
or
rough
drafts
of
your
papers
to
document
the
 evolution
of
your
work.

If
you
have
any
doubts
or
questions
about
citing
and
using
sources,
 please
feel
free
to
consult
with
me.


 
 Special
needs
 If
you
require
special
accommodation
due
to
a
documented
physical
or
learning
disability,
 please
come
see
me
during
the
first
week
of
class
to
discuss
how
I
can
best
help
you
get
the
 most
out
of
this
class.
 




3



Schedule
of
Readings
 
 The
literature
on
nationalism
comes
from
a
variety
of
disciplines,
including
political
science,
 history,
cultural
studies,
and
sociology.

The
assigned
readings
for
this
class
reflect
this
 interdisciplinary
quality.

Some
of
the
readings
are
highly
theoretical
and
abstract,
while
others
 are
empirical.

Some
will
be
entertaining
and
easy;
others
might
be
tough
going.

It
is
your
 responsibility
to
take
each
one
seriously
and
read
it
with
care
to
understand
the
author’s
 arguments.

Changes
to
the
syllabus,
if
needed,
will
be
announced
in
class
and
posted
on
 Moodle.
 
 September
14
 Introduction
to
nationalism
 
 Historical
genesis
of
the
nation
 
 September
16
 Proto‐nationalist
consciousness
 • Anthony
D.
Smith
(2009).

Ethno‐Symbolism
and
Nationalism.

London
and
New
York:
 Routledge,
ch.
4.
(M)
 • Finley
I.
Moses
(1954).

“The
Ancient
Greeks
and
their
Nation.”

British
Journal
of
 Sociology,
5(3):
253‐264.
(M)
 • Gaines
Post
(1973).

“Medieval
and
Renaissance
Ideas
of
the
Nation.”
Dictionary
of
the
 History
of
Ideas,
vol.
3,
Philip
P.
Weiner,
ed.

New
York:
Charles
Scribner,
pp.
318‐324.
 (M)
 
 September
21
 Debating
the
emergence
and
timing
of
nations
 • Hobsbawm,
ch.
1‐2
 • Anthony
D.
Smith
(2004).

The
Antiquity
of
Nations.

Cambridge:
Polity,
ch.
1,
5.
(M)
 
 September
23
 Nations
and
their
states


 • Hobsbawm,
ch.
3‐4
 • Charles
Tilly
(1999).

Capital,
Coercion,
and
European
States,
AD
990‐1992.

Cambridge:
 Cambridge
University
Press,
ch.
4.
(M)
 
 September
28
 Nationalism
and
modernity
 • Gellner,
ch.
2‐6
 
 Nationalist
typologies
 
 September
30
 
Civic
and
ethnic
nations
 • Ernest
Renan
(1995).

“What
is
a
nation?”
In
The
Nationalism
Reader,
Omar
Dahbour
 and
Micheline
R.
Ishay,
eds.

Atlantic
Highlands,
NJ:
Humanities
Press,
pp.
143‐155.
(M)
 • Johann
Gottlieb
Fichte
(1995).

“Addresses
to
the
German
nation.”

In
The
Nationalism
 Reader,
Omar
Dahbour
and
Micheline
R.
Ishay,
eds.

Atlantic
Highlands,
NJ:
Humanities
 Press,
pp.
62‐70.
(M)
 • John
Plamenatz
(1976).

“Two
types
of
nationalism.”
Nationalism:
The
Nature
and
 Evolution
of
an
Idea,
Eugene
Kamenka,
ed.
London:
Edwin
Arnold,
pp.
22‐36.
(M)
 
 
 
 


4


October
5
 Nations
and
nationalisms
outside
of
Europe
 • Anderson,
ch.
6‐7
 • Benedict
Anderson
(1998).

The
Spectre
of
Comparisons:
Nationalism,
Southeast
Asia,
 and
the
World.

London:
Verso,
ch.
15.
(M)
 • Anthony
W.
Marx
(1998).

Making
Race
and
Nation:
A
Comparison
of
the
United
States,
 South
Africa,
and
Brazil.

Cambridge:
Cambridge
University
Press,
ch.
7.
(M)
 
 October
7
 Is
there
an
American
nation?
 • Liah
Greenfeld
(1992).

Nationalism:
Five
Roads
to
Modernity.

Cambridge,
MA:
Harvard
 University
Press,
pp.
431‐460,
480‐484.
(M)
 • Eric
Kaufman
(2000).
“Ethnic
or
civic
nation?
Theorizing
the
American
case.”
Canadian
 Review
of
Studies
in
Nationalism
27(1‐2):
133‐155.
(M)
 
 The
nationalist
imagination
 

 October
12
 Nationalism,
language,
and
community
 • Benedict
Anderson,
Imagined
Communities,
ch.
1‐5
 
 October
14
 Nationalism,
emotion,
and
identity
 • Daniel
Druckman
(1994).

“Nationalism,
patriotism,
and
group
loyalty:
a
social
 psychological
approach.”

Mershon
International
Studies
Review,
38(1):
43‐68.
(M)
 • Mabel
Berezin
(2001).

“Emotions
and
political
identity:
mobilizing
affection
for
the
 polity.”
In
Passionate
Politics:
Emotions
and
Social
Movements,
James
M.
Jasper,
et
al,

 eds.

Chicago:
University
of
Chicago
Press,
pp.
83‐98.
(M)
 
 October
19
 Nationalism,
myth,
and
memory
 • Hugh
Trevor‐Roper
(1983).

“The
Invention
of
tradition:
the
Highland
tradition
of
 Scotland.”
In
The
Invention
of
Tradition,
Eric
Hobsbawm
and
Terence
Ranger,
eds.

 Cambridge:
Cambridge
University
Press,
ch.
2.
(M)
 • Stuart
Burch
and
David
J.
Smith
(2007).

“Empty
spaces
and
the
value
of
symbols:
 Estonia’s
‘War
of
Monuments’
from
another
angle.”
Europe‐Asia
Studies,
59(6):
913‐ 936.
(M)
 
 October
21
 Movie
screening:
1612
(please
note:
we
will
start
today
at
8:00am)
 
 October
26
 Movie
screening:
Katyn
(please
note:
we
will
start
today
at
8:00am)
 
 October
28
 Discussion
of
Katyn
and
1612
 
 Contemporary
nationalism
and
its
challenges
 
 November
2
 Nationalism
and
religion
 • Willfried
Spohn
(2004).
“Multiple
modernity,
nationalism,
and
religion:
a
global
 perspective.”

In
Global
Forces
and
Local
Life‐Worlds:
Social
Transformations,
Ulrike
 Schurekens,
ed.

London
and
Thousand
Oaks,
CA:
Sage,
ch.
5.
(M)
 • Michelle
Goldberg
(2006).

Kingdom
Coming:
The
Rise
of
Christian
Nationalism.

New
 York
and
London:
W.W.
Norton,
ch.
1.
(M)
 
 


5


November
4
 Nationalism
and
ethnic
conflict
 • Steven
van
Evera
(1994).

“Hypotheses
on
nationalism
and
war.”

International
Security,
 18(4):
5‐39.
(M)
 • Siniša
Malešević
(2010).

“Nationalism,
war,
and
social
cohesion.”

Race
and
Ethnic
 Studies,
6
September.
(M)
 
 November
9
 Far‐right
nationalism
and
xenophobia
 • Roger
Eatwell
(2000).

“The
rebirth
of
the
‘extreme
right’
in
Western
Europe?”

 Parliamentary
Affairs,
53:
407‐425.
(M)
 • Pippa
Norris
(2005).

Radical
Right:
Voters
and
Parties
in
the
Electoral
Market.

 Cambridge:
Cambridge
University
Press,
pp.
58‐80.
(M)
 
 November
11
 Nationalism
and
globalization
 • Sheila
L.
Croucher
(2004).

Globalization
and
Belonging:
The
Politics
of
Identity
in
a
 Changing
World.

Lanham,
MD:
Rowman
and
Littlefield,
ch.
3.
(M)
 • Jürgen
Habermas
(1995).

“Citizenship
and
national
identity
:
some
reflections
on
the
 future
of
Europe.”

In
The
Nationalism
Reader,
Omar
Dahbour
and
Micheline
R.
Ishay,
 eds.

Atlantic
Highlands,
NJ:
Humanities
Press,
pp.
333‐343.
(M)
 • Benjamin
Barber
(1992).

“Jihad
vs.
McWorld.”
The
Atlantic,
March.
(M)
 
 November
16
 The
future
relevance
of
nationalism?
 • Hobsbawm,
ch.
6
 
 
 
 




6


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POSC 247: Comparative Nationalism - Carleton College

POSC
247:

Comparative
Nationalism
 Carleton
College,
Fall
2010
 
 
 Professor:
 Office:
 
 Phone:
 
 Email:
 
 
 
 Office
hours:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
...

359KB Sizes 4 Downloads 0 Views

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