PR contract raises question of ethics - Canton Public Library

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Book's interest affects stores

PR contract raises question of ethics By Peggy Alffino staff writer

By Diane Gat* staff writer Canton and Plymouth bookstores are feeling the heat from "The Satanic Verses,'" a controversial book that takes a satirical look at the Muslim culture. Little Professors on the Park in Plymouth had the $19-95 hard cover on the shelves for more than a month with barely a nibble of interestAll that changed last week when author Salman Rushdie was placed under guard by British authorities after Iranian clerics put a bounty of up to $2 6 million on him THE MAIN Street bookstore sold out of Rushdie's book and was having a hard time reordering. "We had two copies sitting around here for 1 V» months." said Joanne Hickson, a Little Professors clerk. Employees a t the store fielded more than a dozen calls from readers searching for copies "Every book distributor is out of it," she said Friday. Please turn to Page 2

58 P a g e s

Canton, Michigan

BILL BRESLER/*t»fl pftoto^rapfwr Metro News C e n t e r in C a n t o n h a d o n e c o p y left Friday of " T h e Satanic Verses."

The contract to promote a fitness festival in Canton has been awarded to a public relations firm whose vice president was the manager of township Supervisor Tom Yack's 1988 campaign Township trustees voted 4 to 2 Tuesday to award a $10,000 contract to Public Administration Research Group (PARG), headed by Cynthia Burgess and William Joyner. Joyner, a former county commissioner. served as manager of Yack's campaign He wasn't paid for the work. He is now vice president of PARG and teaches at Wayne State University and CTeary College in Ypsilanti. The company will be responsible for producing press releases, designing literature, soliciting sponsors and doing other promotional work for Canton Challenge, the sports and fitness festival expected to become an annual event. PARG will be paid $4,500 for those promotional services, and the company was also authorized to spend up to $5,500 in township funds to cover the cost of printing, mailing and related expenses. Trustees Elaine Kirchgatter and Henry Whalen voted against the coot r a c t Treasurer Gerald Brown was not present at the Tuesday meeting.

William Joyner

if an individual has qualifications and expertise they should be considered like anybody else.' — Thomas Yack supervisor Whalen said two things prompted him to vote no, one being what he perceived to be a "lack of a track record, to my knowledge" on the part of PARG "I don't know if Joyner's done anything like this before After all, this is very vital to Canton," Whalen said. Joyner, of Plymouth Township, said the company was established after the November election- Burgess, PARG's president, was a Dem-

ocratic candidate for township clerk in that election. She was defeated by Loren Bennett. Yack ran as a Republican Whalen's other objection was that there was no competitive bidding for the contract. The township usually requires bids on contracts in excess of $3,000 but that limit is occasionally waved, according to township finance director John Spencer When asked why the project wasn't bid, Mike Gouin, the supervisor of township parks and recreation who is in charge of the project, said, "We needed someone to get going with this who knew the community After we talked I asked him (Joyner) to submit a proposal." Yack said Friday he doesn't "know the rules of bidding" and that the matter was handled by Gouin. "Did be call me up and say 'Do you want Bill Joyner to work 9 ' No, he never did that," Yack said of Gouin. Kirchgatter said Joyner's political involvement with Yack was only "a minor part" of her decision to vote against the PARG contract. "That wasn't the sole reason." Kirchgatter said. She said her reason is "best left unsaid for the time being" and refused to elaborate. "1 don't want to jeopardize the success of the sports festival over an issue like this," Kirchgatter said. Please turn to Page 2

Finance reform call continues; answer elusive By Diane Gale staff writer

Redistributing the wealth among school districts, raising taxes and assigning more of the state's budget to education will help improve all Michigan schools That was the message Friday from state Rep. Paul Hillegonds. RHolland. minority leader and guest speaker at a joint luncheon of the Plymouth Rotary and Plymouth Community Chamber of Commerce BUT DR. JOHN HOBEN, Plymouth-Community School superintendent, isn't holding his breath for state legislators to come up with answers for the local district's budget problems. "I didn't hear any solutions," he said. "I'm hearing the same rhetoric After a moment, Hoben added: "He gave a pretty candid summary of what's going on. There's nothing definite coming out of t e n s i n g " With that in mind, the PlymouthCanton school board decided last week to ask voters in the June election to approve an 8 mill tax renewal and a 4 mill increase. The district expects to lose $3 3 million in state aid next year and It won't be able to collect an additional $7 6 million doe to the Headlee Amendment which requires a rollback in the tax rate to offset Increases in property values above the Inflation rate The district needs $3 5 to keep the same educational program It has in place. "I see our programs as deteriorating because we are not going to have the monies to maintain the level of service," Hoben said The Plymouth-Canton schools a r t facing a double-edged sword: The effects of the Headlee rollback and a drop in state aid when the district goes oat of formula this year A district goes out of formula mostly based on higher property rallies 'They (Plymouth-Canton school district) would be OK going oat of formula if Headlee wasn't there," said state Rep Gerald Law. R-Plymooth. who all

THE DISTRICT Is hard to erpIsM to

Paul Hillegonds call for finance reform 'We need to put more money to the educational system. Job security depends more on education and less on seniority. Educational reform is our children.' — Rep

Gerald Law R-Plymouth

still facing a budget crunch in the district But the Headlee Amendment maintains the district won't see all of the extra revenue unless voters give the go ahead The kicker comes in. Law said, when the district Is no longer eligible for aome state aid because of the rollback In millage doe to Headlee "Taxes are up and revenues to the district are down," be said The state currently allocates 7 4 percent of its budget for schools "We need to pot more money to the educational system. Job security depends more an education aad less on seniority Educational l e f t m u is our children." The focus of concern should be on the classroom, said Hillegonds Dave Artley, school board presid e n t applauded Hillegoods for recognising "the priorities . . and seeing education and finance reform as a real priority He's spesking for a lot of people

8H.L S*ESLER/«taff ptwtagrapfcar

Freezer murder R e p o r t e r s , p h o t o g r a p h e r s a n d c a m e r a o p e r a t o r s tried to get p i c t u r e s of L e o n a r d Tyburski a s C a n t o n p o l i c e Det. Richard P o m o r s k i a n d officer Dave Bolfesic (right) e e c o r t e d him to a police c a r waiting o u t s i d e 35th District C o u r t T h u r s d a y . In a f i v e - m i n u t e c o m p e t e n c y h e a r i n g that d a y , J u d g e J a m e s

G a r b e r a c c e p t e d a c o m p e t e n c y r e p o r t a n d ruled the C a n t o n m a n w a s m e n t a l l y a b l e to f a c e f i r s t - d e g r e e m u r d e r c h a r g e s in t h e b e a t i n g d e a t h of hia wife, D o r o t h y , w h o w a s f o u n d in t h e f a m i l y ' s f r e e z e r by t h e c o u p l e ' s d a u g h t e r . A preliminary e x a m ination is s c h e d u l e d for 1:30 p.m. M a r c h 2.

Vacancy anQers what's inside owner of store By Doug Funks staff writer A 1 ft.t&5-aquare-f oot building with plenty of good parting In the heart of downtown Plymouth continues to remain vacant 11 weeks after Borman lac. abruptly aad unexpectedly ciossd its F a r m e r Jack store there Dec 1 Borman. the object of a takeover by AAP, has lease options on the Plymouth store for upward of nine more years Borman is trying to sublease the property, which, according to Its lease, must be used primarily as a food store

Meanwhile, Stanley Dixon J r . owner of the parcel, and a Groase Point* lawyer, is trying withoat much success to bay out Borman'i lease options and market the property himself to a wider range of potential tenants

GILBERT BORMAN, spokesman for Borman. said the company's real estate arm has been socnewhst distracted recently by the Impending marriage to AAP Borman said he expects the store to be occupied "soon " but dscliaed to elaborate turn to

Classifieds Auto Index . . . Real e s t a t e Employment C r e a t i v e living Crime watch . Crossword. . Entertainment Obituaries Sports Street s c e n e Taste . .

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C.E.F C.F . 9E E . . E.F . . 1E 3A . . 2E 5D . . 4A . . 1C . . 1D . . 1B

N E W S L I N E . . ASS-2700 .§§1-2312 SPORTSLIMC . 501-0000 W A N T ! ADS §01-0000 DCUVERY. .

Your Observer Carrier will be stopping by this week to coMecl for the month Ptsass

have the money ready snd be sure to get your receipt. It's worth a §2.00 discount on t h e next c l a s s i f i e d advertisement you pMoa m your hometown ~

Monday, fetxuery

Hot as Hades

Book's interest puts stores on alert C o n t i n u e d from P a o e 1 About two m i l e s a w a y a t Metro N e w t C e n t e r , J o a n Boiling, assistant m a n a g e r , pat the copy they had l e f t in the back r o o m . They were following the lead taken by Waldenbooks, t h e nation's l a r g e s t bookseller, which o r d e r e d r e m o v a l of Rushdie's latest novel f r o m shelves. Waldenbooks had given e m p l o y e e s the option of selling t h e book f r o m the stockrooms. "It's a ridiculous book. It's barely r e a d a b l e f o r tbe a v e r a g e person," said Boiling, who said she's not concerned about h e r own s a f e t y in the backlash and o t h e r t h r e a t s linked t o t h e book. "Maybe in a n o t h e r community t h e r e would be m o r e concern," said Boiling explaining that bookstores with a l a r g e r M i o t t m c o m m u n i t y might see m o r e p r o t e s t . BY F R I D A Y m o r n i n g t h e Morton T a y l o r and J o y bookstore in C a n t o n h a d n t received calls f r o m people

interested in finding "The Satanic Verses." They ordered three copies last mont h and one copy remained unsold Friday morning. Tbe two copies sold in the last couple of weeks a f t e r the assassination threat. "It's a t e m p e s t in a t e a p o t , " Boiling said. "And it will all die down." Store m a n a g e r . Mary F r a s e r agreed, hut added: "There's just so m a n y w e i r d o s out there you just never know." "The Satanic Verses" w a s deemed blasphemous by the Ayatollah Rubollah Khomeini, Iran's Muslim leader. Scholars who have studied the book — the third in a trilogy — h a v e reportedly said they f e a r e d the assassination a t t e m p t would be taken seriously by Muslim zealots. The other books. M i d n i g h t s Children" and " S h a m e " a t t a c k e d government, culture and people.

PR contract questioned Continued from Page 1 S a i d Joyner: " J u s t because a peracH w o r t s on a c a m p a i g n , does that m e a n he c a n ' t w o r k " under contract with t h e township? P A R G was tbe low bidder on a proposal f r o m Yack to «t i communications plan for the township. Trustees shot down that plan two weeks ago, bat they approved a Compromise meas u r e whereby residents will be sur-

( f a n t o n © b s e r u e r 863-670 Published evury M o n d a y a n d Thursday by Obaarvur & Eccentric Newspapers. 38251 Schoolcraft. Livonia. M l 46150. Thlrd-ciass postage paid at Uvonia. Ml 48151. Address alt mall (subscription, change o< add r w s . Form 3589) t o P.O B o x 2428. Livonia. Ml 48151. Telephone 5910500 HOME DELIVERY SERVICE Newsstand . . . . per copy. 25« Carrier montNy.J2.00 Mail yearly. $40 00 AN advert iaing p o Wished in the Cant o n Observer is subject t o the conditions stated in the applicable rate card, copies or which are avatabta f r o m the advertising department. C a n t o n Obeerver. 489 S Mam. Plymouth. M l 48170. (313) 459-2700 The Canton Observer raeerves the right not to accept an advertiaer's order. Observer & Eccentric adtakers have rvo authority to bind this newspaper and only publication of an advertisement shall constitute final acceptance of the advertiser's order.

HIGHER EDUCATION A WINDOW OF OPPORTUNITY

NOTICE T O LAWRENCE NELSON AND OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES I M I b M M Y«ar Attic at Canton. 11*1 •a. • May IS. IMS TW at mn will M BU lo Ik* >!•» M t o Marcfe M. IMS. M !»«• a m ID mUaty Yam An* at Cm-

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veyed to d e t e r m i n e if a Canton h o m e o w n e r s and businesses w a n t to receive township-generated publications. R e g a r d i n g the festival contract, J o y n e r said: "My dealings were not with Tom. My dealings were 100 p e r c e n t with Mike." Yack echoed those sentiments, saying "If a n individual has qualifications and expertise they should be considered like anybody else " Last month, trustees authorised tbe e x p e n d i t u r e of 110,000 for Canton Challenge, which was estabLshed a f t e r tbe demise of the Canton Country Festival. At that meeting. Gouin

said he planned to hire a p a r t - t i m e employee to work on the festival. The employee was to be retained only for the first y e a r of the Challenge, to get it off the ground.

Continued from Papa 1 "I think a month is p r o b a b l y too optimistic," Dixon said. "I would be very surprised if it went (vacant) four or Ave months. Taxes on the property a r e up to date, said Ken Way, city t r e a s u r e r . While Dixon still collects his monthly rent f r o m Borman. he's not happy with the vacancy. "In my opinion, a vacant building wastes m o r e quickly than when t he y' re used," be said. A long-term vacancy at such a large and visible p r o p e r t y as t h e F a r m e r J a c k store can i m p a c t a c ommuni t y psychologically if not economically. " I T H I N * no one likes to see a va-

S I L H

cant storefront, p a r t i c u l a r l y if It w a s left vacant for long," said Mary Roehr, executive d i r e c t o r of the Plymouth C o m m u n i t y C h a m b e r of Commerce.

B o r m a n ' s lease b f y o a t o f f e r now on the table w a s i h < r i l w r i by Dixon as "outrageously Mgh. T h a t ' s the tough out now," be said. T h e y ' r e ext r e m e l y tough n e g o t f c t o r s . "

"If it becomes an eyesore, people begin to s t a r t wondering w h a t ' s happening," she said. Roehr said she doesn't believe Dixon's property will r e m a i n vacant for long.

N E I T H E R DIXON nor Borman would c o m m e n t f u r t h e r about their lease a r r a n g e m e n t or negotiations Dixon said be bought the property several years ago as a long-term investment

Neither does P a t Pulkownik, a commercial Realtor, who said she has talked with Dixon and B o r m a n about tbe property. "'There's s o m e a n i m o s i t y in there." she said of the landlord/ tenant relationship. " H e (Dixon) got stuck with a very low, long-term lease."

" I ' m only 36 y e a r s old," he said "In 10 years, I believe the property will be worth a lot of m o n e y . " Pulkownik r a v e s about the property's value now

O r

The township has launched a c a m paign to e d u c a t e Canton-area residents about reducing w a s t e sent to landfills. The c a m p a i g n is aided by a Clean Michigan Fund education grant f r o m t h e state D e p a r t m e n t of N a t u r a l Resources.

"It's a gem," she said. "There's a lot of senior citizens and people who walk to that s t o r e . "

E

Ski Club members get a lift

On Thursday Gouin called tbe cont r a c t with PARG "a steal." "Generally, a consulting f i r m would not do that for anything n e a r the money I h a d to work with," h e said of tbe a r r a n g e m e n t .

Solid w a s t e problems, recycling solutions, t h e benefits of w a s t e reduction and opportunities to r e c y c l e a r e the c a m p a i g n themes. T R A I N I N G SESSIONS will focus on w h a t m a t e r i a l s a r e r e c y c l a b l e and how t o p r e p a r e t h e m for recycling. Other w a s t e reduction options, such as avoiding wasteful packaging, finding a l t e r n a t i v e s to h a z a r d o u s

0 Safety 0 Security g Tax-Deferred Interest

T h e ski club n c l u d e s Karyn Behnke 48106 Sponsored b y I N Qe«gioui M e n o> Mercv f o u n d e d n 1831 by Ccrttwtna McAiiev

A 38-year-old Co ton m a n discove r e d the theft Wedesday of his 1986 Oldsmobile and nore than 12.500 worth of tools a n d n e c h a n i c a l appar a t u s f r o m his f a r - c a r g a r a g e on Hannan Road

Besides the vehiie, missing i t e m s include assorted tols, drills, saws, a b a t t e r y charger, compressor, g a r a g e door opener and flor jack

L a r r y Otdford 975 S. Main Plymouth. MI 45 $-7249

Making your future a little more predictable

Car, tools stolen from man's four-car garage The victim told police the i t e m s w e r e removed sore t i m e between 1 p.m. F e b 11 and 7 a n Wednesday

Jacobsoris

FARM BUREAU

TO:

Who needs Aspen or t h e Alps when Mt Brighton is just a bus ride a w a y ' Certainly not the P l y m o u t h - C a n t o n Ski Club Every F r i d a y a n d S a t u r d a y night, weather p e r m i t t i n g . 225 to 250 Plymouth-Canton s k i e r s — five or six busloads — hit t h e slopes at a Livingston County ski a r e a The 1.100-member c l u b is the largest one that skis Mt Brighton On a recent S a t u r d a y , m o r e than 200 students f r o m Plymouth-Canton middle schools and high schools enjoyed an evening of skiing and socializing with their school pals Mike Wesner, an e i g h t h - g r a d e r at West Middle School, r e p o r t e d that the snow was " p r e t t y good — better than usual." Audrey Wicke. a s e v e n t h - g r a d e r at Central Middle School, w a s skiing for the 10th t i m e ' i n s season Because her f r i e n d s didn't feel like tackling the m o r e challenging hills, she was skiing — without poles - by herself "I love skiing It's a fun sport I like to j u m p on t h e m o g u l s . " said Wicke. a v e t e r a n skier undaunted by even the steepest slopes

Canton Challenge is scheduled for May 28 to J u n e 4. The youth soccer tournament, which d r a w s thousands of young people f r o m Michigan and neighboring states to the township each year, will kick off the Canton Challenge.

Videos, books, pamphlets, school c u r r i c u l u m m a t e r i a l s , fact sheets and other in-depth i nforma t i on on solid w a s t e and recycling will be g a t h e r e d and housed at the Canton Public L i b r a r y

(C)3A

T h e e e t a l e n t e d s k i e r s fro*n East Middle School are among those who participate in P l y m o u t h - C a n t o n S k i C l u b outings.

Campaign aims to keep trash on citizens' minds Canton residents will learn to break the throwaway habit this spring That's going to be the goal of community l e a d e r s trained to spread inf o r m a t i o n on recycling and w a s t e reduction.

20 19S9 U&E

BONDS MISSLNC A Canton Court m a n told police he 6 missing $7,500 in bonds The vicUridoes not know If the items have beeilost or stolen, a police report staed Tbe seven $1,000 bonds and oe $500 bond had been in the possessio of the m a n but w e r e in his n a m e ad that of a deceased man with Dearborn add r e s s The bonds wee last seen in an envelope that als< contained the

crime watch Canton said

man's

tax

papers,

police

W A R D R O B E MISSING: About $700 in clothing, including a black strapless evening gown, w e r e stolen f r o m the c a r of a 21-year-old Canton w o m a n late Tuesday or e a r l y Wednesday The victim told police her car was locked and parked n e a r her Barchester Street h o m e when the items w e r e removed The missing clothes include 12 shirts, eight pairs of shorts, two pairs of shoes, two sweaters, a curling iron and the gown A $200 briefcase was also taken NO RADAR P R O T E C T I O N : An Okemos m a n will have to be w a r y of

speed limits since a r a d a r detector was stolen f r o m his c a r Wednesday The vicUm's a u t o m o b i l e was parked at the Mobile Lounge on Michigan Avenue when s o m e o n e smashed a window and r e m o v e d t h e $150 detector s o m e t i m e b e t w e e n 6:30 and 10:30 p.m.. police said. Tbe d r i v e r ' s side window will cost $150 to replace, the v i c u m told police ROYAL B U R G L A R Y : The Pizza King r e s t a u r a n t on Lilley Road was broken during the e a r l y hours of Feb 13 A p p r o x i m a t e l y $200 f r o m a cigarette m a c h i n e and another $100 f r o m a cash r e g i s t e r w a s removed Entry was gained by smashing a window in tbe front d o o r This digest of police incidents u-as compiled, by Peggy A u i i n o It c o n t a i n s i n c i d e n t s reported last week to Canton Township police To report crimes to Canton T o u - n s h j p police, call 397-3000

W-W honors Stockmeyer The Wayne-WestU»d school board and district o f f i c i a l paid t r i b u t e to N o r m a n O Stockmeer. 81, of Plymouth, last Monday Ight for his 42 y e a r s of work on behlf of education in tbe district and thoughout Michigan T h e Wayne W e t l a n d d i s t r i c t serves southeast C a j o o Stockmeyer, who lived in Westland for 50 years, rtired in Decern ber f r o m the state loard of E d u e a tion The district p f s e n t e d Stock m e y e r , 81, with a pique c o m m e m o r a t i n g his years of * v i c e On of tlx millions of stn dents you have m a d a d i f f e r e n c e to. we offer our apprCiation. Dennis O'Neill, district su^rintendent, told Stockmeyer Tbe longtime scbol board m e m

ber pledged continued involvement in the public education process My roots a r e very deep in this c o m m u n i t y and it has been a pleasure to serve." Stockmeyer said "I'll still be around and any t i m e I can to be of help to the district, I'll be available " STOCKMEYER was appointed to the state board in 1975 by then Gov William Milliken He won election to an eight-year t e r m in 1980 and served as t r e a s u r e r in 1981-42 and board president in 1985-86 A real e s t a t e investor, S t o c k m e y e r began his involvement with education policy on a local lever, serving with the Wayne Community Board of Education (which included schools in Nankin Township) f r o m 1946-41 In 1961, he was elected to the

board of the Wayne County Intermediate School District, where he served until his 1975 a p p o i n t m e n t to the state board Stockmeyer e a r n e d his bachelor's degree f r o m Wayne S t a t e University and a m a s t e r ' s d e g r e e in business at Harvard University He was appointed to the WSU Board of G o v e r n o r s in 1964 by then Gov George Romriey and was elected to an eight-year t e r m on that board in 1966 He s e r v e d as chair man of the WSU b o a r d f r o m 1967-71 Stockmeyer was also a longtime m e m b e r of the Detroit Institute of Technology a p r i v a t e b u s m e n and technology school H e has served on the Michigan Higher Education Assistance Authority and w a s a region al c h a i r m a n for the White H< Conference on E d u c a t i o n

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M a t t PikMH ^ P l y m o u t h w a s among a g n » | o f Central Michigan U n t v e r s * students who will serve as s l u n t e e r s d u r i n g the 1969 MHOgan Special Olympics State W»t«r G a m e s held Feb 7-16 at S a a r Loaf

Mountain Resort In Cedar Ptlon. a sophomore, helped with the snowshoetng competition

the 1969 edition of Who's Who Among Students m A m e r i c a n Junior College*

F A B S N A G E of P l y m o u t h is among nine students f r o m Schoolcraft College included in

of Plymouth g r a d u a t e d recently f r o m Northern Hinois University.

SCOTT ALAN LUSTIG

Skiers board buses at P l y m o u t h Salem High School at 4 30 or 5 p.m F r i d a y s and Saturdays, and buy their tickets enroute. F o r the b a r g a i n p n e e of f i e . they r e c e i v e an a l l - a r e a lift ticket and a lesson Poul Sincock. assistant to the city m a n a g e r of P l y m o u t h , coordinates the p r o g r a m . Sincock joined tbe ski club as a student 17 years ago Taking a break between runs. Sincock said, "it's v e r y r a r e " kids get into trouble "Last night a kid brought a fifth (of liquor) with him. Before he got it opened, we had it. "Whenever we have trouble, we a l w a y s contact the parents, and the kids know that. They c o o p e r a t e . " said Sincock Sincock receives help f r o m fellow coordinator Bill Heath, a 22-year m e m b e r of the club, and chape rones Scott Van Der Roest. a 1985 Salem g r a d u a t e , and Randy Pflugh, also a 1985 Salem g r a d u a t e This year really hasn't been that good as f a r as a t t e n d a n c e , " s a i d Van Der Roest "In past years, it's been better We've had as m a n y as 700 kids a night."

pfKrto« by JOHN STOHMLZANO'ttafl p h o t o g r a p h *

East M i d d l e S c h o o l s t u d e n t s S c o t t E v a n s (left) a n d Brian S a t t e r l e y r i d e t h e c h a i r l i f t . M e m b e r s of t h e P t y m o u t h - C a n t o n Ski C l u b g o t o Mt. B r i g h t o n e v e r y F r i d a y a n d S a t u r d a y n i g h t , weather permitting.

— OAE

Monday. Fabruary 20, 1989

Monday, faofuyy 20. 196S

How totett Observer about Faced with t h e prospect of writing your first press r e l e a s e in the n e a r f u t u r e ? Don't despair. Don't disparage your fellow club m e m b e r * for giving you the task.

obituaries CHARLES

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s e r v i c e s for C h a r l e s 90, of NortbviUe w e r e Feb. 14 a t C a s t e rline F u n e r a l H o m e lac., Northville, w i t h burial In Glen P u t , Livonia Mr died F e b . 11 a t S t J o s e p h Mercy Hospital In Ann Arbor. ; Born May SO, l t M , he c a m e to North ville in 1901. H e w a s a m e m ber of N o r t h v i l l e Masonic Lodge and P l y m o u t h Elk*. ' Mr. M o r t i m e r i s survived by U s a2m, T h o m a s A4 a n d g r a a d c h i l d r e n , IJuncan and M i c h a e l a t P l y m o u t h

Mr*. B a r r w a s a h o m e m a k e r Mr*. B a r r is survived by ber husband, E d w a r d ; son, Richard of Canton; six grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren CHASE AUSTIN HUGHES F u n e r a l s e r v i c e s for Chase Austin Hughes, 29 d a y s old, of Canton w e r e Feb. 12 a t S t John N e u m a n n Church, Canton. Tbe infant is survived by his parents, Myrle and Mary of Canton; sister, Brittany, and g r a n d m o t h e r , Corine A. Devine of SL Louis, Mo.

Mr*. Fabian died F«b 13 at St. Joesph Mercy Hospital, Superior Township. She was born April 19, 1917, in Searight, P a .

Arm yourself with a p a p e r a n a pen or t y p e w r i t e r and a n s w e r the following questions You'll be well on your way to providing us with the necessary i nform atio n

Mr*. F a b i a n was a domestic worker. She is survived by ber d a u g h t e r , C a t h e r i n e A. Rowe of Canton; son. Charles R. Stremel of Huntington Woods, N.Y.; sister*, Sophia Modrey and Juliann Cehovic, brother, Steve Mudrey, and seven grandchildren.

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What is the e v e n t ' Who's sponsoring it? Who a r e the p a r t i c i p a n t s ? When is it taking place?

• Where Is it o c c u r r i n g ? e At what t i m e is tbe event scheduled 1 ' • Why is this event t a k i n g p l a c e 0 • Where can people buy tickets? • How much is a d m i s s i o n 7 • Who can the public call for further i n f o r m a t i o n ? Please provide the O b s e r v e r with the n a m e and telephone n u m b e r of a person with whom we can v e r i f y the information. If you a r e s u b m i t t i n g a photo for our consideration, please keep in mind that black and white oictures

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reproduce t b e best, Snapshots of large groups don't -eproduct? well and a r e n ' t considered suitable for publication. As a r u t we don't publish photographs d e e d i n g tbe presentation of c h e c k s orplaques If you w a n t us to r e t u r n a photograph, please indicate this on the back of the picture. Identify people i n t h e photograph f r o m left to r i g h t aid by their first names and s u m a m a as well as by the towns in which tl»y live Send the i n f o r m a i o n to the Observer N e w s p a p e r s , 489 S Main, Plymouth 48170.

MARGARET A. FABIAN E L E A N O f l E BARR F u n e r a l s e r v i c e s for E l e a n o r e B a r r , 77, of C a n t o n w e r e F e b . 17 a t St. J o h n N e u m a n n Catholic Church, Canton. Mr*. B a r r w a s born May 9, 1911, in J e r s e y City. Sbe was a m e m b e r of SL J o h n N e u m a n n Catholic Church.

F a b i a n , 71, of Wayne w e r e F e b . I t a t Our L a d y of Good Counsel Catholic Church, Cleveland, Ohio, with local a r r a n g e m e n t s by L a m b e r t - V e n n e u len F u n e r a l Home, P l y m o u t h . Interm e n t w a s a t Holy Cross C e m e t e r y . Brook P a r k . Ohio.

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PR contract raises question of ethics - Canton Public Library

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