School s probe revised policy on skippers - Canton Public Library

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44 Pages

C a n t o n , Michigan

Thursday, March 4 , 1 9 8 2

Volume 7 Number 63

1982 S u b u r b a n C o m m u n i c a t i o n C o r p o r a t i o n A l l R i g h t ! R w r u d

School s probe revised policy on skippers By Dsnnis O'Connor staff writer How often — and when — should parents be ca led if their child skips a class? That's the issue facing the Plymouth-Canton Board of Education as it reviews a proposed revision to the attendance policy for both high schools at the Centennial Educational Park. Currently, teachers are asked to contact parents twice — after a student's second and fourth unexcused absence. After a fifth unexcused absence, students are referred to area coordinators (assistant principals) for disciplinary action. Under the proposed new policy, teachers willjcall parents only once — after a third unexcused absence. Parents may call teachers later, however, to check on their child's atten-

dance. Students still will face disciplinary action from area coordinators after a fifth unexcused absence under the new plan. A committee of teachers and administrators presented this policy change to the board last week. The board is expected to give final passage next week. THE PRESENT POLICY was adopted on a trial basis last August and has been under evaluation. The committee found the second call to parents brought the same response as the first call. And teachers are harnessed with a crunch for time in making that second call, according to the committee. A1 DuBois, a history teacher at the CEP, said parents appreciated teacher contact, but added the second call didn't make much difference in the attendance behavior of the student.4

"Parents responded to the calls," DuBois said. "Parents thought the calls were terrific. "(But) you're paying me gobs of money per hour to sit there and make phone calls (a second time) that don't make any difference." Trustee Flossie Tonda spoke against the change. She said making the second contact with parents benefits students. She also said changing the policy from two to three unexcused absences before a phone call gives the students an extra class to miss. "IF YOU CAN turn around just three kids (in a year) with that one (extra) call, then I think it's worth it," Mrs. Tonda said. DuBois stressed the policy "does rifit make them (students) attend class. It just informs the parents."

Kent Buikema, principal at Plymouth Canton High School, said the new attendance policy has been effective in getting students to class, h e said he doesn't see a problem with the proposed revision "I think, for the most part, it's worthwhile," Buikema said of the proposed policy. "I won't say for everybody. There are some of those (casps) where the second call would be a help "I think in mo$t cases making one call and giving the parent the option o call a second time should be satisfacto ry." The policy will be reviewed again in the spring, Buikema added. The policy is a negotiable item in the teachers' labor contract under forking conditions, he said. The teachers contract expires tjiis fall.

Patients share emotions in facing reality of death By Arlsne Funke staff writer Kristyn Wilkie is a warm and vital 20-jJear-old woman who grabs every bit of life as she copes with brain cancer. Jim Terrasi, 40, battles mixed emotioni and a "drastically changed" life as he fights a slow-growing lung cancer.

Sally Foley social worker

Ms. Wilkie of Ypsilanti, and Terrasi, of Livonia, recently shared their feelings and thoughts about death and dying with psychology classes at Plymouth Canton High School. They were accompanied by Sally Foley, 31, a social worker who counsels cancer patients at University Hospital in Ann Arbor. The purpose of the visit was not so much to talk about cancer, but to explore emotions. "We're all going to die," reminds psychology teacher Mike McCauley. "Death is a mystery. The purpose of this is to make life better." McCauley said the class had been studying the topic for a week. Some students talked about relatives' illnesses. Others stayed out of class because the subject upset them, said McCauley. One girl who couldn't say "die," used the euphemism, "when something happens." MS. WILKIE and Terrasi quickly formed a rapport with the students and became simply Jim and Kristyn. They answered dozens of questions during a 2Vi-hour period. Terrasi will begin training next month at the Center for Independent Living in Ann Arbor to become a peer counselor for other cancer patients. "Sometimes I think, 'Why me?"' he said. "Maybe that's (counseling) why me. In that way, it comforts me a lot." "We have an opportunity to become teachers," Ms. Wilkie added. "There is a lot of beauty in that." Terrasi said his cancer isn't responding very well to the drugs he is receiving. Ms. Wilkie is receiving experimental chemotherapy. Both have had to deal with friends who turn away because of fears about the disease, was diagnosed terminal," she said. "They have had to come to grips with the fact that they face dying sooner than they would have expected," said Ms. Foley. "It is very common for people to think about these things and the meaning of life, even when they have cancers with a high cure rate," she added. "They are exam1 ples of very healthy coping." TERRASI, a production control specialist for Ford Motor Company, suffered a seizure last March while in Florida. A brain scan revealed two tumors in his brain. Please turn to Page 4A

what's inside . . . 11A . . . 6A . . . 14A . . . 2B . . . 7B . . . 3B . . 5-6C . . . 12A . . . 1C . . . 12A . . 1-4B . . . 1B Sec C-D

Business Briefs . Brevities . . . . Campus News . Canton Chatter . Church Clubs in Action . Entertainment . Opinion Sports Stroller Suburban Life. . The View . . . . Classifieds . . . NEWSLINE . . . SPORTSLINE . . HOME DELIVERY CLASSIFIED. . .

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459-2700 591-2317 591-0500 591-0900

CALLS EVERYTfME! John Rase does small jobs and repairs. In order to keep "regularly busy" he runs an Observer & Eccentric Classified Ad. "I get calls everytlme my ad runs! I am very pleased with the results." Remember...

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Jim Terrasi and Kristyn Wilkie share their personal experiences with students in a psychology class at Plymouth Canton High School.

User fees will finance costs

Officials OK sewer repair plan By Dennis O'Connor editor

er), although no formal commitment was made to this system.

Canton's Township Board established the groundwork for the township to expand its sewage capacity at Tuesday's regular meeting — but these plans won't be easy on the pocketbook. The board unanimously decided to begin sewage maintenance and improvement programs on its local sanitary system. J*he board also decided to inform the Wayne County Board of Public Works that Canton was interested in sewage capacity in the new Huron Valley Wastewater System (Super Sew-

The township intends to finance all sewage costs through a user fee. If Canton commits to the Huron Valley system, it will cost approximately $274 per year per household for sewage services, according to a report presented by Wade, Trim & Associates, Canton's engineering consultants.

CURRENTLY, Canton is part of tile Rouge Valley System, but there isn enough sewage capacity in this syste r. to meet Canton's present and future needs. Sewage problems frequently o cur during stormy weather because the small sewage capacity — causn many basements to flood. No serious sewage problems exi;t, however, under normal weather conditions.

These costs are expected to increase to $330 per year per household in 2005 under this plan. Households now pay only $140 per year for sewage services.

Glen Roberts, from Wade, Trim & Associates, recently presented the Township Board with a report on d f-

Man claims forced detention in church Necher added that he had advised strained by force. However, he agreed a few cans of food had been used by Keoshian to talk to the police and to persons who are staying at the church. this newspaper. He said Keoshian "is emotionally disIN REPORTING the Oct. 30 inciturbed" and had caused, disturbances dent, Keoshian said he had been visitseveral times "alth pite increased bus fares, "ridership has held up. Tfcey (elderly) are getting the meney from somewher ; else." Babla Cariappa, who works in the Outer-Wayne Area on Aging office, cited cub in homemaker and home chore funds proposed by he Reagan administration, saying. "This February we saw an rnc i reased demand for snow removal. So other progra I T S will probably run out of money by mid-summer A loss of any one service impacts on other servi cfes." And as for Reagan's idea tfiat families should help the elderly more, Cariapp^ said, "Some of our clients are in their upper 80s and 90s. Their children are senior citizens, too. Y< u can't expect them to shovel snow."

MARGUERITE KANE, Royal Oak senior citizens coordinator, cited two of the 10,000-plus seniors in that city, many of whom receive telephone reassurance, home care, home repairs, recreation, income tax aid and transportation services. Roy, 80, "lives on Social Security and has severe emphysema. The highlight of his day is when a volunteer takes him to a flea market." "Mrs. Wilson, 76, is arthritic and "virtually a prisoner in rooms three flights up. Both of her sons are unemployed. Without the services we provide, she toould be institutionalized." Referring to the home meals program, Ms. Kane said: "We may have to make a choice — who gets a meal? Roy or Mrs. Wilson? This is a choice I do not want to make." "WE HAVE a nervous anticipation," said Shelton Tappes, of the Detroit Area Agency on Aging, as he zeroed in on job funds. "Title V jobs are for people at or below the poverty level. Their incomes average $300 a month. I know because I sign their checks. "We have yet to be informed of what we will receive (from Washington) on July 1, 1982. Unfortunately, there ate always more applicants than we can service. We have 112 slots and 200 to 300 on the waiting list. "There's a need to be served, and we cannot serve it when we're talking about reductions," said Tappes. Many of us wonder if Mr. Reagan understands. Serving the aging is an industry. It's not in the category of people looking for handouts, for alms. . ."

PURPOSE of the hearing w is for state Rep. David Hollister, D-Lansing, to estify today before congressional budget committ ?es on the impact of cuts already made, methods t i e elderly use to cope with cuts, and the possible impact of future cuts. The joint committee consists of six senators and six representatives. Only t h n e representatives — Sylvia Skrel, R-Livonia, Jam* s Hadden, R-Adrian, and Shirley Johnson, R-Royal Oak - and a staffer for Senate Majority Leader W lliam Faust, D-Westland, sat all the way through. Sven Hollister had to leave early. Testimony was dominated by 17 persons who are on staffs of agencies on aginjj. Half of the 20 who spoke were senior citizens. Explained Skrel: "We legislators hear the problems of senior citizens and read their letters every day. We needed to hear from I he agencies." Direct criticism of Preside it Reagan was almost non-existent, though one spea ter was applauded for saying, "Nancy Reagan says 'Let 'em eat cake.' Well, there isn't any cake."

Block focused on a dilemma in the home heating aid act: "If they (elderly) turn down the heat to 65 degrees and wear sweaters, they may lower their home heating costs to less than 15 percent of their incomes, and thus become ineligible for home heating aid." ELIZABETH LEWIS, project director for the Macomb County Council on Aging, told of a Mrs. A.M., 73, a widow who sold her home and used the $7,000 profit to pay rent for a few years. "There's nothing left. Her medical costs are $80 a month. She is dying a slow death. She won't go to the doctor. 'Can't afford it,' she says." Of cuts in the homebound care program, 'Ms. Lewis said, "We used to respond to requests for the homebound in one to two days. Now we must evaluate each request. Some we don't get to for a week or two. To a homebound senior, that must seem like an eternity. Robert Abar, one of the few persons not listing an organization affiliation, complained of property taxes going up 14 percent this year. A different note was struck by the final speaker, Peggy Hinckley, director of the Ann Arbor Senior Citizens Guild, a United Way organization. "I'm from the Old school. When we have all these programs, our seniors are worried to death about their taxes 'cause there's no way to give them for free."

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Spring is Blooming at Livonia Mall

SOME 54,000 senior citizen aides are destined to lose their Title V jobs under the administration budget, said Kate Kaylor, also of the Royal Oak senior citizens center. ' "I am supervisor of telephone reassurance. I have volunteers who will call 22, maybe 30 people a day. They're cripples. They're shut-ins. We've had a terrible hard time with the snow in February. "We call it 'service with love,'" she said, adding, "I do need my job." Lula Williams, chairperson of the Detroit Area on Aging Advisory Council, said, "Seniors have to choose between feeding themselves and paying for their prescriptions." Randy Block, of the Oakland-Livingston Service Agency, said, "I appreciate the feelings of those who say, 'Will it be Mary, Bob or Joe who receives the meal?'"

PUBLIC TRANSPORTAT ON and Title V jobs for senior citizens were two ( f the most frequentlymentioned topics. This surprised Skrel, who had expected to hear housing complaints. "The future of SEMTA is i i great jeopardy," said Sandra Reminga of the six-c ounty Area Agency on Aging. She said the recent 2 5 percent cut in large buses and 27 percent cut in ;mall buses eliminated 500,000 senior citizen trips a year.

Babla Cariappa: "A loss of any one service impacts on other services."

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• March 20 - Easter Bunny Arrives with 10:00am a Parade, Moppets, Clowns • March 13 - Jaycees Special Olympics 1 1 : 0 0 a m a 2 : M p m Basketball Challenge • March 20 - Jaycees Puppet Show ENTRY BLANK

Children: Make your Easter Hat a n d j o i n our Easter P a r a d e Prizes will be a w a r d e d .

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Chairman David Hollister, D-Lansing, and Rep. Sylvia Skrel, RLivonia, alternately chaired the threehour hearing on senior citizens needs. Hollister is due to testify today before a congressional budget committee.

Livonia Mall 7 MILE AND MIDDLEBELT ROADS 476-1160

Staff jhotos by Art Emanuele

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Thursday, March 4,1982

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If we are going to have to have sewer capacity now and for the future, I think this is it," Flodin said about the Huron system. "I believe it's by far the most effective and cost efficient system to get into" The initial costs to enter the new system is higher, Flodin admitted. But he believed the system will offer Canton the extra capacity it needs which the old Houge cannot furnish. Flodin also said charging a user fee is the best means of financing the massive costs. "There are no other alternatives as I see it," Flo-

sewer

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clude construction of relief sewers which will stop excess sewage from entering the existing system — helping avert flooded basements. If this improvement program is part of Huron system grant, federal and state funds could pay for approximately $3 million of the $4.7-million cost. Canotn's remaining share will be $1.74 million, according ot the engineer's report. The rehabilitation program is a $50,000 annual commitment which would support a two-man crew with truck, equipment and materials to repair approximately 400 manholes per year. This high-level of maintenance is needed, Roberts stressed. The initial, two-year $100,000 program is to double maintenance needs which currently exist.

din said. "It's the only practical and reasonable way to do it." It is not feasible to finance this project through the general fund, township officials said. They also believed it wasn't fair to ask voters for a special tax-rate increase to finance the project because only 44,600 residents of Canton's 48,000 population have sewage service. Canton also will begin an improvement program on its local sanitary sewers, following Roberts' recommendation. The improvements will cost an estimated $4.7 million, not including an accelerated annual maintenance program of $100,000 per year for two years and $50,000 annually after that. Improvements in local sanitary sewers will in-

© b s e r u e r Published every Monday and Thursday by Observer & Eccentric Newspapers, 36251 Schoolcraft, Livonia, Ml 48150. Second-class postage rates pending at Livonia, Ml 48151. Address all mall (subscription, change of address. Form 3569) to P.O. Box 2428, Livonia. Ml 48151. Telephone 591-0500. HOME DELIVERY SERVICE Newsstand per copy, 25« Carrier monthly. $1.50 Mail yearly. $30.00 All advertising published In the Canton Observer Is subject to the conditions stated In the applicable rate card, copies of which are available from the advertising department. Observer & Eccentric, 36251 Schoolcraft, Livonia, Ml 48150. (313) 591-2300. The Observer & Eccentric reserves the right not to accept an advertiser's order. Observer & Eccentric ad-takers have no authority to bind the newspaper, and only publication of an advertisement shall constitute final acceptance of the advertiser s order.

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MS. WILKIE, one of nine children in her family, dropped out of Eastern Michigan University after being diagnosed in September as having a recurring malignant brain tumor — her second in five years.The earlier tumor responded to surgery and radiation. "Sometimes I go bonkers and cry and punch the couch," she said. "Then I call somebody to talk." "Time has become very important," Ms. Wilkie said. "Now is really all there is. I feel very much alive." Ms. Foley believes it is important for cancer patients and their family to have a source of counseling. Anyone who wants more information about counseling may call her at in Ann Arbor at 764-5417

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Doctors told him the tumors had spread from his lungs to the brain, causing the seizure. His brain tumor responded to radiology treatment, and he now is receiving chemotherapy for the tumor in his lung. Terrasi smoked for 23 years, and remains a smoker. "You sit and think, 'You damrs a r e g r e a t Clamping Misting a n d pulling

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Thursday, March 4,1982

brevities Announcements for Brevities should be submitted by noon Monday for publication in the Thursday paper and by noon Thursday for publication in the Monday paper. Bring in or m a i l to the Observer at 461 S. Main, Plymouth 48170. Forms are available upon request. •

P U P P E T SHOW March 4 — The Tanger Elementary School will hold a puppet show about handicapped children. The show, entitled "Kids on the Block," will be at 7:30 p.m. in the school, on Five Mile Road near Haggerty. For information, call 459-1363. W I N T E R Y CLASSES The Plymouth Family YMCA has openings in karate, aerobics, tumbling and preschool fitness. Classes are scheduled for various days and times. Fees vary. For information, call the Y at 453-2904.

For information, call 459-1030. Schoolcraft is on Haggerty Road between Six and Seven Mile roads. PLYMOUTH LIBRARY BOARD March 9 — The Plymouth Public Library $oard will meet at 10 a.m. in the city manager's office, Plymouth City Hall, o i Main Street. STRA COP CONCERT OR CHESTRA Marth 9 — The Centennial Educational ^ark (CEP) orchestra will have a concert at 8 p.m. in the auditorium of Plymo nth Salem High School. PARENT COFFEE ylar:h 10 — The Centennial Educ ial 3 ark monthly parent coffee will at 9:30 a.m. in the conference room louth Canton High School.





STRESS M A N A G E M E N T March 8 — A free stress management seminar will be from 7:30-9:30 p.m. in the liberal arts building, Room B200, at Schoolcraft College in Livonia. An alternate session will be March 16. Licensed psychologists from Human Synergistics, Inc., Plymouth, will diagnose stress and suggest ways of handling it. Reservations required.

S E N I O R TAX COUNSELING ThelPlymouth-NortJiville chapter of the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) will provide free tax counseling for persons over 60 years of age. luring last year's return. sions will be March 11 at the Plymouth Public Library, and March 15-17(at Tonquish Creek Manor, Plymouth. iA.ll sessions are from 1-4 p.m. C.JB. P A R T Y March 13 — The Centennial C.B. Or-

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THAT'S ITALIAN March 19 — An Italian dinner will be served 6-9 p.m. at Plymouth Christian Academy, 43065 Joy Road, Canton. Students will entertain. Donation is $3.50 per person or $12 for families.

DIVORCE S U P P O R T G R O U P March 18 — The Phoenix divoUce support group for women will meet 7:30-9:30 p.m. at Geneva Presbyterian Church, 5835 Sheldon, Canton. Dr. Mary Clark, a counselor and psychotherapist, will speak about feelings associated with divorce. The Phoenix group, sponsored by the YWCA of Western Wayne County, meets semi-monthly at various sites. For information, call 561-4110. •

G R I E F AND LOSS March 19 — A weekend seminar on

T-SHIRTS Gallimore Elementary School Tshirts and jerseys are on sale through March 19. Shirts sell for $4 and $6, depending on size and style. Sample shirts are at school. Order forms are available at school office.

10:30 INTRODUCTION TO VWCALC 1:00 (Exocuttvo WcUon Making Made Easy) 1:00 MICROCOMPUTERS AN0 INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 10:30 INTRODUCTION TO THE SOURCE 1:00ADVANCEDIAMC-6WEEKS 1:00 INTRODUCTION TO APflffHTIR II

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DIVORCE S U P P O R T G R O U P March 4 — The Phoenix divorce support group, sponsored by the YWCA of western Wayne County, will meet at 7 p.m. at Geneva Presbyterian Church, 5835 Sheldon, Canton. Margaret Barton, a Livonia attor-

VIETNAM M E M O R I A L F U N D The Plymouth Jaycees Club is organizing efforts for an area contribution to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund. The first 100 contributions of $10 or more will receive the "Buy American Money Saver Book," containing more than $6,000 in savings, rebates, coupons and specials on products and services sold by leading American companies. Contributions should be sent to the Plymouth Jaycees Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund, P.O. Box 279, Plymouth 48170. For information, contact Chairman Ernie Rumsby at 981-2123.

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OUR PROFESSIONAL STAFF AT HAMMELL MUSIC INC.

is happy to prov ide our customers with a complimentary "f lano lesson " This booklet entitled the "Art md Science of Buying a Piano"te Is you what to look for to insure ('ou are getting a quality piano hat will look The Art & good and sound £ood for many btience years to come o l Buying A For your complirpentary copy, stop in, or to receive your copy by mail, senfl$1.(X to . . .

CONSOLIDATION

ISALEI THE END OF THE SALE IS COMING! ... SOLET'SHURRY. We have CONSOLIDATED Our entire collection of Fall and Winter shoes (from all our stores) atourWESTLAND store. Corns sss for yourself the selection end savings.

Jockey* classics for men and boys Stock up now on men's and boys < basics at 20% off the regular ticketed prices. Men's reg. 4 50 to $13, sole 3.60 to 10.40. S*jve on classic and m i d w a y briefs and boxer shorts. Sizes 30^44. Choose power knit, v-neck or athletic shirts, sizes S-XL. Also save on boys briefs, crew neck shirts and v-neck shirts. Reg. $4 to $9, sale 3.20 to 7.20. Sizes 8-20. 25,000 units* in the Men's and Boys departments at all stores. B o y s w e a r not available at Arborland.

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Michigan National Bank West Metro

'Michigan'Money "Michigan'Money

Michigan National Bank West Metro would like to welcome Manufactur ers National Bank & Detroit Bank Corporation customers to the convenience of "Magic Line."

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What is Magic Line?

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Magic Line is a network of automatic teller machines which will be shared by over 150 financial institutions. If your financial institution is a member of Magic Line and you have an access card to your bank accounts, you can use that card in any machine displaying the Magic Line symbol ML regardless of which institution actually owns the machine. You can access your account at any of the following Michigan Money Financial Centers located n Livonia. ML Farmington Road at 5 Mile Fivo Mil* m Hit Wonderland Shopping Center I m m M Krogers, 33151 Plymouth Road at Farmington Road Schoolcraft 1-96 ML Pac N Sav, 37685 5 Mile Road at Newburgh Road m A&P, 29538 5 Mile Road at Middlebelt Road (VARIOUS LOCATIONS FOR MAGIC LINE MACHINES) Plymouth

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Michigan National Bank West Metro

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JMEMBER F.D.I •C. Equal Opportunity Employer

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An Affiliate of the $6.1 Billion Michigan National Corporation.

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Symposium at Hilton explores alcoholism at work A symposium dealing with the problems of alcoholism and alcoholics at work will be the subject of a symposium the end of this month at the Plymouth HiltOO Inn The Michigan Alcohol It Addiction Association (MAAA) is holding the "Administrative Symposium" for directors and administrators of human service programs. The statewide event will occur on March 21 and 22 at the Plymouth Hilton Inn. The symposium was conceived by the MAAA in response to its membership's expressed need for such training, explains Diane Vella, spokesman for the association. "Many human service program directors are trained as clinicians and then promoted," says Ms. Vella, "and private consultants who provide this type of training charge fees which are prohibitive for financially strapped programs. "Conversely, these very programs need sophisticated management techniques to survive in today's economy." The workshops offer experts to guide and train program m a n a g e r s at a low cost. Subjects included are: marketing your program; solving personnel problems; accreditation and third-party payment; alternative fund raising; budgeting and financial planning; and acquiring new clients. The workshops are limited in size to facilitate discussion and maximize

learning, iands-on experience will be provided by presentors. Among the workshop presentors are: George W itkins, president of Pe r f or m ance Res< urce Corp. and publisher of EAP Dige it; Harvey Halberatadt, M.D., medical director of Woodland Hills Center in rroy, Dr. John Miller, development di ector for Lawrence Institute of Technology and a private consultant. Also co iducting workshops a r e A. Gail Maz* raki, consultant on accreditation anc third-party reimbursement processes, Charles Homes, executive director fc r Genessee County Commission on Substance Abuse Services, and Walter Kezial, CPA, from the Southfield f i r m )f J a m e s F. Peters, P.C. DIRECTORS ELECTED The Coiimunity Federal Credit Union of P l j mouth announced its newly elected t x a r d members at its annual meeting n -cently. New board members are; Gary Bilconi, a teacher of general business a Plymouth Salem High and a track and field coach at Salem High; Daniel lerriman, accountant and a partner with Ron Loiselle in General Business > ssociates in Plymouth; Betty St remich, past president of the Plymouth Community Chamber of Commerce and owner of the Hillside Inn; And Mak-garet Wilson, past president of the Plymouth C-C and owner of the Penn The* tre.

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Lawrence A. Higgason of Plymouth has been recognized as being certified in production inventory management (CPIM) by the American Production and Inventory Control Society (APICS). Higgason, who is involved with production control systems planning-purchasing and supply staff at Ford Motor Co., was required to pass four of a possible five written examinations offered by the society's curriculum and certification council to meet the CPIM qualifications. The exams tested knowledge and understanding of the field of production and inventory control in the areas of inventory management, production activity control, capacity management, master planning, and material requirements planning. APICS is a society of production and inventory control professionals serving industry on the management level.

JOINS WELCOR Two Plymouth residents recently joined the staff at Welcor, Inc., a Livonia copy machine dealer. Greer Liverman, who lives on North Territorial Road, sells copiers for Welcor. , Ron Williams, who lives on York Street, works in the set-up and delivery department. UNDERSTANDING STRESS

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A free stress reduction workshop will be held from 7:30-9:30 p.m. Monday, March 8, and on Tuesday, March 16, in the Liberal Arts Building (rooms B-200-210) at Schoolcraft College on Haggerty between Six Mile and Seven Mile roads.

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Board of Regents at its regular meeting in February. Underwood is a former news announcer at radio station WITL-AM in Lansing and also worked at WKAR-FM in East Lansing while a student at Michigan State University. She also worked at WEMU-FM as a student. Underwood completed two years of study toward her bachelor's degree in business administration and plans to continue her education at EMU. As news reporter/producer at Eastern's campus radio station, she will anchor the 5 p.m. and the new 9 p.m. newscast and also will file reports for the station's "Morning Edition" and "Noon Magazine" programs.

The board of directors also is comprised of Barbara Burgett, Margaret Dunning, George Lawton, Clarence Moore, Peter Schweitzer, Bill Sliger and W. Edward Wendover.

Katherine A. Underwood, 20, of Plymouth, has been appointed ndws reporter/producer at WEMU-FM, Eastern Michigan University's National Public Radio affiliate, by the EMU

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JOINS FIRM Ronald D. Mulder, of Canton, former chairman of the sociology department at Hope College, has joined Market Opinion Research as a senior analyst, media research and consulting division. Mulder specializes in research on media credibility and the effects of televised advertising. He has published in Journalism Quarterly, Sociological Focus and is author of "A General Analysis of the Audience of WTTW, Chicago, Public Television Broadcasting" published by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Mulder holds a Ph.D. and an M.A from the University of Chicago and a B.A. from Northwestern College.

The increased awareness of symptoms leading to stress and burn-out hag resulted in an inventory which identifies coping strategies in an individua , says i / ) r r a i n e Colletti, Ph.D., director of clinical services for the firm. "This instrument has been extremel helpful in isolating areas or categori* of thinking and behaving from whicf stress is likely to occur.

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days. It is geared to inexperienced persons who are using or interested in purchasing personal or microcomputers for their home or office. Tuition for each bourse is $95. For registration information call the Continuing Education office at 377-3120, between 8:30 a m and 8 p.m Monday through Thursday.

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

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SIWIK PROMOTED Michael J. Siwik of Canton has been promoted to manager of chain accounts for Lorillard in the Detroit sales area. Siwik will be responsible for managing distribution, and sales and merchandising of key sales accounts. He previously was a division sales manager in the same region since 1980 and has been with the company since 1975. A native of Detroit, he is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Siwik of Garden City and attended Schoolcraft College. Lorillard, a division of Loews Theatres, manufactures cigarettes.

A second offering of the non-credit personal computer course for beginners, in business or at home, {is slated to begin March 20, according tto Oakland University's Division of Continuing Education at Oakland Universi-

Open Mon.-Fri. 8 to 8 Sat. 8-6 Sun. 11-5

ountant

20793 F a r m i n g t o n R o a d , Suite 5 F a r m i n g t o n Hills 1 Block N o r t h of Eight M ile Road

The workshop is being conducted b Human Synergistics, Inc. of Plymouth. For the past 10 years Human Synergistics has worked extensively fo executives in business and industry. In the interest of increasing their information about stress levels in t h i general population, they are offerin the public stress reduction seminars. The workshops will aim at diagnosing areas of stress and suggesting coping strategies. Licensed clinical psyho ogists with many years experience i^i the field will conduct the meetings. Reservations are necessary and ma be m a d ^ b y calling 459-1030. The firm, at 39819 Plymouth Roa focuses on increasing a person's selfawareness and assesses the ways a person thinks and behaves.

Buying computer? OU has course

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BUSINESS AND PERSONAL TAXES, TAX PLANNING ACCOUNTING AND CONSUL TING

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"One of the interesting results ha been the correlation of stress copiri strategies with medical symptoms. S we now are interested in the possibili' of using this inventory as a preventive kind of device."

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Alcoholism. Maplegrove is a complete health care center for the treatment of alcoholism. Maplegrove is individualized programs encompassing residehtial and out-patient treatment, an intensive first-of-its-kind family involvement program, and important follow-up care. Maplegrove is concerned, canng people. But most of all, Maplegrove is help. If you have a drinking problem, or care about someone who does...call or write:

Maplegrove 661-6100 6773 West Maple Road West Bloomfield, Michigan 48033 Affiliated with the Henry Ford Hospital System.

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the stroller

w.w. Edgar can make money — or lose their jobs. "It will be a serious threat, but a needed one, because the economy won't be able to continue as it has been with the workers getting fabulous wages and salaries." As she spoke, she drew an arc on the blackboard with the labor force at the peak of one side and capital coming down on the othe. "These will be exciting times,' Miss Mclntyre went on, "and there will be a great deal of debate and some heart-rending thoughts from the lower classes of the working man. But it will have to be done. This arc will slowly come down, 'and there will be plenty of excitement until it hits the bottom where it will meet capital. "When that happens, we will have a nice, peaceful world, and our lifestyle y/iW change. I will not be around, but you scholars will. It should be great living and an enjoyable life. "Good luck to you." Well, Sally Mclntyre; the best teacher The Stroller ever had, has gone to her reward. Unfortunately, she is not here to see her prediction come true. But she called the turn correctly more than six decades ago.

discover Michigan Bill Stockwell

LAST SATURDAY nearly 3,000 persons saw the Golden Glove Championship bouts at Schoolcraft College. Believe it or not, another estimated 1.000 very disappointed fans were turned away at the door. . Everyone involved in the Golden Gloves tourney was surprised. Schoolcraft College Athletic Director Marv Gans couldn't believe it. Neither could Livonia police officers who were assigned to watch over what they thought was going to be a small crowd. Fans who were turned away obviously were miffed. But few expected 4,000 persons would show up A festive mood surrounded what had to be the biggest show in the suburbs that evening. BIRMINGHAM'S Jim Burch couldn't get the smile off his face. A former Golden Gloves fighter himself, he couldn't recall the last time he saw such a fight crowd in the suburbs.- • It was a night of the new and the old. The oldtimers gathered around the ring and waxed eloquent about the bouts in which they exchanged blows. Included in those ranks were Tony Gallo and Jackie Farmer — familiar names to fans of Golden Gloves matches. But unlike other retired athletes, boxers don't yearn for the old days. They know that today's boxers are quicker, that the sport is safer. When the likes of Hilmer Kenty, lightweight contender, is introduced, the oldtimers applaud along with the rest Of the crowd. As they watched the budding amateurs in the ring, they stood and applauded with the rest of the fans when special skill was demonstrated. And some very special skills were demonstrated — much of it from members of the Livonia Boxing Club. Junior Novice Ron Heady, in the 165-pound class, simply took everybody's breath away with a knockout of opponent Joe Mihela in the first 30 seconds of the bout. • » Livonia's Mike Dardipi pummeled opponent Alvin Thomas until his corner literally threw in the towel. Although Nick Niemiee lost a third-round decision, the bloodied boxer put up a valiant fight. THE EVENING WAS capped off with a victory by Livonia Club's heavyweight Rick Londberg But the victories weren't confined to the ring. More was won that night than bouts. For the first time, the old fight crowd seen down at Kronk Recreation and Gladiator mixed with the crowd from the suburbs. It was a matter of white and black getting together in the suburbs and everybody went home happy — and with a special feeling in his heart.

Did you know that when you visit Detroit's riverfront Civic Center, you can see and visit a building weighing six million pounds that was picked up bodily a quarter-century ago and moved hundreds of feet to its present location? This is the old stone Mariners' Church, a picturesque feature of the riverfront development.

(P,C,R.W,G-13A)*15A

Thursday, March 4, 1982

Economist predicts:

Budget deals are key to recovery By Suzto Rollins Singer staff writer •—

'If future deficits are reduced, you'll see the Fed more willing to bring down interest rates.'

Economic recovery could be several months away if President Reagan compromises with Congress to reduce budget deficits, an economist told told the Economic Club of Detroit Monday. Lawrence Chimerine, chairman and chief economist of Chase Econometrics, a private forecasting firm in Bala Cynwyd, Pa., tied budget deficits to high interest rates. "It will be a consumer-led recovery. But high interest rates a r e standing in the way," Chimerine added. "Unless the current policies are changed, we will have deficits of $100-$200 billion. "That conflicts with the Federal Reserve Board's slow-money policy We need to make some adjustments in policies. If future deficits a r e reduced, you'll see the Fed m o r e willing to bring down interest rates."

BUT CHIMERINE is opposed to bailout proposals for the housing and thrift industries. "Bailouts will just extend the problem. The fundamental problem that is blocking housing is interest rates. Houses are still attractive, but people just can't afford them now," he said. He also noted that Americans shouldn't see major increases in oil prices for about four years. "Because we have been conserving and finding alternative sources to oil, it is taking away the demand for it," he added. When referring to the county's economic state, Chimerine shied away from using the t e r m recession. "A recession is a period of time when growth is temporarily interrupted. There has been no economic growth in the U.S. for four y^ars. We've been in a state of stagnation," he said.

"If Congress and the president reach a compromise, you'll see interest rates come down and inflation slow down in the next six months," he added. However, Chimerine doesn't envision house mortgage rates dipping much lower then 14 percent during the next few years. Once interest rates are lowered, Chimerine projects that consumers will flood the market with large purchases. "The car market has already bottomed out. The housing industry is bottomed out. People have been too afraid to buy m a j o r items, but there is a pentup demand for them. 'As soon as the cost of borrowing long-term money comes down, we'll see the economy moving

, CHIMERINE is hoping Congress will agree to further cuts in social programs and entitlements and that the administration will slow military spending or reduce income tiax cuts.

Students to compete as writers

and that should be in the next few months," he added.

i

EEKING ADDITIONAL

;

NGOS

Junior high and senior high students can win cash prizes in the second annual writing competition sponsored by the Wayne County Intermediate School District. The competition gives students in grades 7-9 and 10-12 the opportunity to enter their work in three categories! essay, short story and poetry. Prizes of $50, $25 and $15 will be awarded in each category in each division. Deadline for entries is March 15. Winners will be announced by April 30. Writers and qualified teachers will judge the entries. Winning entries will be published in a journal with each entrant and each participating school receiving a qopy. Rules for the competition have been sent to junior and senior high schools in the county. Inquires can be made to Lorene Erickson, Wayne County Intermediate School District, 3500 Van Born, PO Box 807, Wayne 48184.

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Student writers to compete

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Junior high and senior high studenUf w i n c a s h prizes in the second annui al writing competition sponsored by the Wavne County Intermediate School restrict The competition gives students in grades 7-9 and 10-12 the opportunity to enter their work in three categories: es* say, short story and poetry. Prizes of |50, $25 and $15 will be awarded in each category in each division. Deadline for entries is March 15

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MSU GRADS The following residents earned! degrees at the end of the fall t e r m at Michigan State University, East Lansing: From Canton: David Nidzgorski jof Franescan, a BA in criminal justice. From Plymouth: Rlmberly A. Henm-lls of North Territorial, a BS in packaging; Margaret L. Johnson of West Ann Arbor Trail, a.B& with honors; Richard A. Miller, of Lexington, a BS in resource development; Thomas S. Powell of Beech, a BS in foods and nutrition; Daniel J. Selke of Heritage Dr., an MS in mechanics; and Jeffrey C.lWestin of Ivywood, a BA in hotel and restaurant management with high honors. RANDALL A. NELSOI Randall A. Nelson of Plymouth graduated recently with a BS degree f r o m U n i v e ^ i t y of Michigan-Dearborn. TOLEDO GRADS

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Two residents were among those Who recently earned degrees from the University of Toledo. Paula Jo Sanborn of West Liberty, Plymouth, earned a bachelor's degree in education, and Jean M Lavoie of Maidstone, Canton, an associate degree in applied science in medical assisting technology EMU GRADS A number of residents recently e a r n e d degrees at winter commencement exercises at Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti. They are: David C. Braonscheidel and Roberta M, Hillman, both of Plymouth, were among those to graduate magna cum laude with a grade point average from 3.7 to 3 89. The cum laude (3.5 to 3.69) list included Debra A. Persichini and Cathy L. Simonetti, both of Plymouth. Canton resident^ to earn EMU degrees were: Judge Allen J r . of Rector Court, BBA degree; David J. Anas of Scottsdale, BS; Teresa L. Beumel of Koppernick, BBA; Joanne E. Borucki of Somerset Drive, BS; Stacia Burns-Gray of Walnut Ridge Circle, BS; Clifford J. Campeau of Camelot, BBA; William L. Krug of Hillary Drive, BBA; Ronald L. Lack of Honeycomb, BBA; Steven M. Malkiewiti of Admiralty Drive, BBA; Jessica A. Rozenbaum of Brittany Drive, BBA; G. Sandra Kay Range of S. Sheldon, BS; Katherine J. Ryan of Greenlawn, BS; and Sue Jordan Smith of Briarcliff Court, BBA degree. From Plymouth. David G. Braonscheidel of Napier, BS, Thomas S. Close of Beacon Hill Court, BBA; Deborah C. Dungan of Beck, BS; Thomas J. Gerou of Orangelawn, BS; Emil A. Hagopian Of Hines Court, BBA; Roberta M. Hillman of Shadywood, BS; Steven E. Laitinen of Pinetree, BBA; Laura A. O'Malley of Ivywood, BBA; Debra A. Pefrsichini of Moorcroft, BBA; Shirley M. Shaw of Ri^man, BS; Cathy L. Simonetti of Ball, BBA; and Shipley A. VanDyke of Mayflower Drive, BBA. MSU HONOREES Beth Hoerner of Beacon Hill, Plymouth, among those students who earned a 4.0 (all A) gradj point average for the fall t e r m of 1981 at Michigan State University. Ms. Hoerner, a graduate of Plym outh Salem High School, is studying human ecology

U-M GRADS The following area residents were among those • to earn degrees at winter commencement ceremonies recently at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. F r o m Canton: Steven Bernstein of Meadowlake, MS in engineering; Michele M. Gohedotte of Tamarack, BA; Michael P . Haffey of Willow Creek, MS in engineering; Carol L. O'Neill of Porterridge , BS in nursing; Deborah A. Rykalsky of BriarBS in nursing; Randy W. Schacht of Brooke Park, BBA; and Eileen Bick Stoor of Carriage Hills, MS degree. F r o m Plymouth: J a m e s R. Ayotte of Russet, MS; Mary Kay Ballnff of Amelia, BS; Linda J. Cunningham of North Territorial, BS in engineering in environmental science; Craig C. Dostie of Amherst Court, BS in electrical engineering; Dale R. F a r land of North Territorial, master's of urban planning; Margaret E. Fisher of Appletree, MA degree; f^abil A. Munfakh of Turtlehead Drive, BS; Richard (j. Raymond of Joy Road, BS; and Jackson W. Roush of Sunset, PhD.

who recently earned degrees from Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind. They were: David W. Booker of Beacon Hill, a B.S. degree in management; Karen L. Decker of Shady wood Dr., a B.S. in industrial management; and Rrisell E. Dickson of Appletree, an M.S. in engineering.

***************** COME TO OUR ISLAND

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JACE W. STOKES Jace W. Stokes of Plymouth is among students at Ferris State College named to the 1982 edition of Who's Who in American Universities and Colleges. HOPE HONOREES The following Plymouth residents were named to the dean's list for the fall semester at Hope College in Holland, Mich: Mary L. Bahr, a sophomore, and Craig M. Stevens and Margaret Visser, tyoth juniors. DCB HONOREES Ike A. Phillips and Ira M. Bargon Jr., both of Canton, were among those named to the dean's list for the fall semester at Detroit College of Business, Dearborn. EILEEN HESS Eileen Hess, daughter of Robert and Phyllis Hess of Simpson, Plymouth, was named to the dean's list for the fall semester at Alma College. Ms. Hess is a 1981 graduate of Plymouth Salem High School. 3 IN WHO'S WHO Three residents were among 11 students at Schoolcraft Collegf, Livonia, named to the 1982 edition of Who's Who in American Universities and Colleges. They were Oliver Lindsay and Charles Snyder of Plymouth, and Sheryl Zylka of Canton. CHRISTINE BORDO Christine Bordo of Burgundy, Canton Township, has been named to the dean's list for the fall semester at Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo. MIAMI HONOREES Two Plymouth residents are among those named to the clean's list at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, for the first semester. They are Barbara L. Grostt of Danbnidge Road and Edward D. Thomas of rkeyRun.

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SUSAN L. EVANS Susan L. Evans, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Robert Br Evans of S. Evergreen, Plymouth, has been named to the dean's list for the fall semester at Albion College.

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Thursday, March 4, 1982

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Canton BPW picks young careerist

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Nancyl Morrin is the first "Young Careerist" selected by the Canton Business and professional Women's Club. The banker was the winner of the first com itition arranged by the club which r iived its charter in January 1981. Ms. Morrin is a branch ass stant manage for Manufacturer's Na ional Bank of etroit. She out ined her career and plans for the futu -e to BPW members and judges at a din i^r meeting in Cyprus Ga rdens Restaurant. Morrin graduated from Easterr Michigan University in 1978 where he earned a bachelor's d;gree in busiiess education. She completed he* decree in three years and was awarded two scholarships. She was a member of Alpha Gamma Delta sbrority where she served as treasure and chapla n.

Graham M I K E A N D P A T Gresock of Canton Township went to Chicago on business for a weekend and came home with two awards. Mike and Pat a»e members of the local Oral Majority branch of Toastmasters International. While in the Windy City, they decided to attend a Toastmasters meeting and ended up with the 3M Club. . Mike was named best speaker in one competition, and Pat won the table topic award. Needless to say, J. Marc Sullivan, their mentor in the Oral Majority Club, was proud of the Gresocks.

PLYMOUTH-CANTON Civitans, by sponsoring the Friday openir^-night performance of "The Fantasticks," make possible two matinee shows — one for senior citizens and one for mentally impaired and physically handicapped citizens, Persons wishing to buy tickets for the March 5 benefit performance can call 459-0022 or'453-6257. Curtain time will be 8 p.m. for the March 5, 6,12 and 13 productions of "The Fantasticks" in the auditorium of Central Middle School. Tickets for the Saturdayafternoon senior citizens' matinee will be distributed to seniors' clubs in Canton and Plymouth by the Civitans. Seniors who are not members of an organization can call Tim Doyle, 459-0022, for information about tickets It's hats off to the Civitans for another thoughtful project and to the cast and company of the PTG musical for doing two extra shows.

'A few of the non-routine responsibilities include occasionally fixing breakfast for my staff, shoveling snow, and fixing Christmas baskets tor needy families ih the community.' —Nancy Morrin young careerist ment areas were complex and interesting," she told the club members. It was after much thought and discussion with the two vice presidents that she decided to interview with the personnel department.

'BEING AN EMU varsity cheerleader enabled me to do some traveling and meet teople from all walks of life," said Morrin. "I also taught adult enrichment classes at a local high school" She began her teaching career with the W lyne County Intermediate School District in continuing education for girls. Thi^ an alternative school fc>r unwed mothers. At the same timcj, she taugh; adult education classes ih the Melvindale-Allen Park Schools. Wh?n school ended in June, she began a summer job with Kelly Services. Her lirst assignment was with Manufactu er's Bank where she was secretary I or ttoo vice presidents in the commerc al lending area. "I enjoyed working there because I founc the banking industry to be very competitive and lending and invest-

"WHILE INTERVIEWING, many career opportunities were discussed and I decided that the branches would be the area in which to start my banking career," she related. Two years later she was a branch assistant manager in charge the eighth largest office, supervising 18 branch employees. Her responsibilities include budgeting, approving loans, performance appraisals, presenting new products and services to the staff, and calling on commercial customers. She also has non-routine responsibilites of occasionally fixing breakfast for her staff, shoveling snow, and fixing Christmas baskets for needy families in the community. She said, "I enjoy working in the branches because of the public contact and variety of responsibilies and challenges." | The young careerist is Junior Achievement coordinator for Manufac-

turer's Bank and a member of the JA Bank Board. Her goal is to obtain her master's degree and achieve the position of bank officer. OTHER CANDIDATES in the young careerist competition were Erma Heck, assistant director for Michigan Human Services and Rebecca Havenstein-Coughlin, head of adult services at the Canton Public Library. Judges, were Saundra Florek, Schoolcraft College counselor; Frances Gambena, Garden City Schools instructor; and Cathy Cole, Dale Carnegie Inc. The candidates were evaluated on a point system in four areas — personal accomplishments, speech presentation, group interaction, and personal interview. To be eligible, they had to be between 21 and 30, be employed in bigness or a profession for at least one year, be outstanding in scholastic work, community service and/or church work. Canton BPW meets the second Monday of the month. Educational and special programs are offered each month. The group encourages networking and resource exchange. Interested women may call Shirley Clapper, 722-6320, for more information.

Experts to answer women's business questions

T H E DOUBLE-DECKER bus conked out, but Bud Martin found other transportation for the Plymouth Lions 35th ? ariniversary party. The dinner-theater party at Greenfield Village was a success, with three charter members in attendance. They were Bill Fehlig, Bruce Richard and Rollie Widmayer.

Well-known attorney Willa Mae King battery of business-orient d exand rperts will be on hand at Schoojcraft College Saturday to help area women answer all but one of their questions starting a new business. .Answers to 25 Questions about ng Your Own Business" is^the >f the all-day workshop to be ofby the college's Women's.Resource Center in cooperation with the Small Business Administration, the Na-

W I N N E R S IN the America & Me essay contest sponsored by the Farm Bureau Insurance Group have been announced. First-, second- and third-place awards for Our Lady of Good Counsel School were earned by Jennifer Dyer, Chuck Ristau and Peter Zeiler. From West Middle School, Ning Peng, Kristal Taylor and Marie Jarosz came in one, two, three. Jennifer and Ning will have their names engraved on a plaque for permanent display in their schools Their essays now advance to statelevel competition. The top 10 statewide winners, who will be announced in March, will receive plaques and U.S. Saving? bonds ranging in value from $200 to $1,000, totalling $4,000 in prizes The top 10 will be honored at an awards luncheon in mid-April. They will visit the office of Gov. Milliken, who will congratulate each winner personally. The governor is one of the contest judges

tional Association of Women Business Owners and the Alliance of FemaleOwned Businesses Involved in Construction (AFOBIC). "There's one question we can't answer," said Jean Christensen, resource center director, but then pointed out there would be a wealth of information on matters including planning and organizing, record keeping, financing, marketing and networking. There also will be a panel of local

by Ms. King, who seeks to help women broaden their thinking regarding possibilities in the business world. "We try- to encourage women to get away from the boutiques and traditional kinds of shops," noted the attorney whose law firm, Patmon, Young and Kirk, specializes in corporate and tax matters. "Women should think in terms of supply businesses, maybe, or franKINDS OF BUSINESSES and organchises. The profit is better. When I last izational possibilities will be explored checked, there were only two women in Michigan with McDonald's franchises. One got hers after the death of her husband and the other after a divorce." Ms. King said she would also discuss why women should think more of businesses as tax shelters. She will talk about .various kinds of organization — sole proprietorship, partnerships (limited and general) and corporations. "I'll answer questions, too, about business laws, and collateral and what* of moving into the old Hough School on L ever other matters come up," Ms. King Warren in the summer of 1963. The said. school, however, was being utilized by The speaker, who has participated in the school district for storage purposes. similar workshops at Michigan State In order for the nursery to move in, the and Wayne State universities, was a district needed a corresponding member of the Michigan Public Seramount of storage space. vice Commission from 1977 to 1980 and The nursery parents looked everyhas served on several other regulatory where — searching, appealing through groups. ' newspapers. Finally, the school board The only woman ever to serve as agreed to move the storage to the Ecpresident of the Wolverine Bar Associkles building and rent Hough School to ation, she also is affiliated with numerthe nursery. ous women's organizations and has won The white building had its image honors including the Sojourner Truth changed to the little red 6choolhouse in award from the Negro Business and the fall of 1968 when gallons of paint Professional Women's Club. were applied by parents.

women with businesses to offer the voice of experience. The event will take place 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in Room B200 'of the Liberal Arts Building on the main campus, Haggerty between Six Mile and Seven Mile. A fee of $30 includes lunch. Those interested in registering may call the resource center, 591-6400, ext. 430.

!o-op children's nursery elebrates 20th birthday

T H E SARAH ANN Cochrane Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution had an American History Month essay contest. The contest was open to fifth- through eighth-graders. Their topic was "A Famous American Born in February." Suzanne M. Kohrs, first-place winner for fifth-graders, wrote about Susan B. Anthony. Suzanne attends Smith Elementary School. Marie Stevens of Eriksson Elementary came in second, and Stacy Bell, also of Eriksson, came in third. ^ Among the sixth-graders, Stdby Lyn Lapham of Moraine School in Northville was first with her essay about Thomas Edison. Nancy Rekuc was second, and Anna Stansell was third. Both attenc Our Lady of Good Counsel School in Plymouth. Mrs. Herman Scott of Northville was chairwoman of the project, which attracted 83 entries.

'oungsters at Plymouth Children's Niirsery have been blowing out |20 candles on birthday cakes with happy gusAs well as marking an important niversary, they have added reason celebration. Last fall's terrible times are row history. The school was closed by the Wayne County Department of Health lj>ecause of sewage problems. Now, new sewers ane being iing installed, each eacn class o 3- and 4 /ear-Olds has had an anniversary birthday cake, and open houies are plpnneq. anned. Applications for the 1982-83 school y^ar wijl be available during two open uses planned for 1 to 3 p.m. Sunday, Mlarch 7 and Wednesday, March 10. The little red school house is on Warren Road at Haggerty in Canton Township.

began in March 19W when eight mothers met to discuss the possibility of a co-op for preschoolers. A year later, the Plymouth Community Cooperative Nursery started with 22 students. The nursery met in the Plymouth Salvation Army Citadel on Fairground. The nursery moved to the Community Center on Union Street in the fall of 1962. It began its first full year of school with a new name, Plymouth Children's Nursery, Inc. The nursery school shared the building with the Plymouth Rifle Club. Mothers had to haur out equipment for use then shove it out of the way at the end of each daj^When their equipment storage area was turned over to the archery club, they had to find a new building.

PLANS FOR A cooperative nursery

PLYMOUTH Nursery had a chance

^"Membership has grown from 22 preschoolers to five groups of 21. Persons wishing more information about the nursery can call Denise Santeiu, 459-9157.

"Women and Mental Health is the topic for the March general meeting of the Northwest Wayne County chapter of the National Organization for Women. A panel of experts will discuss therapy for women from three perspectives - psychiatry, psychology and social work. The program is offered as a public service with all interested persons invited to attend. There is no charge to hear the panel's presentation. The NOW chapter will meet at 8 p.m. Wednesday, March 10 in Hoover Elementary School, Levan Road between Fiye and Six Mile roads, Livonia. The panel discussion will begin at 8:15 p.m. after a brief business meeting.

4n Q n n t h f i p l d

Ethel Ebert, Janet Hamlin and Eleanor O'Connor received service pins. Each has more than 500 hours of volunteer service at the hospital. O'Connor is liamentarian of the league's parlia board of directors.

Anyone desiring more information or transportation should call Jan Evans, 476-3352, or Betty Kelley, 981-6117. ,

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GARY CASKEY/staff photographer

>reschoolers at Plymouth Children's Nursery blow out 20 candles on one of the school's birthday take*.

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Other speakers include Mary G Karenko of Livohia, speaking on "Simplified Record jeeping for Neophyte Business Owners," Mary Perna of Northville on "Financing Your Business," Jeanne Paluzzi of Livonia on "Marketing Your Product or Service" and G. Joan McCotter of Livonia on "Networking: A Prime-Time Activity." Mrs. Karenko hnd Mrs. MeCotter are co-owners of Contractor's Site & Signal Services, Inc., arid co-founders of AFOBIC, one of the sponsors of the workshop. Ms. Pernaj is a branch manager for Security B^nk & Trust and Ms Paluzzi is ownef of JGP Public Relations, Inc., and president-elect for the Michigan Chapter of the National Association of Women Business Owners

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THE CONFERENCE'S leadoff speaker will be Jean Pike, a Schoolcraft counselor. Her topic w}U be "Take a Good Look at Yourself." ^

Willa Mae

Panel topic: Women and mental health'

women were honored by Our Lady of Providence League, a volunteer organization at Providence Hospital

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MEMBERS OF THE panel are experts in their fields. Lore Hirsch, M.D., received her med-

ical training in Heidelberg, Germany, and her psychi itry specialty in New York. She has been a professor of psychiatry at Waynp State Medical College and filled a number of administrative positions with professional bodies in irsch has been in priMichigan. Dr vate practice in Dearborn since the 1950s. Christine Jenien, Ph.D., received her degree in psychiatry from the University of Michigai i. She owns three mental health clinic; in Michigan. One is in Owosso, one in flint, and she maintains her office in the clinic in Farmington Hills, Jensen :ounseling Associates She has been in private practice for 10 years. Bernadette Itavis ACSW (Academy of Certified Social Workers) is the owner and director of Davis Counseling Center in Farmington Hills The center offers a full range of counseling services, from psychiatry to Bocial work Ms. Davis has been in private practice for several yeafs

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Thursday, March 4J1982

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Goiideseune-Goethe

Winkel-Metlert

Mrs. Robert Goudeseune of Mr Road, Canton, announce the Prov it of their daughter, Kimberengage ly Sue o David Roger .Goethe of »n, son of Mr. and Mrs. NorFa _ r jthe of Negaunee. The brideelect is! a 1979 graduate of Plymouth ,gh School. She attend^ OakSalem lunity College and is emland C National Bank of Detroit in ployed Her fiance is a graduate Farmin High School and Northern of Neg Michig University where he majored administration. He is emin busi ployed t , Chef's Pantry in Northville. They plan an August wedding in Nardin Par t Methodist Church, Farmington.

Christine Loraine Mettert and Bryan Louis Winkel were married Jan. 30 in Cherry Hill Methodist Church, Canton Township. The Rev. Bert Hosting officiated. The bride is the daughter of Eugene Mettert of Milan. The bridegroom's parents are Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Winkel of Hanford Road, Canton. Irene Christodolmo of Ypsilanti was maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Phyllis Roberts of Plymouth, Sue Schrock, Simone Pinter, and Julie Morgan, all of Ypsilanti. Rena Applegate was flower girl. x Tye Winkel of Ypsilanti was best man. Groomsmen were Bill Christie and Joe Daratony of Plymouth, Larry Huebler of Canton, and Jimmy Mettert of Milan. Jamie McFarland was ring bearer. The couple honeymooned at Niagara Falls after a wedding reception in the Ypsilanti Armory. The couple will live in Miami, Fla. Both are students at Eastern Michigan where the bride is majoring in nursing and the bridegroom in business management. She is employed by Vic Tanny International. He is employed by C.J. Construction and Dennis Market.

Colffee time?

Friends of the Canton Public Library are poetry in motion when it comes to getting the job done. Glenna Johnson, Carol Dugan, Kathy Teatsch, Lynn Spielman, Beverly and David Whiddon, Sharon Buselmeier along with Mary and Tom Feltz work hard all year long as part of the Friends. They help maintain community interest in the library by holding functions the public can enjoy. Fundraisers such as the new-book sale and the used-book sale have provided funds to purchase extra materials for community use" in the library. The World War I I Encyclopedias, the lighted revolving world floor globe, the community index file and the magnifying glass for patrons with hampered vision are in the library courtesy of the dedicated group. The first used-book sale last April was so successful the club is going full speed ahead toward the second-annual sale. Thousands of books have been donated throughout the past year. Many residents with leftover stock after garage sales have called on the Friends to take the books away. Sandy and Jim Gillig have volunteered their basement for the fund-raiser, since the storeroom in the town hall is overflowing. Prices on assortment will be $1.50 and under so every family member can take advantage of the bound treasures. Donica Keogh, Bob Padget, Mike Gorman, Jean Morse, Victor and Marylinn Troutman, Beverly and David Whiddon have spent many evenings sorting and pricing in preparation for the April clearance. The friends welcome new members and bright ideas from the community. Reading is fun, and so are the people in the Friends fellowship. Call Donica at 397-2996 for information.

ritish, known for generations ikers, have slowly converted as tea PLYMOUTH-CANTON Book Bowl is Coffee consumption in the in full swing. to coff igdom has increased three to , The kickoff was in November during United the level of pre-World War Children's Book Week, and the Super four ti Bowl will be in April during National

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000 Canton Chatter By KATHY FREECE

Library Week. Twenty-four books were chosen for the eight schools involved by teachers and librarians. Multiple copies were distributed to the individual libraries, and a set is kept at the Public Library. The entire project is funded by the Canton Public Library to encourage good fun and comprehensive reading. The contestants will be two fourthgraders and two fifth-graders from the v a r i o p schools. The judges will be school and community librarians. Right now the excitement is within each school as classmates strive to be the chosen representative of their establishment. Deborah O'Connor directs the staff

and LoAnn Smith &re behind the counter - checking oijt books and accepting new application Rose Brylinski, baniel Kohls, Debbie Matzo^ Kristine Mitchell, Tim Richardson and Ruth illegrina keep the shelves well stocked and all of the be hind-the-scenes paperwork in order

981-2027

The library opened officially 16 jnonths ago, and 19,000 cards have been issued to area resident. Many larger communities boast of 19-percent penetration of this public service, but Canton maintains a 40-percent community use.

of the Canton Public Library. Clara Bohrer, Rebecca Havenstein-Coughlin, Carol Kuchta, Roberta Grotzke, Margaret Kitchel and Sharon Garcia are always organizing workshops and programs for all of our citizens.

It is hard to bel eve that our facility circulated 5,000 more books ^ than *hnn Plymouth and Northville libraries combined in the >ast year. It is the fastest-growing irstitution of its kind anywhere, accord ng to Deborah. The extended hours on week nights are one of the many reasons for the heavy flow.

MARTHA SMITH is a senior citizen who has a federally funded position on the staff each week. Beth Fishbane, Barbara Ealovega, Mary Jane Foster, Geraldine Shebnell, Nancy Anderson, Sandra Belanger, Maureen VonBehren, Wende Liebler

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School s probe revised policy on skippers - Canton Public Library

> • • K i l l l» II. # , ant on Cterbrr Twenty-Five Cents 44 Pages C a n t o n , Michigan Thursday, March 4 , 1 9 8 2 Volume 7 Number 63 1982 S...

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