Untitled

Ofaglwh

WILLIAM M^GEE,

DUBLIN:

18,

NASSAU STREET.

STEVENSON, 22, SOUTH FREDERICK STREET. HUGH HOPKINS, ROYAL BANK PLACE, BERLIN ASHER & CO., UNTER DEN LINDEN, 11. NEW YORK LEYPOLDT & HOLT. C. SCRIBNER & CO. PHILADELPHIA J. B. LIPPINCOTT & CO.

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REV. RICHARD MORRIS, LL.D., EDITOR OF HAMPOLE'S PEICKB OF CONSCIENCE; STORY OF GENESIS AND EXODUS; ATENBITB OF INWYT; OLD ENGLISH HOMILIES, ETC. ETC.; MEMBER OF COUNCIL OF THE PHILOLOGICAL AND EARLY ENGLISH TEXT SOCIETIES.

LONDON

:

PUBLISHED FOR THE EARLY ENGLISH TEXT SOCIETY, BY K TRUBNER & CO., 60, PATERNOSTER MDCCCLXXII.

LIBRARY

v

49

JOHX CHILDS AND

SOX, PEINTEBS.

CONTENTS. PAC.H

PREFACE

Vii

OUTLINE OP GRAMMATICAL FORMS IN THE OLD KENTISH SERMONS

A BESTIARY

...

...

OLD KENTISH SERMONS

...

...

...

....

...

1

...

...

...

...

...

26

...

58

MISCELLANIES FROM THE JESUS, COTTON, AND OTHER MSS. I.

II.

xiii

:

THE PASSION OF OUR LORD

37

A MORAL ODE

III.

SINNERS BEWARE

...

...

...

...

...

72

IV.

THE WOMAN OF SAMARIA

...

...

...

...

84

...

86

V. VI. VII. VIII.

IX.

X. XI. XII.

XIII.

FORTUNE THE FIVE JOYS OF THE VIRGIN

87

HWON HOLY CHIRECHE

89

ANTHEM OF

ST

IS

VNDER UOTE

THOMAS THE MARTYR

A LUUE RON

...

90 ...

...

93

FRAGMENT OF A SONG

100

SIGNS OF DEATH

101

XV.

THE PROVERBS OF ALFRED. ,,

XVIII.

...

100

THREE SORROWFUL TIDINGS

XVII.

...

...

THE ANNUNCIATION OF THE VIRGIN MARY

XIV.

XVI.

90

ON SERVING CHRIST

101

TEXT

I.

102

TEXT

II,

103

AN ORISON OF OUR LORD THE DUTY OF CHRISTIANS THE SHIRES AND HUNDREDS OF ENGLAND

139 141

145

VI

CONTENTS.

Yll

PREFACE.

THE

title-page indicates the miscellaneous

and composite character

All the pieces here grouped together possess, of the present volume. however, one characteristic feature, that they are of a religious or didactic nature.

A

BESTIARY

British

Museum,

(p.

1

25) comes from Arundel

MS.

292, in the

of about the middle of the thirteenth century.

is

translated from the Latin Physiologus of Theobaldus. 1

I.

contains the original text from

It

Appendix

which our Early English version

was made. This BESTIARY has "been thrice printed; twice by Mr Thos. Wright, (1) in Altdeutsche Blatter, vol. ii, Leipzig, 1837, (2) in ReliquioB Antiquce,

and by Matzner in

his

Early English Specimens (Alt-

englische Sprachproben).

The

dialectic peculiarities of this treatise

cussed in I

must

my

preface to

have already been disto which

The Story of Genesis and Exodus,

refer the reader for further information.

Scraps from the Bestiary with

quently to

its

curious moralizations are fre-

be met with in our old English authors, and even

'in

Elizabethan writers. It will not be deemed, we hope, out of place to notice here, that Chaucer quotes a line of our Bestiary, probably from the Latin 1

See Preface to Popular Treatises on Science, edited for the Historical Society of Science, by Thos. Wright, M.A., F.S.A., London, 1841.

PREFACE.

Till

version (mirie ge singed

>is

mere, p. 18), in his

Nonne

Prestes Tale,

and Chaunteclere so free Sang merier than the mermayde in the see ; For Phisiologus seith sikerly, How that thay singen wel and merily. to a Bestiary, what meaning has the following " Panthers which where he compares flatterers to in Lyly, passage

Without reference

"

haue a sweete smel, but a deuouring minde 1 (Euphues, ed. Arber, A reference to p. 24 of the present volume makes the p. 149). matter very clear and intelligible. l

341) we are told that the Wood Culver "plucketh of hir fethers in winter to keepe others from " colde ; and our Bestiary tells us, among other things (p. 25), that

In another passage in Lyly

this fond

(p.

dove acts as a mother to other birds. 2

OLD KENTISH SERMONS

26 36) are only a fragment, alas (p. to notice were through the kindness of Mons. Paul They brought my who found them along with their originals, the French Meyer, !

Sermons of Maurice de Sully 3 in a MS. in the Bodleian Library, Laud. 471.

The Sermons, though only

consisting of eleven pages, are of great

an accurate knowledge of our old English dialects. In estimating the changes which have taken place in our language importance for

at different periods, they

show how necessary

it is

to take into con-

sideration not only the date of composition, but also the locality of

our early documents. It has already been pointed out 4 that the Kentish of the middle of the fourteenth century has preserved more archaic forms than the English of Orm or of La^amon. As might be expected, these Sermons of the thirteenth century contain forms older than those found in the Sermons of the twelfth century, edited

by me 1

in Old English Homilies, 1st Series (except pp.

See description of the Panther in Poems

from

the

217

245).

Exeter MS., ed.

Thorpe. a

Duue ne harmefc none fugele ne mid bile ne mid fote. and fedeS briddes J?eh hie ne ben noht hire (0. E. Homilies, 2nd Series, p. 49). 3 See Archives des Missions Scientifiques et IMUraires. 2nd Series, vol. v, p. 162. *

Preface to

AyenUte of

Inn-yt.

IX

PREFACE.

The vocabulary, however, is sometimes remarkably modern, and such phrases as This is si GLOEIUS MIRACLE ; this is si SIGNEFIANCE of the MIRACLE, have a very quaint appearance on account of their composite character; but at the same time they clearly indicate the influence that

r Is

orman French exercised upon the vocabulary of the

Southern dialect toward the end of the thirteenth century. They also show that Chaucer was not the sinner he has been represented

and that he did not inundate the language with French words that had not been in common use previous to his time. to be,

At

p.

x the

reader will find a

of the grammatical

summary

" SERMONS." peculiarities of these

From

the Jesus College MS., Oxford,

we have

printed the pieces

that constitute the bulk of the present volume (p. 37

Among

191).

we may notice more particularly, (1) Another version of " A MORAL ODE," copies of which, with translation, the reader will find

these

in 0. E. Homilies, 1st Series (pp.

158183;

288

An

295).

ad-

ditional text with East-Midland peculiarities will be given at the

end of

my

Second Series of 0. E. Homilies, from a MS. in Trinity

College Library.

The PROVERBS OF ALFRED

(2)

maxims

for the guidance of our

source of these text

many

early is

of our

common

illustrations

to

contain some plain and sensible ancestors'

every-day

3

who

one

The

among The second

and Kenible; 4 copies

(see p.

103)

have transcribed independently 5 from a MS.

formerly in Trinity College Library, Cambridge. this valuable

2

life.

proverbs will be recognized

of Proverbial Philosophy.

printed from Wright

which they seem

!

To speak

plainly,

manuscript has been stolen from the Library by some

has abused the generosity of the authorities of Trinity Col-

1

See Kemble's Dialogue of Salomon and Saturnus (^Elfric Society). See instructions for keeping one's own secrets, p. 116 for choosing a on the choice of a friend, pp. 123, 124, 131, 132, 136-8 how to wife, p. 118 deal with a fool, pp. 127, 128 how to train up a child, pp. 128, 129. 2

;

;

;

;

3

Reliquice Antiques, i. 170. The Dialogue of Salomon and Saturnus, p. 226 248. 5 It is somewhat strange that Kemble and Wright should have both, in In one instance where very many cases, mistaken a short stumpy g for an Kemble reads gise, Wright has guge for gunge, and that this is the correct 4

,

Untitled

Ofaglwh WILLIAM M^GEE, DUBLIN: 18, NASSAU STREET. STEVENSON, 22, SOUTH FREDERICK STREET. HUGH HOPKINS, ROYAL BANK PLACE, BERLIN ASHER & CO., UN...

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